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>> No. 418310 Anonymous
2nd July 2018
Monday 1:01 pm
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New week thread.

What is happening in your life?
Expand all images.
>> No. 418313 Anonymous
2nd July 2018
Monday 3:49 pm
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>What is happening in your life?

Maybe I should rephrase my question.
>> No. 418314 Anonymous
2nd July 2018
Monday 6:46 pm
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I'm moving house in a few weeks. It's bloody hard work just thinking about it.
>> No. 418315 Anonymous
2nd July 2018
Monday 7:48 pm
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>>418310
Not much. Couple of family members dying.
>> No. 418323 Anonymous
2nd July 2018
Monday 10:44 pm
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We are moving into new offices in the same building this week. So we literally have to schlep everything but the kitchen sink up three floors. The small things like chairs, filing cabinets and various office appliances fit in the lift, but items like two 8 ft long solid wood meeting room table tops have required four of us at a time moving each of them up via the staircase.

I'm still not exactly sure why we didn't just rent additional space on our old floor. It is nice to now be in the part of the building that borders right on the coveted rooftop terrace. But I wonder if it was worth the effort of moving everything up three floors. Then again, maybe all the coffee breaks that we will spend outside in the sun overlooking the city from now on will make it worthwhile.
>> No. 418331 Anonymous
3rd July 2018
Tuesday 12:17 am
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I've just hacked together a USB charging cable for my old Gameboy Advance, so I'm pretty pleased with myself.

I've got a real one coming from Amazon but I was desperate to lay in bed playing some Pokemon. I have a slight obsession for playing old games like that in the fully nostalgic way, rather than just with an emulator on my phone. The rubbish speaker and weird old front-lit LCD screen is just part of the feeling that it's missing without.

I wish I had a CRT telly so I could play megadrive games again.
>> No. 418345 Anonymous
3rd July 2018
Tuesday 12:37 pm
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>>418331

> I have a slight obsession for playing old games like that in the fully nostalgic way, rather than just with an emulator on my phone.

You should take a look at the Lazy Game Reviews channel on youtube. The lad there does just that in his reviews of vintage console and DOS games.

https://www.youtube.com/user/phreakindee
>> No. 418346 Anonymous
3rd July 2018
Tuesday 3:07 pm
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>>418345
I couldn't tolerate his voice.
>> No. 418347 Anonymous
3rd July 2018
Tuesday 3:29 pm
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>>418346

What's wrong with it, other than him being a Murrikin?
>> No. 418357 Anonymous
3rd July 2018
Tuesday 7:16 pm
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>>418323
I'm often told I'm a bit odd, but I've always enjoyed office moves and stuff like that.
As long as you haven't got arthritis or anything, and they're not asking you to do it outside of work hours with no pay, then what's not to like?
>> No. 418360 Anonymous
3rd July 2018
Tuesday 8:11 pm
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>>418357

Oh, don't get me wrong, it has been fun in its own way. The whole atmosphere has been much more relaxed than our typical workdays.

The problem is, we really have a fair bit to do at the moment, with project deadlines still before the peak of summer holiday season. We are going to have to get caught up on all of that on Thursday and Friday, and then possibly work at home this weekend. So no, technically it's not unpaid after hours work we have been doing since Monday morning, but the lost work time we will have to make up for could end up being exactly that.

Our boss has always said he'd love to have our offices adjacent to the rooftop terrace, and then the company that was in what are now our new rooms suddenly went tits up at the end of May, so my boss lost no time and phoned facility management the next day to tell them he wanted to move. There was apparently sort of an unofficial waiting list, but the other two or three competing companies inside our building either would have needed more space or less, so it worked out for us in the end. Our space situation was getting slightly crammed anyway, so now we've got about 400 sq ft more than we did on the old floor three stories down. Which should be a good fit for us at this point in time.
>> No. 418374 Anonymous
4th July 2018
Wednesday 12:36 pm
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So how do you see our chances of winning against Sweden this weekend, .gs?
>> No. 418375 Anonymous
4th July 2018
Wednesday 12:54 pm
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>>418310

OP reminds me of this


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNMq8XS4LhE
>> No. 418378 Anonymous
4th July 2018
Wednesday 1:18 pm
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>>418375


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3n2oZCAxAIw
>> No. 418379 Anonymous
4th July 2018
Wednesday 4:44 pm
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>>418374

Pretty close to 0, given the way we played yesterday.
>> No. 418380 Anonymous
4th July 2018
Wednesday 5:45 pm
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>>418310
Going to work and going tesco for some food
>> No. 418381 Anonymous
4th July 2018
Wednesday 9:00 pm
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Puppy chewed my glasses. Are same-day opticians appointments no longer a thing? People were offering me slots in a week's time, ffs.
>> No. 418382 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 12:46 am
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>>418381
What decade are you thinking of lad?
God help you if you want a Doctors Appointment.
>> No. 418384 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 1:07 am
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>>418382 

I still have luck oftentimes ringing up doctor's offices if they can "squeeze me in" that day. Most of the time, they will tell you you can come but that you will have to be prepared to wait two or three hours. 

