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>> No. 405839 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 2:31 pm
405839 Mid-week thread
Mid-week thread?

Mid-week thread.

What are you lot up to?
Expand all images.
>> No. 405840 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 3:33 pm
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Supposed to go to see some famous musician with some internet friends this evening but I can't be bothered so I'm drinking cheap whisky instead. I'll see them all later in the week regardless.
My brother wants to buy a 4th house using our mutual bank account and I put off sending the paperwork for a couple of weeks because I was too depressed to leave the house but I sent it through today so it's probably going to be okay, I'll just have pissed off the lawyers a bit.
>> No. 405842 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 4:20 pm
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>>405839
I've beem ill for 2 weeks with a flu, which has taught me a new love of pokemon as I've clock in many many hours of play after the first time of touching one of the games in maybe 15 years. This love will be ficklely replaced when Civ 6 comes out at the end of the week I am sure.
>> No. 405843 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 4:30 pm
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>>405840
Are you rich?
>> No. 405844 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 5:28 pm
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>>405843
That's relative. I have about £500 income a month.
>> No. 405845 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 5:50 pm
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>>405844

That should make you a top earner in Bangladesh.
>> No. 405846 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 6:28 pm
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>>405844
What's your net worth?
>> No. 405847 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 6:49 pm
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>>405845
Cool.
>>405846
I have no idea.
>> No. 405848 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 6:54 pm
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>>405847
Are you fake depressed, but rich? "Oh how life is so difficult while I help my brother buy a fourth house," kind of fake depressed but rich?
>> No. 405849 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 7:16 pm
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>>405848
Sure, why not. What's the minimum income needed to not qualify as wanting to kill yourself?
>> No. 405850 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 7:28 pm
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>>405839

I've got someone from Capitas coming round tomorrow for a PIP assessment. I've had someone from the CAB help me fill in the form and I've sent off some (hopefully) persuading medical evidence. I'm shitting myself, and that's no word of a lie. Wish me luck, chaps.

Sorry for ticking whinge, but I'm really bloody nervous about tomorrow.
>> No. 405851 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 7:32 pm
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>>405850

Best of luck, mate. I hope the hassle passes and you can live comfortably.
>> No. 405852 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 7:45 pm
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>>405850
Good on you. Be sure to ask what level of income you have to reach before you no longer quantify for mental illness diagnoses.
>> No. 405853 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 7:48 pm
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>>405842

My favourite thing to do when I'm ill and/or skiving off work is lay in bed all day playing Pokemon, and that's the main reason I appreciate how little the series has changed over the years. You can fire up any of the modern entries and feel right at home even if you've never played it since 1998.

I think it's pure nostalgia that comforts me, it takes me back to a time when I'd be off school and my mum or dad would be there to bring me soup and lemsip. Adult life is harsh and unforgiving; even if I had an other half to look after me she'd be working 43 hours a day at some purgatorial call centre while I was on death's door with the man flu, risking my very life to get out of bed and make my own soup and lemsip...

But Pokemon. Pokemon is always there for you.
>> No. 405854 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 7:50 pm
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>>405851

Thanks very much, mate. Much appreciated.
>> No. 405855 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 7:56 pm
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>>405849
A net worth close to a million. Also a good amount of cash in hand.

I have been thinking of ways to kill and bury myself. The best way to do this is probably digging a grave, placing all the earth on a big tarp right next to the grave. I would tie rope to the ends of the tarp and tie the other end of the ropes to a tractor on the other side of the grave. The idea is that I blow my brains out in the grave and the tractor will pull the tarp and all the earth into the grave.

The only problem is how to start and stop the tractor.
>> No. 405856 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 7:59 pm
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>>405855

Honestly pal if you're in that much emotional anguish, then for a reasonable fee, I'm sure I can turn the tractor key and look the other way.
>> No. 405857 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 8:00 pm
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>>405855
Cool. I don't know what my net worth is but the property I own is less than 40k. I always figured it would be easiest to just go to the beach and swim out to sea until I was exhausted. Preferably in the far North of Scotland as then there's the best chance of tides taking the body as far off as South America so it's either never found or at least is found a hell of a long way off.
>> No. 405858 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 8:11 pm
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>>405857
I want to be buried, not out there in the open.

£40 sounds rubbish. Good luck mate.

>>405856
I'm not joking but I'm actually saving for an empty plot of land in the middle of nowhere in Scotland. The one I want is worth £15k freehold. Once I buy it, I will have to come up with a way to maybe automate the tractor and add a timer or something.
>> No. 405860 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 8:35 pm
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>>405858

I know you're not joking lad, I'm just suggesting that it would be far less selfish to pay me to kill you and then we'd both be happy.
>> No. 405861 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 8:39 pm
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>>405860
I'd rather nobody know.
>> No. 405862 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 9:07 pm
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>>405858

You could get a lot of psychotherapy for fifteen grand. #justsayin'
>> No. 405863 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 9:21 pm
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>>405862
No thanks. I just want to stop existing in my body.
>> No. 405871 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 10:23 pm
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>>405863
You could get a lot of DMT for fifteen grand.
>> No. 405876 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 10:45 pm
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Just had dinner.

Now moving on to a couple of bottles of Strongbow in front of the TV by myself.
>> No. 405880 Anonymous
19th October 2016
Wednesday 10:57 pm
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>>405876

'owt good on?
>> No. 405890 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 1:37 am
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>>405850
The best thing to remmeber lad, is that you will likely never ever see this person again, so dont hold back and make out like it's ok. It's the worst day ever and cry if you have to.
>> No. 405896 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 2:16 pm
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Pipchap here again. Just finished my PIP assessment, it went alright.The assessor was an independent registered nurse and had experience with people with MS, answered questions about my medications and how my illness effects me and lost my balance trying to do one of the physical "demonstrations". I feel it could go either way, but she seemed very confident about my claim and has encouraged me to appeal if it all goes tits up if the DWP says "no" to my claim.

Now I've got to wait for six to eight weeks. At least the hard part is over.

That said, thanks for reading and I hope everybody's week's going passably so far, lads.
>> No. 405897 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 2:32 pm
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>>405896

Fuck me, I'm glad we check to stop any old cunt claiming it but this really is too much.

I can't stand whiners who go 'hurrr I'm ashamed to be British' or whatever over every little thing they disagree with but the way we treat people with nothing or the inability to get something really fucking disgusts me about this country. What a load of shit.

Best of luck lad.
>> No. 405898 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 3:04 pm
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>>405896

>image.jpg


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-Odr7E4klE
>> No. 405899 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 6:07 pm
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>>405897
Fucking this. For fuck's sake, spasticlad* has fucking MS. Give him his fucking PIP, you DWP cunts. There shouldn't even be a fucking assessment. Goddamn.

* but you're our spasticlad. Anyone else calls you spasticlad and you don't like it send 'em to be and I'll take them to a brief encounter with a combine harvester.

>>405855
u ok there hun
>> No. 405900 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 6:59 pm
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Split up with the Mrs, which has entailed me running back to the city I'm originally from. Just packed the desktop computer, midi gear and one of my guitars and got the hell out.
It's not half as bad as I thought it would be.
>> No. 405901 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 7:00 pm
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>>405897
>>405899

Cheers lads, I appreciate your support.

I still receive DLA while my PIP is being processed, but no doubt that if my PIP is successful, I'll only receive a fraction of what I used to receive because I'm still "technically mobile" but my MS fatigue and unsteadiness severely limits how far and for long I can walk.

Anyway, enough of all that. I'm going to eat some chips and mayo.

I'll update the thread with the PIP decision when I receive the dreaded brown envelope.

Thanks again, chaps.
>> No. 405902 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 7:24 pm
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>>405900

Cheers to you. If it feels like the right decision, then it often is.
>> No. 405904 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 7:32 pm
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On friday I went to the pub with a friend, he whipped out some coke so we sniffed some of that and went to one of his friends and played guitars and chatted for a while, then went somewhere else where we decided we'd get a train into the countryside and look for mushrooms in the morning. We did that, carried on 'the sesh', found plenty of shrooms, and headed back for around 7pm. I'd planned to go out that night anyway, met up with other friends, but found out my ticket had been sold for dramatic and harrowing reasons which I won't get into here, so I went to a free party instead. It was pretty fucking awful, definitely one of the worst raves I've attended. The music was objectively bad, like... minimal electro? just a kick, clap, one synth line, and some bass. They played some psybreaks at one point which was fun, but it was terrible, and everyone there was a complete pagan moon worshipper, which is adorable and charming at first but quickly becomes redundant when it's the only topic of conversation. I got to bed at around 1pm sunday and slept until around 11am monday.

I had a physics exam wednesday and completely fucked it up, and I have an assignment due in tomorrow which I haven't even start. I still feel depressed and my body still hurts from my 3 day weekend. I haven't done that in over a year, and I probably won't for another year. Got too much stuff to prioritise these days, and any sense of nostalgia I might have gained was lost in the bitterness I felt at the rave being so awful. OH WELL!
>> No. 405905 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 7:33 pm
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>>405902
It was a tough decision to make but it's been coming a while now. I've gone through enough breakups in the past to be able to deal with it with a minimum of fuss. Stiff upper lip and all that.
Plus it's been good to get back to thew hometown and see a few people. 7 years away and it's like i never left. Everyone is happy to see me.
>> No. 405906 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 7:40 pm
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It's almost Friday. Very happy about that.
>> No. 405908 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 7:59 pm
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>>405905

So your relationship also lasted seven years then?

That's a long relationship to walk away from. Must feel like the end of an era to you, no matter how far apart you and your partner felt at the end.
>> No. 405910 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 8:17 pm
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Just got home from grocery shopping a while ago, but now I just realised that I forgot coffee and a battery for my multimeter.

So I'm going to have to get dressed again and go back down to Tesco's. I need my coffee in the morning.
>> No. 405911 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 8:53 pm
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>>405910
Pop to the Esso lad.
>> No. 405912 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 9:23 pm
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>>405911

Back again. Turns out my multimeter didn't just need a new battery, but it's also broken. I kind of thought the "low bat" sign might explain why I couldn't measure voltages and resistances with it anymore, but now with a new battery, the problem persists. I'll pop over to Halfraud's tomorrow after work to see if they've got any decent ones on offer.
>> No. 405913 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 9:52 pm
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>>405912

Don't do it ladm8, you know that you'll end up with some overpriced bit of tat.

You can get a quality branded meter for £21.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Extech-MN35-Digital-Mini-MultiMeter/dp/B0012VWR20/
>> No. 405915 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 10:24 pm
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>>405913
Definitely try this at home.
>> No. 405916 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 10:27 pm
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>>405908
>So your relationship also lasted seven years then?
No, the relationship was four and a half years. I originally went to the other city to go to uni there as a mature student, and ended up staying because I met her.
The saddest part is we were still very close, but I just wasn't able to make her happy (I'm not sure of anyone could). This in turn made me pretty unhappy. It was a horrible wrench to do it but it had to be done.
>> No. 405917 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 10:53 pm
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>>405915
It's perfectly okay to do if you've got a 240v meter, although it will probably trip the ELCB.
>> No. 405918 Anonymous
20th October 2016
Thursday 11:06 pm
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Sparklads, I want to learn about leccy and all that. I havn't visited any of it since GCSE. Recommend a few books for a novice like me or even good youtube channels you might know of.
>> No. 405919 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 12:02 am
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>>405918
Horowitz and Hill, The Art of Electronics is absolutely the best reference text - its one of those huge books full of stuff and you'll probably never finish it ever, but its brilliant.

I sadly don't have a recommendation for domestic electricity type works, that stuff is much simpler, as long as you don't get the colours wrong.
>> No. 405920 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 12:17 am
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>>405918

>I want to learn about leccy and all that. I havn't visited any of it since GCSE.

If you want to do some "hands-on" stuff and are not just interested in the theoretical side of things, you can order a home electronics kit online. There are many different kinds, with which you can learn about electrics and electronics by doing your own experiments and building your own circuits.

I did reasonably well in physics at school, but for me it's also been a very long time, so I forgot most of it again. But then last year, I started building my own electronic circuits using the Arduino platform. That would probably be too much too soon for you at the moment, but that really is a whole lot of fun once you've got the hang of things a bit.
>> No. 405921 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 12:32 am
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>>405920
Agreed - Arduino is every bit as good as they say and a cheap, modern way to experiment.
>> No. 405922 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 1:18 am
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>>405921

The nice thing about Arduino is that it is really as complex as you want it to be. You can use it to simply make a few LEDs blink, or you can design a multi-client RF based home automation system. And very literally anything in between.
>> No. 405923 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 1:29 am
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>>405922
What I like about it is that its really easy to get started and the tools (being PC based) are very easy to use. Just building simple circuits, as you say stuff like making LEDs blink, reading sensors or pot or whatever, is far easier on Arduino than knocking up some prototype breadboard or circuit - debugging when you're learning the basics like that is actually way easier on an Arduino.
>> No. 405924 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 2:08 am
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>>405923

The simplicity of Arduino, if you want your project to be simple, that is, has sadly earned it a reputation as being electronics for idiots. Some stuck up professional computer programmers wrinkle their nose at novices with no electronics or programming background who now get to design their own circuits despite a still tentative grasp on the subject matter.

And it's true that Processing, which is kind of a simplified C, is a very forgiving programming language, with an abundance of ready made libraries that do all the hard work in the background which a beginner-level programmer will have no clue about.

But we had the same phaenomenon twenty years ago with HTML. Its very nature as a simple and forgiving markup language that produced decent results even if you otherwise had no clue about programming made putting your own web site together a piece of piss with just a few lines of code. And computer programming professionals scoffed at all the noobs who thought they had become web developers over night.

But it democratised programming and went a long way making the web as popular as it then became. With free hosters like geocities and the like. And the same is true for programmed circuits and Arduino today . It means you no longer need a Ph D to create your own projects. And I guess that just doesn't sit well with some of the more passive aggressive autistic computer programmers.
>> No. 405925 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 3:53 am
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>>405918

If you go the Arduino route, get one of the starter kits that comes with a breadboard and a grab-bag of components. There are a lot of people at my Hackspace who mess around with Arduino-type projects, but most of them are lacking the kind of fundamental knowledge you'd pick up in GCSE electronics.

The skills you learn from building simple circuits with discrete transistors and 555s are essential if you're going to progress. There is a very good introductory course at the link below that covers most of the basics.

It's worth knowing that RS Components offer free next day delivery with no minimum order. God knows why, but they'll happily do free postage on 15p worth of resistors.

http://www.banggood.com/Basic-Starter-Learning-Kit-UNO-R3-1602LCD-Sensor-Breadboard-For-Arduino-p-1085891.html?p=0V041318698362015074

https://startingelectronics.org/beginners/

http://uk.rs-online.com/web/

If you're really keen, you can do far worse than joining an amateur radio club. The RSGB Foundation course teaches a lot of really useful skills; most clubs charge nothing for the course aside from the exam fee of £27.50. Once you've got your license, you have access to a massive chunk of the radio spectrum.

There's all sorts of really cool stuff you can do with an amateur radio license. You can send messages around the world with JT65. You can bounce messages off amateur-built satellites or the surface of the moon. If you're really lucky, you might get to talk to one of the astronauts on the International Space Station.

https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

>>405919

Seconded. TAoE is a masterpiece.
>> No. 405926 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 10:17 am
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Have the day off today. So my laptop charger decided to fucking die. What a piece of shit, I've only had it since January.
>> No. 405927 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 11:08 am
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>>405925
I used to work in purchasing and RS are gods.

Additional information going forward: never use DHL.
>> No. 405928 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 12:10 pm
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My ikea bed arrived but I can't be bothered to assemble it so there's just a massive pile of wood in the corner.
>> No. 405929 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 12:28 pm
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>>405924 with an abundance of ready made libraries that do all the hard work in the background which a beginner-level programmer will have no clue about.

Arduino's library handling is a fucking nightmare, as well as one of its best parts.
I'm hoping that the micro:bit foundation stuff will have a cleaner path from simple to more complex programming. The drag&drop graphical block editor stuff is close to zero-barrier, through a few other options to python, and then on to just treating it as a full mbed device, to bare metal with or without the RTOS of your choice.
>> No. 405931 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 1:11 pm
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>>405929

>Arduino's library handling is a fucking nightmare

This is mainly true for obscure poorly documented libraries which come with few or no examples. On the other hand, you can always take a look at the function definitions within the libraries if you're not sure how to use them.

What I find more nightmarish is when you buy bargain bin hardware components for Arduino from China. They are often knock offs of more expensive Adafruit or SparkFun components. And you get what you pay for. I bought a generic TFT display as well as an MP3 breakout off eBay, both from China for less than £5 each, including (!) p&p. And I spent the better part of a week both times to try to get them to work. Because they come "naked", with no wiring instructions and quite often also without proprietary libraries, so you will have to use other libraries that these parts are compatible with. But even finding all that out can take you days and will be fucking frustrating.

So now I only buy Adafruit, Sparkfun and similar. Their stuff costs ten quid more, but it just saves you a whole lot of hassle because with them, you get bespoke libraries, good example sketches, and good how-to tutorials. And also, the cheap Chinese stuff is often one generation behind Adafruit. The TFT display only has an SD card slot, whereas Adafruit's displays now all have MicroSDHC. Also, the screen resolution on the latest Adafruit TFTs is much better.
>> No. 405932 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 4:03 pm
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>>405926

I should point out, before anyone starts a Go Fund Me page or something, that about half an hour after posting this I realised the electricity had gone entirely when I angrily tried to make a coffee.
>> No. 405933 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 5:38 pm
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>>405932

>I should point out, before anyone starts a Go Fund Me page or something

I wouldn't think anybody was going to. You are overestimating .gs.
>> No. 405934 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 5:39 pm
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>>405932

It would've still been in warranty anyway, you daft haporth.
>> No. 405935 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 5:51 pm
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>>405933

We only make Go Fund Me pages for when people run out of tea a week before dole day.
>> No. 405936 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 5:58 pm
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>>405935

>people run out of tea a week before dole day

Poor sods. You mean they don't even have 99p for Lidl's cheapest tea?
>> No. 405937 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 6:58 pm
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>>405936


"This is Terry. Terry is 28 years old and has to walk 3 miles to the nearest Lidl in the hopes of getting fresh tea bags with the last 99p he has left, only to find out when he gets there that they've sold out. For just two quid a month, Terry, and literally hundreds like him, would never have to suffer this indignity again."
>> No. 405938 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 7:21 pm
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>>405937

Yes... we should start a charity.

And call it the NSPPP (National Society for the Patronisation of Poor People). And then run TV adverts.
>> No. 405939 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 7:47 pm
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>>405938
Maybe they will come up with better adds for poor people, instead of having the same useless and annoying format.
>> No. 405942 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 11:22 pm
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I woke up drunk at 23:00 and ate a whole packet of halloumi.
>> No. 405943 Anonymous
21st October 2016
Friday 11:44 pm
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>>405942
Blimey. How big a pack?
>> No. 405944 Anonymous
22nd October 2016
Saturday 12:17 am
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I made authentic Canarian mojo rojo tonight. I will be having it in a few minutes with papas arrugadas, which are "wrinkly potatoes". Their skin gets wrinkly because you cook them in extremely salty water, like, over 100g of salt per pint of water. You use smallish new potatoes and then eat them with the skin and the mojo rojo sauce on top (see photo). It's a popular tapas dish throughout the Canary Islands.

Most online recipes for mojo rojo are quite different from the way the stuff tastes when you order it in a restaurant in Gran Canaria. So I had to reverse engineer my very own recipe, which is about as close to the real thing as you can get. And it seems to hit the spot... the last time I made some for a party, a whole pint of it was gone in an hour.
>> No. 405945 Anonymous
22nd October 2016
Saturday 12:31 am
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>>405944
Cooking is for women.
>> No. 405946 Anonymous
22nd October 2016
Saturday 12:40 am
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>>405945

How very droll.
>> No. 405947 Anonymous
22nd October 2016
Saturday 12:48 am
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>>405944

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenerife

Can you post some cellular photography m7? Sounds like a lovely dish; it'd be awesome to see a pic of your valiant attempt.
>> No. 405950 Anonymous
22nd October 2016
Saturday 1:13 am
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>>405947

Well, here it is... I think my attempt looks reasonably appetising.

