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>> No. 25847 Anonymous
5th December 2017
Tuesday 6:17 pm
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I need a good method to calm down or still my mind. I'm prone to panic attacks and would love to be able to to control it through any techniques you guys have.
Expand all images.
>> No. 25848 Anonymous
5th December 2017
Tuesday 6:30 pm
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Sorry I can't be of more specific help but look into some books about Mindfulness. It's all about identifying and mitigating things like this.
>> No. 25850 Anonymous
5th December 2017
Tuesday 6:43 pm
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As great as her increasingly ubiquitous tits are, I can't help but imagine how annoyed I'd be if she came to my dinner party/BBQ/whatever dressed specifically to show off her bazookas to her legions of Instagram wankers followers.

On that topic, OP have you considered knocking one out to her Instagram? Probably not a long term solution, but it's "elinhakanson" regardless.
>> No. 25851 Anonymous
5th December 2017
Tuesday 7:24 pm
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Seconding mindfulness, and just trying to meditate in general, it's a good thing to practice. For the time being here's a song that is supposedly so relaxing it's advised not to listen to it while driving:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfcAVejslrU

The song makes use of many musical principles that have been shown to individually have a calming effect and has been endorsed by the British Academy of Sound Therapy.
>> No. 25852 Anonymous
5th December 2017
Tuesday 8:06 pm
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>>25850

She's welcome to come to my BBQ and stick my hot juicy sausage between her plump buns IYKWIM.

>>25847

The good news is that anxiety is easily the most treatable of the common mental health disorders. There's no magic bullet, but there are many effective techniques that can progressively reduce your anxiety symptoms.

If you haven't already, speak to your GP. They can offer you a range of treatments that you might find useful. Because of the way the NICE care pathway works, you might initially only be offered self-help materials or other low-intensity treatments; if that happens, just make another appointment and you'll get bumped up to the more useful stuff.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is the best clinical intervention for most people, but pharmaceutical treatments can also be useful on their own or in conjunction with CBT. Sertraline or citalopram would be the most commonly offered first-line treatments. These drugs are in the SSRI class of antidepressants and take about two weeks to start working. Anecdotally, people with anxiety tend to prefer citalopram. If you have trouble sleeping, it might be worth trying mirtazapine - there's less evidence to show that it's effective in treating anxiety, but it does have fairly strong sedative effects.

Many people with anxiety and panic disorder find it helpful to use a beta-blocker like propranolol. Beta-blockers suppress the effects of adrenaline, so they reduce the physical symptoms of anxiety like shaky hands and a racing heart. The clinical evidence is mixed, but some people find that propranolol immediately stops their panic attacks and takes the edge off their anxiety.

The newest tool in the arsenal is pregabalin. It has similar effects to benzodiazepines like valium, but with significantly lower risk of dependency and addiction. It's usually only prescribed if SSRIs have failed, but it's worth pestering your GP for it if you think it might be right for you.

If you've had difficulty in getting access to suitable psychotherapy through the NHS, you might want to consider the services offered by Anxiety UK. They can refer you to a local therapist at a means-tested rate for as little as £15 per session.

https://www.anxietyuk.org.uk/our-services/book-your-therapy-here/

In terms of stuff you can do yourself, my first suggestion would be to take a look at your general lifestyle. People often overlook simple things that contribute to their symptoms. Caffeine is a stimulant and can increase symptoms of anxiety, so try to cut down on your intake, especially at night. Don't give it up all at once, because the withdrawals will shit you up. Hangovers can make your anxiety worse, so try to avoid drinking too much.

Exercise is very helpful - it doesn't need to be anything major, just a brisk daily walk can make a world of difference. Sugar can also contribute to anxiety. There's a two-way relationship between stress and insulin, which can set off a rollercoaster of hypo- and hyperglycaemia.

