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>> No. 405839 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 2:31 pm
405839 Mid-week thread
Mid-week thread?

Mid-week thread.

What are you lot up to?
879 posts omitted. Last 50 posts shown. Expand all images.
>> No. 411100 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 11:36 am
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>>411099
Sounds like Ian Malcolm was right again.
>> No. 411101 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 11:40 am
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>>411096
But that's wrong because when I daydream, I generally become oblivious to my surroundings. I enter a very happy, relaxed state of mind. I may even get excited and pace faster than normal (this is where I start to calm myself of course. I've had bad experiences in the past where someone has walked into my line of sight whilst I'm uncontrollably grinning to myself). I was definitely neurotic when I made the post though.

>>411097
Yes, they did mention this. That my behaviour is occurring during a time of high-alert due to the recent attack. They were reasonable in their inquiry but the accusation still hurts.

>>411099
Yes, I thought about this. It feels good to pace personally but I think it would've been best to just grab a seat at a table and drink something.
>That drone warning
Truly, we're entering a new age.
>> No. 411102 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 11:44 am
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>>411101
I think you're taking it too personally. I've been approached by police and security in the same fashion in the past, even recently I had some coppers bang on my door as someone called about a suspicious vehicle left on my property. They're just doing their job.
>> No. 411103 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 12:06 pm
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>>411102
Well, alright.
>> No. 411105 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 12:15 pm
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>>411102

I once came out of a club at night and just quickly wanted to get something from my car which was parked a short distance from the club. It was slightly rainy, so I did a jog. Next thing I knew, police were pulling up beside me and asked me if there was a problem. It turned out they had seen me running, and thought that that was suspicious, and that I was running away from them. So they asked for ID, and when they ran it through the computer and it came back clean, they advised me that the next time I'd run down a street like that, I should make sure there are no police around who might take it the wrong way.

I still thought that was a bit much. I should have the right to run down a street whenever I feel like it, and not have to worry about police thinking that that's suspicious behaviour.
>> No. 411106 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 12:31 pm
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>>411102
Just like a good GP would rather you waste their time with trivial things than miss the early signs of something serious, a good copper would rather look into it and be sure it's nothing than miss something.
>> No. 411107 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 12:35 pm
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>>411106

In the end, you are arguing in favour of a police state by saying that.
>> No. 411109 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 1:09 pm
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>>411107
You don't have to agree with it being necessary to not have your feelings hurt by it happening.
>> No. 411110 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 1:30 pm
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>>411107
In much the same way as in opposing it you are arguing in favour of cancer.
>> No. 411112 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 5:07 pm
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>>411110

>In much the same way as in opposing it you are arguing in favour of cancer.

This would warrant a posting of the meme image of Jackie Chan raising his hands to his head in disbelief, but responding to your drivel isn't worth risking a ban.
>> No. 411113 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 5:39 pm
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>>411112
Don't blame me,>>411107lad. They were your words, not mine.
>> No. 411117 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 7:23 pm
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>>411113

> They were your words, not mine.

Are you illiterate?

I essentially said that you are in the end arguing in favour of a police state if you say that police should investigate even the smallest peculiarities, due to the off chance that there might be more sinister things going on.

If you honestly think keeping watching for minute signs of cancer (which is bollocks in itself) is the same thing as suspecting people of being criminals because of one strange thing they do, then I am quite worried for you, lad. Because then you are just the kind of gullible git that governments enjoy having as citizens nowadays.
>> No. 411122 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 8:29 pm
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>>411117

A police force can be vigilant without being oppressive. That's pretty much the cornerstone of community policing.

I've suffered from a lot of major mental health issues. The police have consistently been one of the most helpful services, because they're proactively looking for people in distress. I didn't get tazed or locked up, I just had someone checking that I was OK. Occasionally they were guarded or downright rude, but generally they were polite and friendly. Maybe my experiences are totally atypical, but for me the police were a caring ear when nobody else gave a toss.

If someone is wandering the streets late at night, that warrants some amount of investigation. They might be at risk of perpetrating crime, or they might be at risk of becoming a victim. They might be experiencing some kind of personal crisis and need referring to another agency. Asking that person who they are and where they're going isn't evidence of a police state, it's just basic policing. It's an opportunity to start a conversation with someone who might be dangerous or vulnerable. As long as that intervention is performed politely, fairly and compassionately, then it's exactly what the police are supposed to be doing.
>> No. 411123 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 8:39 pm
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>>411105
Wasn't there a case of a black lad who got shot because he was running down a street somewhere in the US?

