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>> No. 17017 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 1:16 am
17017 drones over Gatwick
(to stop us continuing to fag up the /101/ thread)

It is really starting to sound like they've arrested the wrong people.
17 posts omitted. Last 50 posts shown. Expand all images.
>> No. 17036 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 2:19 pm
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What if the Quadcopter-carpet-bagger starts sending drones out over our school playgrounds next? Especially interested in the opinion of >>17027
>> No. 17037 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 3:12 pm
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>>17032
It's also the 30th anniversary of Lockerbie.
>> No. 17038 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 3:27 pm
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>>17030>>17031
I feel really sorry for them - that is a shit start to Christmas.
>> No. 17040 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 3:43 pm
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>>17036
It isn't school playgrounds I would worry about - here are some interesting and relevant things from 2 (!!) years ago about what the ISIS drone makers have been getting up to.



and this

http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/7155/isis-drone-dropping-bomblet-on-abrams-tank-is-a-sign-of-whats-to-come

As you can see, these are all the consumer-level DJI ones repurposed, so fairly easy to mitigate against.

If I wanted to spy on school playgrounds, or something similar jimmy-like, I think it would be a flying wing rather than a quadcopter. If I just wanted to hurt people, well, RC aircraft have been around for years, flying something into someone would definitely kill, and in the old days they would have petrol and shit - far more combustible. Most model aircraft/drones nowadays are ridiculous fragile (carbon fibre, balsa, polystyrene makes up nearly all of them), you wouldn't be able to take many people out. There is also the cost - the OP picture is a professional level DJI used for filming - I guess one could repurpose it for kiddie-fiddling-type surveillance, but it costs about 6 grand and you would be likely to lose it; I imagine even paedos are working to a budget. Lastly, these things can stay in the air a LONG time - there are some amazing YouTubes showing first-person-video flights.

https://www.banggood.com/ZETA-FX-79-Buffalo-FPV-Flying-Wing-EPO-2000mm-Wingspan-RC-Airplane-Kit-p-1092449.html
>> No. 17041 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 4:53 pm
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>>17035
A quote from plod:

"We are also going through many reports of sightings of drone activity over the last few days," he said.

He added there was "always a possibility that there may not have been any genuine drone activity in the first place", but they were working on a range of information from members of the public, police officers and staff working at Gatwick who had reported otherwise.


Christ on a fucking bike, it gets worse.

PERHAPS THE WHOLE THING WAS TROLL COMPLAINTS???

So a load of eco-warriors make complaints saying they saw a drone and that shuts an international airport?? This is even more nuts.

>>17029
LAD IT WAS YOU!
>> No. 17044 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 4:58 pm
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5jNVhBbuZY

NOT NOW VODAFONE

Even if you are using ArduPilot over GSM as I suggested in >>17019
>> No. 17045 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 5:15 pm
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>>17041

That surely can't be right. The tower would have been able to see the drones and they wouldn't have shut down the entire airport without such confirmation.
>> No. 17046 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 5:54 pm
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>>17045
It's human nature. All it takes is someone in the tower to think they've seen the drone everyone is talking about or to adopt the mentality that they they daren't admit
they can't see it because the consequence of saying it's fine for planes to continue flying leading to an incident when they were forewarned would be too great.
>> No. 17047 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 6:34 pm
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>>17046

I do understand that, but ATC operators are heavily trained to avoid this exact sort of pattern of thinking.
>> No. 17048 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 7:12 pm
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>>17040
I reckon it's time Purpz hands over our resident drone-lad. Today it's closing airports and stopping kids going outside at playtime but next thing you know he will stop Father Christmas from coming.
>> No. 17049 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 7:15 pm
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>>17048

If eagles can be trained to stop drones, surely flying reindeer can.
>> No. 17050 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 7:55 pm
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>>17049
I've always thought it particularly cruel to try and train animals to intercept drones - the chances of the props turning them into mincemeat is pretty fucking high, even if you have super eagle eyesight and claws.