If you tend to get physically tense or jittery, I'd suggest trying progressive muscle relaxation. It's a simple technique that takes about 10 minutes and has an immediate effect. Full instructions are at the link below.

http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/docs/ACF3C8D.pdf

There's an increasingly strong body of evidence supporting the use of mindfulness to manage anxiety. It doesn't suit everyone, but it's well worth a go. This lecture gives a good outline of the history and science behind mindfulness and includes a short guided meditation. If you're interested, I can recommend the book Mindfulness: A Practical Guide. I've included both an Amazon link and a PDF link.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAy_3Ssyqqg

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mindfulness-practical-guide-finding-frantic/dp/074995308X/
https://libgen.pw/view.php?id=880031

For a broader perspective on using mindfulness techniques for dealing with anxiety and depression, I suggest looking into Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. It's the hot new thing in psychotherapy and appears to be highly effective, particularly for people who don't get on with Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. The effect of ACT is slightly odd - it doesn't seem to make people less anxious, but it makes them much less bothered about feeling anxious. Again, links to Amazon and a PDF download for a recommended book below.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Happiness-Trap-Based-revolutionary-mindfulness-based/dp/184529825X/
https://libgen.pw/view.php?id=1051907

I'd also suggest checking out your local library. Every library in the country should now have a "Books on Prescription" section, with a vetted range of self-help books.
>> No. 25853 Anonymous
5th December 2017
Tuesday 8:48 pm
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>>25850

I realise it's very juvenile for a man approaching middle age, but a good big pair of tits like hers will still stop me in my tracks. I'm socially aware enough to not stare and drool, but fuck me if I'm not still very much distracted by them.
>> No. 25854 Anonymous
5th December 2017
Tuesday 10:36 pm
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Perhaps I'm wrong about her, but can you lads imagine basing your existence around a body part of yours? Imagine waking up and thinking hm, how do I best show off my feet today? Carving your entire online persona (the only one many of us have) around your feet?
>> No. 25855 Anonymous
5th December 2017
Tuesday 10:39 pm
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>>25852
This post wasn't directed at me, but I can certainly do with its advice. Thank you.
>> No. 25858 Anonymous
5th December 2017
Tuesday 11:49 pm
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>>25854

It's probably only a small part of her day, really. If it's making her money (I assume it is?) or bringing her some sort of fleeting happiness, then I can't really judge.

I wouldn't like to count up the hours I've spent washing my car, or doing my hair, or trimming my beard. They're all similar activities.
>> No. 25860 Anonymous
6th December 2017
Wednesday 12:15 am
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>>25847
Who is she?
>> No. 25870 Anonymous
6th December 2017
Wednesday 5:53 pm
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>>25847
Try this https://www.headspace.com/
>> No. 25872 Anonymous
6th December 2017
Wednesday 6:06 pm
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>>25852
>SSRIs
>mirtazapine

I have to argue against both of these based on personal experience. SSRIs fucked up my brain chemistry permanently. I have not been able to feel pleasure in the same way since, it is like my entire existence has been muted. I last used them 10 years ago and still affects me, I haven't felt an orgasm like I used to since, the trade-off is not worth it.

To say mirtazapine will help you sleep is an understatement. It will fatigue the fuck out of you, and you will not be able to do more than a small amount of exercise without feeling like your muscles are being chemically burned. It will also increases your appetite, and I've seen research that suggests that it also affects how the body distributes fat making it harder to loss and easier to gain which I could well believe. All of this resulted in me being the fattest I've ever been as direct result of taking Mirtazapine, my body weight increased by a third. It will improve your mood, without permanently turning you into a robot though which is a big bonus over SSRIs.
>> No. 25873 Anonymous
6th December 2017
Wednesday 8:09 pm
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>>25872

Sexual side effects are common with SSRIs, although there's no substantial evidence to suggest any risk of permanent impairment. These side effects appear to be far less common for patients taking citalopram than sertraline, paroxetine or fluoxetine. I can't speak to your personal experience, but SSRIs are relatively very safe and generally well-tolerated by most patients.