These are weird times we are living in.
>> No. 411124 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 8:46 pm
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>> No. 411125 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 8:48 pm
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>>411124
Good on you. You can count.
>> No. 411126 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 10:02 pm
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>>411124
Subtitled porn?
>> No. 411127 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 10:06 pm
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>>411117
>I essentially said that you are in the end arguing in favour of a police state
... and I essentially said that you were, as they say, not even wrong.
>> No. 411128 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 10:22 pm
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>>411122

>If someone is wandering the streets late at night, that warrants some amount of investigation. They might be at risk of perpetrating crime, or they might be at risk of becoming a victim. They might be experiencing some kind of personal crisis and need referring to another agency. Asking that person who they are and where they're going isn't evidence of a police state, it's just basic policing.


I simply shudder at the way you see the world. Your mental issues might go far beyond what you are aware of.

I am allowed to say that, because I was diagnosed with schizoid personality disorder a few years ago. I too have mental issues now and then, as it were.

You are essentially saying that anybody who walks home by themselves at night is either a potential suspect or a potential victim, or a lunatic, and either way needs to be approached by police to clarify the situation.

Well fuck. When I walk home alone from a pub at night, the last thing I'd want is police taking interest in why I am doing so. In all the years I've walked home shitfaced from a pub, I have never fallen victim to a crime (and I'm a small framed 5'5'' lad), and I have also never committed a crime of any sort, if you overlook very occasional public urination.

And this is what I mean. There is a fine line between vigilant policing and a police state. If you only see the world as crimes waiting to happen, then that is both appalling and worryingly removed from the actual truth.

Have a word with yourself, mate. And lay off the pills a bit. Or something.
>> No. 411129 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 10:27 pm
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>>411128
>In all the years I've walked home shitfaced from a pub, I have never fallen victim to a crime (and I'm a small framed 5'5'' lad), and I have also never committed a crime of any sort, if you overlook very occasional public urination.
And how often have you been stopped by the police while doing so?
>> No. 411130 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 10:29 pm
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>>411129

Not once. And I wouldn't have it any other way.
>> No. 411131 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 10:44 pm
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>>411130
Just so you know, you are a filthy criminal and I hope the police catch you when you're pissing on someone's door.
>> No. 411132 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 10:50 pm
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>>411128
>You are essentially saying that anybody who walks home by themselves at night is either a potential suspect or a potential victim, or a lunatic, and either way needs to be approached by police to clarify the situation.
No, you are saying that. Nobody else is saying any such thing. That's why you're talking bollocks.
>> No. 411133 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 10:58 pm
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>>411130
Exactly. This was the same time period as what we've been talking about. So they're, for the most part, just stepping in when it matters, and not been sticking their noses into bother drunks for no reason.
>> No. 411134 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 11:10 pm
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>>411131

>Just so you know, you are a filthy criminal and I hope the police catch you when you're pissing on someone's door.


I will try to make sure it'll be your door, just to make it worth it.

Ten thousand years of civilisation, and our crowning achievement appears to be that people get an ASBO for weeing in someone's front garden at night.
>> No. 411135 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 11:15 pm
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>>411134
Sure, if you ignore, like, everything else about civilisation but that.

So what you're saying is, you don't mind people using your garden as a toilet?
>> No. 411136 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 11:22 pm
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>>411135

No, that's a shit thing to do under any circumstances.

But does it really warrant police intervention? Are you really that much of an antithesis to a self-reliant human being that you have to get the coppers involved just because one person pissed in your garden one time?

This is why government services never have enough money, you know. Because of bell ends like you who call the cops on a nocturnal urinator.
>> No. 411137 Anonymous
7th June 2017
Wednesday 11:42 pm
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>>411136
>No, that's a shit thing to do under any circumstances.
So then you'll excuse us for calling the cops on the cunt that did what you agree to be a shit thing to do.
>> No. 411139 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 12:07 am
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>>411136

I normally wouldn't bring mental health into a discussion like this, but you did sort of start it.

You say that you've got schizoid personality disorder. One of the defining traits of this disorder is an indifference to social rules and norms. Another is an extreme tendency towards privacy, seclusion and self-sufficiency.

