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>> No. 15521 Anonymous
6th June 2018
Wednesday 9:02 pm
15521 Welsh lad dies in Shagaluv
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6448731/magaluf-british-irish-tourist-dead-apartment-fall-spain-jumped-over-wall/

>Brit tourist fell 65ft to his death in Magaluf after ‘jumping over wall thinking corridor continued on the other side’

>A YOUNG Brit who fell to his death hours into his Magaluf holiday jumped over a wall thinking there was no drop, police believe.

>Thomas Owen Hughes, 20, was found lying dead below the Eden Roc apartment block on Sunday morning at about 11am.

>He was initially described by police on the island as Irish - but they have now said he was British.

>Investigators also said they believed he fell to his death after mistaking the apartment block where he fell for his holiday hotel.

>Mr Hughes is understood to have been staying at Magaluf’s Universal Hotel Florida, virtually next door to the Eden Roc block.

>Sources at the local Civil Guard, the force investigating Mr Hughes in conjunction with a local court, said today they believed the death was a tragic accident.
Expand all images.
>> No. 15522 Anonymous
6th June 2018
Wednesday 9:32 pm
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Bit grim, but okay.
>> No. 15523 Anonymous
6th June 2018
Wednesday 9:35 pm
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>>15522

Is there a rule that we can't have grim news on here?
>> No. 15524 Anonymous
6th June 2018
Wednesday 9:42 pm
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>>15523

Did I tell you to stick your thread, you touchy so and so?
>> No. 15525 Anonymous
6th June 2018
Wednesday 10:08 pm
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>>15524

It was an honest question.

You're the one needlessly turning it into a cunt off.
>> No. 15526 Anonymous
6th June 2018
Wednesday 10:24 pm
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>>15525

You see, when you think “touchy so and so” is the start of a cunt off, you might be the one starting the cunt off, with intent or otherwise.
>> No. 15527 Anonymous
6th June 2018
Wednesday 10:30 pm
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>>15526
Yeah, well, anyone who uses curly quotes outside of Microsoft Word is a definite cunt.
>> No. 15528 Anonymous
6th June 2018
Wednesday 11:05 pm
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>>15521

Sixty-five feet (or twenty meters)... Bloody hell. Talk about thinning the herd.

Source of my image: http://twistedsifter.com/2012/03/65-foot-snow-corridor-in-japan/

Imagine falling from that height...
>> No. 15529 Anonymous
6th June 2018
Wednesday 11:08 pm
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>>15528

When did it snow like that in Magaluf?
>> No. 15530 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 12:17 am
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>>15529
When Amy Winehouse dropped her handbag?
>> No. 15531 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 1:14 am
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>>15522

Grim? I chuckled and thought "darwinism."
>> No. 15532 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 1:19 am
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>>15531

Like this berk who thinks there should be a sign on a sea wall to say there's a big drop.

https://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/news/i-ll-sue-over-horror-fall-1-6631599
>> No. 15533 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 1:48 am
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>>15532
What a silly bugger. He should be asking for a mattress at the bottom. As everyone knows, falling is painless - it's hitting the ground that does the damage.
>> No. 15534 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 2:25 am
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He was sitting on the high bit, with his feet on the seat bit, stood up and pratfell over backwards. I'm not sure how one would even pull that off if it was ground level behind it.
>> No. 15537 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 11:21 am
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>>15534

Reminds me of being in Havana and strolling along the Malecon promenade every night. The Malecon is basically a sea wall right on the Atlantic Ocean that's a few miles long. It's typically around 15 to 20 feet above sea level. It's the centre of social life for many ordinary Cubans at night, where they gather to fish, have a few drinks and cigars, or ask a few pesos off Western tourists for amateurish renditions of La Cucaracha or Ay Mi Cuba on their plywood guitars.

Anyway, even a 15-foot drop can probably near enough kill you. Because you'll probably land on some jagged rocks at the bottom of the wall, or worse, you'll drown in the sea which is often somewhat rough along the Malecon.