Far more sensible to let the Police cosplay as anti-tank soldiers.
>> No. 17052 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 8:58 pm
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A few pigeon hunters would solve this problem nicely. I know drones are pricey, but if you can't keep it in your proverbial pants, you should learn what a bell end you are.
>> No. 17053 Anonymous
23rd December 2018
Sunday 9:38 pm
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>>17050

The Dutch have abandoned the idea of using trained eagles.

It's an endemic problem in all sorts of research - they didn't sanity-check their hypothesis and method by asking some people already working in that field. I keep seeing experiments where they only tested on the consumer-grade DJI drones, presumably because they're easy for novices to get up and flying; the problem is that these drones are incredibly benign in all sorts of ways. They're small, they're slow, they don't produce a lot of torque and they're designed to be as safe as possible in a crash. Crudely speaking, they're expensive toys.

A decent heavy-lift drone of the type used by professional photographers is a genuinely scary bit of kit. It'd make absolute fucking mincemeat out of a bird of prey. Serious racing quads are capable of 0-60mph in under 2 seconds and a top speed of well over 100mph. Accidents involving larger model helicopters have caused decapitations - they're basically flying lawnmowers. Anyone who thought that an eagle might be a serious deterrent to drones clearly hasn't asked any radio control hobbyists.




>> No. 17057 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 10:35 am
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>>17053 That camera drone is fair enough - scary amount of battery, but otherwise just a nice big drone.

The mad helicopter, though - even watching it at 0.25 speed, it's insane. It just seems to row itself through the air. How on earth can it have enough side thrust to do that? The multiple-g up & down is impressive, but the off-axis stuff is stunning. Clearly matey doing the flying is quite good - but the machine's performance is unreasonable. Not sure I'd want to see an FPV feed...
>> No. 17058 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 11:14 am
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I don't have a clue what I'm talking about but what if every drone had a remote identifying feature, sort of like a remotely accessible pet's microchip,then if law enforcement had a skeleton key type of override feature and could take over the remote control.
>> No. 17059 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 12:35 pm
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>>17058
I can build a drone from scratch if I want, Make PCBs, solder components onto it, load open source software into it. Plans like yours would only work on commercially made drones, through legit sales channels, and would only affect the lawful and idiots, not miscreants.
>> No. 17060 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 12:45 pm
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>>17059
Simple solution. If a drone doesn't provide identification, shoot the fucker down. The technology already exists to do this without using projectiles.
>> No. 17061 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 2:00 pm
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>>17060 If it's pissing around with an airport, why ask it for ID?
Pick the chip out of the smoking wreckage.

If I'm messing around on my own land, or with permission, though, I think that shooting it down, ID or not, seems unreasonable. .
>> No. 17062 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 2:51 pm
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>>17061
>If it's pissing around with an airport, why ask it for ID?
I'm not ruling out the possibility that in future there may be legitimate reasons for a drone to be at an airfield. Also it would be consistent with existing air and sea practice where you hail an unknown craft before firing upon it. If you know who's operating a given drone, you can notify them if it's going somewhere it shouldn't. In future it could be used to alert an autonomous vehicle to emergency airspace restrictions.
>> No. 17063 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 3:22 pm
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Why can't a drone just be tracked by old fashion means. I assume Gatwick has a radar system and a few helicopters around what's wrong with just finding out where it lands and seeing who collects it and giving the opperater the traditional 'polite conversation whilst the cameras are off down at the station'?
>> No. 17064 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 3:33 pm
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>>17063
You know that phrase "below the radar", right?
>> No. 17065 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 3:37 pm
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Gatwick drones: Police called to drone sighting find it was a light on a CRANE

https://www.mylondon.news/news/south-london-news/gatwick-drones-police-called-drone-15591495
>> No. 17067 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 4:09 pm
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>>17064

Yes you mean where military aircraft fly low so the curve of the earth blocks the radar signal. Now I want you to think about why I logically think that wouldn't apply when you are within visual sight of an airport and and you need constant signal from a radio control unit.
>> No. 17069 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 4:39 pm
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>>17067

Not him, but I'd like you to think logically about why a drone the size of a bird might not be that noticeable on an ATC radar.
>> No. 17070 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 4:53 pm
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>>17057

Modern brushless electric drivetrains deliver absolutely insane amounts of power. The limiting factor used to be servo motors, but they went high-voltage brushless a few years ago. At the extreme end of 3d aerobatics, the main challenge for aeromodellers is building an airframe and rotor system that can cope with the unbelievable g-forces involved. It's not unheard of for a model to just rip itself apart in mid-air.

