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>> No. 5803 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 1:04 pm
5803 10k to invest
I've got 10k sitting in my current account not earning me anything. I think it's time I invested it in something.

So ideally I'd like zero risk, high reward and the ability to liquidate it at short notice. Clearly I can't have all three so I suppose I could deal with not having access to it for some period of time.

I'm not worried about ethics (land mine companies etc would be fine) but it has to be 100% legal.

Any suggestions?
Expand all images.
>> No. 5804 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 1:15 pm
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>>5803
>Clearly I can't have all three so I suppose I could deal with not having access to it for some period of time.
FWIW, and I'm sure you've realised this already, in setting out your iron triangle you've freed the one corner that opens up by far the fewest options. If you're looking for very low risk and very high reward, I can only really recommend the lottery. £2 at stake but potentially millions in reward.
>> No. 5805 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 3:19 pm
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>>5803
> zero risk, high reward
What kind of fantasy world do you live in?
>> No. 5806 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 3:42 pm
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Peer to peer lending
>> No. 5807 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 4:02 pm
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>>5806
I tried this. Thanks to bad debts I only just broke even after two years, plus it requires a lot of active management if you're to reinvest the repayments so they're not sat there doing fuck all.

What timescale are we looking at, OP?
>> No. 5808 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 4:04 pm
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>>5804

> If you're looking for very low risk and very high reward, I can only really recommend the lottery

Mirth.

Anyway, there really are no low risk / high reward (legit) investments out there, because if there were then everyone and his dog would be investing in them.

My personal Top Tip is to try to work out a way to open a savings account in a country with massive interest rates. You get all the benefits of high interest, with none of the downsides of living in a high inflation economy.
>> No. 5809 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 4:23 pm
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>>5808
>none of the downsides of living in a high inflation economy
Apart from the dwindling exchange rates. It's all well and good doubling your rubles but if you get twice as many to the pound you gain nothing.
>> No. 5810 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 4:44 pm
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Applying for £1K or so of Lloyds shares when the discount becomes available is looking like it could be a good idea. The discount combined with the bonus for keeping them for one year could make it quite low risk and high-return compared to other investing options, although it could still all go tits up.
>> No. 5811 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 7:42 pm
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>>5810
Apologies for hijacking, but how does one actually buy and sell stocks? Can you just go on a website like in GTA? I'd like to try pissing about with low-value ones and a few quid.
>> No. 5812 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 8:00 pm
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>>5811
That's what websites like Stocktrade are for.
>> No. 5816 Anonymous
9th October 2015
Friday 9:12 pm
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>>5811
I'm not entirely clued up on the details, but buying these shares involves pre-registering interest through a government website. And as around a quarter of a million people have currently registered their interest in buying, it might be a bit too late already.
>> No. 5852 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 3:27 pm
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>>5811
>>5812

On a similar note but maybe not worth a new thread:

Last time I was on the London underground there were advertisements about for an online stock trading site with a cutesy-ish name. I should have made a note of it but didn't. Any of you regular commuters see the same ad?

I'm also interested in investment and plan to have a few things on the go within the next year.
>> No. 5853 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 3:56 pm
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>>5852
If you're planning on purely share dealing then the differences between the likes of AJ Bell, Hargreaves Lansdown, Stocktrade, The Share Centre, Alliance Trust, HSBC, Barclays, Halifax, etc are small, but it will depend on how often you're trading and how much you're investing.
>> No. 5854 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 4:04 pm
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>>5852
I tried an app on my phone called Trading 212 for a couple of weeks with a 10k practice account.

They seem to advertise a fair amount.
>> No. 6129 Anonymous
26th January 2016
Tuesday 7:35 pm
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>>5803
I realise I'm fairly late to the party replying to this; but for zero-risk you can't do much better than Santander's 1-2-3 current account.

3% on balances up to 20,000. Aside that, you can open a couple of 5% interest accounts (TSB, Lloyds) but they are only for balances up to 3000 and 2,500 respectively last time I checked.

If you're not looking to use the money for a while, get into bonds.
>> No. 6132 Anonymous
26th January 2016
Tuesday 8:17 pm
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>>6129
>zero-risk

The average cash interest rates in each year since the turn of the century haven't generated a real return. By all means save enough to establish an emergency fund but apart from that you're losing out.
>> No. 6136 Anonymous
28th January 2016
Thursday 2:42 pm
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>>6132
If I'm reading this correctly, it's showing the money earned/lost adjusted to inflation? Thanks for the diagram, but it seems that it's a tad out of date.

Inflation didn't go above 0.3% in 2015, so earning 3% is still getting you SOMETHING at least. That said, what would you recommend for medium/long term savings? Bonds?
>> No. 6137 Anonymous
28th January 2016
Thursday 7:45 pm
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>>6136
The chart was made by Nutmeg, who are discretionary investment managers (mainly using ETFs) so do they have an interest in making cash look unappealing. Equities will beat cash over the medium to long term.

For cautious investors over the medium to long term there are structured deposits, MetLife's capital guarantee ISA, Prudential's range of PruFunds (ISA or bond, but the protected ones are only available for under a bond), Aviva's Guaranteed 90/100 funds (bond), LV's flexible guarantee funds (bond), there's a few funds which try to guarantee a return of at least 80% of the highest ever share price (Investec's Multi-Asset Protector and one from Zurich/Sterling, off the top of my head) and then there's plenty of what used to be called defensive managed (Mixed 0-35% shares) and cautious managed (Mixed 20-60% shares) but if you're savvy enough you could beat OEIC funds using ETFs. There's many options, the best fit depends on your objectives and risk tolerance.
>> No. 6138 Anonymous
28th January 2016
Thursday 7:49 pm
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>>6136

Standard advice is an even mix of gilts, investment-grade bonds and tracker funds. There's some debate about the appropriate ratio, but most advisers agree that you need a mix of bonds and shares.

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