But Cubans don't seem bothered. Some locals told us that yes, there have been people who died falling off the wall, but that they just should have been more careful.

Cubans in general seemed to have a much more natural attitude to life's dangers. Not like health and safety obsessed Britain. We also visited a sugar cane cooperative where they extracted the sugary juice from sugar cane stalks. Health and safety would have had a field day here, as the mechanical press they were using provided many different possible ways of sticking your hands in the wrong place and then, well, pretty much having its juices extracted as well. But they, too, just said, "Well, you just have to be careful, that's all".

This is why the human genome is deteriorating, you know. Because we are permitting people to live who would all have died from their own stupidity when we were still all cavepersons. And we're letting some third world communist country show us up.
>> No. 15538 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 4:41 pm
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>>15537

>This is why the human genome is deteriorating, you know. Because we are permitting people to live who would all have died from their own stupidity when we were still all cavepersons

While I don't agree that we should just let stupid people die, I think the way we see danger in the west has allowed people to be far less alert and wise than they should be. The more likely scenario to a thicko using that arm crunching machine is that he'd realise that he'd better fucking learn to pay attention while using it, thus maybe improving his general awareness that little bit. Add lots of little experiences up like that over a lifetime and you're left with maybe not a clever person, but certainly a competent one. Whereas in Britain all he'd have done is press a button from six feet away and worn some goggles just in case.

There's quite a lot of thickos that work in the restaurant industry, but since their entire life revolves around knives and hot objects, they do seem to learn a certain sharpness they didn't start with, I see it all the time. I suspect this is similarly, and more effectively, what happens in places like the military, or practical, heavy industrial positions.

A little bit of struggle in life is probably all it takes to make a solid man (or woman).
>> No. 15539 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 5:59 pm
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>>15538

>Whereas in Britain all he'd have done is press a button from six feet away and worn some goggles just in case.

And it would be accompanied by a siren sound and a sign flashing the words "sugar extraction in progress".

I am good with knives, as home cooking has been one of my hobbies for some 20 years now. I can chop celery like other people shuffle cards, and people have told me they were amazed at the speed at which I can cut up a pot's worth of vegetables for a stew. Without ever cutting myself at all. But again, it's 20 years of frequent practice. And you really only gain that kind of dexterity with your hands through years of practice. And indeed by now and then cutting yourself, and badly. But not by wearing cut proof gloves or goggles.

If I ever lose my desk job, would you be interested in hiring me? Always good to have a plan B...
>> No. 15542 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 6:18 pm
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>>15539

The only times I've ever cut myself was by using a knife wrong - I have two scars on my offhand finger because of trying to use a normal knife to cut crusty bread, and the knife slipped. Not sharpening a knife can also lead to bad cuts, but even then you're far less likely if following proper technique.

If you use the 'claw' technique pictured, it's basically impossible to cut yourself unless you're swinging the blade like an axe. I remember my very first head chef didn't use that technique, and would proudly show off his mottled hand full of scars, saying it was how he 'learned' to cut properly. I just asked him why he didn't just hold stuff like in this picture, then he wouldn't have had cut himself at all. He didn't like me very much.

It's a lot of fun to stare someone directly in the eye while chopping stuff really fast, I think it goes a long way to impressing the waitresses. It freaks the fuck out of some people too, but it's not particularly dangerous.

>If I ever lose my desk job, would you be interested in hiring me?

Definitely, to be honest even without britfa.gs nepotism you'll get a job in a kitchen no bother, people like to hire vaguely competent people who are new to the industry so they can mould them. Though I suppose I could get you better than minimum wage.
>> No. 15543 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 6:21 pm
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>>15542
>Though I suppose I could get you better than minimum wage.

