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>> No. 407828 Anonymous
7th January 2017
Saturday 1:36 pm
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Weekend thread? Weekend thread.

How's it going, lads?
446 posts omitted. Last 50 posts shown. Expand all images.
>> No. 411225 Anonymous
10th June 2017
Saturday 5:42 pm
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>>411218
You need to make a thread in /uhu/ about this lad.

Would subscribe to your newsletter.
>> No. 411233 Anonymous
11th June 2017
Sunday 12:23 am
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>>410992
I found this video very useful and informative. Thank you.
>> No. 411238 Anonymous
11th June 2017
Sunday 3:58 am
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>>411225

There really isn't much else to tell; I've cleaned and regreased the internal moving parts of my fishing reel, and replaced the bearings. Done.

That said, are any other fishing lads on here? And if so, how and where do you fish, and what kinds of fish?
>> No. 411430 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 1:36 am
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I went into an off licence tonight to get toast for tomorrow's breakfast. I got harrassed by a group of 20-year-olds hanging about inside. They told me not to forget the baby food. And sanitary towels for my wife.

I'm just a lonely middle aged lad who forgot to buy bread in Tesco's tonight. I did not deserve being taunted by lads very nearly half my age.
>> No. 411432 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 1:57 am
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>>411430
That doesn't really sound much like harassment. If you were there for that it'd be a helpful reminder, you could've just said "Cheers lads", they wouldn't know anyway.
>> No. 411437 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 2:48 am
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Lads. In drunk.

Waheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeey.
>> No. 411442 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 3:20 am
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>>411432

Well it was the way they said it. Not with a tone of "May we kindly suggest remembering to get baby food and towels". But it was more like, "look at that greying balding loser, what's he doing in here on a Saturday night, doesn't he have middle aged people stuff to get back to?"

I actually said "No, I'm alright lads", while deliberately trying to sound disappointed that they were picking on such an easy target.
>> No. 411443 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 3:21 am
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>>411430

Should have asked if they'd forgotten their nappies and nutted the biggest looking one right in the cunt first move they made. The only single advantage to being 30+ is that you can fight down shiteing 20-something kids with ease. Wait until you're 40 and they sense your weakness like hyenas.
>> No. 411444 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 3:32 am
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>>411437

Aki sed he bummed you
>> No. 411456 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 1:43 pm
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>>411443

On the other hand, you know that divine justice will be waiting for them once they hit 35 or 40+ and become the butt of jokes themselves. Ignorance is truly bliss. While it lasts.

I took a psychology class in school, which mainly dealt with developmental psychology, and I remember jotting down notes one day about middle age. Our teacher, only in his early 30s himself, told us the biggest problem you will have in middle age is the fact in itself that you are middle aged. Now that I am in early middle age myself, I am beginning to understand this in a way that you just aren't capable of at 17.

It's occasionally quite sad when you have to remember that your wild days are behind you, where you would hang out in clubs till the break of dawn, chat up - and sometimes take home - young women, and drink improbable amounts of alcohol like it was nothing. Your middle-aged body and mind become increasingly incapable of doing any of those things. And that will mostly be alright with you. Most weekends, you will simply be glad to have a few hours of down time at home in front of the TV where nothing happens and nobody wants anything from you.

And then when you think of all the opportunity that was right in front of you when you were a younglad. At my age, for better or worse, you will already have gone down a certain irreversible route in your life, and you will have decided not to follow certain opportunities while you decided in favour of others, which then may or may not have come to fruition.

Another bullet point I remember from that psychology class was that the older you get, the more central it becomes to be able to look back and be happy with the life you have led. For better or worse. But I'm not really 100 percent there yet.
>> No. 411457 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 1:49 pm
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>>411437 here again.