I can confirm that an FPV feed from an aerobatic helicopter is a horrendous ordeal of motion sickness.

>>17060

This was discussed at length in the other thread; the police are simply unwilling to shoot a drone down because they can't be sure of where the bullet will land. You know how some Arabs and Yanks like to shoot guns in the air as a celebration? People regularly die when those bullets come back to earth. A shotgun with frangible shot would be reasonably safe, but you're limited to a range of about 100m. Larger drones can happily cruise at a couple of kilometres above ground level.

As was discussed at length in the /101/ thread, there's no easy answer to stray drones. The radio control systems they use are highly resistant to jamming and it's entirely feasible for a serious hobbyist to build a fully autonomous drone that can keep flying even in a complete radio blackout. Jamming GPS signals in close proximity to London is potentially more disruptive than a drone over an airport.
>> No. 17071 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 4:56 pm
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>>17069

You can definitely see a drone on radar, but at that level of sensitivity you'd be picking up all sorts of other junk as well. A savvy drone builder could use radiotransparent materials (kevlar and glass fibre) for the frame and propellers, reducing the radar profile of their drone to little more than a pigeon. In the general case, false alarms are likely to be far more disruptive than actual drone incursions.
>> No. 17072 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 5:09 pm
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>>17070

>A shotgun with frangible shot would be reasonably safe

Do they not still use shotguns and pellet shot to do bird control at airports anyway?
>> No. 17074 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 6:12 pm
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Have Labour called for an inquiry yet? That's usually their stock response to this sort of thing.
>> No. 17075 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 6:39 pm
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So do we seriously not know who it was? In today's world with all the surveillance bullshit. How is that possible? My uncle got a ticket in the post for dropping a cigarette butt in the street once.
>> No. 17076 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 6:52 pm
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>>17072

From what I've read, they generally prefer nesting deterrents like spikes and nets combined with active deterrents like birds of prey, noise generators and lasers. Wandering around airside with a shotgun is a massive liability issue.
>> No. 17077 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 7:04 pm
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>>17070
>the police are simply unwilling to shoot a drone down because they can't be sure of where the bullet will land

I repeat
>The technology already exists to do this without using projectiles
>> No. 17080 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 9:50 pm
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LADS IT WAS ALIENS COVERED UP /BOO


>> No. 17082 Anonymous
24th December 2018
Monday 11:20 pm
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>>17075

>So do we seriously not know who it was? In today's world with all the surveillance bullshit. How is that possible?

I'm not sure, but it makes me feel good.
>> No. 17084 Anonymous
25th December 2018
Tuesday 12:35 am
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>>17077

>The technology already exists to do this without using projectiles

There are some devices on the market that might take down some drones some of the time.

A 2.4GHz jamming device will "shoot down" some radio controlled drones. Some of them will just drop out of the sky, some of them will carefully land themselves, some of them will gracefully return to a pre-programmed landing site using GPS, some of them just won't care because they're not operating on 2.4GHz. A wideband jammer will affect these non-2.4GHz systems, but they'll also interfere with everything else in the area that uses radio; of particular concern are mobile phones, emergency service and aeronautical radio systems. FHSS control signals used by modern radio control systems are remarkably difficult to jam, especially if the operator is using high-gain antennas and exceeding the legal transmitter power limit.

A GPS jammer won't "shoot down" anything. Some drones flying on a GPS-based autopilot will automatically land, some will fly north until they leave the range of the jammer or run low on battery (at which point they'll land), some of them will failover to IMU navigation and continue their flight plan with mildly degraded autopilot accuracy.