The consistency is a bit more coarse and thin in the picture above; but good mojo rojo is smooth with a very fine and slightly thick texture. That's how they made it at the four-star hotel in Playa del Ingles where I was staying anyway.
>> No. 405951 Anonymous
22nd October 2016
Saturday 4:06 am
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>>405944
>>405950

Not to piss on any parades or anything but you realise that Mojo Rojo basically translates to "red sauce", right?

I've had a zillion version of patatas/batatas bravas all over Spain and beyond and they've mostly all been shit except for this one Catalonian speaking restaurant a few minutes walk from Park Güell in Barcelona. Those were pretty ace.
>> No. 405954 Anonymous
22nd October 2016
Saturday 1:27 pm
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>>405951

Your ignorance amuses me.

Papas arrugadas con mojo rojo is one of the signature dishes of Canarian cooking. And your standard patatas bravas are different in that the papas arrugadas are cooked in what is pretty much a salt brine, at over 100 grams of salt per pint of water. The salt draws water from the potatoes, so their skin wrinkles during the cooking process. Before serving, you let the potatoes dry off for a minute or two in the pot without water, which gives them a salty crust.

Canarian "red sauce" consists mainly of red bell pepper, plenty of fresh garlic, red chili pepper, as well as salt, sugar, paprika, lemon juice, cumin and dried tomatoes. Pretty much every restaurant there has its own recipe for mojo rojo, but by and large, they all taste similar. Some even add a bit of finely ground almond.
>> No. 405975 Anonymous
23rd October 2016
Sunday 1:17 am
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>>405950

That looks really horrible, edible but horrible. If I hadn't eaten for a day I'd give it a go. Looks nasty.
>> No. 405977 Anonymous
23rd October 2016
Sunday 1:49 am
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>>405975

Well that is just what papas arrugadas looks like. Do a google image search and you will see. I don't think my version of it looked particularly repulsive.
>> No. 405982 Anonymous
23rd October 2016
Sunday 3:43 am
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>>405977

IMHO it looks like a meal for 50p. Something you would eat if you were hungry. As a side probably ok.

Roast potatoes. Mmmm. You know you want them.
>> No. 405994 Anonymous
23rd October 2016
Sunday 1:08 pm
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>>405982

It's usually served as an entree or as tapas. Not as a main course, no.

I've suggested the dish to a Spanish/Caribbean tapas bar that I sometimes go to. One of the owners even said he remembers it from a holiday in Tenerife. They showed interest, but so far haven't put it on their menu.
>> No. 405996 Anonymous
23rd October 2016
Sunday 1:26 pm
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>>405982
Yeah this sounds like an excuse to eat hot salty roast potatoes. I'm not sure the precise makeup of the sauce matters.
>> No. 406003 Anonymous
23rd October 2016
Sunday 1:58 pm
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>>405996

> I'm not sure the precise makeup of the sauce matters.

It is a pretty tasty sauce though. If done right. I would give you my precise reverse engineered recipe, but then again, something tells me you would not appreciate it.
>> No. 406010 Anonymous
23rd October 2016
Sunday 9:13 pm
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>>406003
Not him but I might be interested.

I had salted potatoes Lanzarote when I visited, don't think they came with any sauce though. They were interesting, alright to have a small number occasionally but I couldn't eat a lot due to the massive saltiness. Their blood pressure must be through the roof if they eat them regularly over there.
>> No. 406011 Anonymous
23rd October 2016
Sunday 9:17 pm
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>>406010

You need salty food in a hot climate to replace the salt you sweat out.
>> No. 406015 Anonymous
23rd October 2016
Sunday 11:04 pm
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>>406011

This is why I always show off my money and girlfriends to my meal before I eat it.
>> No. 406016 Anonymous
23rd October 2016
Sunday 11:17 pm
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>>406015
Mirth.
>> No. 406020 Anonymous
24th October 2016
Monday 1:47 am
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>>406010

ok for what it's worth, here it is:

Canarian Mojo Rojo sauce

- 2 large red bell peppers
- 1 large, medium-hot red chili pepper
- three to four sun-dried tomatoes
- 50-75g of triple concentrated tomato puree
- 1/4 bulb of fresh garlic
- about 7 tablespoons of olive oil
- about 3 tablespoons of regular vegetable oil
- three tablespoons of white wine vinegar
- two teaspoons of sugar
- one small teaspoon of salt
- one teaspoon of fresh lemon juice
- 1/2 teaspoon of sweet paprika
- a dash of ground cumin, to your personal taste
- one teaspoon of ground almond (alternatively, one or two peeled whole almonds). We really just want a faint hint of almond in our sauce.
- 2-3 tablespoons of plain wheat flour


Skin the bell peppers, remove the seeds from them, as well as from the chili peppers and the dried tomatoes, chop everything up a bit and put it in a blender together with the chopped garlic, the oil, the vinegar, the tomato puree and the lemon juice. Put your blender on the highest setting and leave it there for a few minutes, until everything has a fine, smooth texture. Now add the sugar, the salt and the cumin to your taste. Finally, add the wheat flour, bit by bit, with an egg beater. Whisk until the flour has completely dissolved. Leave in the fridge for an hour before serving.


Salt crusted papas arrugadas are also fairly simple to make; take about half a kilo of small new potatoes (not much bigger than golf balls), clean them gently with warm water, and then place them in a pot with about a litre of water. Add just under 200 grams of (sea) salt to the water, and boil the potatoes until they get soft inside but still have a bit of "bite". Then drain the water and leave the potatoes in the pot on the plate for a minute or two (with the heat turned down) so they can dry off and develop their wrinkly, salty crust (but make sure they don't burn). Shake the potatoes in the pot gently a few times to remove excess salt before serving.
>> No. 406052 Anonymous
25th October 2016
Tuesday 1:03 am
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>>405954

I wasn't suggesting that papas arrugadas are the same as patatas bravas, merely that as I've had the latter in a hundred places and every one has been different, that it should surprise you to find a bunch of different recipes and variations for the latter.

I have never had papas arrugadas, but they sound very nice and I will definitely try some if I ever wake up finding myself mysteriously stranded on Chav Island.
>> No. 406058 Anonymous
25th October 2016
Tuesday 4:44 pm
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>>406052

>Chav Island

So Gran Canaria is Chav Island to you? Is that it?
>> No. 406062 Anonymous
25th October 2016
Tuesday 8:27 pm
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>>406058
Well it's just one chav island in a chav archipelago.
>> No. 406063 Anonymous
25th October 2016
Tuesday 8:30 pm
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>>406062

And you have been there personally how many times to know this?

Or are you like one of those people who think Birmingham is a chav shithole, but they've actually never visited anywhere near it?
>> No. 406064 Anonymous
25th October 2016
Tuesday 8:43 pm
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>>406063
Not him, but I can confirm that Birmingham is, in fact, a chav shithole. It's not as bad as Newcastle, but it's certainly up there.
>> No. 406065 Anonymous
25th October 2016
Tuesday 8:46 pm
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>>406063
If only I were privileged enough to possess that knowledge second-hand.
>> No. 406067 Anonymous
25th October 2016
Tuesday 9:33 pm
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>>406065

Well what do you think you will see if you go to the touristy parts of those islands? If you think you'll meet cultured upper-class Brits in Playa del Inglés, then what a shock, you will be utterly disappointed (some of them, you might find in Meloneras or Pasito Blanco). And yes, parts of Playa del Inglés will seem worse to you than Magaluf.

But have you been to Tejeda, Agaete, or Arucas? No? Well, I thought so. You were staying put with the three star all inclusive package holiday chavs that you complain so much about.
>> No. 406068 Anonymous
25th October 2016
Tuesday 10:09 pm
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I think I might need to stop taking speed so often, but it is just so gosh darn fucking cheap.
>> No. 406069 Anonymous
25th October 2016
Tuesday 10:43 pm
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>>406068
Poor mans coke though. Gives me a headache.
>> No. 406120 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 12:37 am
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>>406068
>>406069

The trouble is finding good speed, which is to say relatively pure amphetamine sulfate. Even the darknet markets are awash with utter crap; "ooh but if I buy an ounce it's only 6 quid a gram", but that's no good when you're honking a gram of the stuff a day to even feel anything.
>> No. 406123 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 3:36 am
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>>406120
Maybe I just never had the good stuff then.
>> No. 406124 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 9:12 am
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>>406120

I heard this from some Polish guys at an after party not long ago. They were saying 'whizz' is just shit that keeps you awake - that's all I'd ever considered speed to be for, keeping you up. And they said good speed should give you a bit of euphoria.
>> No. 406125 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 11:41 am
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>>406124
Actually now you mention it, way back when I started buying drugs off the original darknet markets I remember speed used to make me feel pretty damn good; now it's mostly just body load and bruxism. Perhaps I've just ravaged my brain so much over the intervening years that it's simply got no happy chemicals left. Who knows, really.
>> No. 406127 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 11:51 am
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Just made a resolution to start losing weight. I now weigh 14 stone and a half, at 6'1. I know that that still doesn't mean I am grossly overweight for my height, but I wouldn't mind weighing about a stone and a half less, like I used to. Most of it is stomach fat, so it's kind of becoming a burden on my lower back.
>> No. 406128 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 12:01 pm
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>>406125

Hitler was a total junkie. It's no secret the nazis used meth, but this book makes some hilarious claims about their other drug use, such as towards the end of the war they built one-man nazi submarines to sail up the Thames, fed the sailors crystal meth so they stayed awake for the 5-6 days it would have taken, and most of them got psychosis from being so fucked up inside a tiny metal tube for that long. The allies bombed the Nazi meth plants, which where the main reason they managed to invade France so quickly. Also Hitler was rattling from heroin during his final days in the bunker. That has to go down as worst drugs withdrawal/comedown in the history of humankind.
>> No. 406129 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 12:01 pm
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>>406128

Forgot the link:

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/sep/25/blitzed-norman-ohler-adolf-hitler-nazi-drug-abuse-interview
>> No. 406131 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 12:01 pm
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>>406127
Is there a way we can keep each other motivated via. gs that you can think of?
>> No. 406132 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 12:05 pm
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>>406127
Is there a way we can keep each other motivated via. gs that you can think of?
>> No. 406133 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 12:22 pm
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>>406132

we could just start a weight loss thread.
>> No. 406135 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 12:35 pm
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>>406128

Yes, and meth was freely available both to Wehrmacht soldiers as part of their ration packs, and to the general public via their neighbourhood pharmacy.

If historical sources are to be believed, it was advertised as a little helper to keep your shit together in your daily life.

Kind of an unfortunate brand name though... it was called Pervitin.
>> No. 406136 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 12:53 pm
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>>406135

Daring theory on that note: Could the entire Third Reich be explained as a collective meth experience that went horribly wrong?
>> No. 406137 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 1:46 pm
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>>406133
http://britfa.gs/fat/res/3936.html
>> No. 406138 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 4:42 pm
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>>406124

> And they said good speed should give you a bit of euphoria

It should give you a shit-ton of euphoria. Not in an MDMA way but in a "I could conquer the world right now, by the way why don't I email all those friends I haven't spoken to in years and find out how they're doing".

As >>406128 points out, Hitler was a total meth head, which is why he thought it was a good idea to invade Russia. The videos of him shaking towards the end of the war are just him coming off daily use as supplies dwindled and the kybosh came down.
>> No. 406139 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 5:57 pm
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>>406136
That's exactly what the recent book about it posits.
>> No. 406143 Anonymous
27th October 2016
Thursday 7:36 pm
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It all makes sense now...
>> No. 406144 Anonymous
28th October 2016
Friday 10:13 pm
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My housemate is shelling garlic cloves. He's filled a large tupperware container with them so far.
>> No. 406145 Anonymous
28th October 2016
Friday 10:27 pm
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>>406144
Maybe he's brewing up a cold remedy.
Or maybe he's just really high.
>> No. 406147 Anonymous
29th October 2016
Saturday 12:36 pm
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>>406144

That shounds fantashtic, I've been shearching for decent clovesh shince I moved here from the Netherlands. How much for 7 gramsh?
>> No. 406148 Anonymous
29th October 2016
Saturday 1:03 pm
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>>406147
Sheven for a shilling.
>> No. 406149 Anonymous
29th October 2016
Saturday 1:24 pm
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>>406148

Shplendid.
>> No. 406155 Anonymous
29th October 2016
Saturday 7:48 pm
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>>406149
>> No. 406156 Anonymous
29th October 2016
Saturday 10:12 pm
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>>406155
>> No. 406157 Anonymous
30th October 2016
Sunday 12:19 am
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>>406144

Why? It's really cheap to buy already peeled.
>> No. 406178 Anonymous
30th October 2016
Sunday 1:09 am
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>>406157
It's cheap to rent a prostitute and yet normal people cultivate mutually agreeable sexual relationships.
>> No. 406185 Anonymous
30th October 2016
Sunday 1:59 am
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>It's cheap to rent a prostitute and yet normal people cultivate mutually agreeable sexual relationships.

Why not join a religion so you can capture women who don't believe in what you belive and use them as sex slaves. Because your holy man encourages it. Need to grow a beard though.
>> No. 406189 Anonymous
30th October 2016
Sunday 2:48 am
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>>406185

Wowie, I think we've got a successor to Chris Morris in our midst, lads.
>> No. 406191 Anonymous
30th October 2016
Sunday 3:13 am
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Flying cow spotted in the Middle East. Signs that burgeoning religion is growing in the area and the letter L has been banned. More to follow.
>> No. 406193 Anonymous
30th October 2016
Sunday 4:02 am
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>shelling garlic cloves
>> No. 406196 Anonymous
30th October 2016
Sunday 9:26 am
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>>406157
I don't know and I like not knowing so I'm not going to ask.
>> No. 406242 Anonymous
1st November 2016
Tuesday 1:25 am
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Watching The Sixth Sense on TV.

That movie doesn't get any less gripping if you've seen it a few times and are well aware of its surprise ending.

Bruce Willis uses a Zippo lighter to blow up a Boeing 747 taking off
>> No. 406380 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 5:18 am
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Ended up on a coke session with the owner of the company I work for. We discussed in depth about how I though his current business model wouldn't hold up to expansion, and how I'd seen numerous other outfits die a death after taking his approach. He seemed to agree actually (there's two owners in partnership, apparently I've hit on a sore point)

So tomorrow I can expect either to be bumped up to overseeing the expansion, or bumped down to toilet scrubbing or something. Or he'll just not remember, that'd be nice
>> No. 406381 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 5:38 am
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>>406380
Haha. Bump.
>> No. 406387 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 1:27 pm
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>>406380
Get on that shit mate, formalise it at work and see if you can take a leading role in it.
>> No. 406388 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 1:48 pm
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Witnessing the effects of software bloat at the moment. I bought a brand new desktop computer with Windows 10 on it, but I forgot to buy the current MS Office package for it as well, and couldn't find my old Office 2010 DVD, so I will have to make do with an old copy of Office 2002 for the time being.

Everything in Office 2002 runs lightning fast on my new computer. It barely takes three seconds for Word to fully launch. Whereas I remember that my old Office 2010 would take a considerable amount of time, up to ten seconds, to fully load on my old computer which I bought around 2011.
>> No. 406389 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 2:22 pm
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>>406388
Obviously it's the bloat. Your new computer definitely isn't faster than one from five years ago.
>> No. 406390 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 3:33 pm
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>>406389

But what have they really added to fucking word processing software to justify the extra horsepower requirement?
>> No. 406391 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 3:45 pm
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>>406390
https://support.office.com/en-us/article/What-s-new-in-Word-2010-4e27dcda-1deb-44cc-af0d-dd5a7f7d84bd

Now stop pretending to know better.
>> No. 406392 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 4:06 pm
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>>406391

The way I see it, they just added loads of fluff that isn't immediately necessary for the core functionality of writing letters, composing boring and confusing slides with PowerPoint, and punching a few numbers into a spreadsheet using Excel.

You can do all of that with Office 2002 just the same way.
>> No. 406393 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 4:14 pm
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>>406392
They didn't get rid of Office 2002, dickhead. If you think it suits your needs, good for you, keep using it. Other people don't and have upgraded. I honestly have no idea why some people have such difficulty with stuff like this.
>> No. 406394 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 4:16 pm
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>>406393

And I've got no idea why you're getting so hot under the collar about this.
>> No. 406395 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 4:22 pm
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>>406394
Nothing like a wordy little "u mad??" to show that you're a valuable and bright poster.
>> No. 406396 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 4:26 pm
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>>406395

U mad tho, innit bruvm7t?

ahem... is that better?
>> No. 406397 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 5:37 pm
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>>406392
But in the never versions they introduced lots of effects which make PowerPoint presentations even more tedious. How else can they keep PowerPoint Bingo vaguely interesting?
>> No. 406398 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 5:58 pm
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>>406397

As my old boss used to say... if you've got a truly compelling idea, all you need is one pen and one whiteboard's worth of space to show it. I will never forget the look of quiet derision on his face whenever some of my coworkers would bore him with expertly drawn and animated, yet quite vacuous PowerPoint presentations.

Most presentations people hold today are more about them showing they're a PowerPoint whiz than actually getting some sort of point across.

I had this one marketing lecture one semester at university. Held by this 30something marketing executive twat with a BMW M3 and designer suits... he would blow through two dozen PowerPoint slides in one lecture, and they had bits flying across the screen everywhere, and animated diagrams and the lot. But at the end of it, you always really felt totally beaten over the head, as if you really weren't able to get any kind of take-home from it. So a lot of us just stopped going.
>> No. 406399 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 6:28 pm
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Today I was on a PR course (as that's a bit of my job) about writing and stuff.

I expected it to be a course where they tell us to get down with the kids and use 'u' instead of 'you' or something on twitter and in press releases.

It was actually really fucking good, and I learnt a lot. Huh, who knew how powerful certain words could be in spinning your story?
>> No. 406400 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 7:13 pm
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>>406399

What are the best words then?
>> No. 406401 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 7:49 pm
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>>406400

Not him, but I've noticed an increase in the word "fuel" in advertising recently. I imagine the PR justification is to do with,

>"at the end of the day people lead such busy lives nowadays y'know... moving forward we should also make allusions to green, sustainable living... carbs y'know... they just don't have time y'know... God, I can't get that Bill Hicks' routine out of my head... now's a good time to capitalize on the nation's low mood... should I just throw myself out of the window now... it's important we make the individual feel important y'know... would nine floors do it... so let's get our message out there guys... are we all in agreement guys?"
>> No. 406402 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 8:02 pm
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>>406400

It completely depends on context, it was some really subtle shit. I am very impressed.

There's too much to reel off here and explain properly.


>>406401
What?
>> No. 406403 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 8:08 pm
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>>406400
Actually, fuck it, a quick and one on a basic level that doesn't need all the bullshittery.

They had a real problem with people flushing nasty shit down Virgin's Trains toilets. No matter how much they plastered DO NOT FLUSH XX AND XX DOWN THE TOILET' people still did it.


They then replaced all that with PLEASE DO NOT FLUSH XX AND YOUR EX'S SWEATER, BORKEN DREAMS, MEMORIES, YOUR MUM'S DODGY DINNERS' etc and they've noticed a huge decrease in people flushing undesirable shit and a knock on effect on complaints about their toilets.

People naturally skim over warnings like the first one because they subconsciously guess the kind of message, but reading the second makes them see some sort of humour to it, gets a bit of them thinking about the message more and taking it in a relaxed way instead of feeling like they're being lectured and not really giving a shit. It creates a bit of a bond with the company that makes it not seem too bad and serious and they tend to respect it more.

It blew my mind but there are lots and lots of subtle ways to to do this kind of thing.
>> No. 406404 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 8:20 pm
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>>406403

>It blew my mind but there are lots and lots of subtle ways to to do this kind of thing

Freakonomics popularised this sort of thing a decade ago, and these "ways" have been employed by companies and politicians for decades. If this is your business shouldn't you have already known the basics of behavioural economics?
>> No. 406405 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 8:55 pm
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>>406404

It's not my business, I bullshitted my way into a job and so I'm making it up as I go along.