You really are spoiling us, Mr Ambassador.
>> No. 15544 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 6:23 pm
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>>15543

Sadly in the world of hospitality, that's an incredible offer. I've seen head chef jobs advertised for a tenner an hour.
>> No. 15545 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 6:54 pm
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>>15542

There was a documentary about Chinese cuisine on TV a while ago, where they showed a chef in a Chinese street kitchen using a big, razor sharp cleaver, the kind you use to chop through bone, to delicately peel a fist sized onion. Which he was able to do expertly without fault. The presenter then asked why he would take a cleaver like that to peel an onion, and he just shrugged and said he had been doing it that way all his life.

I guess the point here is that even the most odd technique of doing something, when perfected, can be efficient.
>> No. 15546 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 7:14 pm
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>>15545

>I guess the point here is that even the most odd technique of doing something, when perfected, can be efficient.

That's true, though the argument could be made that he'd be more efficient if he'd learned to do it with a smaller knife, or at least he'd have perfected it faster. To be honest as long as a knife is sharp as fuck and you're dexterous enough to control it, then technique will translate. I just don't think there's much point getting your fingers in the way when you absolutely don't have to, which is how my old chef would do it. He might not have cut himself for years, but he's cut himself about a hundred times more than I have now I'm his age.

I'm also guessing it was a chinese cleaver you saw, which has more in common with a normal knife than a bone cleaver (it's lighter and thinner) and is used as a do-it-all knife in asia to great effect. They're great, I have a cheap one knocking around somewhere. Not that you couldn't peel an onion with a meat cleaver, mind.

Without descending too far into knife wankery, it's been said (and I agree) that the weight of a heavier knife lends more stability which leads to greater precision.


>> No. 15547 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 7:35 pm
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>>15546

I think you're right in that I just remembered that the Chinese chef did say that his cleaver was his all-purpose knife in his kitchen.

Maybe it's a bit like the wok being the Chinese all-purpose cooking pot, frying pan, and what-have-you.

Ok now I'm hungry. Maybe I will get some Asian take away in a bit.
>> No. 15548 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 8:05 pm
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>>15542
>If you use the 'claw' technique pictured, it's basically impossible to cut yourself
I've tried to cut 'properly', I really have, but I don't understand it. The last time I tried it that way instead of my usual way (pictured) the knife sliced into my index. There's no way of avoiding the skin on your fingers each time you bring the knife up and back down.
>> No. 15550 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 8:15 pm
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>>15548

You rest the flat of the blade against a knuckle, like in my picture - you shouldn't ever raise your knife edge above this knuckle, you don't need to, effectively you're rubbing the flat of the knife against the knuckle and using it as a guide. As much as I love your diagram, I'd have to see you in motion to assess what you're doing wrong, but I suspect it's either lifting the blade too high, or keeping your fingers too straight.

Start at 2:00 here to see what I'm talking about better, he films it at a perfect angle to see what to do:


>> No. 15551 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 8:34 pm
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>>15547

>I just remembered that the Chinese chef did say that his cleaver was his all-purpose knife in his kitchen.

>Maybe it's a bit like the wok being the Chinese all-purpose cooking pot, frying pan, and what-have-you.

I'm a little bit obsessed with the idea of a minimalist approach to cooking, and all things really. I love the idea of the cleaver and the wok as the only tools necessary to create an entire culture's worth of food. It's very refreshing when you're used to Western chefs lugging about huge knife cases. I had three different melon ballers and four sizes of paring knife in my kit for a long time, FFS. It's not at all necessary when you can do basically everything with a single chef's knife too.
>> No. 15552 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 9:36 pm
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>>15551

As I said, I only cook as a hobby. But I, too, only have three knives that I really use. One is a big meat knife with which I cut anything from steak to large vegetables, then I have a paring knife for the slightly smaller things, and a fruit knife with a serrated blade which I use for delicate things like ripe tomatoes (because it'd be a pain to sharpen the other knives each time just to neatly slice a tomato). Oh, and I also have a potato peeler, really the cheapest kind you can get, I think it was 49p once at Tesco's in the bargain aisle. But it's the best potato peeler I have owned in a long time.