Mirtazapine's sedative effects appear to be paradoxically related to dose - higher doses can have lower levels of sedation. It preferentially blocks the histamine receptor which causes drowsiness, but higher doses have noradrinergic effects which offset this. The sedative effects of mirtazapine are strongest in the first two weeks. Weight gain is a known side effect of mirtazapine, affecting about 30% of patients; the average weight gain over a 40 week period is about 3kg (half a stone). We don't know why mirtazapine has this effect or which patients are particularly susceptible. Weight gain may not be of significant concern to everyone; many people with anxiety or depression have poor appetites and may be underweight or at the lower end of the healthy weight range.

Psychopharmacology is a complex and poorly-understood field, so choosing a drug treatment for mental health problems requires careful research, clinical judgement and some amount of trial-and-error. There are advantages and disadvantages to all treatments and everyone responds differently.
>> No. 25874 Anonymous
6th December 2017
Wednesday 8:57 pm
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>>25872

> I have to argue against both of these based on personal experience. SSRIs fucked up my brain chemistry permanently. I have not been able to feel pleasure in the same way since, it is like my entire existence has been muted. I last used them 10 years ago and still affects me, I haven't felt an orgasm like I used to since, the trade-off is not worth it.

How long were you on them? I was Escitalopram for a couple of months the worst I had from it was (sometimes ridiculously) delayed ejaculation. Then I went on venlafaxine and within two weeks I was in the grips of full on anhedonia orgasmica (pleasureless orgasm), I immediately noped the fuck out and began tapering off. It took months to feel pleasure during orgasm again and even now it's not quite what it was.

What was really weird was that it seemed to take away all of the dopamine related "brain pleasure" from everything from having sex to having a beer. Either it was entirely rerouting my dopamine via the reuptake inhibition or, terrifyingly, actually being neurotoxic to dopamine receptors.

>>25873

> there's no substantial evidence to suggest any risk of permanent impairment

Because no one's done the studies exactly because the results would be inconvenient to say the least.

In the not so distant future we will look back at SSRIs in the same way that we look back at Benzedrine and Valium now; horribly under-researched snake oil with ridiculous side effect to therapeutic benefit ratios handed out like Smarties to turn a profit.
>> No. 25877 Anonymous
6th December 2017
Wednesday 10:37 pm
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>>25874
>How long were you on them?
This is all close to 10 years ago so my memory is fuzzy. I was on Escitalopram for about 3 months until my insurance run out, then I switched to citalopram for I guess a year or 2 before I switched to Mirtazapine for probably a year.

>What was really weird was that it seemed to take away all of the dopamine related "brain pleasure" from everything from having sex to having a beer. Either it was entirely rerouting my dopamine via the reuptake inhibition or, terrifyingly, actually being neurotoxic to dopamine receptors.

This sounds like my experiance only I never recovered.
>> No. 25884 Anonymous
7th December 2017
Thursday 2:53 am
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>>25877

> This sounds like my experiance only I never recovered.

I wonder if the variable factor was how quickly I came off once I realized what was happening. The idea that these drugs are capable of turning off your basic dopamine pleasure response reward system is frankly terrifying.


Also, while no actual doctor would recommend this, my own personal plan if my ability to feel pleasure hadn't come back was to really flood the brain with dopamine in an attempt to hard-reboot whatever the fuck was wrong (basically drop 50-75mg of methamphetamine into my system; to give you some idea, cocaine produces a huge release of dopamine, up to about 350 units, with methamphetamine you get up to about 1250 units). Apropos of nothing...