Went to a club for the first time in ages. I must be turning into an old fart, because I've never noticed before the number of young people who spend half the time on the dancefloor actually on their phones texting or whatever.
>> No. 411458 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 1:52 pm
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>>411456
>you know that divine justice will be waiting for them once they hit 35 or 40+
Or they may not, which is just as good.
>> No. 411459 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 2:01 pm
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>>411457

>>411456 lad again.

My nephew has told me that too. I think it's quite autistic behaviour. You're there in a club to enjoy yourself there and then, not to spend that night incessantly fidgeting with your smartphone.

My "core" clubbing age was during the mid to late 1990s. Just around the time when mobile phones became widely affordable to young people. Maybe it was simply because you couldn't do much of anything with a typical 1990s mobile phone back then besides call somebody, for which the middle of the dance floor was kind of the worst place to be for obvious reasons. But we didn't do any of that nonsense. Very occasionally, you would see somebody break out their phone in the lounge area adjacent to a dance floor, but that was about it.

I think it's borderline autistic behaviour to spend your whole time in the club just looking at a stupid smartphone screen.
>> No. 411460 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 2:43 pm
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>>411456

I was basically born middle-aged. I've always liked cups of tea and pottering about in the garden and early nights. I've always liked blazers and classical music and being sensible with my money. I've always liked feeding the ducks and buying old tools from car boot sales.

I'm not exactly thrilled about my receding hairline and lower back pain, but approaching middle age has largely been a blessing. I used to be a weird old man in a young man's body, but now I'm just an old man. I don't get funny looks when I say that I'm taking my BSA Bantam to a steam rally. My peers are more than happy to have a quiet pint in a quiet pub.
>> No. 411461 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 2:54 pm
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>>411460

One thing that really grew on me at the dawn of middle age is indeed gardening.

I live in a flat myself, but there is a big garden behind my parents' house which needs frequent attention. My parents are both in their 70s and struggle to keep the garden in shape, so I gradually started taking charge about ten years ago. I now often spend entire Saturdays mowing the lawn, cutting back trees and bushes, and tending to flower beds. I would have found all that fucking boring as a 20-year-old lad, but nowadays, I genuinely love doing this kind of thing. Gardening is such a soothing activity. You do something productive, you're out in nature, you often see instant results, and it gets your mind off problems. And I make my parents happy, because they get to enjoy a well-kept garden without having to do all of the hard work themselves anymore.
>> No. 411474 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 5:22 pm
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I've just moved into a place with a huge garden. It's an insane amount of work - the sellers stopped doing anything to it except cutting the grass a couple of months before moving,
Ah well, self inflicted, It'll be nice when it's back under control, but at the moment, it's hack & slash. Also, the peach tree in the greenhouse is looking poorly. Dropping leaves and small fruit. Some kind of spiderweb bastard things living in folded up leaves.
>> No. 411476 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 5:36 pm
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>>411474

If it gets too much for you, rip out some of the stuff at the back of the garden and turn it into a wildflower or cornfield meadow. They're cheap as chips, piss-easy to sow, require practically no maintenance, look great and have tons of eco cred.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=436
>> No. 411477 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 5:52 pm
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>>411476
Yeah, it sort of depends h\\ow much effort we're prepared to sustain.
The far end is apple orchards - it's tempting to keep goats there like the previous owners did. I'm sure we can catch up - it's just a bit overwhelming with all the moving, catching up, tooling up and learning stuff simultaneously. Probably doing the wrong things the hard way, of course. Next year, right things, the right way...
Just grumbling, really, I fucking love it here.
>> No. 411480 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 6:12 pm
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>>408044
Give me job! I design things. Should do, at least.
Also I am foreign, that makes me cheap & eager.
>> No. 411481 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 6:21 pm
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>>411474

Neglect is always your worst enemy in gardening. When you haven't done something in a while, haven't cut back bushes or trees or haven't taken good care of the lawn or the flowers, your garden can turn into wilderness before you know it.

As plant growth tends to be logarithmic the same way as cell growth, the longer you haven't done anything, the faster it becomes even worse.
>> No. 411504 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 8:15 pm
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>>411477
>it's tempting to keep goats there like the previous owners did.