I believe it's the Vietnamese who say that "A poor workman blames his tools". In other words, if you are good at what you do, then you don't need a whole drawer full of fancy highly specialised knives to prepare a good meal. Your skill will be refined enough to make do with lesser tools and kitchen implements.
>> No. 15554 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 10:20 pm
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>>15552

>In other words, if you are good at what you do, then you don't need a whole drawer full of fancy highly specialised knives to prepare a good meal. Your skill will be refined enough to make do with lesser tools and kitchen implements

That's very true. I can fully understand why someone who skins 50 salmon a day might want a long, thin, filleting knife, but that's not a realistic scenario for very many people, and with the requisite skill it's just as easy with a 10" chef's knife. I think those drawn to cooking, professional or home, tend to be quite obsessive people as it is, so just want to collect as many shiny objects as the can. I'm no different, I have about 40 knives, and used to carry them all around in a big fucking toolbox as an agency chef. But it just wasn't necessary.

This is what I carry around now, working in all sorts of different kitchens for different people. The oyster knife admittedly is quite specialist, but that's just down to what I tend to lean towards.
In all honesty I probably don't even need the steel, as every fucking kitchen in the world has one somewhere, and even if they don't, you can use the rough ceramic on the bottom of a mug or plate anyway. I just wrap all that up in an apron and stick it in my bag. I've never once wished I'd brought anything extra.

Sage for me borderline blogging at this stage.
>> No. 15555 Anonymous
7th June 2018
Thursday 11:03 pm
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>>15554
I've noticed over the years that people broadly fall into two categories when it comes to any pursuit, be it creative, practical or intellectual.

Type A loves learning about all the fancy techniques and bells and whistles and new developments and speciality equipment and loves building a mental and physical collection of these, seeing it as a natural part of their progression.

Type B prefers to grind away at the basics, often almost fetishising how much they can accomplish with the simplest techniques and equipment, less distracted than type A by niche avenues to discover.

This is obviously a massive oversimplification and I'm not describing it very well either, nobody is either completely A or B. But I keep seeing it in my life. As an example, years ago at skool when me and my friends went through that stage where we all wanted to play the guitar, one of my mates was rather richer than me. He got a nice guitar with an expensive amp, and kept buying pedals for all sorts of things, electronic tuners and metronomes, different slides and capos, spending all his time trying to learn things like two-handed tapping and sweep-picking and the like. He couldn't stand there and play out a full song for the life of him. He ended up getting very frustrated at how much better I sounded on my cheapo Yamaha, when I just practiced for hours a day since I had nothing better to do. Lately another friend of mine got into weightlifting, quite coincidentally, at the same time as me. He's been upset at my progress when he's been trying all these fancy dietary things like keto or GOMAD or avoiding polyunsaturated fats (this list goes on forever) and he loves very unconventional exercises. Meanwhile I'm poor again and just eat the same, albeit more, and go to a cheap gym where I mostly do simple compound lifts, and he's frustrated I've had more progress. Even those grip-building doodads you squeeze haven't helped him beat my deadlift. But then I'm often frustrated when he tells me his new routine and I've no idea what the lifts he's talking about are since I've never bothered to memorise that much.

As I said, huge oversimplification. Hopefully you sort of know what I'm on about. I'd actually class myself as a natural Type A, I love having specialist knowledge and possess no attention span. I've occasionally just been coerced toward Type B by circumstance.
>> No. 15557 Anonymous
8th June 2018
Friday 12:20 am
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>>15555

I know exactly what you mean. I think I'm a natural Type A too, but have learned to be a Type B through the circumstances of being poor as fuck growing up. I also think when I do first get into something I buy everything under the sun related to it, but as I learn more and more about it, I eventually pare it down to the bare minimum of exactly what I need and what works for me. It's a very expensive way to go about things, and I think it has a lot to do with compensating for not being able to have anything as a kid. And admittedly though it's the bare minimum amount of equipment I need, there's still about £200 in that picture.
>> No. 15558 Anonymous
8th June 2018
Friday 12:37 am
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>>15555

I'm an avid angler myself.

