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>> No. 26822 Anonymous
11th June 2018
Monday 10:50 pm
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I can't find a proper job and it's depressing me. I've got a degree, 2:1. I'm 25 and sick to fucking death of working a shit minimum wage job where I'm treated like a bellend by management and customers alike. I keep applying to job I think I could do but never hear back. Are there unknown tricks and hints to landing this mysterious grad job? Lord fucking knows I'm sick of stacking shelves.

Maybe I should take more of a change with more 'out there' jobs. I'm really frustrated with my life at the moment. I sometimes think about suicide although I know I would never ever do it. I think it's more of a indicator I've got to change my situation than do something drastic.

Just needed to rant.
Expand all images.
>> No. 26823 Anonymous
11th June 2018
Monday 11:07 pm
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Does knowing you're not alone help? I'm in exactly the same situation, and not to be presumptuous but I'm sure others on this board are, and thousands more across the country.
>> No. 26824 Anonymous
11th June 2018
Monday 11:07 pm
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>>26822
What's your degree in? For STEM that's rather unusual.
>> No. 26825 Anonymous
11th June 2018
Monday 11:08 pm
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>>26824
Is it, though?
>> No. 26827 Anonymous
11th June 2018
Monday 11:17 pm
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>>26824 Media production.
>> No. 26828 Anonymous
12th June 2018
Tuesday 12:10 am
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>>26827

At the risk of sounding cruel. That is a degree that is treated in very low respect outside the industry, and is too over subscribed to be meaningful in the industry. It has one of the lowest pay for graduates for the very situation you are in now. Surely you were warned this was a risk when you took the subject?
>> No. 26829 Anonymous
12th June 2018
Tuesday 12:11 am
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>>26828
>Surely you were warned this was a risk when you took the subject?
Not him but by whom?
>> No. 26830 Anonymous
12th June 2018
Tuesday 12:17 am
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>>26829

Career advisors, the general paraphernalia they hand out to people at colleges when they start to apply to unis, and probably in the materials given out by the universities themselves when you visit them. It really is a well enough known statisitc that I can remember it and I applied for uni 15 years ago.
>> No. 26831 Anonymous
12th June 2018
Tuesday 12:27 am
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>>26828 yeah I know that now, and no I wasn't warned. I was told I'd have a creative and fulfilling job and get paid to travel to exotic locations, I'm not even joking or being facetious.
>> No. 26833 Anonymous
12th June 2018
Tuesday 12:40 am
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The most construtive advice I can give you is get a job as a runner. The pay is shit, but it is the gateway into the industry and is considered a rite of passage.
>> No. 26834 Anonymous
12th June 2018
Tuesday 1:49 am
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Did this degree teach you the practical side of TV production or just the getting tea and chatting shit parts?
>> No. 26835 Anonymous
12th June 2018
Tuesday 9:53 am
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>>26833
Aren't a lot of the entry level media jobs ones that tend to use unpaid interns? I always thought because it's such a desirable industry, they take advantage of people who want to work in it.
>> No. 26837 Anonymous
12th June 2018
Tuesday 10:16 am
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>Are there unknown tricks and hints to landing this mysterious grad job?

I don't know how much of a secret it is, but when you apply for graduate schemes, you need to be able to explain how the stuff you did at uni are transferable and useful skills.

I did a music degree, but I can talk long and hard about my use of highly directed, technical hardware and software, how composition assignments can translate into planning, preparation, and an understanding and comprehension of set guidelines, how playing and collaborating with other musicians for coursework is a clear sign I work well in groups, etc etc.

Essentially for us poor fools who did non STEM degrees, our qualifications aren't necessarily immediately obvious to an employer, but if you're capable of expressing how your course content is actually useful in the workplace then you're golden.
>> No. 26839 Anonymous
12th June 2018
Tuesday 9:46 pm
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I'm sorry to hear about your situation OP.

I, like you, studied something non-stem and found myself trapped for a bit. worse than that, I couldn't get a minimum wage job filing paper, so I tried to get the experience doing it, I couldn't even get that.

It was quite a low when I couldn't get somebody to let me come in and literally work for free.

I was unemployed for a while, managed to luck out and get a grad job job, was unemployed again, got another job, then got on a really competitive grad scheme which is where I am now.

The main thing to remember is it's not personal. I've been rejected for countless jobs paying way less demanding way less in skill and I took that as a reflection that if I wasn't good enough for those jobs, I was somewhere below that.

This is false. I am now earning more than any of the jobs that rejected me paid and taking on more responsibility and skill.

Most of it is luck, and perseverance. If you want on grad schemes, buy the books and practice thier shit maths and reasoning tests.

Get to assessment centres and pretend you already work there and are just filling in the gaps for interns as a candidate didn't show up.