Most people think that pissing on someone's doorstep is totally unacceptable. Most people think that it's perfectly reasonable to call the police if someone pisses on their doorstep. I don't want to say that your attitudes are rooted in your personality disorder, but it'd be a hell of a coincidence if they weren't.
>> No. 411140 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 12:48 am
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>>411139
>You say that you've got schizoid personality disorder. One of the defining traits of this disorder is an indifference to social rules and norms. Another is an extreme tendency towards privacy, seclusion and self-sufficiency.

This describes almost everyone who uses imageboards doesn't it?
>> No. 411142 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 12:53 am
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>>411140
Yet somehow we don't all go around pissing through people's letterboxes. Funny that, isn't it?
>> No. 411150 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 2:57 am
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>>411136
What other choice do I have? I'm not above opening fire on you if we lived in a lawless society for pissing on my property because you are a lunatic and less than human in my eyes. But hey, we have to be civilised, right?

Imagine the savings psycholad. We wouldn't even need a police force and there would fewer cunts pissing on people's gardens.
>> No. 411151 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 3:01 am
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>>411142

We prefer arses.
>> No. 411153 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 5:02 am
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>>411117
>If you honestly think keeping watching for minute signs of cancer (which is bollocks in itself) is the same thing as suspecting people of being criminals because of one strange thing they do, then I am quite worried for you, lad. Because then you are just the kind of gullible git that governments enjoy having as citizens nowadays.
But that makes complete sense to me. If you can justify a doctor's invasion of his patient's privacy on the grounds of protecting the individual's health then you can justify the law enforcement's invasion of the civilian's privacy on the grounds of protecting the society's health. After all, the individual is the atom of society, right? (At least, that's the conventional view for now)

>>411140
From my understanding, schizoid PD is a bit more then just the indifference to social norms and tendency to seclusion. Yes, the average imageboard-browser is going to have these traits but what separates the schizoid is that they're like this from birth and the severity of it as well.
Schizoids in early childhood literally do not express emotion. This is different from the aloofness and reservedness of the imageboard-browser as most imageboard-browsers became the way they are due to social conditioning (i.e. social rejection) or they had these tendencies amplified by their conditioning.
Then there's the daydreaming. Schizoids "live in two worlds". There's reality but then there's the second world they've created inside their mind. It's a world they've built up over several years since childhood, adding more and more detail to it. It has a very extensive history of events as well and they seem to be unable to leave it behind so they're kind of "here" and also kind of "there" as you interact with them, so there's this empty look in their eye.
Then, there's the fear. The pure, unbridled, baseless fear. No matter how intimate they get with another person, they never truly feel at ease with anyone. This isn't some kind of trauma from somebody touching them funny way back when, they were always like this. Schizoids live their lives stuck in a constant state of fight or flight. They're typically quite skinny as their fight-or-flight state prevents them from being fully aware of their body's internal state, keeping them in a sort of tunnel vision.

I think I've read some argue that the origin of Schizoid PD is that the mother, when pregnant with the schizoid child, was afraid. The idea is that when a mother is pregnant with a child, the child, despite not being born or fully conscious, is still receiving information about the outside world through the mother (this may not necessarily be a kind of spiritual thing. The mother's hormones and moods are also something to consider but nonetheless, information is information). If the mother's in a dangerous, violent environment then her feelings of fear and insecurity is what conditions the child. The Schizoid's fear then is explained to be a kind of pre-loaded stress to ensure its survival by keeping it alert. Another side effect is the elongation of the limbs and fingers. It's a bit odd though. Surely, you'd see more schizoids in low-income environments? When I see Carl Jung speak of schizoids, he describes them as unbalanced INFJs and INTJs. According to stats I'm able to find, this amounts to around 3% of the population so it hardly explains every case.
>> No. 411154 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 11:35 am
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>>411139

If you know so much about SPD, then it's also worth noting that as far as "smoking guns" for this condition go, a rejection of social norms is quite a weak one. Your social norms depend very greatly both on the culture you were brought up in and the cultural subgroup within which you were raised. What seems perfectly logical in one culture or even just within one cultural subgroup can seem daft or even as a serious violation of social norms to other groups.