Fishing is a hobby where quite often you can blow some serious money on all the state of the art gear that your overpriced fishing supplies shop will manage to sell you. The irony is that none of it will help you catch more fish if you are unlucky. I don't believe that there is such a thing as "talent" for angling, but there are just people who will catch more on a rusty nail and a piece of string than you will on your 300-quid rod and reel. In other words, in my experience, for most people there is almost zero correlation between the money you spend on equipment and the amount of fish you end up catching with it.

I have about five or six mid-priced rods altogether (I'd really have to go into the basement to count them), and three upmarket reels. I still try to be reasonable with the price of new equipment I buy. The one thing I don't regret buying is the three reels, they are Shimano, Mitchell and Penn reels and all three of them were worth the money. But again, none of it is a guarantee that you will catch a single fish.

I tend to have a decent amount of luck though whenever I go. Usually there's always a fish or two biting.
>> No. 15559 Anonymous
8th June 2018
Friday 12:51 am
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>>15555

Behavioural economics makes the distinction between "optimisers" (people who want the very best) and "satisficers" (people who are happy to settle for something that's good enough).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satisficing

>>15550

It can be very fiddly to use the claw grip on small, rounded items like the last slice of a tomato. I don't know what the proper technique is, but I often end up laying things flat on the cutting board and slicing through them horizontally or pinching them between finger and thumb and carefully cutting down the middle.

>>15552

>I believe it's the Vietnamese who say that "A poor workman blames his tools". In other words, if you are good at what you do, then you don't need a whole drawer full of fancy highly specialised knives to prepare a good meal.

I think we've taken the wrong moral from that saying. A workman's tools are his responsibility. If he hasn't brought the right tools for the job, that's his fault. If they're of substandard quality, that's his fault. If they're poorly maintained, that's his fault. If he's blaming his tools, he's really only blaming himself.

You can buy an old Record or Stanley woodworking plane from a car boot sale for a couple of quid. If you know what you're doing and you're prepared to do some fettling, you can end up with a very fine tool. A cheap Chinese plane is an exercise in frustration, because it's just fundamentally incapable of reliably producing a clean cut. You can make do, but the speed and quality of your work will inevitably suffer. A £300 Lie-Nielsen plane is only marginally better than a well-fettled old Stanley, but you know that it'll be perfect out of the box. If you're an amateur with more money than time, that reassurance might be worth paying for. If you don't know what a really good tool feels like, it can be hard to overcome the deficiencies of a bad one.
>> No. 15560 Anonymous
8th June 2018
Friday 1:31 am
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>>15559

>It can be very fiddly to use the claw grip on small, rounded items like the last slice of a tomato. I don't know what the proper technique is, but I often end up laying things flat on the cutting board and slicing through them horizontally or pinching them between finger and thumb and carefully cutting down the middle.

The former is exactly how I do the last bits of big tomatoes and onions etc., and the latter is how I do cherry tomatoes and baby radishes such. Anything else around new potato sized or smaller and harder than a cherry tomato, I'll do with a paring knife in my hand, which is not that safe really, as you're essentially cutting towards your thumb. But anyway as far as I know your solutions for small stuff are the logical ones.


Anyway, I've found a hilariously overdramatised rendition of basically the first thing you learn to do in a kitchen, and people reacting as if it's a superhuman ability. I can't stop laughing at it. Imagine standing there while that unit stares at you from over his glasses.


>> No. 15561 Anonymous
8th June 2018
Friday 1:46 am
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>>15558

I have a mate who would probably strongly disagree about the talent in fishing. But from how it sounds it's all about knowing your waters, knowing the baits, and absolutely nothing to do with having expensive gear.