Also, I have a bad back and when it acts up again and ibuprofen doesn't do the job, I go into A&E and tell them I had a sequestrated lumbar disc hernia a few years ago (that's pretty much the grand daddy of disc hernias, short of being paralysed), at which point I will get sympathetic looks from the orthopedist and all the prescription strength pain relievers I want.
>> No. 418385 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 1:21 am
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>>418381
How old were the lenses? If they were within the last year, you might as well just buy another set of specs. If you're sure for another test in the next few months, get the cheapest ones you can lay your hands on and keep them as a second pair when you get proper ones.

If you can't see well enough to get to work and do your job, call in sick as you may pose a risk to yourself and others.
>> No. 418396 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 11:00 am
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>>418385

>If you can't see well enough to get to work and do your job, call in sick as you may pose a risk to yourself and others.

Elf and safety, innit.
>> No. 418399 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 11:33 am
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>>418381
>>418382

Maybe it depends where you live. Specsavers in the Arndale Centre seems to have several available today.
>> No. 418405 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 1:50 pm
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Looking at last minute package holidays. The Canaries look tempting.
>> No. 418408 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 2:51 pm
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>>418385
Lenses must be at least five years old, and I've got old and long sighted in the meantime, hence the reluctance to dig out an ancient prescription. Christ, maybe bifocals beckon, but I really don't like that idea. I'm a shambling fuckwit at the best of times - variable lenses depending on angle strikes me as guaranteed carnage. Even wearing a hat means I forget that the world above me exists and I continuously bash my head into things. Not knowing where my arms are would be worse.
(and far from Arndale, but thanks, m80)
>> No. 418415 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 4:39 pm
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>>418408
Sounds like you're due for a test. Since you're long rather than short, if you know your prescription and can get away with it pick up some cheapo reading glasses. They're shit, but they'll get you through the week or two until your new set are ready.

Also, protip for anyone that didn't already know, collect new glasses on a Friday or Saturday if you can. I'm very short sighted, and it typically takes me a day or two to adjust every time.
>> No. 418421 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 8:48 pm
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Christ, lads.

I hope I never need glasses. They sound like a proper pain in the arse.
>> No. 418422 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 8:57 pm
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>>418421
Just get LASIK if you do.
>> No. 418423 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 9:01 pm
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>>418422

I'm blind as a bat without my contact lenses, but I would never get laser surgery.

I've had contacts since age 16 and I never really had many problems with them, so I see no reason really.
>> No. 418425 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 9:45 pm
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Got a cancellation today, so new glasses inbound.
Can't do the reading glasses thing, as my prescription is almost all cylinder, no sphere.
And hell no, to LASIK. Far too high a probability of permanent uncorrectable obtrusive damage. While my eyes may be shit without a bit of plastic in front of the, they're great when they're corrected. I've also heard enough things bounce off my lenses (or splatter on to them) that I really feel uncomfortable when not protected. Glasses forever.
>> No. 418426 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 10:16 pm
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>>418425

> Far too high a probability of permanent uncorrectable obtrusive damage.

My granddad was developing a glaucoma in his right eye as he got towards his 80s. He told me once, "Anon, your eyes are the most precious gift you will ever own. Guard them well!".

I keep remembering that. I always wear high-quality UV blocking sunglasses when the sun is out, and I switched to UV blocking contact lenses as well a few years ago. My eyesight may be shit without my contact lenses, but with them, my eye doctor has said, I have the eyes of an eagle. Apparently, around ten percent of the population have an unusually high resolution of the retina, which is what I also have. So it's a bit as if the rest of the population sees the world in HD, and I see it in 4K.

Anyway, my point is, I am far too worried that I could spoil that with botched LASIK. Everything I have heard about it so far and from the experiences that friends have told me who have had it done, nothing quite sways me to have it done on my eyes as well.
>> No. 418428 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 10:47 pm
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>>418426

The complication rate is unreasonably high for what is basically a cosmetic procedure. I'd feel like a right tit if I permanently fucked my eyes out of vanity.

>>418425

You can order a cheapo pair of glasses online for less than £20. If you need glasses to drive, it's a good idea to keep a spare pair in the glovebox.
>> No. 418431 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 11:11 pm
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>>418428

> You can order a cheapo pair of glasses online for less than £20

Depends on his prescription and his tolerance for coke bottle lenses. The minimum I can expect to pay for a pair of Chinese glasses is about £75 for glasses where the lenses jut out of a plastic frame, or £113 if I want them thin enough to be more or less flush with the frame. If i got £20 glasses the lenses would be so thick they'd probably hit my eyes.