If you just want a generic grad job and know what field, make a Linkedin and search for people with a job you want and see what route they took, it can really help illuminate things and give you an idea of a rough set of skills and experiences you need.

You're just 25, it's far from over as long as you keep trying.

I'm here often, if you have any specific questions, please let me know, happy to help. I know how dire it can seem, but you can get out of this.
>> No. 26840 Anonymous
12th June 2018
Tuesday 9:47 pm
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>>26839

Also lad, without wanting to be rude to the other lads, I think they're wrong.

I also wasted a lot of time trying to show how my degree related to jobs I was applying for. Scrap that, it's about aptitude.

You need to be assertive, confident, a good listener, willing to show initiative and communicate well. It's up to you how you find ways to demonstrate this.
>> No. 26841 Anonymous
13th June 2018
Wednesday 5:12 am
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>>26840

>You need to be assertive, confident, a good listener, willing to show initiative and communicate well. It's up to you how you find ways to demonstrate this

Absolutely, and the perfect opportunity to showcase this is by being able to write a cover letter that explains your transferrable skills. You can't exactly show anyone how good a listener you are if you never get an interview because you haven't bothered to explain why someone with a media degree is even applying for a graduate developers scheme.
>> No. 26842 Anonymous
13th June 2018
Wednesday 6:41 am
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>>26841

>Absolutely, and the perfect opportunity to showcase this is by being able to write a cover letter that explains your transferrable skills.

What's your point? The point I was making is that nobody really cares about whether or not you think you can communicate well from your music degree, they want to hear it from real, meaty examples in the real world.
>> No. 26843 Anonymous
13th June 2018
Wednesday 7:42 am
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>>26842

Never mind lad.
>> No. 26844 Anonymous
13th June 2018
Wednesday 1:00 pm
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>>26839
How old do people applying for grad schemes tend to be? Due to changing courses/long term illness I won't graduate my undergrad course until I'm 27. Will I be too old to compete with the young bucks who apply when they're 21?
>> No. 26845 Anonymous
13th June 2018
Wednesday 1:15 pm
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>>26844
Why do you think you'd be unable to compete with them?
>> No. 26846 Anonymous
13th June 2018
Wednesday 2:23 pm
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>>26844

I think most people prefer to hire someone a bit older. There's a perception we know what we're doing more than the younger folk. Saying that I rarely have to disclose my age on application forms anyway.

In your case, as a fresh graduate, you'll be on equal footing with the 21 year olds.
>> No. 26847 Anonymous
13th June 2018
Wednesday 6:25 pm
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For what it's worth, OP, I graduated with a BA and MA (which I paid for) in English Literature and I'm now 28, working in a pretty good job. I'm definitely not in the type of long-term career I want to be in, but it's an above-average salary for my area. More importantly, the experiences I've had over the past few years have been invaluable.

It's a fucked up system, but applying for jobs and getting hired is very much about tailoring applications, jumping through hoops, and dogged perseverance.

I won't try to offer advice, but I will tell you how things came together for me: I worked a load of various temporary jobs while doing my MA to pay off my loan. As I paid down my debt, I signed up to one of the better agencies handling healthcare admin around my hometown. While there, I was smashing out applications for permanent positions left, right and centre. I interviewed for a part-time permanent NHS job, landed it due to one of the doctors liking the cut of my jib, and stayed there for about two years. I earned a pittance but it looked fantastic on my CV. During this time I was in constant contact with my old university careers advisor, who put me in contact with a place doing private healthcare I.T. type work. After two interviews there, I'm now on a decent full-time wage.

These things tend to compound, one thing after another, step by step. The above probably isn't unusual, but it's not a typical 'grad job' route, either. No one expects you to stack shelves forever.
>> No. 26848 Anonymous
13th June 2018
Wednesday 7:33 pm
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>>26844

Obviously you get a lot of fresh uni grads, but there's a good mix, particularly in certain areas or on certain schemes.

And no, nobody gives a shit about how old you are. I bombed miserably after uni for a while as I said and I work with fresh grads, I work with older people, I work with career changers.

There are people that are in their 50s and gunning through these things, I really wouldn't worry abotu your age at all lad.

20s is still very, very young.
>> No. 26849 Anonymous
13th June 2018
Wednesday 9:31 pm
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>>26848
Makes me feel better about applying for a graduate position as a 30 year-old. Cheers for that.
>> No. 26850 Anonymous
13th June 2018
Wednesday 11:06 pm
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Lads OP here, I'm begging to think my depression and suicidal thoughts is more to do with my lack of important and overall happiness with life but I think getting the right job would really help with some of those feelings.

Thanks for all your replies and well wishes!

>>26848 That makes me feel a lot better!

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