And if I say that I wouldn't call the police on somebody urinating in my front garden at night (I would go after them though and yell at them to never do it again), then that may just be an indication that I was raised differently from the cunts who think calling the cops on a urinator is a reasonable thing to do.

Again, we're talking urination here. It's nasty, it's gross, but where is the damage. If somebody throws a rock in your kitchen window at night, that's very different, and I, too, would call the cops if I couldn't get hold of that person who threw the rock. But even if I would be pretty upset about it, what damage does a pint of urine in a hedge do. Yes, it carries an ASBO if police are made aware of it. But there we go again, and I don't think I am the only one who thinks ASBOs as a concept tend to be very overbroad and really just show the government's desire to punish behaviour which isn't, or wasn't per se illegal.
>> No. 411155 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 11:44 am
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>>411154
If I shit in your mailbox, would you call the police on me?


Anyway, what is this rubbish about anonymouse imageboard users being mentalist? Absolute bollocks.
>> No. 411156 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 12:05 pm
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>>411153

>Schizoids in early childhood literally do not express emotion.

Schizoidlad here.

I was actually quite an emotional and affectionate child. I was known to be quite sensitive as well. And I had no problem showing emotions and affection. For example, there is one family picture of me as a ten year old where I very affectionately hug my mum and dad, with a very noticeable expression of joy and sincerity on my face.

Things just started going wrong for me from about age eleven. From that point on, there was repeated terrible tragedy in my immediate family, and that is probably when I developed SPD. We're talking deaths of several family members, and ensuing mental illness of the remaining parent, which had its own effect on me as a child and youth growing up.

> This is different from the aloofness and reservedness of the imageboard-browser

In daily life, this, and not a lack of emotion, would probably be my defining trait that people would mention to you when talking about me.

>Then there's the daydreaming. Schizoids "live in two worlds". There's reality but then there's the second world they've created inside their mind.

Careful lad. Yes, daydreaming is another trait of the condition. But there is a very clear distinction between SPD and schizophrenia here, and one which is often missed and leads people to believe they're the same. Schizophreniacs think their dream world is reality, often to the extent that they may believe beyond a shadow of a doubt that they are a secret agent who is being hunted by the government and whatnot, and they thus really struggle to tell imagination from reality, if they manage to do so at all.

Schizoids, on the other hand, usually know perfectly well that their dream world is just a dream. Switching back and forth between the two worlds happens on a conscious level for them. They also, despite their daydreams, tend to have a quite realistic perception of their own self. Schizophreniacs may unshakably believe they are a secret agent, while a schizoid will usually be very aware that that's a daydream and not reality.

To tell you the honest truth, there are times when I thoroughly enjoy my capability for vivid imagination. It can be an escape from daily life which works quite well to maintain my inner balance. Maybe escapism is another word you could use. And escapism is something which many people actually practice. Any film you watch, any soap opera you follow regularly is in the end little more than escapism from reality. If you really immerse yourself into the world they create, then that's every bit as "daydreamy" as I am. Maybe the difference is that I don't need Eastenders to get my imagination going.
>> No. 411157 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 12:57 pm
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>>411155
>Anyway, what is this rubbish about anonymouse imageboard users being mentalist? Absolute bollocks.
I don't remember saying they were mentalist. Only that they're typically aloof and reserved.

>>411156
>Schizoids, on the other hand, usually know perfectly well that their dream world is just a dream.
I'm fully aware of this distinction. I never meant to imply that Schizoids can't see the distinction between imagination and reality, only that they seemingly cannot leave their imagination behind. It's almost a sort of compulsion or addiction for them.
I appreciate your input and I'm sorry for your loss. But yes, it does seem that you were conditioned into your current state. There are some schizoids who were like this from the very beginning. When they grow a little older, they'll often say that they feel a "wall" between the emotions in their mind and their face. Overall, I find them very interesting. Whereas the psychopath seeks power because he wishes to dominate others, the schizoid seeks power because he wishes to distance others.
You don't need to justify escapism. I've seen several "X is a waste of time" arguments and "What is it, to waste time?" counter-arguments. I maintain my stance though: the schizoid lives primarily in a world of his own creation.
>> No. 411158 Anonymous
8th June 2017
Thursday 1:08 pm
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>>411156
Huh... This describes me quite well, although I have never been to the doctors for any mental issues. I do daydream a lot. So much so that I just zone out while walking or driving and snap out of it just to realise I don't know where the fuck I am.
>> No. 411166 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 1:22 am
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>>411157

>There are some schizoids who were like this from the very beginning. When they grow a little older, they'll often say that they feel a "wall" between the emotions in their mind and their face.