I would imagine a nice rod helps in the same way a high end guitar feels nicer to play or an expensive pan is more predictable to use, but like almost everything else we've discussed won;t make you any better on its own.
>> No. 15563 Anonymous
8th June 2018
Friday 5:56 pm
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>>15560
A lot of people just never put the effort into learning. Or they do learn but then stubbornly stick to it wont try other ways of doing the same thing.
Alex French Guy is a great example of how to keep improving.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOqwl2KTzd4
>> No. 15565 Anonymous
10th June 2018
Sunday 12:46 am
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>>15561

The secret really is in reading the waters where you plan to fish. And just plenty of "local knowledge". Try to make out where your target species might gather (read up on it on the web or watch a few youtube videos for that purpose), and then your focus is going to be all on how to fool that species into thinking there isn't an angler on the other end of that juicy worm or maggot that's floating in front of them in the water. And if you are new to a fishing spot, always strike up a chat with a local next to you who is fishing there as well. Anglers tend to like helping out fellow anglers and don't normally see them as competition.

I've been on fishing holidays to places like Sri Lanka and the Caribbean, where often you have dirt poor locals, and all the fishing gear they own is a spool of nylon monofilament with a couple of hooks on it, or one battered old fishing rod with a creaky old reel. And I saw them pull 30-pound fish out of the water like it was nothing. While I, with my carbon fibre fishing rod and brand name reel worth a combined £120, with teflon monofilament for £10 a spool, often ended up going home with almost nothing.


>I would imagine a nice rod helps in the same way a high end guitar feels nicer to play or an expensive pan is more predictable to use

It does make the experience more fun. I maintan that your rod really doesn't have to be top of the line, depending on your target fish, nearly any mid-range rod will do. But your reel is where it's at, and where quality is going to make a big difference. A £15 reel from your local shop just tends to feel cheap and not well put together. The bearings will be low-grade, it will be "clickety", and it won't run as smoothly. I wouldn't trust a reel like that to withstand anything large and nasty that has taken your hook (a good size conger or catfish might end up being the ultimate test for your reel). Being that your hands will spend a great deal of time fidgeting with the reel, you really should invest in something proper.

My favourite reel for some time has been my Mitchell Avocet Salt 4000. It's a midsized eggbeater reel, but you can still reel in a 25-pound fish with it no problem. It runs incredibly smoothly, if well looked after (I completely strip it down and regrease it at the beginning of every season), and build quality is flawless. It runs for about £40 now, but I bought it new when it came out for almost £60.
>> No. 15566 Anonymous
10th June 2018
Sunday 11:25 am
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>>15565
I recently discovered that some fishermen use remote controlled "bait boats" to survey the water (using sonar and fish finders). It is apparently very successful, but I'm not sure what the point of it all is.

https://deepersonar.com/en/
>> No. 15567 Anonymous
10th June 2018
Sunday 1:16 pm
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>>15566

I went on an offshore big game fishing trip in the Canaries once. They took us a little more than a mile out to sea, and they had a built-in sonar device on their boat. It was definitely convenient, because it allowed them to locate schools of tuna or other fish for us. In open water, with up to a mile of water column below you just a mile from shore, it's otherwise pretty unpredictable where there might be fish and where not.

But I don't see the point of a sonar device for a muddy shallow lake in Britain. It looks more like some sort of cutesy gadget. You will be much better off going by what you actually see. General knowledge about where you might find your target species in a lake and then taking it from there normally does the trick. In that sense, I think a sonar device like that is cheating.
>> No. 15568 Anonymous
10th June 2018
Sunday 2:12 pm
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>>15563
This was an interesting video. I enjoyed it.
>> No. 15700 Anonymous
21st July 2018
Saturday 9:43 pm
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In parenthesis

'stupid cunt'

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