I've also looked into LASIK/PRK but the complications worry me. Not just blindness, but the more common side effects like dry eyes and seeing starbursts and halos around light sources at night. I already have all that shit and I wouldn't want it getting any worse. I wish there were better options out there but it seems to me that we're basically stuck with ever-improving technology from the 1970s until we're advanced enough to safely replace eyes with healthy new ones growns from stem cells.
>> No. 418434 Anonymous
5th July 2018
Thursday 11:31 pm
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>>418431

>but the more common side effects like dry eyes and seeing starbursts and halos around light sources at night.

I had a swollen cornea once from overwearing my contact lenses. That is, I was working crazy hours at the time and barely got six hours of sleep at night. Which meant I often wore my contact lenses 18 hours a day. And if you do that every day for some time, a side effect can be an irritation of the cornea and then a swelling. Which isn't painful besides an occasional itching sensation, but, and this is my point, you see halos around light sources and other bright objects. It's very irritating and certainly not something I'd want to have permanently as a side effect of laser surgery.
>> No. 418439 Anonymous
6th July 2018
Friday 10:38 am
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>>418431
>>418434

>seeing starbursts and halos around light sources at night.

I'm glasseslesslad, and I get that quite strongly. Are my eyes actually fucked?
>> No. 418442 Anonymous
6th July 2018
Friday 12:13 pm
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I really want to fly to a certain eastern European country to make a passionate gesture to this bird (verified not a honeytrap) but there's no way I can afford it.
>> No. 418445 Anonymous
6th July 2018
Friday 12:56 pm
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>>418442
>to make a passionate gesture to this bird
Is this what the kids are calling it now eh
>> No. 418448 Anonymous
6th July 2018
Friday 1:17 pm
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The lesbian couple in the flat next door have just adopted a baby. They were sitting on their balcony last night with the baby, and told me they were now proud parents.

I was really only under the impression that they were flatmates up until now, not really having had much contact with them since they moved in. But a few things now make more sense.

Good on them. They seem like they will make nice parents.
>> No. 418455 Anonymous
6th July 2018
Friday 3:02 pm
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>>418445
I decided to jerk off and watch Fringe instead. Much cheaper.
>> No. 418456 Anonymous
6th July 2018
Friday 3:25 pm
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I've realised that corn on the cob is a perfectly good snack food.
>> No. 418457 Anonymous
6th July 2018
Friday 3:31 pm
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>>418455

Good on you.

There is no such thing as a bad time for a wank.
>> No. 418458 Anonymous
6th July 2018
Friday 4:05 pm
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>>418457

I fully agree.
>> No. 418460 Anonymous
6th July 2018
Friday 4:30 pm
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>>418458


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFYZj9noPiM
>> No. 418555 Anonymous
8th July 2018
Sunday 1:27 am
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>>418310

HAD A WANK OVA GIRLS NO BRAS NO NICKAS. SAW FANNIES AND NIPS OUT FLUTTERIN BREEZE WHOOPS SAW YER BUM CHEEKY FLIRT SUMMER NIPS POKIN OUT I'M 24 HARD AS WOOD LUV SPUNK LIKE A VOLCANO
>> No. 418776 Anonymous
17th July 2018
Tuesday 12:17 pm
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My Audi sat nav DVD is showing early signs of disc rot. I just tried to take a few pictures of it, but it doesn't show up well in them. So far it doesn't cause any system failures though.

I've got a factory OEM sat nav system ("Audi Navigation Plus") in my 2007 Audi A4, and the DVD is about as old as the car and in the seven years since I bought the car, I've only removed the DVD once.

I guess the inside of a car isn't a good environment for a DVD in the long run. My oldest DVDs at home that I own are movies like The Matrix pt. 1, which I bought in 2002, and it still looks good as new. Or perhaps the materials used in the Audi DVD were of inferior quality.
>> No. 418792 Anonymous
17th July 2018
Tuesday 10:48 pm
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>>418776
Won't the maps be considerably out of date now? Stick an Android head unit in there.
>> No. 418793 Anonymous
17th July 2018
Tuesday 11:35 pm
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>>418792

Yes, there are some roundabouts here in my neighbourhood which didn't exist ten years ago, and which are shown as the old intersections which they were until about five years ago. Also, a new tangential road was built here a while ago and when I am on that road, my sat nav thinks I am driving right across the fields that it was cut through.

The sat nav DVDs are somewhat expensive, even if you get them used off eBay. I want to keep my factory sat nav though, because it's really a very good sat nav, as factory sat navs go.