>> No. 25906 Anonymous
7th December 2017
Thursday 11:01 pm
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>>25847

I find Alan Watts explains anxiety best: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5qtrhE6Fmg

>>25877

Do you masturbate a lot? Orgasming releases a lot of dopamine and also tricks your brain into thinking you're getting laid constantly. If you stop, your dopamine will increase naturally, you will have more energy because your brain wants to get you laid again.
>> No. 25914 Anonymous
8th December 2017
Friday 9:41 am
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>>25906

>Do you masturbate a lot? Orgasming releases a lot of dopamine and also tricks your brain into thinking you're getting laid constantly. If you stop, your dopamine will increase naturally, you will have more energy because your brain wants to get you laid again.

[citation needed]
>> No. 25923 Anonymous
8th December 2017
Friday 6:10 pm
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>>25914

This is an experiment you can do yourself if you don't believe it.

If you don't notice a difference in mood/energy after a week, then go back to wanking again, doesn't matter to me, and it'll be an amazing orgasm, so what have you got to lose?
>> No. 25924 Anonymous
8th December 2017
Friday 6:30 pm
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>>25923
>so what have you got to lose?
Your prostate.
https://www.nhs.uk/news/cancer/frequent-ejaculation-may-decrease-prostate-cancer-risk/
The increase in 'energy' that you're talking about tails off after a week or so, something to do with testosterone or one of the other similar/related hormones. My conclusion is that you should have one day a week where you masturbate 3-4 times then not any other.
>> No. 25925 Anonymous
8th December 2017
Friday 6:51 pm
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>>25924

Absolute pseudo-science. What do they mean by "ejaculation"? Is that by masturbation or sex? Ejaculating by having sex is much better for us because of the emotional connection and the exercise it provides, it's natural. Wanking to porn everyday is depressing and saps our sexual energy without anything in return.

Yes anecdotal, but I always find that after having sex I have more energy during the next day, but masturbating just saps it away.
>> No. 25926 Anonymous
8th December 2017
Friday 7:06 pm
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>>25925
>What do they mean by "ejaculation"? Is that by masturbation or sex?
It means ejaculation. That's not a complicated term mate.

I imagine the difference, as unrelated as it is to the actual science mentioned above, has to do with the same thing as men being able to exercise harder when a woman's around, again, a momentary burst of hormones.
>> No. 25927 Anonymous
8th December 2017
Friday 7:54 pm
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>>25925
Pseudo-science? It's a cohort study you mong. It's from similar studies that we get such pseudo-scientific nonsense that smoking during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of infant mortaility.
>> No. 25934 Anonymous
8th December 2017
Friday 11:34 pm
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>>25927

They based their argumen on what is 'natural', and sapping 'sexual energy'. I don't think they actually understand what pseduo-science is, it is just a phrase someone used in an argument with them once.
>> No. 25937 Anonymous
9th December 2017
Saturday 11:14 am
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I can't speak for other SSRIs but I wouldn't recommend Sertraline and I'll personally never take an SSRI again. I had MONTHS of withdrawal symptoms even after tapering down. There was no benefit and I'd rather not be a zombie with a broken willy. Even if they'd helped, the horrific withdrawal set me back so much it would've made any improvement pointless. Ultimately my anxiety is far worse now and the minor depression symptoms I had before have become major ones.

It isn't worth it for me to try another type, I was lied to about what these are and what they do. I used to think everyone who denounced SSRIs were of the "man up" variety and I wish it hadn't taken this experience to open my eyes. Maybe they can "help" some people, but trading my entire personality for relief isn't worth it to me.
>> No. 25943 Anonymous
10th December 2017
Sunday 1:52 am
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I do appreciate these comments, chaps. I had thought I was being daft for stopping the SSRIs, but it's true, they were making my life worse, for sure. I might not have been as sad, but I was more anxious than I've ever been, not to mention the willy worries.

My missus is a mental health nurse and seems to think the people describing these symptoms aren't doing themselves any favours in the long run by stopping the medication. That seems to be the thinking of most in the trade, which I find troubling.

When my GP laughingly described one of the 'very rare' side effects of sertraline to be sucidal thoughts, perhaps I should have trusted my gut and never taken them.

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