Turns out there's a good bit of PR in it so I've just tried not to get fired, but getting put on courses like that really help me know what I'm actually meant to be doing.
>> No. 406406 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 9:00 pm
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>>406403
Thinking, Fast and Slow is a good book about all this - its the same idea behind the Behavioural Insights Team aka the Nudge Unit in government.
>> No. 406407 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 9:18 pm
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>>406406

Fuck, my books to read queue is slowly building up faster than I can cope.
>> No. 406408 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 9:46 pm
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>>406406

> the Behavioural Insights Team aka the Nudge Unit in government


The idea to say fuck freedom of choice, people must be brought to do whatever a government considers desirable individual and/or mass behaviour.

That's the concept in a nutshell. Few things are as antidemocratic as this.
>> No. 406410 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 9:56 pm
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>>406408
We fought a World War to win the freedom to live unhealthily and to overburden the health service and these conniving cunts want to wrestle it away from us.
>> No. 406411 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 10:08 pm
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>>406410

"Nudging" goes far beyond any kind of health campaigns.

TV ads that tell you to quit smoking still leave you with the freedom to either actually give up fags, or keep smoking until you die from it. Not even attempts to put the financial burden of smoking related illnesses on those who do the smoking are in fact really nudging per se. And I, personally, made the choice to quit smoking five years ago not because some government ad told me to, but because I realised all on my own what I was doing to myself, and that people in my parents' generation were actually beginning to die from decades of smoking, left, right and centre.

The problem is the attitude that is the basis of "nudging" the way its proponents understand it today. It's a kind of arrogance towards the free will of the people, and the idea that the government knows best and that the people just haven't realised it. It's a kind of "Yes, people might see it that way, but we believe our view is best, and so we're going to have to make people follow us by using underhanded methods that will fool them into believing that they themselves made those decisions of their own volition".

And that shows just a very egotistical disregard for the real opinion of the people.
>> No. 406412 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 10:47 pm
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>>406411
The notion that people know what's best for themselves better than the experts is utter nonsense, and part of how we've ended up in this mess in the first place.
>> No. 406413 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 10:54 pm
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>>406412

>The notion that people know what's best for themselves better than the experts is utter nonsense

You frighten me.
>> No. 406414 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 10:58 pm
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>>406413
OK lad, you go and attempt open heart surgery or a root canal on yourself, and see what happens. We don't need experts, right, byootiful British people know what's what.
>> No. 406415 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 11:07 pm
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>>406414

>OK lad, you go and attempt open heart surgery or a root canal on yourself, and see what happens.

Are you really that stupid?
>> No. 406416 Anonymous
3rd November 2016
Thursday 11:17 pm
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>>406408
You clearly haven't read or know much about it.
>> No. 406418 Anonymous
4th November 2016
Friday 2:03 am
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>>406411

That really isn't a fair characterisation.

Behavioural economics use the phrase "choice architecture" to describe the way we are presented with choices by businesses and other institutions. A very large body of research shows that people make decisions in quite irrational ways, not because they are irrational people, but because the modern world is exhaustingly complex and confusing. We fall back on heuristics, broad rules of thumb that usually get us to a reasonable solution but sometimes fail quite badly.

Choice architecture can be used for malevolent reasons, the most obvious example being Ryanair's booking process - they carefully design their choice architecture to trick you into paying for unnecessary extras. Groups like the Behavioural Insights Team can use choice architecture for good, to make positive and healthy choices easier and more convenient.

If you're sceptical, I strongly recommend reading the following report. It's a joint production between the Behavioural Insights Team and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation on poverty and decision-making. It suggests a lot of small, inexpensive interventions that could help millions of people to enjoy greater financial security and help their children to escape from the trap of intergenerational poverty.

http://38r8om2xjhhl25mw24492dir.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/JRF-FINAL-VERSION-24.10.pdf
>> No. 406420 Anonymous
4th November 2016
Friday 3:10 am
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfNqyjZcleI
>> No. 406422 Anonymous
4th November 2016
Friday 7:19 am
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>>406416

Brilliant retort m8
>> No. 406543 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 2:57 am
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None of you lads still up and watching TV to witness the election results?

For shame, .gs. For shame.
>> No. 406544 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 3:00 am
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>>406543
Of course we are!
>> No. 406545 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 3:04 am
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>>406544

Cheers mate.

Sitting here with some hot mead and watching the whole debacle unfold. You're welcome to join me.
>> No. 406546 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 3:10 am
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>>406545
I'm here too, feeling a bit light headed after holding my breath over Florida.
>> No. 406547 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 5:03 am
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I'm up, just because I've been playing some Unreal Tournament. I really should've been in bed hours ago.
>> No. 406548 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:20 am
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>>405839
Drinking leftist tears by the gallon. They're all on suicide watch now. It's beautiful. It's YUGE!

People sobbing on video, curling up into a ball to deny reality. It's wonderful. IT BURNS, DON'T IT, MOTHERFUCKER? HAHAHAHAHAHAHA
>> No. 406549 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:22 am
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Watch as they all claim they're going to Canada now. Not wonderful diverse Mexico though, for some reason...wonder why? ;)
>> No. 406550 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:28 am
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>>406549
Probably because Mexico's mostly in a state of chaos due to cartels whereas Canada isn't? What are you even trying to say m8?
>> No. 406551 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:32 am
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>>406548
>Drinking leftist tears by the gallon. They're all on suicide watch now. It's beautiful. It's YUGE!
In the words of Richard Hawley, "There's a river flowing, from my door, think I'll sail away".
The facebook grief is fucking hilarious mate, I think I'm going to be laughing for week non-stop.
>> No. 406552 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:38 am
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>>406550
Hmmm and I wonder why that is... ;)

>>406551
Watching a furious black woman on the BBC burst blood vessels earlier. The BBC and other lefty and globalist outlets are going to be downing pills and having shotguns in their mouths tonight or being restrained by loved ones and medical professionals.
>> No. 406553 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:41 am
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>>406552
You don't actually have any points, do you.
>> No. 406554 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:44 am
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Katy Perry is now the commander of a revolutionary front, apparently. Does she have a lot of military experience?
>> No. 406555 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:46 am
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>>406552

You're a living cliche. How does that feel?
>> No. 406556 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:53 am
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>>406555
Let me guess, we'll live in a better world once all of the evil whiteys are killed, right?
>> No. 406557 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:54 am
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>>406556
What?
>> No. 406558 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:56 am
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It's sad that people like this have to face dolphin rape today!

Get fucked hypocrites.
>> No. 406559 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 8:59 am
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>>406557
Let me explain things in terms a child (IE you) could understand.

White people have been tolerant since forever. Really fucking tolerant. And what do we get? We get called racist. Non fucking stop. We get called bigots, when we've done nothing wrong. We see statements about ALL white people where if you swapped out the word white for black, the poster would go to jail.

Fuck all of you cunts, we're not going to take it any more. Calling us (or anything) racist has NO EFFECT now. You're the boy who cried wolf.
>> No. 406560 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 9:03 am
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>>406559
Where do you live, m8? And/or where have you been? I'm white, and have traveled a lot and lived in various countries, yet that's not been my experience at all.
>> No. 406561 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 9:07 am
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>>406560
I live in a northern town with fuck loads of immigrant rape gang cases. That's where I live.
>> No. 406562 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 9:14 am
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>>406561
What's the town?
>> No. 406563 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 9:25 am
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>>406562
1 - Way to miss the fucking point.
2 - The fact that it could be any number of towns, doesn't this seem like a bit of a fucking problem?
3 - Nice try GCHQ.
>> No. 406564 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 11:28 am
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Just having a proper cannot, will not, be arsed sort of day. Clothes that aren't a duvet toga feel like a lead weight, tasks that aren't quietly tugging myself off are a absolute slog, people who aren't video game sprites a tedious bore. I cannot, and will not, be arsed.
>> No. 406565 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 12:51 pm
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Distributed my questionnaire for my dissertation sometime a few days ago. Need 30 or so people, so far have 4. No worries I won't post it here for a few good reasons but I'm miffed that only two of my facebook friends (out of 100) bothered and the other two are from call for participants. I've pretty much spammed it in panic.

Doesn't help dissertation deadline is in the beginning of December. I've got all the write up for the first half done and the second half all prepare for what equates to copy and paste in anticipation of the results.

Meanwhile said friend who did mine has his own questionnaire and he posted it on this large facebook group and got 200 responses in a day. I'm waiting to be accepted in the fb group so I can do that.

Plus I have a job interview next week that requires a presentation on my dissertation so it's all cutting it close.
>> No. 406566 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 1:03 pm
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>>406565

Honestly, I always wonder what's too top you just completely fudging it?

If you post it I'll do it though.
>> No. 406567 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 1:20 pm
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>>406565
I got my diss mark back last month. Failed, need to resubmit.
>> No. 406568 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 4:36 pm
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>>406565
What is the topic of it?
>> No. 406571 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 7:47 pm
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>>406566
absolutely nothing. You could easily fabricate results. But it's probably easier to actually get people to do it for you.

I'm not going to share it because I don't feel comfortable posting something that identifies me. I know this isn't the otherchan but seems a bit risky.
>>406568
Computer security, notably social engineering.

This is one of those projects where I actually like the subject and writing about it and reading about it fascinates me. In comparison to topics that bore me to tears.

>>406567
You the lad who had a matter of days to submit their dissertation?
>> No. 406572 Anonymous
9th November 2016
Wednesday 7:50 pm
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>>406571
Oh sage and all but I realise that my questionnaire has some sort of technical fault in that google buggered up their forms and I either receive data delayed or not at all.

On my end I can submit data and get instant response. Turns out other people don't give me an instant response. This is the sort of shite you can't know until you're deep into it so that's a piss take.
>> No. 406574 Anonymous
10th November 2016
Thursday 8:25 pm
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Just watched last night's Last Leg.

I would have expected a little more than cliché demonstrative indignation.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4kNOHJqfEE
>> No. 406575 Anonymous
10th November 2016
Thursday 8:30 pm
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I'm having a go at some Asian bird on a dating app because it said she liked comfortable silences and she messaged me. The ditz can't keep her stories straight.
>> No. 406576 Anonymous
10th November 2016
Thursday 8:35 pm
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>>406575

>The ditz can't keep her stories straight

Are you sure she's even Asian? Or a bird?
>> No. 406577 Anonymous
10th November 2016
Thursday 8:52 pm
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>>406576
I don't care. If she can't handle a comfortable silence then I don't want to talk to her.
>> No. 406590 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 7:53 am
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>>406574
> little more than cliché demonstrative indignation.

Well it is a comedy show so they have to have some of that in the show.

I thought the political insight provided by Richard Osman was really insightful.
>> No. 406591 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 11:31 am
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>>406574
i honestly hate everything about this show and the people in it. I still can't believe they picked Katie Hopkins over Saville for Worst Person of the Year because she 'fat shames'
>> No. 406592 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 11:43 am
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>>406548
she's pretty cute for a zombie
>> No. 406593 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 11:43 am
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>>406548
she's pretty cute for a zombie
>> No. 406594 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 1:39 pm
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>>406591
As awful as he is, I can't believe that anyone could genuinely suggest that Nige is somehow a worse person than Katie fucking Hopkins.
>> No. 406595 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 3:28 pm
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Hang on, hang on!

Since when was Clinton a left winger?
>> No. 406596 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 4:11 pm
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I heard this a minute ago and nearly cried. Time passes so quickly.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miZHa7ZC6Z0
>> No. 406599 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 5:02 pm
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>>406596

Not how I wanted to spend my time but fuck it. My god YouTube in a browser on a tablet is a bit shit.
>> No. 406600 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 5:35 pm
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>>406595
Since around March. Don't worry, she'll be back to her usual position before too long.
>> No. 406601 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 5:36 pm
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>>406599


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVeFEBCwXy0
>> No. 406602 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 5:40 pm
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How do into women, lads?
>> No. 406603 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 5:45 pm
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>>406601
what the fuck
>> No. 406604 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 5:47 pm
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>>406602
>>/emo/18262

Alternatively, someone please upload that picture of Ostrichlad's tutorial.
>> No. 406609 Anonymous
11th November 2016
Friday 9:55 pm
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>>406601

It's pretty amazing to think that a little over 20 years ago, that was considered average to good quality graphics.

Wonder what people will say about computer game graphics of today's video games in 20 years. I mean, they are now bordering on a kind of realism that is fast becoming indistinguishable from actual reality.

Yes, you can still tell that it's a computer game when you look at the current Womb Tomb Raider. But it is getting to a point where it's really not that far removed from photographic reality. The first Tomb Raider in 1996 was so blocky that there was simply no way you could have mistaken it for reality. But it seems we're edging ever further in that direction.
>> No. 406621 Anonymous
12th November 2016
Saturday 8:25 am
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>>406609
Apparently it's not realistic unless your hero is scratched and bloodied to fuck.
>> No. 406622 Anonymous
12th November 2016
Saturday 8:41 am
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>>406609

The thing about modern games that ruins the realism for me is that everything looks so smooth and shiny.
>> No. 406624 Anonymous
12th November 2016
Saturday 3:16 pm
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>>406622
Agreed. They need to litter the outdoor scenes with a few old trolleys, fridges, fag-ends and crisp packets everywhere.
>> No. 406626 Anonymous
12th November 2016
Saturday 4:17 pm
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>>406624

Who would want to play games that look like Birmingham?

I think the direction for the next 20 years into which video games are headed is that you will see them approach live action kind of asymptotically. Newer generations of computers with more processing power will mean the difference will become ever more slight. But it will probably take at least another few years after that before you can really say that a video game looks indistinguishable from reality.

Fun fact: When the first King Kong movie came out in the 1930s, moviegoers were shocked because they really believed that a 50-foot gorilla was actually climbing up the Empire State Building. By today's standards, those scenes in the film are amusingly crude stop motion that nobody would ever be fooled by. But I guess you can say audiences weren't as conditioned as they are today to spot such special effects. There's another famous example from the silent movie era where an audience was shown experimental film footage of a steam locomotive coming towards them. Apparently, some of them jumped up from their seats terrified because they actually thought they were about to be run over by that train.
>> No. 406629 Anonymous
12th November 2016
Saturday 5:23 pm
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>>406626

We're going to get a really big leap forward with foveated rendering. Your ability to see in high resolution comes from your fovea centralis, which only provides a field of view of about two degrees. Your macula provides about eight degrees of moderately high resolution sight, but the rest is very fuzzy peripheral vision.

If you can do eye tracking quickly enough, you only need to accurately render a tiny fraction of the screen to match that small slice of high-resolution eyesigh. The rest can be rendered at extremely low resolution, which saves a massive amount of GPU processing power.

Nobody really took the idea seriously until recently, because it requires extremely low latency in the rendering pipeline. VR turned out to be an enabling technology, because it also requires extremely low latency to prevent motion sickness. A small fortune has been poured into VR-related research over the last few years, so we get foveated rendering almost as a freebie.

On your second point, I urge you to try HTC Vive. There aren't many places in the UK with demo units, but it's worth the trip. The sense of reality is absolutely startling, and it doesn't go away. It's not about being able to look over your shoulder, it's about tricking your subconscious into thinking that you're not looking at a screen. I've been using VR since the DK1 came out in late 2012; I still get vertigo if I look over a steep cliff, I still flinch when something comes flying towards my head. The feeling of being there is extraordinarily strong.

I'm not normally prone to get caught up in technological hype. I'm a crusty old software developer who usually moans about all the bullshit fads that the wankers with silly haircuts are getting obsessed with. With that said, I sincerely believe that VR is the biggest step forward in technology since Berners-Lee invented HTML. I'm seriously considering betting my career on it.
>> No. 406632 Anonymous
12th November 2016
Saturday 7:38 pm
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>>406629

> With that said, I sincerely believe that VR is the biggest step forward in technology since Berners-Lee invented HTML. I'm seriously considering betting my career on it.


I don't know... virtual reality has been around since the early 90s, both as a concept and with actual software applications.

Back then, naturally computers lacked the kind of processing power that is necessary to create a virtual reality that is actually deserving of that name. But my point is that at the beginning of the 90s, VR was hailed as THE biggest thing in technology ever, and predictions were made that we would soon be immersed in a kind of nonstop virtual reality. If you look at films like Stephen King's Lawnmower Man or that one Aerosmith music video with Alicia Silverstone, then that was certainly how the foreseeable future was imagined by most people.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSmOvYzSeaQ

But technology didn't quite evolve into that direction. With the Internet becoming a mass phenomenon from 1995 onwards, it proved to be far bigger than the idea of sticking VR goggles on your head to display what was back then very crude graphics by today's standards.

My long-standing theory is that if "the Internet" hadn't happened the way it did, then maybe all the resources that went into the hype surrounding it would have been spent evolving the concept of virtual reality. Perhaps then nowadays, we really would have lifelike virtual reality. On the other hand, we would have millions of socially awkward shut-ins devoid of any contact to the outside world because then there also wouldn't be Internet forums and image boards today.

To go out on an argumentative limb, I think it was U2 who got it right in their prediction of the future in those days. Around the time of their "Zoo TV" phase in 1991-93, their idea was that the future would be one of 24-hour news and information and interactive access to it, and where we would be constantly surrounded, to the point of oversaturation, by digital audiovisual media of many different kinds.
>> No. 406637 Anonymous
12th November 2016
Saturday 8:59 pm
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>>406632

I'm not saying you're wrong or meaning to be an arsehole, but for some reason I find it quite funny that your main points of reference for that post seems to be music videos.
>> No. 406640 Anonymous
12th November 2016
Saturday 9:43 pm
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>>406637

My main point of reference wasn't one single music video by a then already aging mainstream rock band (and if you read my post attentively, I also referenced The Lawnmower Man). It was only meant to illustrate my overall point.

You probably weren't alive back then, younglad, or not old enough to witness contemporary pop culture, so you wouldn't know. But around 1993 to 94, in the tech and computer world, virtual reality was thought of as THE big thing of the new millennium. And as I said, in my opinion, "the Internet" beat VR to the punch.

That music video did not invent the idea of VR, but on the other hand, it also wasn't a vapid tech fantasy that simply parrotted the technological trends of its time. To me, it serves as nutshell proof of mainstream pop culture perceptions of the trends that were thought to be the immediate future back then. And pop culture perceptions, for all their overblown daftness, always have a grain of truth to them.

But you wouldn't know that, having grown up with Lady Gaga and Coldplay.
>> No. 406642 Anonymous
12th November 2016
Saturday 11:58 pm
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>>406632

I remember VR the first time around. I remember those godawful Virtuality headsets that gave you a migraine. Vive and Rift have about as much in common with those systems as an iPhone 7 does with a ZX Spectrum.

There's a really hard threshold with VR technology. Up until a certain point, it's just a nausea-inducing novelty. If you solve a dozen really difficult technical problems, something magical happens. Your subconscious just accepts the notion that you're inside the virtual world, rather than looking at something through a weird pair of goggles. It's not something that can be explained second-hand, you really have to experience it for yourself.
>> No. 406644 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 8:59 am
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>>406642
Well said. It's effectively chance that the rise of the web coincided with the VR boom/bust of the early/mid 90s. The technology was nowhere near capable of fulfilling the wildly optimistic role drummed up in the tech and gaming press at the time. VR was a problem that could not have been solved at the time, but plenty of companies sprang up out of nowhere to make a fast grab for as much venture capital as they could - and disappeared almost as fast when the dust settled and it became clear to all involved that the VR people expected was many, many years away.

A more nuanced argument could be that this debacle set back VR's reemergence, since investors would run a mile at the mere mention, but I suspect that the difference would be a couple of years at most. Several of the components that go into a modern VR headset are made possible by other, partly related developments elsewhere in tech. In addition to the latency/tracking issues mentioned by other posters, the most obvious benefit that today's VR headsets derive from another field are the displays, which are high-quality and affordable due to the incredible rate of technological development and economies of scale involved in the production of flat panel displays for smartphones.
>> No. 406645 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 9:13 am
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>>406640
Funny, most of the people I know who are into Gaga and Coldplay tend to be middle-aged.
>> No. 406646 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 10:22 am
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>>406644

>Several of the components that go into a modern VR headset are made possible by other, partly related developments elsewhere in tech.