Schizoids generally tend to have problems expressing feelings and emotions. This manifests itself not only in the things they say or do, but also in their body language, which tends to be static and about as reserved as the impression they will give on the intellectual level.

That doesn't mean schizoids aren't capable of intense emotion and all that. Although some schizoids may have succeeded at becoming just as emotionless on the inside as they appear on the outside, they generally and more likely just struggle to express what they feel inside. That's how it is with me anyway. I am aware that I am deep down a very emotional person, and within my little world inside my mind, I deal with these emotions and don't suppress them. But again, the outside world would be forgiven for thinking that nothing of that sort is going on inside me at all, because I only very seldomly let slip any remarks about my actual feelings.

Also, one upside to my dreamworld imagination is that I arguably had a talent for imaginative storytelling when I was in school. I absolutely loved it when we had to write short stories and that kind of thing. To the point that one teacher said to my mum that he was WITH NOTHING TO SAY BECAUSE I AM A CUNT that a twelve year old was capable of painting such vivid pictures with his words.

Maybe I should have followed that as a career. As a writer or something. But I didn't.


>Whereas the psychopath seeks power because he wishes to dominate others, the schizoid seeks power because he wishes to distance others.

I don't seek power. I'm not sure I understand what you mean by that anyway, but my desire sometimes is just to have as much peace and quiet from the outside world around me as possible. Especially after a hard day's work of having to deal with insufferable people in reality.
>> No. 411167 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 1:25 am
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>>411166

>that he was WITH NOTHING TO SAY BECAUSE I AM A CUNT

That seems slightly harsh for a word filter.
>> No. 411168 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 1:28 am
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>>411167
That word was overused as a meme here for a while. One of the oldest wordfilters, don't take it personally.
>> No. 411169 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 8:28 am
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>>411166
>That doesn't mean schizoids aren't capable of intense emotion and all that.
I'm aware of this. I spoke with a schizoid who entered the military. He said that despite the intensity of fear he was experiencing, ultimately, his sergeant praised him for maintaining steel nerves in the face of adversity even though he was just as scared as everyone else.

>I'm not sure I understand what you mean by that anyway, but my desire sometimes is just to have as much peace and quiet from the outside world around me as possible.
Exactly. You desire independence from your environment however the reality is that the more dependent you are on something, the more power it wields over you. If you maximise your independence from it, you also maximise your power over it. The true desire is a desire for distance and peace but this can only be fulfilled through the pursuit of power. You can't separate the pursuit of independence from the pursuit of power. So yes, restating my original point, while the psychopath will pursue power for the sake of domination, the schizoid will do so for the sake of distance and so outwardly, they end up appearing very similar.

>>411168
Can someone post a screenshot of the word? I must admit, it's piqued my curiosity.
>> No. 411172 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 11:42 am
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>>411169
>> No. 411185 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 4:27 pm
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>>411172
Thank you.
>> No. 411190 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 6:52 pm
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>>411169

>I'm aware of this. I spoke with a schizoid who entered the military. He said that despite the intensity of fear he was experiencing, ultimately, his sergeant praised him for maintaining steel nerves in the face of adversity even though he was just as scared as everyone else.

If my friends and/or coworkers are to be believed, that is also one of my traits. Apart from a few occasions where I have indeed lost it, I tend to be quite calm on the outside in the face of trouble. Inside, I will shit my pants the same way as everybody when there are still mountains of work to do before impossible deadlines can be met, or when my boss has another choleric outburst and says he "will fire the lot of us" (in his otherwise endearing Glasgow accent). Which he never really means, but oh well. But I tend to appear cool as a cucumber on the outside. Which prompted my coworkers to actually give me an original "keep calm and carry on" coffee mug for my birthday one year.


>Exactly. You desire independence from your environment however the reality is that the more dependent you are on something, the more power it wields over you. If you maximise your independence from it, you also maximise your power over it.