Where is your house? Albania?
>> No. 411506 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 8:24 pm
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>>411504
It's more a smallholding than a house, to be fair. Norfolk, so kind of like Albania except that they get better broadband.
I have, quite comprehensively, packed my rice.
>> No. 411507 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 8:25 pm
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>>411481 As plant growth tends to be logarithmic the same way as cell growth, the longer you haven't done anything, the faster it becomes even worse.

Yeah, hence the hack&slash, and sort it out later. It ain't tidy, but it ain't taking over any more. Much. The lack of rain has also backed things off a bit.
>> No. 411531 Anonymous
18th June 2017
Sunday 11:06 pm
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>>411506
Is it expensive to buy something like that?
>> No. 411544 Anonymous
19th June 2017
Monday 8:06 am
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>>411531
Depends what you want and where - as ever.
This is the one I didn't go for -
https://www.ruralscene.co.uk/properties/ar4527/
£500K gets you 10 acres, nice house, big barn. That one's less agricultural than I went for. So, not cheap as such, but that doesn't buy you much in some cities.
You can get a ramshackle house and few acres for much less, and if you want to live in the arse end of Wales, much much less. Rural bits of Europe can be cheap, too.
>> No. 411550 Anonymous
19th June 2017
Monday 10:43 am
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>>411507
Do you mean logistic?
>> No. 411571 Anonymous
19th June 2017
Monday 6:07 pm
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>>411550
I think he means exponential.
>> No. 411577 Anonymous
19th June 2017
Monday 9:55 pm
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I've always lived in a tower block with no garden in sight anywhere. I moved into a small semi-detached a couple of months back and it has a garden. The landlord is an old woman so she has all these weird potted flowers, herbs and plants all over the place. Since it was so hot, I just keep the windows open for most of the day now. I realised that the flowers and herbs give off this great, strong smell at dusk and dawn. I fucking love it. I sit outside at dusk nowadays and just relax there.

I wish I knew more about gardening.
>> No. 411579 Anonymous
19th June 2017
Monday 10:46 pm
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>>411577

Get yourself to /eco/ mate
>> No. 411581 Anonymous
19th June 2017
Monday 10:50 pm
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>>411544

That's a bit of an eye opener. It's amazing how expensive the property is around here. I'm not surprised to see grotty city centre flats sell for 400k, but you couldn't even get a house that big in half the Yorkshire dales areas I've been looking at. Maybe it's because it's national park land.
>> No. 411589 Anonymous
19th June 2017
Monday 11:45 pm
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Never knew how much an acre was. I'm a visual kind of person and someone once told me that a football pitch is 1.5 acres. Ten acres seems massive. Must be expensive to take care of all that land.
>> No. 411595 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 11:18 am
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>>411589

The hectare is a much better unit. 10,000 square metres, or an area of 100 x 100 metres. Even if you're not much of one for metric, it's piss-easy to visualise and reason about. An acre is the area of one chain by one furlong.
>> No. 411597 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 2:08 pm
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>>411595
Also, if you want to sponge off the farm dole everything is in hectares.
>> No. 411598 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 2:31 pm
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Turns out we get farmdole on the new place. £1400 a year. Feels odd, man.
>> No. 411601 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 3:43 pm
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>>411597
We won't be sponging off the EU soon. Those cunt farmers will go back to being poor and maybe stop cutting down trees and flooding everywhere.
>> No. 411603 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 4:04 pm
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>>411456
>And then when you think of all the opportunity that was right in front of you when you were a younglad. At my age, for better or worse, you will already have gone down a certain irreversible route in your life, and you will have decided not to follow certain opportunities while you decided in favour of others, which then may or may not have come to fruition.

> Another bullet point I remember from that psychology class was that the older you get, the more central it becomes to be able to look back and be happy with the life you have led. For better or worse. But I'm not really 100 percent there yet.