Gaming GPUs are the obvious example. We're seeing huge advances in AI because of the immense power of relatively cheap GPU chips. The new self-driving Tesla cars are powered by a fairly ordinary Nvidia GPU; the massive parallelism of GPUs allows them to identify and track multiple objects in real time. People willing to spend £600 to play Crysis effectively bankrolled AI research.

The display thing is a bit of a happy accident. VR needs very low persistence displays - the pixels need to switch off very quickly, otherwise you get motion-sickness-inducing blur. The only suitable technology is OLED, because LCDs just can't darken fast enough. OLED technology has been around since the 1960s, but didn't really go anywhere until Samsung wanted brighter displays for their phones. If Samsung had decided to stick with LCD panels, then consumer VR would still be many years off.

It all speaks to the virtuous circle of technological development, I suppose. One industry spends a couple of billion on R&D, then every other industry gets access to some unimaginably sophisticated component at commodity prices. A clever engineer has a look in the Mouser catalogue, notices an interesting part and says to himself "hmm, I could do something cool with that".

Smartphone manufacturers start buying lots of accelerometer chips to sense when your phone is sideways. Nintendo notice that accelerometers have got cheap and design the Wii. The growing market for motion sensors leads to cheaper and more accurate accelerometers and gyros. Some hobbyist realises that you can now build an autopilot system for about £20, so we get quadrotor drones. Amazon see what the hobbyists are doing and realise that they could use the same technology to deliver stuff. You couldn't plan that kind of development in a million years.
>> No. 406647 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 11:51 am
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>>406642

During VR's first hype, I was in London once at a big video game arcade where they had kind of an experimental VR rig with which they wanted to gauge user response. So I tried on their kit and they showed me a 3D simulation. It was kind of pitiful. So I said to them, "So... this is what everybody is losing their shit about?". Noticing my sarcasm, they actually seemed a bit offended.

Back then, x486 processors were the industry standard, and Intel Pentium CPUs hadn't even been introduced. So you can imagine what the 3D visuals looked like. Not sure what type of processor that VR headset ran on, but what I saw through those goggles looked like a low-rent version of Doom.

That said, your suspension of disbelief does not hinge on hyperrealistic graphics. There have been experiments where people were asked to play a simple game of Pong, and their brains were scanned while they were playing. They found out that your brain can identify with a simple bar that you move up and down the screen just as much as with an ego shooter with the latest realistic hi-res graphics. Something about the same areas of your brain being stimulated. It might be that hyperrealistic 3D VR of our time makes it even easier to fool yourself that what you are seeing is actually happening. But your brain itself doesn't even need that.
>> No. 406649 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 12:13 pm
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>>406646

>The new self-driving Tesla cars are powered by a fairly ordinary Nvidia GPU

Until very recently, many cars' electronics were powered by nothing more than 8-bit chips. Atmel, for example, which is nowadays popular with Arduino users, provided a simple 8-bit RISC architecture with which a great many of functions in a car can be adequately controlled. Even an engine management system including its fuel map can be controlled by an 8-bit chip. Many cars used either Atmel clones or similar chips from other manufacturers.

But in the last five to seven years or so, new cars have become so complex that you usually find 32-bit or even 64-bit CPUs in them. Not only have engine management systems become more complex. If you take upmarket cars like BMW or Audi, then you often have interactive displays with which you can adjust anything from suspension hardness to automatic transmission shifting points at the touch of a button. All the electronics that that entails can no longer be implemented using 8-bit technology.

>Smartphone manufacturers start buying lots of accelerometer chips to sense when your phone is sideways. Nintendo notice that accelerometers have got cheap and design the Wii. The growing market for motion sensors leads to cheaper and more accurate accelerometers and gyros. Some hobbyist realises that you can now build an autopilot system for about £20, so we get quadrotor drones. Amazon see what the hobbyists are doing and realise that they could use the same technology to deliver stuff. You couldn't plan that kind of development in a million years.

There is indeed a lot of synergism between different tech industries. I think what also drives it is the simplicity with which those sensors can be tapped into and put to a wide range of alternative uses. Typically, they will give out their data via serial, SPI or I2C connection, and it's fairly simple to read that data and analyse it. Interfaces are all surprisingly standardised. So an accelerometer in your smartphone can be made to work just the same way as part of an Arduino circuit.
>> No. 406650 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 12:17 pm
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I lost my job and unfortunately am back at home.

My dad, the ever nice guy that he is, tried to make me feel better by explaining that he'd written his will so that the house will be split equally between me and my two siblings with the agreement that it cannot be sold unless all parties agree to it and are not living in it.

I appreciated the sentiment, that I'd always have a house to live in and a place to stay, but it just made me think of my parents dying and depressed me more.
>> No. 406651 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 12:17 pm
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I lost my job and unfortunately am back at home.

My dad, the ever nice guy that he is, tried to make me feel better by explaining that he'd written his will so that the house will be split equally between me and my two siblings with the agreement that it cannot be sold unless all parties agree to it and are not living in it.

I appreciated the sentiment, that I'd always have a house to live in and a place to stay, but it just made me think of my parents dying and depressed me more.
>> No. 406671 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 4:50 pm
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>>406646
Agreed - its a virtuous circle of development, in a large part driven by games.
>> No. 406672 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 5:38 pm
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>>406651
That's a recipe for disaster. Sorry, wills are best kept as simple as possible.
>> No. 406673 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 5:42 pm
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>>406672

I know these things get said often before money is involved but as siblings we're really, really close. Only one of them could spoil it as bait of a loose cannon who gets money and spends it and has no savings or anything so might just want the cash to burn through.

Regardless even if I was struggling for a place to live a third of our house is probably a pretty huge deposit still.

There's something ominously grim about discussing divvying up the loot for when my parents die too.
>> No. 406674 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 6:03 pm
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>>406673
>There's something ominously grim about discussing divvying up the loot for when my parents die too.

I have had such conversations with my parents, they're pretty blasé about it and to be honest I don't really care.

It's all very well saying you get on really well with your siblings but shit like that breaks people all the time, no matter how close. I don't want to sound morbid but I wouldn't advise it for the sake of your finances, living ability or relationship with siblings.

I really would keep it simple - let the executor sell it and divvy it up as appropriate. Hopefully by the time your dad kicks the bucket you'll be better sorted in terms of income and housing.
>> No. 406675 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 6:07 pm
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>>406674
Morbid is the wrong word here and I can't think of the right one. You know what I mean.
>> No. 406677 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 7:49 pm
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I don't think discussing this stuff is grim at all - in my family we had no such conversations and I had a hell of a time when they went.
>> No. 406678 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 7:55 pm
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>>406677
And yet, people hear all these stories about families being ripped down the middle and getting bankrupted trying to pay the lawyer's fees required to solve the issue of the inheritance and they still go on to make wills like that. Not that I'm saying your >>406673's parents are numpties; they're well-meaning numpties blinded by love and optimism, which are the two main crisis factors that led to them having had kids in the first place.

I so desperately wish I had any sort of family.
>> No. 406679 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 8:04 pm
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>>406678
>>406675

Is it really that open to legal problems if it explicitly states it can only be sold with the agreement of all parties? Not sure how that could be worked around.
>> No. 406683 Anonymous
13th November 2016
Sunday 10:19 pm
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>>406678
>I so desperately wish I had any sort of family.
Why? To inherit something? Or for somewhere to belong?
>> No. 406694 Anonymous
14th November 2016
Monday 1:05 am
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>>406646

>Smartphone manufacturers start buying lots of accelerometer chips to sense when your phone is sideways. Nintendo notice that accelerometers have got cheap and design the Wii. The growing market for motion sensors leads to cheaper and more accurate accelerometers and gyros. Some hobbyist realises that you can now build an autopilot system for about £20, so we get quadrotor drones. Amazon see what the hobbyists are doing and realise that they could use the same technology to deliver stuff. You couldn't plan that kind of development in a million years.

>You couldn't plan that kind of development in a million years.

>in a million years.

>million years.

Come now lad. I agree with the thrust of your point but yes, yes you bloody could.
>> No. 406697 Anonymous
14th November 2016
Monday 1:34 am
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>>406694
Then why are you being so bloody autistic about it?
>> No. 406709 Anonymous
14th November 2016
Monday 2:26 pm
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>>406694

It will be intriguing to see where technology will really be in a million years. If we survive that long as a species at all. Will we have become a galactic civilisation? Will the exponential rate continue at which we are developing our technologies?
>> No. 406729 Anonymous
16th November 2016
Wednesday 5:31 pm
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My brother's divorce got finalised today. So we're going to meet tonight in our favourite pub and celebrate.

I'm very happy for him that he is finally able to put this chapter of his life behind him. His now ex wife was just an all around conceited, mentally unstable princess. Thank God they didn't have kids together.
>> No. 406730 Anonymous
16th November 2016
Wednesday 7:40 pm
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>>406729
>Thank God they didn't have kids together.

Best touch wood on that.
>> No. 406731 Anonymous
16th November 2016
Wednesday 10:52 pm
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>>406730
Don't even have a stiffy mate.
>> No. 406732 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 11:40 am
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My family set up a whatsapp group and added me.

I use whatapp to talk to girls from tinder. So I've pretty much left that group sharpish.
>> No. 406733 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 12:22 pm
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>>406732

The setting up of whatsapp groups has become a real pandemic. It's fucking annoying for the most part. I'm in four different whatsapp groups. Two from work, one with my brothers and my dad, and one with my evening Spanish class. Plus a greater number of other whatsapp contatcs. And I don't see the benefit of any of them. I miss the old days when we were kids, before the Internet. You just had more time to yourself without all that newfangled nonsense.

What I find abhorrent is the way mums use smartphones to control their kids. My coworker's wife proudly showed me her app with which she can track their kids' GPS location with five-second accuracy. I'm fucking glad I was a kid in the 90s and not today. Mobile phones were low tech, clunky and expensive, and none of us kids had one.

If we allow this to continue, then one day it will be considered child endangerment to not track your kids via GPS.
>> No. 406734 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 1:13 pm
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>>406733

The kids are always going to win in the end. The smartarse little sods figured out how to spoof GPS location data about a week after Pokemon Go came out. If they can use proxies to access The Pirate Bay, they can certainly use them to evade the parental filters on the family broadband. The robot apocalypse will probably be started by a spotty teenager whose Minecraft server got a bit out of hand.
>> No. 406735 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 1:24 pm
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>>406734

I guess it's the equivalent of bribing my best friend's older brother to "cover for us".

We would frequently go play at a creek near a forest, just over half a mile from the neighbourhood where we grew up. That was forbidden, because as inept 10-year-olds just a day out of infancy, naturally there was a 100 percent chance we would fall into the creek and drown in ten inches of water. Or be snatched by evil forest spirits. So I would always tell my mum that I was at my friend's, and when my mum called there to check on us, we would tell my friend's older brother to tell her that we were either around their house somewhere or just down the street.

Our cover was blown one day though when my mum was driving to the supermarket and saw us at the creek.
>> No. 406736 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 1:32 pm
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>>406733

I've got Steam, YouTube and Vimeo (I'm not sure either) and bugger the rest. But I don't eat tuna and boycott Nestlé, so I'm already an oddball.
>> No. 406737 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 4:56 pm
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Top Gear comes out on Amazon tonight lads.
>> No. 406739 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 5:56 pm
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>>406737
tell 'em, Steve-Dave.

I might have watched pirated it, if it wasn't for the months and months of constant hype.
>> No. 406740 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 7:14 pm
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Dumb fucks in my local Co-op have reduced a load of Copella apple juice from £2.59 (available for £2.00 in non-ripoff shops) to 49p because they've misread the sell-by date as today when it's actually the 27th. Needless to say, I'm going to be drinking a lot of cloudy apple juice in the foreseeable future.
>> No. 406741 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 7:17 pm
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>>406740

Co-op is great at reducing stuff, unlike my local Tesco which tends to reduce stuff on its sell by date by a generous 10 pence.
>> No. 406742 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 8:53 pm
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Wow, really quite taken aback by how affected reading a few old texts from a friend I lost contact with in the depths of depression I was.

Pills and exercise only do so much I suppose.
>> No. 406743 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 8:56 pm
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I can't remember if I mentioned this in this thread or a weekend thread but I'm the lad with the online survey for my dissertation.

I'm starting to get panicky that I've not got my required number of participants and this damn thing is due fairly soon. Reckon it's ok if I post it here and deal with the consequences of letting you lot do it?
>> No. 406744 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 9:02 pm
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>>406743
Just make it up, when I was at uni one of my friends got a First even though the research for his dissertation was entirely fabricated.
>> No. 406746 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 9:44 pm
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>>406743
If your research is dependent on what Joe Public has to say then chances are you aren't doing a Real SubjectTM so I'd say fuck it, throw in a few dummy responses fed through an RNG and wave your hands about statistical noise in the data and p values a whole lot before making whatever point you were going to make anyway.
>> No. 406747 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 10:42 pm
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>>406743

I'm in a similar situation in that I need two actors for a music video but don't actually have any friends. It's depressing me now I've said it out loud.
>> No. 406748 Anonymous
17th November 2016
Thursday 11:22 pm
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>>406744>>406746
I'd rather not fabricate it. I am the master of bullshitting assignments but I would prefer I do this one legitimately. I could have fabricated it last week if I wanted.
>>406747
Have you looked at what your uni offers? Mine has a section on their blackboard where you can ask for participants. Two people should be a doddle.

If in doubt there's always craigslist. There's always some pervert who'd love to do that for free.
>> No. 406749 Anonymous
18th November 2016
Friday 12:06 am
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>>406748

I'm not even at uni yet, this is a level 3 college course. I had to fib about my GCSE's to get onto that.

Don't suppose there're any Mancunian dancers on .gs? I wouldn't be totally surprised to find out Bez posts here.
>> No. 406750 Anonymous
18th November 2016
Friday 12:40 am
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>>406749
Have you looked at Starnow?

I used to briefly look on there for extras jobs and I remember there being plenty of jobs that paid nothing so you could probably stick a listing on there.
>> No. 406751 Anonymous
18th November 2016
Friday 12:46 am
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>>406750
actually scratch that I remembered why I never used starnow. They require payment to accept jobs so that'll limit participants.

You could always ask around your college. Lecturers and heads of your department is probably best.
>> No. 406775 Anonymous
19th November 2016
Saturday 10:24 am
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IMG_1374.jpg
406775406775406775
'Morning, chaps. Spasticlad here again.

Quick update on my PIP claim: I got it! Bulky brown envelope arrived earlier this morning. Awarded enhanced rate care and standard mobility components. Very, very happy and so fucking relieved.

Have a wonderful weekend, lads.
>> No. 406800 Anonymous
20th November 2016
Sunday 12:40 am
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>>406775
Uh, shit. That image spiked my anxiety. I'll have to re-read my DLA papers about PIP to calm my nerves.
>> No. 406905 Anonymous
21st November 2016
Monday 9:29 pm
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My boss told me today that "things aren't looking good for us", and that he will have to let five, maybe six people go at the end of the year. He will tell the employees who will be affected by this in "private conversations" on Friday afternoon.

What a shit way to start the week. Around half of us are now in limbo because we fear we will be among those five or six people. I figure I will be told to leave, because I am single with no kids and no mortgage. I would imagine that that matters.

I like it better when you just learn out of the blue one day that you're being fired. Now we've got this hanging over our heads for the rest of the week, and it hasn't exactly boosted morale. One of my coworkers started crying because our boss told her last week that he would like it if she put a little more enthusiasm into her daily work, and she thinks that that doesn't bode well for her this Friday.
>> No. 406906 Anonymous
21st November 2016
Monday 9:34 pm
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>>406905

Eh, this week is my last week after being let go last month and I'm similar to you, young with no kids and no mortgage.

kind of gripes with me because they're keeping a load of people that do nothing and take the piss.

It really fucking sucks, I haven't been able to find another job as of yet so I'm back to mum and dad's and for some reason I feel embarrassed.
>> No. 406907 Anonymous
21st November 2016
Monday 9:57 pm
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>>406906

>kind of gripes with me because they're keeping a load of people that do nothing and take the piss.

To tell you the honest truth, for two or three of my coworkers, it would be for their own good if they got the boot, so they would finally wake up from their own apathy and be forced to fend for themselves again instead of always being dragged along by the other people in our section who actually do all the work.

I am almost embarrassed to admit it, but my coworker who started crying today is one of those people. She's good fun and a nice and caring person, but she just doesn't pull her own weight. She always needs people to push her. I'd go have an after work drink with her any day possibly shag her as well, but she can be very frustrating to work with because everything she does always takes forever and is then often filled with little errors and minor oversights. Numbers will be in the wrong column, arrows in PowerPoint presentations will point the wrong way or not be there at all. Small stuff, but it adds up and will give you an overall impression of slipshod workmanship.
>> No. 406911 Anonymous
21st November 2016
Monday 10:47 pm
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>>406905
Your boss isn't very experienced at this sort of thing, which makes it worse. You're quite right that its the lesser of two evils to simply do it, rather than talking about doing it and shitting everyone up.

I've had to let a lot of people go in my current job - planning, thinking about, then doing it is the absolute worst thing I ever get to do, its actually quite similar to dumping a partner.
>> No. 406914 Anonymous
21st November 2016
Monday 10:51 pm
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Here we go again, with the office drones pretending their spreadsheets and powerpoints actually fucking matter. Christ.

They should make it illegal to fire people before Christmas though, that's just unbelievably harsh. Almost as bad as when you get taken on by a company in the lead up to Christmas and then they try to use the festive atmosphere and team meal to hook and brainwash you with The Company Values more effectively.

Work is awful lads and the sooner we are rid of it the better. The word "work" itself, it denotes something that must be impressed upon you. It should be a breach of human rights. One day we'll have the robots, lads, the fucking robots.
>> No. 406922 Anonymous
21st November 2016
Monday 11:28 pm
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>>406911

>I've had to let a lot of people go in my current job - planning, thinking about, then doing it is the absolute worst thing I ever get to do, its actually quite similar to dumping a partner.

I've been on the receiving end a good number of times, and it does feel that way. At my last job, my boss was quite polite and told me that if it was up to him, he would have kept me. But several major projects had ended and we were struggling to pull in new projects of similar magnitude to keep people busy and, effectively, employed. But he told me I could count on him for a "stellar reference" to any future employer. Which kind of begged the question why they let me go in the first place if I was that good. But we parted on good terms, he kept his word, and four months later I was doing the same kind of work again at a different firm for more money.
>> No. 406925 Anonymous
22nd November 2016
Tuesday 12:36 am
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>>406922
Yes, there is a way of making someone redundant without actually formally doing it, particularly if they've been at the company for less than two years. The usual reason is that money/budget is tight and so in that situation you need to cull anyone that isn't absolutely perfect and motoring. Most people will resign / sign something that says they have, particularly if you give them a couple of months money (as I always argue strongly for). It's the right thing to do by the person, and for the company it negates the risk that they're going to go legal and take you to a tribunal.

Unless they've actually punched someone or nicked the photocopier, I too always give extremely good references, just because doing anything other than that is a cunty thing to do, even if they were a cunt. It's rare that they don't find a similar job for more money, just as you suggest.

It's a horrible situation for both to be put in (as a boss you tend to get told to do these things) and I've also let people go I liked and wanted to keep.

The modern world of work is weird.
>> No. 406931 Anonymous
22nd November 2016
Tuesday 2:34 am
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I've had a really weird day off. I woke up at 3pm but have still managed to order three takeaways, and have two wanks. I also got my tongue stuck on an ice cube.

I've also watched a lot of people on youtube doing things like tasting ration packs or taking apart household electronics. I also asked my Amazon Echo the best way to kill myself. It gave me the number for the Samaritans.
>> No. 406934 Anonymous
22nd November 2016
Tuesday 9:48 am
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>>406931

Ask it the best way to pay warehouse workers a decent wage, tin can, Nazi, fuck.
>> No. 406935 Anonymous
22nd November 2016
Tuesday 9:56 am
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>>406934
No. I am up my own arse and I need attention and the world to cater to me and me alone.