A GPS spoofer would cause most (but not all) GPS-guided drones to hurtle back to earth, but they're controlled weapons under international law because they pose a tremendous threat to civil aviation. The GPS signals sent by the satellite constellation are extremely weak and they propagate in unpredictable ways, so a GPS spoofing device may cause navigation errors in aircraft operating tens or hundreds of miles away. You might take the drone down, but there's a very real chance that you could cause an emergency situation on a passenger jet.

All of the above options are currently illegal (even for police forces) without an amendment to the Wireless Telegraphy Act. The Armed Forces can legally deploy these systems, which is why they were called in at Gatwick. For obvious reasons, we're not entirely sure what technologies they are using.

There are various entanglement-based devices on the market, but most of them haven't been demonstrated against high-performance drones. They'll definitely take down a DJI Phantom, but they might be torn to shreds by a big hexacopter or simply outrun by a fast quad.

Some researchers have demonstrated prototypes of ultrasound-based devices that would interfere with the accelerometers and gyroscopes in the drone's aeronautics package, causing a loss of attitude control. These devices have not been successfully demonstrated in real-world situations and would in any case have very limited range.
>> No. 17085 Anonymous
25th December 2018
Tuesday 1:36 am
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>>17084

Why not just build a load of kamikaze drones to smack the bad drones out of the sky?

You could either automate it or employ a local FPV wonk.
>> No. 17088 Anonymous
25th December 2018
Tuesday 3:42 pm
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>>17084
Just knock together a few high PSI air vortex cannons in someone's shed or buy a few hail cannons off the yanks. if it doesn't blow the drone apart it will fall like a brick. There's no risk of a small to medium size air-vortex taking down an airliner, no projectiles hurting peoples feelings and can probably keep pigeons away on an automated system.



That's what I thought otherlad was talking about.
>> No. 17094 Anonymous
25th December 2018
Tuesday 8:33 pm
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>>17085
Or use eagles


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5E6m252IbiY
>> No. 17095 Anonymous
25th December 2018
Tuesday 8:47 pm
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>>17094

Do keep up, lad - >>17053
>> No. 17107 Anonymous
26th December 2018
Wednesday 3:04 pm
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>>17095
Use vultures instead.
>> No. 17112 Anonymous
26th December 2018
Wednesday 6:38 pm
17112 spacer

600px-Vulture_Patrol.png
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>>17107
But vultures don't have any anti-air attack!
>> No. 17302 Anonymous
8th January 2019
Tuesday 6:28 pm
17302 Heathrow airport: Drone sighting halts departures
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-46803713
>> No. 17303 Anonymous
8th January 2019
Tuesday 6:34 pm
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>>17302

A quid says it's just a stray carrier bag.
>> No. 17304 Anonymous
8th January 2019
Tuesday 6:35 pm
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>>17302
I'm happy to temporarily be blamed for it if it means I'll get a fix figure payout from the papers.
>> No. 17307 Anonymous
8th January 2019
Tuesday 9:04 pm
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>>17302
I WAS DEFINITELY AT WORK
>> No. 17309 Anonymous
8th January 2019
Tuesday 9:17 pm
17309 spacer
Bet it was just a bit fat wood pigeon, all fluffed up because of the cold.
>> No. 17310 Anonymous
8th January 2019
Tuesday 9:37 pm
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>>17307
You ain't fooling us with that old chestnut. It'll be the front page of the Mail for you tomorrow 'PUSHIN' HIS LUCK: CANAL ENTHUSIAST BLOCKING ASYLUM SEEKER DEPORTATIONS'.
>> No. 17349 Anonymous
13th January 2019
Sunday 11:37 am
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Whack some lasers on it! I can't believe the Drone Troll hasn't thought of this yet. The real world effectiveness would likely be quite limited, but ire would be immense.
>> No. 17350 Anonymous
13th January 2019
Sunday 1:40 pm
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>>17349
That would just allow people to see exactly where the drone was in the sky.
>> No. 17351 Anonymous
13th January 2019
Sunday 2:42 pm
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>>17350
Now you tell me.

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