This was fairly difficult for me to read. I am, finally, starting to realise that large root cause of a lot of my sadness is that I am almost entirely unable to look back on my life and be happy with it.

I have always been a melancholy sod who tends to tends to overplay my failures and overlook my triumphs, but I really can't help feeling that I've painted myself into a corner where, as you wisely point out, I've gone "down a certain irreversible route in [my] life" and it's really, really not the route I wanted to go down at all. This leads me to an unenviable position where not only can I not look back and be happy with my life, but I also can not look forward with any real sense of hope, joy, or purpose.

Bugger.
>> No. 411614 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 7:30 pm
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Well this certainly motivates me to continue with my mature student adventure at the ripe old age of 27.
I'd hate to be in my late 30s and not have given it a shot.
>> No. 411618 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 9:19 pm
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>>411614
I went into uni as a mature student and now at the same age as you I feel like I have missed out on so much. Admittedly it's just how different postgrad has been but I guess no matter what you do you end up with regrets.
>> No. 411619 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 9:25 pm
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I just failed a fucking access course at the age of 22. I might kill myself.

It was in fucking media. What the fuck is my problem?!

Fuck!
>> No. 411621 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 9:28 pm
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>>411618

>>411618

Yeah, there will always be regrets but I figure the worst would be the feeling of never having tried to achieve something.

Currently working minimum wage with very little prospect of anything interesting or fulfilling happening in the near future without a change of course, I've got to do something to get out of the rut.

>>411619

I'm going to be a bit of a dick here and suggest that you didn't apply yourself. When I was getting bad grades in my (just completed) access course it was down to not putting in the work. If you were having problems you should have asked for help or told somebody! Have you any chance at resits?
>> No. 411622 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 9:54 pm
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>>411621

I fucked up massively in a really stupid way on my final project, twice. I could have tried harder, but I get so despondent and the way in which I messed up almost drove me mental. I kept thinking I was the only person who was actually real and anything and everything that happened around me was just a reflection of my inner turmoil. I didn't try as much as I could, but I don't know, I just don't care about anything ever. Nothing and no one really interests me. And when I do start mucking stuff up I feel too ashamed to ever ask for help, but my entire existence feels like a permanent embarrassment sometimes. There were no exams, it was wholly practical course.

I've been in contact with local mental health services, but that was weeks ago now. I supposed to get a call today I think, but it never happened.

Actually thinking about this shit is actually quite upsetting.
>> No. 411624 Anonymous
20th June 2017
Tuesday 10:21 pm
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>>411622

Are you sure media and the like is for you? I had similar sounding problems first time round in uni and had to drop out (I also have a few (actually a lot of) mental health issues) but after a few years I considered getting back into education.

Those few years were important and I figured out what I wanted to learn. In my case I decided that the arts/media really weren't what I wanted to study academically as I was happy enough pursuing them in my own time.
So I went for Maths & Physics with my mind on studying engineering afterwards.
The thing is I wasn't great at maths and physics in school, so I had a lot of doubts about pursuing it again, but studying again after so many years I think a lot of the pressure that was present in school was absent and I found the subjects much more approachable and understandable.

I definitely had problems motivating myself for my old artsy degree so I kept that in mind when I was studying again. Maths is a very different beast to art though, I always had difficulty deciding on subject matter for arty subjects but with maths you have a set number of topics you just have to learn. Still found it difficult to get into the swing of revision but I managed to push myself eventually. It's hard work if you're a bit scatterbrained or ADD in your thought patterns, but seeing my grades starting to take a dip helped motivate me to try harder. Just my thoughts on the matter. I don't want to be a complete dick but sometimes all it is is forcing yourself to learn to work harder.