I'm going to kill myself if you carry this on, and don't give me the number to the Samaritans.
>> No. 406940 Anonymous
22nd November 2016
Tuesday 11:38 am
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Fella sat by me on the train looks pure like Richard Lewis (Larry David's mate).
>> No. 406941 Anonymous
22nd November 2016
Tuesday 11:42 am
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>>406935

Besides using the ambient sounds of your home to better target ads, what does an "Echo" even do?

Even the name sounds like a pastiche.
>> No. 406942 Anonymous
22nd November 2016
Tuesday 11:48 am
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>>406941
You can also tell it to buy stuff for you.
>> No. 406945 Anonymous
22nd November 2016
Tuesday 4:11 pm
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>>406940
Did he also wear comically over-sized clothing and converse shoes?

wiseguy
>> No. 406947 Anonymous
22nd November 2016
Tuesday 5:38 pm
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>>406935

>I'm going to kill myself

I'd just like to heartily recommend that you do so.

You're the kind of person who owns an Echo. While I'd be happy to base my decision on that alone, I actually don't need to think of a second part to this sentence.
>> No. 406949 Anonymous
22nd November 2016
Tuesday 9:09 pm
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>>406941
At the moment, not much. Echo is a platform that makes possible a very large number of cloud-based voice microservices, and Amazon is very keen for developers to add their own services to this framework, but it will take time.

Think of literally anything you use technology for daily that could be automated by simple voice commands - remind me what I have on tomorrow, book a table at Prezzo for tonight, order a large domino's to home, add washing up liquid to this week's shopping list etc. etc.

Voice controls haven't really caught on until now because a) they've not been very intelligent in understanding sentences beyond very simple commands and b) people generally don't like talking to their smartphone in public. Cloud computing and machine learning solves a), whilst making Echo a standalone device that stays in your home avoids b).
>> No. 406950 Anonymous
23rd November 2016
Wednesday 12:24 am
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>>406949
Everyone I know who has one thinks its revolutionary - not sure myself. The technology behind it (based on a company called Evi based in Cambridge, who Amazon bought about 4 years ago) is very clever.

I don't like the idea of Jeff listening to everything myself.
>> No. 406962 Anonymous
23rd November 2016
Wednesday 2:20 am
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>>406950

I'd hardly call it revolutionary, but it's pretty useful, even in this early stage. It feels incredibly natural to just ask out loud for a reminder to be set or a light to be dimmed. I use it a lot more than I thought I would.

Once it works nicely with google calendar and such it'll be a great little PA.

As for it farming all my secrets, I've been using Amazon since 2003 and average 350 orders a year - there's not much else they can learn about me at this point.
>> No. 406966 Anonymous
23rd November 2016
Wednesday 1:13 pm
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People love the Echo because they are Happy Little Consumerists, basically.
>> No. 406967 Anonymous
23rd November 2016
Wednesday 5:42 pm
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>>406966
What kind of idiot would PAY for a device that has an always on microphone and sends the audio to remote servers, not even as a hidden service but as a feature?

Fucking idiots. Or, reputation management scum who are posting everywhere on the internet about how "great" the echo is. End your life, cunts.
>> No. 406968 Anonymous
23rd November 2016
Wednesday 5:46 pm
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>>406967

What about the Xbox Kinect?

Oh, wait, nobody actually bought those.
>> No. 407005 Anonymous
25th November 2016
Friday 2:11 am
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>>406967

It's a bit daft how angry people get when other people buy an Echo, or an iPad or a curvy TV or whatever.

If I want Bezos to hear my fap noises I'm bloody well entitled to make that happen.
>> No. 407007 Anonymous
25th November 2016
Friday 2:24 am
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Drinking
>> No. 407015 Anonymous
25th November 2016
Friday 6:22 am
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Had my ex over for a three day fucking and crying extravaganza. It's so fucking shit when you still love someone but you know you can't be with them.
>> No. 407018 Anonymous
25th November 2016
Friday 10:54 am
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>>407005

I don't get angry about those other things though. Just the Echo. Specifically.

Mostly because it's Amazon, and then the remainder because of the snoopology.
>> No. 407019 Anonymous
25th November 2016
Friday 11:11 am
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>>40701
What did poor little old Amazon ever do to you?
>> No. 407020 Anonymous
25th November 2016
Friday 11:57 am
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>>406931
Your life sounds like a sitcom skit
>> No. 407026 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 12:28 pm
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Still getting used to being a Dad. The poor washing machine does not know what has hit it. The binman almost threw a fit about having to actually move a full bin.
>> No. 407028 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 12:56 pm
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>>407026
How's the complete lack of sleep going for ya, NewDadLad? I hope you have fond memories of getting a solid 8 hours of rest cause that's all they're gonna be for the next 4-8 years, just fond memories.
>> No. 407029 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 1:37 pm
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>>407028
>How's the complete lack of sleep going for ya, NewDadLad?

My youngest daughter is 11 months old. She never woke me up in the night until we moved her into her own room because her mum could sense when she was starting to whimper and would latch her on to her tit.

My favourite method of trolling new dads is to show them the price of baby and toddler shoes from Clark's, because lots of mothers insist on shoes only from there so they'll fit properly.
>> No. 407030 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 2:21 pm
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>>407029
Why the fuck does a baby need shoes?
>> No. 407032 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 3:10 pm
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>>407030

Tap dancing.
>> No. 407033 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 3:15 pm
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>>407030

Lad.
>> No. 407035 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 3:20 pm
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>>407030
Because women, lad. Women. For the bargain price of £32 you can get some Clarks baby shoes. If it's a baby girl then you can be forking out over £40 for cute baby boots.

http://www.clarks.co.uk/p/26119011

You're in for a shock when you have a kid.
>> No. 407041 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 5:25 pm
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>>407035

Might get an early vasectomy and blame it on a heroic climbing accident.
>> No. 407051 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 6:55 pm
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>>407035
Wow. My shoes are cheaper than that. A bunch of babies are out there, who can't walk, who are wearing shoes better and more expensive than what I wear. Am I that much of a failure? What am I living for? What is the point of all of this? I'm so tired. It will be 2017 soon, and it will be Monday even sooner. Why do I even do this?
>> No. 407052 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 7:31 pm
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>>407041

Ice axe in the nads?
>> No. 407053 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 7:35 pm
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>>407035

Make the woman pay for said shoes (which will be too small 6 weeks later) if she wants them.
>> No. 407055 Anonymous
26th November 2016
Saturday 7:40 pm
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>>407053
But it's the man's place to provide financially.
>> No. 407062 Anonymous
27th November 2016
Sunday 1:26 am
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>>407055

>But it's the man's place to provide financially.

It's amazing how 50 years of emancipation have left that particular tenet nearly untouched.
>> No. 407063 Anonymous
27th November 2016
Sunday 1:34 am
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>But it's the man's place to provide financially.

Have you been brainwashed by neofisherpersons lad
>> No. 407065 Anonymous
27th November 2016
Sunday 1:47 am
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>>407063

I am starting to be confused.
>> No. 407068 Anonymous
27th November 2016
Sunday 2:08 am
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>>407065


It's ok we just need to do a verification

If you post your name, address, date of birth and full bank details, our credited IT experts will have your problem resolved as soon as possible.
>> No. 407071 Anonymous
27th November 2016
Sunday 9:12 am
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>>407055
When you're in a relationship what's yours is hers and what's hers is hers.
>> No. 407072 Anonymous
27th November 2016
Sunday 1:36 pm
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>>407071


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8NnE5z9L_o

(from about 1:00 in)
>> No. 407073 Anonymous
27th November 2016
Sunday 2:02 pm
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>>407071
Also, no means no and yes means no.
>> No. 407099 Anonymous
30th November 2016
Wednesday 8:09 pm
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Less than 4 hours until we can all enjoy Gotta Be Andrew, lads.
>> No. 407102 Anonymous
30th November 2016
Wednesday 10:21 pm
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Completed a dissertation. It's my second one. My first one I did in 3 weeks because I'm not clever. I did this second one over the course of 5 months. I still feel exhausted like I did the first one. If anything this one cause significantly more stress even though I spaced it al out and did less work per day compared to the first. Not to mention I actually enjoyed the subject of the second one while the first one was awful.

Now to look for jobs and realise there aren't any.
>> No. 407106 Anonymous
1st December 2016
Thursday 1:03 pm
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>>407102
The bad news is that you've missed the Christmas casual rush.
>> No. 407231 Anonymous
5th December 2016
Monday 10:27 pm
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I'm mad for Turkish Delight, lads. And for some reason my brain doesn't think it's sweets. Obviously it is sweets, but it's unusual taste and texture mean that I don't really register it as such.
>> No. 407234 Anonymous
6th December 2016
Tuesday 1:24 am
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>>407106
A career job, mind you. Done enough odd jobs to pay for my rent and I need a full time job to go with the degree now.

Should hear the results of a job interview from a few weeks ago. They said they'd tell me 3 weeks after the interview even if I was unsuccessful. I'm not holding onto hope that they'd do that because I've had a job interview prior that said the same thing and I didn't get a call or an email. I didn't really bother to remind them because it turned out to not be something I'd like. I'll probably return to firing off the CVs as the same rate I used to in the next few days if I don't hear anything/was unsuccessful.

Probably should figure out what to do in my free time apart from play video games and wank. A lot of jobs in my area want programming so I'll have to revisit the fundamentals of that. I do want to avoid jobs with programming. I see it too much as a hobby and it bores the shit out of me in a work setting.
>> No. 407235 Anonymous
6th December 2016
Tuesday 2:01 am
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>>407234
I have some bad news for you...
>> No. 407237 Anonymous
6th December 2016
Tuesday 11:49 am
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>>407231
I can't deal with Turkish Delight, it literally smells, feels and tastes like soap.
>> No. 407238 Anonymous
6th December 2016
Tuesday 2:21 pm
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>>407235
Well I got an unsuccessful email this morning. Are you happy now, you bastard?

Joking aside it's time to start firing off those CVs. It's promising that I'm getting multiple interviews so I must be doing something right prior to fucking up during the interview.
>> No. 407240 Anonymous
6th December 2016
Tuesday 2:52 pm
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>>407238
You are not lying enough.
>> No. 407243 Anonymous
6th December 2016
Tuesday 4:42 pm
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>>407234

> Well I got an unsuccessful email this morning. Are you happy now, you bastard?

That's actually pretty decent; in my experience most places just disappear on unsuccessful applicants like lasses well out of your league do when they wake up sober the next morning.

Personally I always try to follow up an unsuccessful interview with a short, but personalized, email giving suggestions on how the candidate might improve and/or areas to strengthen etc. Obviously I can only do this because I have a small company with a high retention rate and probably only do a handful of interviews in any given year (although one year I did an absolute ton, and every candidate was wank).

>>407238

> A lot of jobs in my area want programming so I'll have to revisit the fundamentals of that. I do want to avoid jobs with programming. I see it too much as a hobby and it bores the shit out of me in a work setting.

Now I'm interested in what is is you do / want to do. I'm guessing something science or maths heavy with programming used for solving equations or modeling systems. Am I close?
>> No. 407245 Anonymous
6th December 2016
Tuesday 10:12 pm
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>>407240
Experience has taught me lying on my application goes poorly during the interview stage as it's a little more difficult to lie on the spot. Though I do live by the creed of "if you can't dazzle them with your brilliance, baffle them with your bullshit"
>>407243
Yes it's lovely getting confirmation and I respect an organisation more if they make the effort to do that. Even more so when they provide feedback but I accept that it's not possible in most cases.

I did systems security at uni and what I was taught is light on programming. It's certainly helpful in some aspects but you can get away with not knowing a single thing about it. The closest to programming that needs to be known is SQL (and other query languages), Linux commands and some html. All of which are not programming. Programming doesn't really come into it unless you want to work devops or want to show off to an employer employing protesters that you can make your own customised python software in specific situations. An example might be a way to crack a cipher quickly or an automated application that runs a set of tools.

I've had maybe half a dozen interviews in a short period of time so there's certainly interest. I just seem to tumble at the interview stage. My feedback is usually the same. I get curve balled at basic technical questions where I go blank. I can tell you the formula to solve a RSA cipher and who created it on a whim but not what the seven stages of the OSI model without having to Google it.
>> No. 407246 Anonymous
6th December 2016
Tuesday 10:33 pm
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>>407245
>Protesters
Penetration testers*

Positive feedback I get usually consists of being passionate, talkative in a good way and being knowledgeable in focused area which in itself is a double edged sword as I'll neglect researching other subjects in preparation for an interview.
>> No. 407247 Anonymous
6th December 2016
Tuesday 11:09 pm
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>>407246
Translation:
>being knowledgeable in focused area
Not enough broader knowledge.
>talkative in a good way
Would not shut up.
>passionate
Well at least you tried.
>> No. 407256 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 5:23 pm
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>>407243

>in my experience most places just disappear on unsuccessful applicants

It depends. The latest in HR staffing philosophy seems to be to let people off easy and reply kindly to unssuccessful applications. The idea behind that being that unless you're a complete git, there is a chance that you will be hired by another company in the same industry in due time, and that therefore it can't hurt if you've got no hard feelings against their company.
>> No. 407257 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 5:51 pm
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>>407245

>Experience has taught me lying on my application goes poorly during the interview stage as it's a little more difficult to lie on the spot. Though I do live by the creed of "if you can't dazzle them with your brilliance, baffle them with your bullshit"


There's a thin line between advertising yourself and embellishing a few things here and there, and flat out lying.

And I would never lie in writing on an application. Interviewers will fact check on you before you are even going there for an interview. One of my coworkers left us and then applied for a new job at another company, and one of their HR people then called my boss one day to check if the information on the CV was really accurate. In this case, it checked out and my boss could confirm everything. Just saying, if you absolutely feel you must lie, it's better to do so in person during an interview. An interviewer will see up to eight or ten other applicants that day, so they might even forget the lie that you told them.

But in the end, it will always come back to bite you. If you will only have a chance at a particular job by lying about yourself, about your skills and/or your experience, then it's somewhat likely that you're not the right person for it to begin with. And that will show at some point during your daily work routine, unless you can cope with a steep learning curve and having to keep faking it.
>> No. 407258 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 7:09 pm
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>>407257
>And that will show at some point during your daily work routine
Who really cares by this point?
>> No. 407259 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 7:10 pm
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I think the main problem with sitting am interview is that the interviewer seems to want you to have lived your life so far with a positive attitude, having contributed your utmost to your work because you live in a world where everything isn't shit, work isn't awful, and anything you do with your day matters.

Sitting an interview seems to be a struggle to not reveal that everyone is basically incompetent, yourself included. Of course you'll do or say anything to get this job that you know you'll hate; it's all you can do to mean you're contempt for the interviewer that they don't start to know this.
>> No. 407260 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 7:10 pm
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>>407258
The people paying you.
>> No. 407261 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 7:24 pm
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>>407260
For a long time I've said that we need to stop doing silly dances and hire people properly. Competency based questions are hard to bullshit. If you're asked to describe an experience you don't have, it'll become fairly obvious to the interviewer that something isn't right, and it almost certainly won't stand up to any followup questions.
>> No. 407262 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 7:24 pm
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>>407260
Exactly - they'll fucking fire you.
>> No. 407263 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 7:35 pm
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>>407262
Or, even worse, keep you on.
>> No. 407264 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 8:08 pm
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>>407262

I think they can even ask back some or all of the salary they paid you during your time there. If they can prove that you lying to them was vital to them hiring you over other applicants.
>> No. 407265 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 8:45 pm
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>> No. 407266 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 8:49 pm
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>>407265

Elaborate.
>> No. 407267 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 9:14 pm
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Impulse bought some Tête de Moine from Lidl. Apparently spending £6 on a wheel of cheese was enough to get raised eyebrows from the checkout man.
>> No. 407268 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 9:16 pm
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>>407267

That's some real high brow shit right there ladm8.
>> No. 407269 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 9:36 pm
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>>407268

Lidl have highbrow stuff now and then.

Last year, the lidl here where I live had a limited time offer of a whole leg of Serrano bacon for 40 quid.

Not sure who they were aiming at with that though. The typical Lidl shopper doesn't strike me as somebody who would buy their bacon by the leg, let alone that they would appreciate Serrano.
>> No. 407270 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 9:37 pm
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>>407267

Was that all you were buying? Just buying loads of cheese is a bit odd.
>> No. 407271 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 10:04 pm
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>>407270

Maybe it was the three foot long mouse trap he bought with it.
>> No. 407273 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 10:11 pm
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>>407267
£6??

Fuck me, usually it's like 30 euro.

Lidl varies from area to area. I used live on the border of a council estate and the Lidl was awful. The cashiers had tattooed necks with their kids names and fake nails. I remember a fight broke out because the queues got so long. Best day was when there was a giant shit smear across the aisle - someone rolled into a turd with a trolley and travelled across the shop with it stuck in the wheel. No one bothered cleaning it.

Later I've had the chance to go to a Lidl in a decent area and it was like night and day.
>> No. 407274 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 10:24 pm
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>>407270
The only other thing I bought was a chocolate cake.

>>407273
I've had a look online and it'd have been a tenner from Waitrose and about twice as much from online retailers. Comes with its own curler, too.
>> No. 407275 Anonymous
7th December 2016
Wednesday 11:02 pm
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Just made a bread starter for a wheat and rye bread that I will bake tomorrow night.

I've taken up baking my own bread as a hobby, and this one is my first experiment with a starter that will have had nearly a day to ferment.
>> No. 407276 Anonymous
8th December 2016
Thursday 12:55 am
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>>407266
I typed up a long post and then I tried to submit/post. This broken website came up with an error about not being able to post without an image. I uploaded an image without opening it, and then turns out that my long post disappeared.
>> No. 407337 Anonymous
12th December 2016
Monday 10:04 pm
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Just watched Time Commanders on BBC Four. Of all the TV shows from the 00s to revive, this is a bit of a funny one to choose.
>> No. 407338 Anonymous
12th December 2016
Monday 11:10 pm
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>>407337

BBC Four innit. Only Connect got poached by BBC Two, so they've gone for something properly nerdy that they can keep for themselves.

They've also made it impossible to wank over by letting Greg Wallace host.
>> No. 407351 Anonymous
13th December 2016
Tuesday 3:32 pm
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Applying to jobs, informal phone interviews and juggling Christmas and making plans for NYE is fun.

I kind of want to win the lottery because all my problems seem to stem from lack of money.
>> No. 407357 Anonymous
13th December 2016
Tuesday 6:08 pm
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>>407275
Are you adding yeast, or trying to make a sourdough starter?

If it's the latter, it really needs a couple of weeks to get going properly.
>> No. 407366 Anonymous
14th December 2016
Wednesday 1:32 pm
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>>407357

It was a wheat bread with about ten percent rye flour. A bit of rye in a wheat dough will make your bread a bit more rustic.

It wasn't really a sourdough. For the starter, I mixed two parts of wheat flour with one part of rye flour, and then added a bit of yeast and about a teaspoon of sour cream (to introduce lactic acid bacteria). I then let the whole thing ferment for two days, after which the starter had quite a bit of flavour. Then I kneaded a fresh wheat dough with yeast, salt, sugar and sour cream and added the starter to it, and let everything ferment for another four hours.

It really produced a very tasty bread.
>> No. 407367 Anonymous
14th December 2016
Wednesday 5:06 pm
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>>407337
They've done it better this time by having two human teams compete against each other.

The roleplaying from the poshos was fucking fantastic.

"Why aren't you attacking?"
"Because I will be the one writing the letters to the poor mothers of those sons of Rome lost on the battlefield."
"You've been killed!"
"I am in Elysium now, it is up to my men to avenge me".

Real wargamers.
>> No. 407373 Anonymous
15th December 2016
Thursday 3:38 pm
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Hi!
>> No. 407374 Anonymous
15th December 2016
Thursday 4:14 pm
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>>407373

Have we met?
>> No. 407376 Anonymous
15th December 2016
Thursday 10:31 pm
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I went to the doctor because I have a mole that has been really sore for months and has started to grow and look funny.