I'm still not sold on the way you put this idea about power. For me, it's not a consideration of power. It's simply the feeling that I am most comfortable when I am left alone and not bothered. I've got friends, and I have had romantic relationships, and I enjoy both friendships and relationships as much as the next person. But I always have this feeling that I need much more breathing space than most other people I know. I will for example sometimes disappear off the face of the earth for a week or two, for all that some of my best friends will know, but then reappear out of the blue and pick up again where we left the last time we saw each other. In the past, this has alienated both some of my friends and sometimes also women that I was with, but it is the only way to be for me. Of course, you can't just do a disappearing act on a romantic partner like that, so it was more a kind of tendency to sometimes not call for two or three days but with no bad intentions whatsoever. But even that can be a tough act to follow, especially when you're with somebody who's a bit on the needy side, and who will interpret a stunt like that as a questioning of your entire relationship.

In the end, I'm past the point where being schizoid was an abnormality to me, a hindrance or an obstacle that would have kept me from living a normal life. Nowadays, I try to see the blessings of it, which are that I am both a person who tends not to crack under fear, and somebody who is independent and self sufficient enough that he doesn't necessarily need other people to enjoy himself. Oh, and of course there's my dream world imagination. To tell you the truth, I would sorely miss my imagination if somehow one day it would disappear from my psyche.
>> No. 411198 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 8:25 pm
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>>411190
>I'm still not sold on the way you put this idea about power
I believe this is because you see me as stating your "true" intentions but that's not the case. Fat people don't have the "true" intention of getting fat, they just enjoy ignorantly consuming tasty food. A lust for the pleasure of food is their intention. Their weight gain is merely a byproduct of their action. I'm only looking at the flow of cause and effect and what effect your actions have.

>For me, it's not a consideration of power
I see this clearly. You don't lust for power. You only wish for peace. I'm just saying: as you create distance, you are simultaneously empowering yourself in much the same way that as you walk in rain, you simultaneously get wet in the rain. The intention is on distance but the effect of the action is empowerment. This calm aloofness is what outwardly and shallowly likens the schizoid to the psychopath.

>and somebody who is independent and self sufficient enough that he doesn't necessarily need other people to enjoy himself
That's good to know. I'm happy you've found happiness however the dynamic is still shifted towards you. You need others less than they need you and so you, despite the focus of your intention being on peace, have in fact empowered yourself. You are the one that can walk away from the bond most easily. Just as you said regarding the romantic-partner hypothetical scenario, she could misconstrue your detachment as a true absence of attachment and gauge you to be sociopathic. She'll suspect that you'll leave her the moment she's no longer useful.

You're a good person. It's just that you'd look evil in my opinion. Personally, I do envy the schizoid. I see it as very useful while Mars and Earth align. I think, in a world-ending SHTF scenario, the schizoids will be the ones to either thrive solo or become leaders of militias.
>> No. 411199 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 8:54 pm
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>>411198

About the whole pyschopathy thing - I wouldn't be surprised if some people said about me that they could imagine me being a psycho. That I might come off in a certain way to them. But to my understanding, actual psychopaths don't just momentarily switch off and detach any kind of compassion, for it to later be reactivated in some way. They don't feel it, ever, to begin with. That's not the way it is with me. I can detach compassion for a short time, but then it only comes back to haunt me, and often gravely, when I think of what I have done to somebody during one of those moments of emotional detachment and pure self interest.

And I can only tell you what my therapist told me about me. He said that I am more on the benign end of the schizoid gamut. Somebody who ticks the relevant boxes of SPD, but who is also deep down a compassionate human being who is aware of, and cares about the needs and desires of other people. He advised me to spend more time nourishing that side of myself, and to explore ways in which maybe just a few simple words like "I'm happy for you", or "I was worried for you", or "I know how you feel" could sometimes help offset the air of detachment that some people might get from me.

This was coming from somebody who, in a former capacity, actually used to be a court appointed forensic psychiatrist. Somebody who would help courts convict murderers, serial killers, rapists, the lot. He told me he gave up that position because it was "too depressing" for him. His sense of accomplishment in getting justice for victims could not make up for having to delve deep into the abyss of what some people are capable of doing unto their fellow human beings.
>> No. 411202 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 10:31 pm
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>>411172
Sorry but your image inevitably reminded me of this.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRCM0jWEQjQ
>> No. 411203 Anonymous
9th June 2017
Friday 10:56 pm
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>>411202

There was nothing inevitable about this, not yet anyway.

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