For reference my mental health has been plagued by weird anxiety like symptoms since I was in primary school, which made getting a job difficult when I was older. I've only consistently worked for a couple of years now (at age 27), and at times it has made me feel like complete shit as I try to navigate the shitty world of normie social interaction. It's worth it in the end though, so long as you're capable of looking at it as a learning experience and really working on improving your social skills (or even just your social mask). People are shallow on a lot of levels that make social skills and presentation of yourself a very vital skill to work on.
>> No. 411626 Anonymous
21st June 2017
Wednesday 2:42 am
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>>411621

I knew a few mature students at uni. Yes, there were times when we were making rude jokes about them, but what did we know, being 20 and still all wet behind our ears. They stuck out like a sore thumb at our parties, if they came to them at all. On the other hand, it probably wasn't easy mingling with people ten years younger than yourself. But looking back on it now, they really were a lot more mature than us. And one thing they could always give you was advice about the job world out there, which was very useful for somebody like us "regular" students, who had seen nothing but the insides of classrooms up to that point.

All in all, uni is certainly a life experience. If you succeed at it, it will teach you ways of thinking which you simply didn't know before. And I wouldn't think that it can't be that way anymore for you at 27 or 28. It almost doesn't matter what you choose to study; unless you are a complete prat* to begin with, it will have its effect on the way you see the world, and that effect will very likely last for life. No matter what kind of career path you will then follow after uni.


(* One of my mates was a complete prat before uni and is still a complete prat now, with his law degree long in his pocket. The closest you could describe him would be that he is a real life version of Gaz from Two Pints of Lager, who in a stroke of improbability passed law school and now works as a solicitor)
>> No. 411635 Anonymous
21st June 2017
Wednesday 11:57 am
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>>411624

I definitely like the subject. I think I made a mistake in choosing what I did for my final project, I just wasn't as invested as I thought I would be and it required a lot of travel and organisation and whatnot. Also I have no real friends so I didn't really have anyone to help me out as a favour.

Anyway, my tutor just told me I passed, which is a fucking joke, but is also the worst grade I could have achieved, and means I very much won't be going to uni ever. Cool.

I think I'm going to try to teach myself a lot of new editing stuff and maybe keep writing proposals, scripts and the like, because it was only ever the production itself that made me want to curl up into a ball and die.
>> No. 411639 Anonymous
21st June 2017
Wednesday 1:38 pm
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>>411635

Was it an Access to HE diploma? What was your final grade? The situation probably isn't as bad as you imagine.
>> No. 411640 Anonymous
21st June 2017
Wednesday 3:19 pm
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>>411639

It goes pass, merit, distinction. I understand that only the latter two give you a way into uni.
>> No. 411642 Anonymous
21st June 2017
Wednesday 4:11 pm
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>>411640
Bollocks. Russel group onwards might turn their noses up but I assure you somewhere nice like Chester won't care.
>> No. 411643 Anonymous
21st June 2017
Wednesday 4:21 pm
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>>411642

I hope so. I'm definitely underachieving in life.

Oh, also I lied about having a C in English to get on the course, so I need to sort that.
>> No. 411645 Anonymous
21st June 2017
Wednesday 4:44 pm
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>>411640

The overwhelming majority of access courses are based on the Access to HE Diploma. These courses include 45 graded credits, each graded at pass, merit or distinction. If you're on one of these courses, what counts is the aggregate of all your grades, not just the grade for your final assignment. Talk to your tutor to confirm exactly what qualification you're being awarded and what your grades are, then check the UCAS website.

>Oh, also I lied about having a C in English to get on the course, so I need to sort that.

A lot of less-selective universities don't care about your GCSE grades, especially if you've got a qualification with an equivalent Key Skills component.
>> No. 411648 Anonymous
21st June 2017
Wednesday 4:59 pm
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>>411645
>A lot of less-selective universities don't care about your GCSE grades, especially if you've got a qualification with an equivalent Key Skills component.

I can personally confirm this having gotten into (and finished) university without any GCSEs. The reference I got from a passed employer was incredibly shitty as well so I guess nobody cares to look into that either.

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