She immeditaely said I needed a quick hospital appointment and they rang me literally the same day to tell me I've got one before the end of the months.

The speed with which the doctor referred me to the hospital and the speed with which they got me an appointment was too impressive. I'm guessing that means I'm fucked, so, well, that's really put a dampener on Christmas and my life.
>> No. 407377 Anonymous
15th December 2016
Thursday 10:32 pm
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>>407376

Bollocks, didn't even manage to post this in the thread for minor rants and piss offs. It's a really downward spiral.
>> No. 407378 Anonymous
15th December 2016
Thursday 10:41 pm
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>>407377
It doesn't mean you're fucked, it just means you have a thing that has a high likelihood of being fucked. Chances are you're fine, it's just a thing they're keeping an eye on. Be glad it was caught before the NHS has been privatised.
>> No. 407380 Anonymous
16th December 2016
Friday 3:20 am
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>>407378

This. As someone with three currently benign skin tumours I can attest to the fact that the NHS moves like greased lightening when there is even the possibility of skin cancer. Odds are you are fine but will have to take a bit more precaution under then sun and keep an eye on them.

If it helps you sleep sounder I was diagnosed 6 years ago and they have stayed static since appearing. Long sleeves and learning how to actually use sunscreen - these are not exactly life changing challenges.

As I say mate, you are likley fine, and if not they'll nip the fucker out fast.
>> No. 407381 Anonymous
16th December 2016
Friday 3:23 am
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>>407376
I had a mole that had started to bleed and looked misshapen a few months ago. After going GP they sent me a referral to a hospital within a couple of weeks. Was fairly worrying they did it this quickly. They do it quickly because a GP has no real way of telling if it's going to kill you without tissue sample analysis which can take a month. A month could be the difference between the cancer spreading to the rest of your body.

The procedure is pretty simple. You go to a dermatologist. They'll examine it and then they slice it off, cauterise the wound and in about two weeks it's fully healed if you follow their instruction so the wound doesn't get infected. I had learned that the mole that from the sample that they took as a souvenir was not harmful to me roughly a month after the operation was done.

It isn't anything to worry about. You're likely to be ok. It's the NHS's interest to spend a pittance of whatever it costs to remove possibly cancerous moles rather than spending 5ish years of cancer treatments for one person. Them acting quickly ensures the cheapest option.
>> No. 407383 Anonymous
16th December 2016
Friday 4:20 pm
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Suspicious moles get acted on very very quickly in the NHS because they're easy to see.
On the other hand there are plenty of other cancers with much less obvious symptoms which get routinely dismissed by doctors as nothing.
>> No. 407384 Anonymous
16th December 2016
Friday 4:33 pm
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I had a thing on my lip which looked sort of like an embedded blackhead except it was horizontally longer, hurt like fuck if I picked at it. It was there for months. Anyway one day it just fell off. Skin is weird.
>> No. 407385 Anonymous
16th December 2016
Friday 4:56 pm
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Thanks for all the resassurance lads, very kind of you all, didn't realise how common skin that may potentially kill you was.

I never even considered it until it started hurting.

Even if it isn't canceorus do you think they'll cut it off for me? It hurts like fuck.
>> No. 407386 Anonymous
16th December 2016
Friday 5:17 pm
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>>407385
>Even if it isn't canceorus do you think they'll cut it off for me? It hurts like fuck.

They tend to cut the whole thing out there and then, then do the biopsy afterwards.

If they don't cut it off and the result of the biopsy is that it is benign, then you need to mention some keywords like "bleeding" or "very painful". If you don't say this, they put a tick in a box that says "cosmetic" and refuse to remove it.
>> No. 407399 Anonymous
17th December 2016
Saturday 1:58 am
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>>407385
Once the operation is done the pain is gone. The wound itself doesn't hurt either. The most you'll feel is the bandage being pressed on it. You'll have a very unnoticeable scar. Mine just has a slightly different colour skin pigment. The only issue is the hair from the mole. I now have a slightly longer hair protruding from the area where the mole used to be compared to the rest of the hair in that area. I thought the cauterisation would burn it completely off but nope. But it's a pretty damn low price for ensuring the mole isn't cancerous.
>> No. 407409 Anonymous
17th December 2016
Saturday 11:51 pm
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I have a mole on my chest that I'm not sure if it's a third nipple.
>> No. 407412 Anonymous
18th December 2016
Sunday 12:13 am
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>>407409
It is definitely cancer. Cut all your nipples off. Better safe than sorry.
>> No. 407414 Anonymous
18th December 2016
Sunday 2:37 am
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>>407409

Get hold of a gun made of gold and make a secret nuclear submarine base on the moon. You'll die but will be immortalised on ITV 1PM Christmas day for the next 20 years. Probably.
>> No. 407417 Anonymous
18th December 2016
Sunday 1:04 pm
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>>407414

>a secret nuclear submarine base on the moon.

Strange, I don't remember that bit.
>> No. 407422 Anonymous
18th December 2016
Sunday 9:07 pm
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>>407409

Whereabouts on your chest? If it's above your actual nipples it's probably just a mole.

>The nipples appear along the two vertical "milk lines," which start in the armpit on each side, run down through the typical nipples and end at the groin.
>> No. 407425 Anonymous
18th December 2016
Sunday 10:48 pm
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>>407422

If the bottom of your left nipple is 12 o clock, it's at 3 o clock about 2cm away.
>> No. 407434 Anonymous
19th December 2016
Monday 2:06 pm
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>>407425
Hmm, could be supernumerary. Unless it's an irregular shape or pigmented, and is noticeably getting bigger I wouldn't bother troubling the GP with it, as other lads above me have said.
>> No. 407441 Anonymous
19th December 2016
Monday 7:40 pm
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>>407425
How can the bottom of anything be 12 o'clock?
>> No. 407442 Anonymous
19th December 2016
Monday 8:16 pm
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>>407441

An upside down clock.
>> No. 407443 Anonymous
19th December 2016
Monday 8:21 pm
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>>407441
When you're looking down from the top of it.
>> No. 407444 Anonymous
19th December 2016
Monday 9:48 pm
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>>407441
Nurse's watch.
>> No. 407448 Anonymous
20th December 2016
Tuesday 2:08 pm
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Just a few days till Christmas, and I've got no fucking idea what to get my mum.

Problem is, she runs a tight ship at home in her household and already has everything in terms of household appliances and implements that you could think of. She also has no noteworthy hobbies (she has always said "my family is my hobby"). So I guess all I can do is get her some tacky novelty tech gadget from Curry's or Halfraud's that will not be too demanding for a 60-year-old housewife.
>> No. 407449 Anonymous
20th December 2016
Tuesday 2:26 pm
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>>407448

Or a necklace, or some earrings? You know, something that might show that you have put some thought into it?
>> No. 407450 Anonymous
20th December 2016
Tuesday 4:59 pm
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>>407449
A pearl necklace wouldn't go unnoticed.
>> No. 407451 Anonymous
20th December 2016
Tuesday 5:18 pm
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>>407450

Exactly. Ask him next-door, he might help.
>> No. 407452 Anonymous
20th December 2016
Tuesday 9:06 pm
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>>407451

> he might help.

It sounds more like >>407450 lad badly needs help himself.
>> No. 407453 Anonymous
21st December 2016
Wednesday 12:54 am
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I actually got asked tonight by a facebook friend if I wanted to go to Stonehenge tomorrow morning to celebrate the winter solstice.

It's only a little over 100 miles from here. Apparently, they're really having a bit of a do there every six months both for the summer and winter solstice. With long haired druids humming songs and banging drums and all.

I declined the invitation, but reading about it now, it actually kind of seems like an intriguing way to spend a day. No more pointless than all the other things I have been doing so far before Christmas.
>> No. 407454 Anonymous
21st December 2016
Wednesday 1:04 am
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>>407453

You div.

He was asking you to to go drop acid and dive into free range organic hippy student muff.

I'm willing to bet that's more fun than any other Christmas you've ever had.
>> No. 407455 Anonymous
21st December 2016
Wednesday 1:09 am
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>>407454

> free range organic hippy student muff.


You really know how to make it sound appealing.
>> No. 407456 Anonymous
21st December 2016
Wednesday 1:13 am
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>>407455

Hippy birds are where it's at mate. Might smell a bit fruity sometimes but they'll get your kundalini rising IYKWIM.
>> No. 407457 Anonymous
21st December 2016
Wednesday 1:24 am
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>>407456

I know somebody like that. No thanks. She did some sort of reiki shit on me before we had sex, and kept talking about sending me angels. She only wears 70s looking second hand clothes, and uses her bathwater to water her plants. Bakes her own organic bread, preferably with flour from a local mill, and keeps a strict vegetarian (at least not vegan) diet.

As far as weird shags go, it was alright. She was surprisingly good with her hands, maybe some sort of knob reiki or something.
>> No. 407460 Anonymous
21st December 2016
Wednesday 11:02 pm
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Ok, so I didn't go to Stonehenge today. But I am kind of beginning to think that that's something I might do on June 21. They do a similar ceremony for the summer solstice.

Maybe that'll be nicer too than standing around in the cold on December 21. According to Google Maps, the Stonehenge site is completely out in the sticks, with the nearest village over a mile away. Not the sort of place where I like to spend six hours when it's cold outside.
>> No. 407461 Anonymous
22nd December 2016
Thursday 12:38 am
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>>407460

You big fanny.
>> No. 407462 Anonymous
22nd December 2016
Thursday 1:36 am
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>>407460

Sure, if you want, but the gash you find that time of year is going to be considerably less peng. Summer solstice is where it gets packed out with "gap yah finding myself volunteering teaching Malaysian children to play the pan flute" cunts.
>> No. 407464 Anonymous
22nd December 2016
Thursday 1:17 pm
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>>407462

>Sure, if you want, but the gash you find that time of year is going to be considerably less peng.


That's quite enough out of you, teenlad.

Life isn't always about shagging birds, you know. Even if your hormone deluged brain will lead you to believe otherwise at your age.
>> No. 407466 Anonymous
22nd December 2016
Thursday 4:47 pm
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>>407462
That's a really good point, the older I get the more I have time for celebrating old pagan festivals or community events, mostly as a knee-jerk reaction to the firmly established consumerism of Christmas. I quite like the idea of events designed around social cohesion and spending time with other humans than gluttony and gift-giving; celebrating the end of the longest nights makes a lot of sense to me. We all hate the gloom and dark of winter, right? I've got a long history of dropping tabs and having a good time talking to strangers too.

Although I did read that Vice article where apparently people in sleeping bags were blatantly shagging around the stones at the Summer one. I'd rather not see some gap yah type named India getting fingerblasted when I'm trying to enjoy a sunrise.
>> No. 407467 Anonymous
22nd December 2016
Thursday 4:52 pm
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I saw a bunch of photologs on imgur/reddit of people doing stuff at stonehenge today, all the pagan things will be hugely overcrowded next year. Gaining popularity and that.
>> No. 407468 Anonymous
22nd December 2016
Thursday 5:02 pm
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>>407466

>Although I did read that Vice article where apparently people in sleeping bags were blatantly shagging around the stones at the Summer one.

I saw somewhat worse at Glastonbury once. Two people shagging inside a collapsed two-person tent that was soaked in rain and mud, with the door flap zipped shut. And at some point, a handful of bystanders outside began cheering them on.

I guess when you've taken the right drugs, nothing about that situation will keep you from continuing with the act.
>> No. 407469 Anonymous
22nd December 2016
Thursday 5:20 pm
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>>407467

I wonder how people even get permits to actually be inside the stone circle. From what I've been able to gather, normally visitors are asked in no uncertain terms to stay on the foot path that surrounds the site. To avoid damage to the monument itself.

Maybe it's a freedom of religion thing. I guess those druids really see it as a sacred religious site, and so authorities would be right cunts to deny them access.
>> No. 407479 Anonymous
22nd December 2016
Thursday 11:56 pm
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>>407467

>all the pagan things will be hugely overcrowded next year. Gaining popularity and that.

It looks like you're not wrong there:

http://stonehengetours.com/stonehenge-winter-solstice-tour.htm
>> No. 407599 Anonymous
27th December 2016
Tuesday 2:46 pm
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I'm off work until January 2. First time in more than five years that I've got the whole week between Christmas and New Year's Eve off.

I plan to spend my time just sitting on the couch watching TV and playing video games. What would seem like a waste to some is just some well earned rest and downtime for me.
>> No. 407618 Anonymous
28th December 2016
Wednesday 12:16 am
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>>407599
Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.
>> No. 407619 Anonymous
28th December 2016
Wednesday 12:29 pm
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>>407618
It is a very good phrase and most apt for this time of year. I am doing the square root of fuck all today.
>> No. 407639 Anonymous
28th December 2016
Wednesday 11:38 pm
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Just started watching "Jaws" on ITV+1.

Very disappointingly, it's not in cinemascope widescreen. What's the point of showing a mobie like Jaws in 16:9...
>> No. 407646 Anonymous
29th December 2016
Thursday 2:38 pm
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I got a fifty quid amazon voucher and I've just used it to buy pen refills, a screen protector for my watch, keyboard cleaner, screen cleaner, shampoo and other depressingly boring things.

Is this what it's like to start getting old?
>> No. 407647 Anonymous
29th December 2016
Thursday 3:38 pm
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>>407646

Yep. Welcome to the long slide towards the grave. Trips to the garden centre and the council tip, having a favourite chair, owning slippers, keeping odds and ends in biscuit tins. It's all laid out before you like a dismal buffet at the christening of a bastard child.
>> No. 407648 Anonymous
29th December 2016
Thursday 3:51 pm
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>>407646
Pretty much.

I've spent the day waiting for a Royal Mail delivery. They text at 7am to say they're delivering today but no sign of it yet.
>> No. 407649 Anonymous
29th December 2016
Thursday 4:47 pm
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>>407646

>Is this what it's like to start getting old?


It sounds more like you're turning into Jon Richardson.
>> No. 407650 Anonymous
29th December 2016
Thursday 10:57 pm
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>>407647
I'm 22 and I already own slippers. Proper old-man leather jobbies as well. They're comfy as fuck and keep my feet warm when half the radiators in my house don't work properly.
>> No. 407651 Anonymous
30th December 2016
Friday 9:36 am
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>>407650

Combat boots and proper socks. And I'm 32.
>> No. 407652 Anonymous
30th December 2016
Friday 12:42 pm
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>>407651
Not around the house surely? That sounds horribly impractical.
>> No. 407653 Anonymous
30th December 2016
Friday 1:36 pm
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>>407652

>Not around the house surely?

If your house is in Svalbard maybe.
>> No. 407654 Anonymous
30th December 2016
Friday 1:39 pm
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>>407653

My attempt at humour, yet again foiled by the word filters.
>> No. 407656 Anonymous
30th December 2016
Friday 3:26 pm
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I just fixed the power sockets in the kitchen. They are surface mounted, this being an old building, and the contacts inside the sockets behind the refrigerator and the washing machine were corroded, I can only assume from moisture. The washing machine suddenly quit this morning, as did the refrigerator. So I had to disassemble the sockets, file off the corrosion from the wires and the contacts, and put everything back together.

I think I now have an idea what that burnt smell has been occasionally lately. There were smolder marks inside the socket housing. Maybe it's safer to replace the sockets entirely. I'll see if Homebase have similar ones.
>> No. 407663 Anonymous
30th December 2016
Friday 5:45 pm
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>>407656
I love doing that sort of job around the house though - very satisfying.
>> No. 407665 Anonymous
30th December 2016
Friday 6:21 pm
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>>407663

The funny thing is, just before I started, my mum happened to call and I told her that I was about to disassemble the power sockets. And she said "Oh no... that's really dangerous, don't you know that? Can't you have an electrician come and do it for you?".

Precisely what was an electrician going to do besides removing the kitchen's main fuse from the fuse panel (my flat has those old screw-in fuses), checking the sockets one more time with a multimeter and then removing the socket cover to get to the burnt contacts to clean them?

(well ok, he probably would have installed all new power sockets, at three times the shop price. As they do.)

I would have been out 100 quid, on a Friday night before New Year's Eve, and would have had the electrician snorting derision at me for wasting his time with such a simple job (whilst happily bagging the £100).
>> No. 407667 Anonymous
30th December 2016
Friday 8:37 pm
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>>407665
At least that much m8.
>> No. 407675 Anonymous
31st December 2016
Saturday 1:00 am
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>>407665
>Precisely what was an electrician going to do besides removing the kitchen's main fuse from the fuse panel (my flat has those old screw-in fuses), checking the sockets one more time with a multimeter and then removing the socket cover to get to the burnt contacts to clean them?
Be compliant with the building regs.
>> No. 407726 Anonymous
2nd January 2017
Monday 1:07 pm
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The sun is out and it's a clear winter sky, I've been for a nice relaxing walk and now back in my room it's like summer, the sun heating up my room through the window, window open, sound of the odd plane and nice fresh air as I relax on my bed.

I've not felt this great for a while, this is absolute bliss. It's the little things in life.
>> No. 407729 Anonymous
2nd January 2017
Monday 4:07 pm
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>>407656
Been meaning to sort the lightswitches & sockets out at my Mums for a while. They're all at least 30 years old and many of them have lost their click, so to speak. I assume the lightswitches at least would be a fairly simple affair.
>> No. 407730 Anonymous
2nd January 2017
Monday 9:36 pm
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>>407729

> I assume the lightswitches at least would be a fairly simple affair.


Yes, fairly simple.

Before you do ANYTHING to electrical fixtures around the house, ALWAYS shut off or remove the main fuse(s) to the room or area of the house that you will be working in. And then, BEFORE you actually get to work, make sure the light switch really doesn't have power.

The rest should be self explanatory. Just make sure you get the colour coding of the wires right. Simply connect them "like for like" from the old switch to the new one.
>> No. 407755 Anonymous
4th January 2017
Wednesday 10:09 am
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>>407726

22 degrees and I am swaddled up against the cold. Watching the sun set over the mountain with a beer and hating that I will be spending some of the night doing web-dev.

Roll on my holiday to Thailand.
>> No. 407761 Anonymous
4th January 2017
Wednesday 6:09 pm
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Had a blizzard last night that cut the power for 12 hours. Supposed to be -9 tomorrow night. I am bloody enjoying it though.
>> No. 407770 Anonymous
5th January 2017
Thursday 9:45 am
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>>407755

>>Roll on my holiday to Thailand

Escort lad?
>> No. 407773 Anonymous
5th January 2017
Thursday 12:46 pm
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>>407770

I am sensing a sex tourism/Gary Glitter theme there as well.
>> No. 407775 Anonymous
5th January 2017
Thursday 2:11 pm
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>>407773

How can you put sex tourism and noncing together? It's perfectly feasible for someone to be a sex tourist without being morally repulsive!
>> No. 407776 Anonymous
5th January 2017
Thursday 3:58 pm
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>>407775

>How can you put sex tourism and noncing together?

I don't. The nonces do.
>> No. 407778 Anonymous
5th January 2017
Thursday 7:20 pm
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Just got home after a two hour shopping (and other things) run.

Having some hot chocolate and a piece of lemon sponge cake right now. So fucking good... after all that time spent out in the cold tonight.
>> No. 407780 Anonymous
5th January 2017
Thursday 8:28 pm
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It's my other half's birthday tomorrow. I spent ages decorating a card to her "from" our thirteen month old daughter only to notice at the very end I've written "HAPPY BIRTDAY" in large letters on the front of it. Fuck's sake.
>> No. 407781 Anonymous
5th January 2017
Thursday 8:31 pm
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>>407780

> "HAPPY BIRTDAY" in large letters on the front of it.

That's still not bad for a 13-month-old.
>> No. 407789 Anonymous
5th January 2017
Thursday 10:33 pm
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>>407788
They'll have gone off and had an HR huddle where they decided to pick the candidate with the nicest arse, or who they reckon would be least trouble in the future when dicked around by insane HR policies.
Fuck HR and fuck inane hiring practices.
(If they're competent, then with any luck they were watching your performance (and it was a performance, completely unrelated to your employed role), and noted how much of a cunt you were / weren't. And then hired the one with the nicest arse.
>> No. 407792 Anonymous
5th January 2017
Thursday 11:08 pm
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>>407788
Work isn't about compromise anyway. You have a group meeting, the director pooh-poohs the suggestion and then about 10 minutes later he suggests the exact same thing because the idea has to come out of his mouth.
>> No. 407793 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 12:16 am
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>>407788
You're describing a Balloon Debate. The real reason is to see how you perform in public speaking and sorts which is why the scenarios don't have a clear answer.

I agree that its bullshit that handicaps people who show natural leadership and initiative. Not once have I as part of my office job needed to choose between saving a pregnant woman or a doctor on a sinking ship. Not once.

>Is that true? I basically got the desired result of the exercise but I could still score badly? I understand the workplace is all about compromise but surely having somebody who directs the conversation and achieves the desired result is preferable?

Offices operate under the pretence that decisions are made with a show of hands. Remember that we're talking about dim-witted HR women.
>> No. 407794 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 12:42 am
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>>407788
After 14 such interviews and group exercises, I became extremely depressed and cynical. I ended up working in a bookshop near my house after I asked the manager there if she had a spot for me.

I don't know if everyone else is just a cunt, or if I can't function in a normal society, but there is something really wrong with finding work. The whole process just seems off.

Anyway, I don't know how long I can last with this job, or what kind of future awaits me. At the very least, I am kind of happy here.
>> No. 407797 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 1:41 am
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>>407788
Been to a few assessments for grad jobs. They're all the same. You'd think I'd get the hang of it and manage to get a job out of one of them but clearly I'm a bit of a thicko.

The structure is basically introduction presentation, quiz, interview (and performance of your own presentation), lunch, group task and then a closing presentation. All of the assessments follow that schedule and if not it's in a different order.

Now as >>407793 says I've done the whole sinking ship group task. In my feedback they said I was too pragmatic as my case was to let the fucker with the third degree burns and has no use in going to the island despite his heroic attempts at deflecting fire away from the ship to himself stay on the ship. Bit of a bad move saying that (in a less sweary way of course) but I had recently become aware of the concept of groupthink which states that a better consensus is made when at least one person suggests a hard truth and disagrees with the majority but not solely for contrarian reasons.

But I like the group activities. They're usually what stands out in an assessment as they do try to be different. Interview is the same, presentations are the same and quiz is the same. Quiz tends to be some bullshit aptitude test that I can't tell how they read that data that suggests a better candidate. Obviously the more correct answers, yes but it's so abstract you can't really apply them to real life scenarios. Even if you say it's to see how someone would solve a problem and how quickly they manage it, there's never going to be a case where you need to figure out which squiggly line looks like the next in sequence. Even for a job that requires some level of pattern recognition ability like say cryptology its just bullshit to me. Worst is the personality sections of an aptitude test. I don't see how the results of those tests can be any more enlightening than the personality quizzes in Heat magazine. The numerical and graph interpretation sections are reasonable though. Though the last aptitude quiz I took for a job had a graph interpretation section where you had to answer over 20 questions in 8 minutes based on 6 different charts and graphs. That's just not reasonable. They weren't simple questions like "what was the number of sales in Q3 in 2014" either.

One of the best assessments I've taken was the NCC challenge. They give you about 20+ challenges and give you two to three months to figure it out. There's about 10 or so trivia questions this year which most people would google but there's merit in the other challenges where you have to figure out what the given cipher text is in plaintext. No telling you the type of cipher, just figure it out. I didn't solve it but I got close as I discovered the type of cipher and helped me learn more about it. Enjoyable. Far from these aptitude tests where you're pressed for time. In reality you would just google for the answer or at least try to educate yourself. I don't know how I've gone from spending two months reading a metric fuckload of research papers and books to come up with a convincing argument but now I have to be a rainman savant who has to figure out an abstract line of questioning in mere minutes.

I'm rambling on. I wouldn't employ me either.
>> No. 407810 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 2:16 pm
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>>407797

I hate assessments. I was invited to one right after uni, and it was basically The Apprentice without Sir Alan. It was for a larger advertising firm, and they were looking to employ four or five new fresh talents. We were given different taks that day in teams of five to draw up a marketing concept for an item. Of all things, our team's item was a dog poo scraper. An implement not unlike a kitchen spatula that was supposed to help you clean poo off the pavement if your little flea ridden mongrel did a number two. The other teams had similarly ludicrous items.

I felt pretty ridiculous, and the whole presentation we then gave at the end of it was nothing but a big piss take if you ask me. Well and we were asked to individual interviews both before the group exercise so that they would get to know us first, and then after the exercise to review how we had been carrying ourselves. We were also supposed to tell them what we liked, and especially what we didn't like about the other team members in our respective group. Which was obviously some sort of ruse to test your loyalty and team spirit. The interviewer said, "Go on, you can speak freely here. We won't tell anybody".

They told me there was going to be a second round of interviews a week later, but that they weren't sure yet which applicants would be invited for that again. Well, I didn't hear from them for about two months, after which they sent me an e-mail thanking me again for taking the time to be at the assesment, but they had in the mean time found the most suitable applicants.

Nowadays, I try to make a point of not accepting invitations to assessments when I apply for a job. They're just one big piss take.
>> No. 407814 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 4:31 pm
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>>407810
I had an apprentice type of assessment.

Now keep in mind that while I do have an undergraduate degree with "business" in the title it's surrounded by IT words. I somehow manage to get job interviews by business departments of organisations and they must assume my knowledge of business is quite high.

Cue me bullshitting this task and somehow being the leader of my group where we came up with a business plan for a fitness app. I honestly thought it went well. During the presentation we were asked how it's going to make money. Most people in my group went a bit quiet. I've been in a similar situation where I had a group task to create a business plan for some netflix knock off. In that instance we were asked how it was going to make money and we all went quiet. In the assessment I took my experience from that and applied it thinking it would save us.

Now I didn't get the job. At the half-way point I realised I wasn't going to anyway because I was informed I did badly during the aptitude test and it became quickly apparent this wasn't the job for me. I've had similar with a phone interview where I realised during that it's not for me. I try to persevere because in the back of my head I'm thinking I need to take the chance.

Out of all the jobs I've applied to, the ones that I really want and have put in an actual effort in the application process rarely get back in touch. I'd say 90% of jobs I apply for and move onto the next stage with an interview (either in person or phone) I have just slapped my covering all bases CV without even a covering letter to them. Turns out if I appear eager then I won't get it. I mean christ that describes my life. I only got into uni because I spontaneously walked into a college and applied to a random course the day before the application deadline. At that point I stopped caring about life and just thought "fuck it". The grades I've got that were the highest from assignments are night before jobs while the assignments that I prepare for properly end up being worse.

It's sort of like a drunken kung fu mastery on the surface.
>> No. 407815 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 4:40 pm
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I only just noticed what Darth Vader's actually doing in the OP image.
>> No. 407816 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 5:42 pm
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>>407814

> I've had similar with a phone interview where I realised during that it's not for me.

I once applied for a position as a call centre employee for a well known major British bank. To earn a few quid during uni on the side. They then did the job interview right over the phone, with no need for me to come to their offices or anything.

Interesting experience. The interviewer, a middle aged woman, tried to intersperse the interview with a few lifelike exercises to test my politeness and patience. For example, right at the beginning, she asked me two times to spell my name, and the third time she said "hang on, there must be something wrong with my phone here, can you start again?". And then she suddenly started telling me one or two things about her private life. I guess again to see how I would handle myself if one of their clients derailed the conversation into private matters, as it happens I am sure.

They would have hired me happily, but it turned out the pay was just too meagre to be worth the effort. I found a student job a few months later at a firm that paid double that. Probably would have been interesting though.
>> No. 407817 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 6:14 pm
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>>407816
I genuinely have issues understanding people on the phone. Chalk it up to the fact that my network isn't great and my hearing can be shockingly bad.

It's both good and bad to get a phone interview. Good because it means I don't have to pay for travelling to an interview which in 99% of interviews they don't reimburse (I even had to ask job centre to pay for a train ticket and they refused saying my measly bennies should cover it even though they barely cover the most basic of lifestyles) but bad because of the above issues.

Still not experience the skype interview though. I imagine that has many problems in itself.
>> No. 407818 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 6:43 pm
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>>407817

>Still not experience the skype interview though. I imagine that has many problems in itself.

There are entire chapters of job seekers guides devoted to that topic now.

My boss says he's not a fan... anymore, that is. He doesn't care what people look like when they're pretending to be on the job but are really sitting at home in shorts and flip flops under their table, with a dress shirt and a suit jacket quickly thrown on. He is more interested in how they carry themselves when they are actually in a job situation, i.e. in a one on one real life interview. He says he also doesn't like the awkwardness of peeking into a perfect stranger's personal living space like that. He told me that one time, he did an interview on skype and the applicant had to interrupt the interview because their dog was suddenly defecating onto the livingroom carpet and then wouldn't stop barking.
>> No. 407819 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 7:34 pm
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>>407029 here again.
>My favourite method of trolling new dads is to show them the price of baby and toddler shoes from Clark's, because lots of mothers insist on shoes only from there so they'll fit properly.

I've only gone and trolled myself. Ended up in Clarks today to get my daughter her first pair of shoes and also picked up some new shoes for work in the sale. Mine came to £19, reduced from £55, hers came to £26. I'll be wearing mine for around 45 hours per week, she can take about 3 steps before realising she can't be arsed and would rather crawl instead.
>> No. 407820 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 9:17 pm
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>>407818
There does seem to be a culture where work is seeping into personal lives. I remember the age old phrase of not letting the two lives overlap which came from parents, relatives and anyone else that was an adult. Not to mention television shows that said as much. So when a skype interview is going on, that employer is indeed viewing the applicant's personal life and there's going to be at least a level similar to uncanny valley. Something is wrong about it but what is it?

The fact I have to treat my facebook as if an employer may look at it is a bit off even though my privacy settings are set to friends only for anything personal. I basically need to have two personas on the internet. My public one which involves my real name and a work email. The other for places like this where no personal info about me is (hopefully) stored. I have an email or two for personal. I had partially retired my hotmail address from 2002 a few years ago when making new emails.

I was also lucky to delete forum postings from the mid 2000s. I honestly feel deeply sympathetic towards the latter end of this generation that has everything they do stuck on the internet for what is probably forever. I don't like the idea that you can google someone's name and they're part of the flavour of the month meme where they did something that makes them unemployable.

The point is, is that I struggle to understand how employers basically want people who are perfect and are always on the job. In reality, people are pretty damn imperfect and there are some concepts that employers hold that just aren't feasible.
>> No. 407821 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 9:19 pm
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>>407820
What you're describing is the reason why sites like this exist.
>> No. 407822 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 10:33 pm
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>>407820

> I don't like the idea that you can google someone's name

I don't like that you can google someone's name, full stop. For the best part of a decade now, I have made a point of not leaving anything with my real name attached to it on the Internet. I've got zillions of different aliases for all the web forums I am on, which is something I do enjoy. But crucially, I have no Facebook account at all. No personal web page, no blog, no nothing. As far as the web is concerned, I don't exist. I've even asked the owners of older web sites where my real name used to appear to delete it. There are a few web sites where I've had no luck contacting the owner (usually some free hosted web sites that were popular in the late 90s to early 2000s). But you will find zip about me from about the year 2000 onward. And I have checked thoroughly.

I was never comfortable with the idea that people could just gather information about me at a mouse click. But I really arrived at the resolution to disappear from the Internet after I had a bad experience with a lass that I met for a blind date. She was a bit on the creepy side (and I mean, potential-stalker, restraining order-requiring creepy), and out of nowhere she bombarded me with questions about things that she had read about me online. This made me feel immensely and genuinely uncomfortable. And a few days later, I finally set about erasing my existence from the web. And I haven't looked back.
>> No. 407823 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 11:17 pm
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>>407822
What's your name? I'll see what I can find on you.
>> No. 407824 Anonymous
6th January 2017
Friday 11:39 pm
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anon.png
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>>407823
John Smith.
>> No. 407825 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 1:11 am
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>>407824
Hey, I know you. You've got that brewery in Tadcaster.
>> No. 407826 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 10:53 am
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>>407822>>407821
A lass I know lost her job because her boss went poking around and found a post on her Livejournal about how difficult he was to work with. This was in 2003.
>> No. 407827 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 1:28 pm
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>>407826

>A lass I know lost her job because her boss went poking around and found a post on her Livejournal about how difficult he was to work with.

I have no sympathy. If you do something like that, it's excessively naive to think there is no possibility of bad consequences.

That said, one of my former coworkers got fired once because a picture of him popped up on a news web site that showed him taking part in a BNP protest rally. Waving a banner and all that. My boss, who was half Singhalese, took offence personally and fired him.
>> No. 407829 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 1:45 pm
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>>407827
What a weird equivalence. Taking part in a publicized - and controversial - event is quite a different thing to posting on your own Livejournal.

Were you just looking for a reason to share your anecdote?
>> No. 407830 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 1:50 pm
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>>407829
Are you just looking for a reason for a cunt-off?
>> No. 407831 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 1:53 pm
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>>407830
No, I don't think I want anything to do with you.
>> No. 407833 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 2:24 pm
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>>407829

>Were you just looking for a reason to share your anecdote

No; I just wanted to illustrate my point that nowadays, you will always have to remember that other people will be watching what you do in your own time. Especially if you either flat out insult your employer online, or if you just happen to hold racist political views which you go to the length of publicly expressing by taking part in a BNP march.
>> No. 407836 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 3:18 pm
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>>407730
> Simply connect them "like for like" from the old switch to the new one.

And try to figure out what kind of switch you need before you buy a new one. There are different kinds depending on whether it's one switch controlling one light, two switches controlling one light or other combinations.
>> No. 407842 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 4:03 pm
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>>407833
The Internet is defined as a public space and I see no problem with people being held culpable for what they post publically. Before the Internet if you went to Speaker's Corner and started ranting on a soapbox about how shite your employer was I don't think anyone would consider it unjust if you got the sack, so what makes this any different?
>> No. 407843 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 4:31 pm
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>>407842
>if you went to Speaker's Corner and started ranting on a soapbox about how shite your employer was I don't think anyone would consider it unjust if you got the sack
It's cunts like you that have ruined everything.
>> No. 407850 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 4:42 pm
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>>407843
Dry your eyes mate. If the internet was treated more like a public space, then cunts like you and the ones that got fired would not get in trouble. Morons.


Everyone should be anonymous all the time. Forced. Everywhere.
>> No. 407854 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 4:54 pm
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>>407842

My first visit to Speakers Corner was almost 20 years ago. There was a guy there ranting about women and fishing for over an hour in a way that could very nearly get you jailed for hate speech today if you said something like it on an online web forum. And yet, he had a crowd of probably 100 people listening to him. And attentively.

I think the web has just made it possible to reach infinitely greater audiences with your pointless drivel. Speakers Corner itself, and its whole concept, have maybe been rendered forever obsolete by the web. But very soon after the beginning of mass Internet use, a very pronounced backlash against people who rant against others online too candidly began taking place. To the point where almost anything controversial you say publicly online can now be deemed criminal hate speech. Oftentimes, all it takes is a critical mass of people who are simply for whatever reason offended by your ideas.

Is that a good thing? I don't know. In the old days, when some idiot was spewing his nonsensical ideas on his soap box at Speakers Corner, you would simply boo him or walk away. And you would quietly shake your head at how somebody like that could honestly believe his own rubbish. You didn't walk over to a nearby policeman to have the chap arrested because he said something you disagreed with. You didn't call twenty of your friends to come down to Speakers Corner and boo that person together with you.

If you know what I mean. People tend to be oversensitive these days. And things like that whole concept of "safe spaces" tie right into it. It stifles free speech in a way that can not be good for society in the long run. I am not saying open dolphin rape and actual maritime issues should be tolerated. Much of that is illegal now for very good reasons. But these days, like I said, pretty much any view you express online can cause an epic shitstorm because somebody will not like the fact that you are for the most part still allowed to say something that they don't agree with.
>> No. 407859 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 5:20 pm
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>>407842
>The Internet is defined as a public space
It's a public space that reaches inside your home and every private aspect of your life. It's pretty much unavoidable. I get what you're saying but you have to be being intentionally obtuse if you can't see why people would disagree or take umbrage with it.
>> No. 407864 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 5:44 pm
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>>407854
If it's not criminal it's not a freedom of speech issue is it dunderhead?
>> No. 407872 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 7:07 pm
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>>407850
I'd be in prison.
>> No. 407874 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 7:24 pm
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>>407850
Mate, I work for my employer 40 hours a week. What I say and do during the other 128 is none of their concern. Firing someone because they said something nasty about you outside work is an act of the highest cuntitude, and you're a cunt for endorsing it.
>> No. 407876 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 7:43 pm
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>>407874
Most employers have a social media policy these days.
>> No. 407877 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 8:06 pm
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>>407876
Never mind that, most employers consider you to represent the organisation whether or not you're at work. So >>407874, the idea that you can publically badmouth them and expect to get away with it is ridiculous. And that doesn't mean remarks you make to your mates. Don't try and tell me you haven't signed a contract that has no clause related to your behaviour outside of work.
>> No. 407880 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 8:35 pm
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>>407877

>Don't try and tell me you haven't signed a contract that has no clause related to your behaviour outside of work.

I've got a policy like that with my current employer. Except they put it together with "business secrets" in my contract.

I agreed that I will be laid off immediately and liable for damages if I either divulge business secrets to the employees of rival companies or publicly in a "social media context", or if I make public comments on social media about my employer that could cause damage to their reputation or otherwise lead to financial loss.

"Off the record", they said to me quite candidly that they can't legally expect me to lead a blameless personal life in terms of what I do in my own time on Facebook and whatnot, but told me it would be "greatly appreciated" if I considered myself a representative of my company both on and off the job.
>> No. 407881 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 9:02 pm
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>>407880
And I bet you'd like if if they continued to pay for your time both on and off the job.
>> No. 407883 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 9:11 pm
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>>407854
I'm reminded of a description of free speech in China I read a few months back. In reality the Chinese state doesn't give a fuck what you say, what it cares about is how many people are listening. The same more or less applies here as you say but I'd go on to add that the problem is how restrictions on speech can be hijacked by groups of easily offended.

In my undergraduate days I discussed the issue with a lecturer over student unions and he illuminated that the real issue is the majority is apathetic which allows small groups of vocal extremists to control discussion by crying to authorities who of course have to take them seriously. To draw back to your example of Speakers Corner its not a place of free speech but a place where the authorities are ordinarily lax unless someone complains to them having not understood the point of it.

>>407874
I think there is a general presumption that bringing your employer into disrepute stops being an affair of your private life much as a Restraint of Trade clause carries past employment if it effects the business. Yes your professional life should stay out of your private but at the same time your private life should stay out of your professional.

This is not to say that spying on your paper girl dissing your fannypack on weibo isn't excessive but like all things there is a golden mean at work that people should be responsible for.
>> No. 407889 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 10:06 pm
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>>407883

>the problem is how restrictions on speech can be hijacked by groups of easily offended.

This. Hate speech laws are really there to make it less likely for you to get away with saying some truly vile things against minorities or other people. And it's hard to argue against that in good conscience. What these laws shouldn't be is a free-for-all, in which just because something offends you, you get to declare it hate speech or see yourself as a harrassed minority of whatever kind.


>that the real issue is the majority is apathetic which allows small groups of vocal extremists to control discussion by crying to authorities who of course have to take them seriously.

Also true. More than that, the tunnel vision that these screamy dyed in the wool extremists often display is astounding. Anybody who won't agree with their silly extremist ideas is the enemy. Just because you hold quite fringe or niche views, doesn't mean you are a minority that is protected by hate speech law and has a right to invoke hate speech laws against anybody who asks even the most timid critical questions that challenge your world view. Or at least it shouldn't mean that.
>> No. 407890 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 10:21 pm
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>>407889
It's a cranky website staffed by ex-Marxists if I'm not mistaken, but quite a wide range of different people all argued against hate speech laws in good conscience at http://www.spiked-online.com/newsite/article/hate-speech-is-free-speech/18444

I've always thought free speech meant the right to offend and was always horrified growing up by hearing about the German laws designed to prevent Holocaust denial - and those laws have seeped into our society too. We don't have the First Amendment in Europe and it is a shame I think.

Where is the limit of free speech? Maybe scrawling NONCE or JEW on someone's front door: that's criminal damage. Writing vile and hate-inciting leaflets and handing them out is free speech. I wish those who talk about valuing free speech would address the very worst of what they purport to defend.
>> No. 407891 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 10:35 pm
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>>407890

>I've always thought free speech meant the right to offend

That's a loaded issue. Should you have the right to offend? And should or should you not also have the right to feel offended, and derived from that the right to not be offended?

But you're not wrong. As I said before, pretty much literally anything you ever say can be misconstrued by somebody and taken as offensive. And if you watch programmes like "It was alright in the 70s" on Channel 4, which attempt to expose all the baseline latent dolphin rape and actual maritime issues in 70s Britain, you can't help hoping that in another 40 years time, people will find cringeworthy the fact that everybody and anybody was so easily offended by just about anything in the 2010s.


>hearing about the German laws designed to prevent Holocaust denial

These laws were put in place right after the war at the behest of the allied forces (including Britain), to weed out Nazism among the German population in a kind of top-down approach. They also made the public display of symbols associated with the Third Reich illegal, like the swastika or the German Imperial flag. I don't really think that's a bad thing. Has kept Gerry from attempting world domination again the last 70 years, hasn't it.
>> No. 407892 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 10:53 pm
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>>407890
>I've always thought free speech meant the right to offend and was always horrified growing up by hearing about the German laws designed to prevent Holocaust denial

Horrified? Really? Fuck me, you must have been a strange child.

Did the accounts from Auschwitz exercise you in the same way?
>> No. 407893 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:07 pm
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>>407890

>Maybe scrawling NONCE or JEW on someone's front door:

You would probably get away with the nonce bit. There is a less than remote chance that a judge would tell that person "Well, but you are a nonce, aren't you?". But I don't think you'll hear a judge say "Yes, but you are indeed a Jew, are you not?"
>> No. 407894 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:10 pm
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>>407889
>Hate speech laws are really there to make it less likely for you to get away with saying some truly vile things against minorities or other people.

My understanding is they are designed to address inciting violence in a public space. Its not about disrespecting someone's mother its about you not actively calling for Terry from the Post Office to be lynched (even if he really deserves it).

Minority stuff comes into it because of race riots and what-have-you but its not the words in themselves that are the issue.
>> No. 407895 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:13 pm
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>>407893
Wouldn't writing Jew be a bit of a compliment, anyway?

My understanding is that dolphin rape against blacks, Arabs and various other shitskins is because they're viewed as inferior to us whereas with antisemitism you're starting off from the position that Jews are our superiors.
>> No. 407896 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:17 pm
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>>407895
Shitposters just don't care about the craft like they used to.
>> No. 407897 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:22 pm
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>>407896
It's not shitposting. It's true. If you scrawl JEW on a door then it's a tacit admission by yourself that you find that person to be smarter, richer and more powerful than yourself. You are envious of them. If you write BLACK BASTARD on a door then this is through viewing that person as beneath you and being repulsed by them.
>> No. 407899 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:31 pm
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>>407895

>My understanding is that dolphin rape against blacks, Arabs and various other shitskins is because they're viewed as inferior to us whereas with antisemitism you're starting off from the position that Jews are our superiors.


I am struggling to wrap my head around that statement.
>> No. 407900 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:33 pm
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>>407899
Don't bother. Lad's a kook.
>> No. 407901 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:33 pm
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>>407899
I don't see why.
>> No. 407904 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:36 pm
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>>407881
This. In fact, whenever someone has said something like that to me, that's been my exact response. "I'll consider myself to represent you outside work if you'll pay me to do so." If they're paying me to be on call or footing the bill for a conference, then I'd consider that I'm effectively on the clock and need to behave appropriately. Otherwise, they're effectively asking for a free lunch, and I don't work at Pret.

>>407883
>I think there is a general presumption that bringing your employer into disrepute stops being an affair of your private life
A presumption on whose part? There's clear legal precedent that comments made outside work do not amount to "bringing the employer into disrepute" and are not grounds for disciplinary action. Cases have been brought around objectionable comments where the employer wasn't mentioned and comments that were critical of the working environment, amongst others. In each case, dismissal was held to have been unfair, with a reduction in damages (typically 20%) for the claimant's contribution.

>much as a Restraint of Trade clause carries past employment
With the exception of maintaining confidentiality, those clauses typically aren't worth the paper they're written on. If your contract says you can't work for a competitor for so many months, you can pretty much ignore it.
>> No. 407909 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:53 pm
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>>407904

> There's clear legal precedent that comments made outside work do not amount to "bringing the employer into disrepute" and are not grounds for disciplinary action.

So... nobody ever got fired for slagging off their employer on Facebook? We have all been dreaming?
>> No. 407910 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 11:58 pm
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>>407899
What do people say about the Jews? They're good with money. They're intelligent. They're influential. These are positive traits.
>> No. 407911 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 12:05 am
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>>407910
They're greedy, sneaky misers and they're conspiring against the white man.
>> No. 407912 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 12:08 am
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>>407909
Time to work on your reading comprehension there, lad.
>> No. 407915 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 12:12 am
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>>407910

That's not really an accurate historic account of antisemitism though. The Nazis in fact were convinced that Jews were an inferior and degenerate race, and that killing them off was therefore almost kind of a public health concern (they called it volks gesundheit, literally "the people's health"). Marriages between Jews and non-Jews were verboten as per the Nuremberg race laws of 1935 (?), to prevent the degeneration of the Aryan blood and race. Fake statistics were cooked up that tried to claim that mental illness and all kinds of neurotic disorders were significantly more prevalent among Jews. There was a compulsory subject called rassenkunde in secondary schools, literally "race studies", which indoctrinated the young that Jews were racially inferior and was based on incredibly intricate pseudoscience.

Not something you'd do if you thought Jews mainly had positive traits.
>> No. 407917 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 12:20 am
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>>407915
>Not something you'd do if you thought Jews mainly had positive traits.

It's classic cognitive dissonance. As you said yourself, the negative things about them had to be made up; cooked up statistics and pseudoscience. It's not like proper negative dolphin rape like against certain Asian groups where there's bountiful evidence that they view women as inferior beings and diddle kids so are clearly backwards. What we have with the Jews is the dolphin rape of envy.
>> No. 407918 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 12:20 am
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>>407910

>They're good with money.

This stems from the fact that in most mediaeval European societies, Jews were forbidden from farming or even owning land, as well as many traditional craftsmen trades. So they had to carve out their niche in other areas, which made them develop their very own culture of merchantry and moneylending. It has simply become a very intrinsic part of Jewish culture over the centuries.
>> No. 407919 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 12:43 am
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>>407918

That's not really relevant to the conversation, that's just you showing off your trivial pursuit skills.
>> No. 407920 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 12:55 am
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>>407918
It sort of helped that the niche was there to be filled by virtue of Christians being forbidden from usury.
>> No. 407922 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 2:49 am
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>>407892
I was obsessed with the Holocaust as a kid of ten or so and would impersonate the deadened facial expressions of Auschwitz inmates I had seen in photographs by sucking my cheeks in and filling my eyes with blank despair. In the classroom and playground, and to my mum to make her cry. I was a strange child.
>> No. 407923 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 3:46 am
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>>407922
No, you are just a racist.
>> No. 407924 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 5:32 am
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>>407923
We're Jewish you stupid fuckbulb.
>> No. 407926 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 12:38 pm
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>>407924

I doubt that you are actually >>407922 lad. And if you are, you are the worst troll we have ever had on here.

And >>407922 lad really should have had his head examined when he was a younglad. It kind of sounds like he also lit his hamster on fire and beat up the multiple sclerosis kid at school.
>> No. 407928 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 12:44 pm
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>>407926
I think he's just trying a bit too hard.
>> No. 407929 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 12:58 pm
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>>407928
I just can't get what he's trying so hard to do. If it's to come across as a headcase - he's succeeded, and should stop. Please stop.
>> No. 407930 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 1:27 pm
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Is sparkling water bad for your teeth?

I managed to kick the habit of a lifetime, I don't smoke, I very rarely drink, I eat reasonably alright (bar a few takeaways) and I finally managed to stop drinking fizzy drinks.

I have replaced them with a bottle of sparkling water just because I actually enjoy the refreshing fizz rather than the caffeine and sugar.

My problem is that I can't find a conclusive answer online, some say it is absolutely fine, others say it erodes your teeth as it is still carbonated, just at a much lesser rate.

Any sane input welcome.
>> No. 407931 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 1:36 pm
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>>407930

Nevermind, I've just found a great BBC article summing it all up quite nicely and the studies done the matter a good few pages into Google.

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20150911-is-sparkling-water-really-bad-for-you
>> No. 407932 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 1:54 pm
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>>407930

Sparkling water is basically carbonic acid, and in theory, it has the power to dissolve calcium compounds like the calcium phosphate that your tooth enamel is made from. This is a similar process to rain water (which contains CO2 from the air) washing out underground caves in limestone formations.

That said, on the one hand, carbonic acid is a very weak acid in terms of its corrosive capacity, and you would probably have to keep your teeth in concentrated carbonic acid for a good number of days to see even the slightest effect. Citric acid, for example, has a much higher corrosive capacity even in small concentrations, which is one reason, combined with the sugar content, why some children have tooth decay at a very early age from drinking loads of fruit juice every day.

Also, the crystalline calcium phosphate in tooth enamel is one of the toughest calcium compounds that are known. With proper calcium rich nutrition, tooth enamel can literally last for a person's lifetime.
>> No. 407933 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 2:08 pm
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>>407932

Excellent post, thank you. I'm now going to make the clever science redundant and ask, is a bottle of sparkling water (San Pellegrino or such like) likely to cause me cavities in that case? I know everybody is different but it seems from your post that it would have to be substantial amounts over prolonged periods.
>> No. 407936 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 3:52 pm
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>>407933

You would probably have to keep a big gulp of sparkling water in your mouth at all times. Also, carbonic acid is a very unstable acid. You see that when a bottle of fizzy drink goes flat quickly. The carbon dioxide contained in it has a tendency to want to escape. Other acids like hydrochloric or sulfuric acid are much more stable in that respect.

So even if theoretically you managed to keep your mouth full of sparkling water at all times, you would still regularly have to take another fresh sip of carbonic acid. I can't see the overall feasibility.
>> No. 407937 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 4:45 pm
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>>407933
Far from damaging your teeth, a hard mineral water like san pellegrino actually has quite a significant amount of calcium and other useful minerals.

There's also evidence that a small amount of calcium spread out through the day is much better absorbed by your body, than a high amount of calcium once a day (like a glass of milk or supplement.)
>> No. 407938 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 5:18 pm
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>>407936
>>407937

Both interesting and very helpful, thank you lads. I'm a little embarrassed about how little I seem to know about what I'm actually drinking.
>> No. 407939 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 6:23 pm
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>>407937

>a hard mineral water like san pellegrino actually has quite a significant amount of calcium and other useful minerals.

It has them because carbonic acid was the dissolving agent. What you have in your calcium rich sparkling water is most likely calcium carbonate. Because part of the carbonic acid has formed a compound with calcium ions. But that is not a bad thing, because calcium carbonate has a better bioavailability of the calcium that your body needs.
>> No. 407940 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 6:45 pm
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I don't really understand OP image, I think I'm missing something.
>> No. 407941 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 6:50 pm
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>>407940

Some lad said he finally got it the other day and I had a good look.

I've not watched Star Wars so maybe it's a quirky reference, other than that I was trying to guess whether it was something to do with him pouring water from a filter into a jug or wasting his time when he could just put his jug in the water?
>> No. 407942 Anonymous
8th January 2017
Sunday 7:50 pm
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>>407940
He is filtering the water.
>> No. 407963 Anonymous
9th January 2017
Monday 1:23 pm
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>>407940

Pictures don't always have to make sense.

Remember that the next time you see an Arab on the roadside playing turtle jenga.
>> No. 407968 Anonymous
9th January 2017
Monday 2:18 pm
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>>407963

Typical shitskin behaviour.
>> No. 407969 Anonymous
9th January 2017
Monday 2:43 pm
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>>407963
That's not how you play Jenga.

>>407968
Good to see that casual dolphin rape is still the norm around here.
>> No. 407970 Anonymous
9th January 2017
Monday 2:57 pm
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>>407969

>That's not how you play Jenga.

Right... you would indeed need three turtles in every row, and then stack them in a cross pattern.

I am sure it would be amusing though.
>> No. 408019 Anonymous
12th January 2017
Thursday 3:51 pm
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Planned to get back on job searching to the capacity I did shortly before christmas.

I had been applying for jobs during this period but fire and forget CV submissions. I've only just lost all motivation after seeing the application form for one place which essentially requires an essay and to fill out dozens of text boxes despite submitting my CV on the first step. I've exhausted the places I genuinely want to work for so it's a little difficult to come up with an answer of "why I want to work for us" for an organisation which is your average generic business.
>> No. 408020 Anonymous
12th January 2017
Thursday 4:45 pm
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>>408019
My personal rule is that any employer that won't accept "I'm looking and you're hiring" as a complete answer is not somewhere I'd want to work.
>> No. 408021 Anonymous
12th January 2017
Thursday 6:51 pm
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>>408020
Not a lot of those. It's easy for organisations I'd want to work for but I just bullshit with the usual "I like the prospect of the workplace culture and potential self improvement this business offers" when I can't think of anything else.

I do agree with David Mitchell's sentiment that it's unreasonable to want employees to be happy at work.

One company had the nerve to list a job that pays significantly less that similar jobs and expect a more qualified individual than the others. I got the feeling that this company had a shite application portal, would not bother to inform unsuccessful candidates, have textbook interview questions and a senior employer who doesn't know his arse from his elbow and would employ his thicko nephew at the end of it all. Just a hunch.
>> No. 408023 Anonymous
12th January 2017
Thursday 8:25 pm
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>>408021

>but I just bullshit with the usual "I like the prospect of the workplace culture and potential self improvement this business offers" when I can't think of anything else.


I don't know why most places even bother still asking that. It's obvious that 90 percent of people who take an application remotely seriously will write whatever the latest job seekers guide will tell them to, and not really mean it anyway. And the ten percent who couldn't be arsed to feign believable interest in their possible new employer on that question beyond having a place to work that pays their bills likely wouldn't have made it past the first round of interviews anyway.

On the other hand, getting an answer like that wrong precisely because an HR person is tired of the same old drivel copied verbatim from a job seeking guide is a real possibility. I know that you're told nowadays that you need to "stick out" from the mass of poor unwashed jobseekers desperate for gainful employment, but if I was an HR person, I would give somebody at least the benefit of doubt that they would make better judgements on things that really matter on the job, besides writing what HR assumedly would like to hear.

I was asked a question once in a personal interview that was an interesting twist on the whole theme. The guy asked me, "In your opinion, how come you haven't worked for us before?". Loaded with pitfalls too, that one. They were one of their industry's leaders, so saying that I simply didn't know them or what they did was a bit like saying you don't know the industry very well. And if you say "I was happy at my old job", they might use that against you to insinuate you had no vision to advance and further your career. So I said, "well, I suppose it just didn't happen. Maybe I just had a different focus at the time or wasn't aware that you offer such interesting positions". Which was a bold faced lie, but I think they liked my answer. Didn't get the job though.
>> No. 408024 Anonymous
12th January 2017
Thursday 8:27 pm
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>>408022
I recently took an online test which was after the application.

It's automated and I failed it. I say failed, it was a "there are no wrong answers" quiz and I wasn't what they were looking for. Heard their response 10 minutes after completion. I'm a little peeved I wasted time writing an application and get rejected on an automated basis.

It would be a lot nicer if I could just fire off my CV and perhaps a covering letter and leave it at that. Also what pisses me off is there's no job site that have negative operators to reduce the number of job listings in London. Half of my job searches turn up London based jobs and I refuse to work there. I have a very short list of places I refuse to move to and it would be nice if I could do something which prevents those jobs populating my feeds.

I'll tell you what, job searching on the internet is a lot better than it was back in the early to mid 2000s. Still shit though. There's no level of standardisation which prevents me from registering for a new application portal with the exception of linkedin support which is still a bit shit.
>> No. 408025 Anonymous
13th January 2017
Friday 12:04 am
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>>408022
What is their wages like?
>> No. 408031 Anonymous
13th January 2017
Friday 5:55 pm
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I installed grindr and fucked a guy for the first time last night, I've never even seen a guy naked before! Why did nobody tell me how fun it is sucking dick? They're so smooth.

Shame he didn't shower. Two brushes and still smegma in my mouth. And his cum tasted like shit.
>> No. 408032 Anonymous
13th January 2017
Friday 6:22 pm
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I just realised that I did arse to mouth.
>> No. 408033 Anonymous
13th January 2017
Friday 6:48 pm
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>>408031
>>408032
Are you intentionally making your posts vomit-inducing?
>> No. 408035 Anonymous
13th January 2017
Friday 7:19 pm
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>>408032
Don't be such a homophobe.
>> No. 408036 Anonymous
13th January 2017
Friday 8:06 pm
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>>408031
Blimey.
>> No. 408037 Anonymous
13th January 2017
Friday 8:49 pm
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>>408033

Funnily enough, I did that too. Guacamole and tortilla chips. It was when I was deepthroating a cock.
>> No. 408042 Anonymous
14th January 2017
Saturday 8:08 pm
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>>408033

Time for a gross heterosexual story maybe.

I once went camping in a remote corner of the Scottish Highlands with one of my exes, and personal hygiene had been very scant for two or three days which we had spent in the same clothes in heavy rain. And then one night, we were both pissed off our heads and lying in the tent together talking about sex. At some point, she said, "I bet you're not gonna go down on me the way I am now".

So I took her up on that dare, and started licking her minge. It was a smelly mess, it was like having day old fish and chips with cottage cheese, while licking a nine volt battery.

I didn't make her come, but that wasn't my objective anyway, I just wanted to show her that if you dare somebody to do something, it's a good thing to be prepared for them then actually doing it.

Still pretty gross. We then fell asleep soon after, and the next day, I woke up with her unwashed minge taste still in my mouth. On top of a vicious beer breath. My girlfriend said my mouth smelled like something had literally died in it, and not just in a comedic sense.
>> No. 408047 Anonymous
15th January 2017
Sunday 1:13 am
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I think I finally get part of the joke in OP's picture.

Darth Vader is trying to filter seawater to get freshwater for human consumption, but the joke is that that's not possible using a simple water filter like that.

Besides evaporation or distillation, the only way to desalinate seawater is reverse osmosis. Which requires much more equipment than Darth Vader has in that picture.

What that has to do with Star Wars, I don't know.
>> No. 408048 Anonymous
15th January 2017
Sunday 1:17 am
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>>408047
I was reverse image searching it today actually, and it's apparently one of the 'pictures that cannot be explained'. So how can it be that you are explaining it?
>> No. 408049 Anonymous
15th January 2017
Sunday 1:48 am
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>>408048

>'pictures that cannot be explained'
>> No. 408050 Anonymous
15th January 2017
Sunday 2:26 am
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>>408049

As a mountain biker who knows most of the trails on Ilkey Moor, the alien is a fake. The trail in the picture is blue grade 2 foot wide approx easy singletrack. The heather seen in the background grows to a height of around 8 inches. The boulder in front of the alien is no higher than 30cm so my estimate is that the 'being' is no taller than 2 feet based on the track width, boulder height and the heather in the background.

Here's an example of what the terrain looks like and how fucking brilliant mountain biking is :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XSFjRAmiUM
>> No. 408051 Anonymous
15th January 2017
Sunday 2:35 pm
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>>408050
Why couldn't an alien be 2ft tall? Seems like you just wanted an excuse to talk about mountain biking. I'm not watching your video.
>> No. 408052 Anonymous
15th January 2017
Sunday 5:53 pm
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>>408051
Watched it for you. Boring. Just a bloke riding a bike. Occasionally he goes over some rocks.
>> No. 408053 Anonymous
15th January 2017
Sunday 10:00 pm
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