I don't like Android head units, most of them look cheap.
>> No. 418794 Anonymous
17th July 2018
Tuesday 11:46 pm
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>>418793
The sat nav DVDs are available for free from torrent websites. Most sat navs have free updates for life nowadays, so don't feel obligated to pay.

I hope you're aware of the irony of calling a DVD expensive while calling a head unit cheap looking, lad. Sounds like the epitome of the lower middle class; ~10 year old Audi, terrified of looking poor. Princess Anne probably uses a Chink knock off TomTom, because she's not a daftarse. Have a word with yourself.

Download and burn the ISO for the updated DVD and be done with it.
>> No. 418796 Anonymous
18th July 2018
Wednesday 1:43 pm
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>>418794

>Sounds like the epitome of the lower middle class; ~10 year old Audi, terrified of looking poor. Princess Anne probably uses a Chink knock off TomTom, because she's not a daftarse. Have a word with yourself.


Conjecture, lad.

Baseless conjecture.
>> No. 418797 Anonymous
18th July 2018
Wednesday 5:05 pm
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Fucking hell. I just got stung in the back by a wasp. I was sitting down in my seat in my car and suddenly felt a sharp burning sensation. At first I thought maybe it was just the heat from my leather seats, but then I turned around and saw that there was a wasp crawling up the back of the seat.

I guess it didn't get me full on through my suit, shirt and T-shirt, because the swelling isn't as bad as it usually is from a wasp sting. I just got home and had a look at it in the bathroom mirror.

But it still fucking hurt. Pesky little things.
>> No. 418798 Anonymous
18th July 2018
Wednesday 7:13 pm
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Broke my own hand this morning. Tiny fracture on my knuckle.

Using a mouse on left-handed setup is fucking weird.
>> No. 418799 Anonymous
18th July 2018
Wednesday 11:48 pm
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>>418798

One of my coworkers keeps calling it "weird" that I am left handed but still use my right hand for my computer mouse.

The really weird thing is that I've tried using the mouse with my left hand, but it really just feels unusual and anything I do with the mouse that way lacks precision, from drawing things to clicking on stuff. I guess even though I am left handed and do everything from hand writing to masturbating to wiping my arse with my left hand, decades of using my right hand with my computer mouse have conditioned part of my brain to find that pretty normal.
>> No. 418800 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 12:25 am
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>>418799
I do everything right handed except wank.
>> No. 418801 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 12:29 am
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>>418799
We had this discussion in another thread; I was taught to use a PC right handed so that's the way I always do it despite being left handed. I tried a m8's left-handed guitar and could not fathom it at all - even simple stuff was mind-boggling and just felt wrong.
>> No. 418802 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 12:31 am
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>>418800

It always takes me aback that nearly a decade of easily accessible internet porn hasn't done this to more blokes. I just imagine most lads fucking fumbling like a retard to mouse with their left hand, and slowly peck in the letters one at a time for TEEN MILF SQUIRT ORGY
>> No. 418803 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 1:07 am
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>>418802
I wank ambidextrously.
>> No. 418804 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 1:22 am
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>>418803
My hero.
>> No. 418805 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 8:45 am
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>>418802

Being left handed, my left hand has always been my wank hand since early youth. So I never had any problems using my mouse and wanking off simultaneously.
>> No. 418806 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 9:31 am
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>>418805

I started out left hand wanking, then one day I got a cramp in my arm and couldn't do it anymore, so switched to the right and have been ever since. I can't do it with the left hand to this day, some 15 years after the incident.

I don't know if I managed to wank so much I permanently damaged my arm or something.
>> No. 418807 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 1:49 pm
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>>418310
In wales for the week

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 418808 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 2:12 pm
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>>418806

My ex girlfriend actually asked me once how I do it every day, wanking off without getting carpal tunnel. To her, it felt like a real effort whenever she was wanking me off.

So I asked her, what about when she got herself off. Rubbing your G spot to climax doesn't really seem to be much less effort. She then rightly said that she never felt the need to do it up to two times a day. And that she usually used a vibrator because it was so much more convenient.
>> No. 418809 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 3:35 pm
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>>418808

That's women for you in a nutshell isn't it. Always having things done for them, never putting the effort in for themselves.
>> No. 418812 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 4:58 pm
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>>418807

Oh you poor fool.
>> No. 418814 Anonymous
19th July 2018
Thursday 5:14 pm
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>>418809

Then again, my ex wasn't like that in every respect. She was often the one who initiated sex. She often got right to the point, and would just simply lower herself onto my knob when she felt like it. And she didn't need the kind of foreplay that some women expect. You know, the types who expect to be waited on and are really just lying there waiting for the bloke to do everything.

She sometimes said maybe she was a lad trapped in a woman's body, because she kind of dealt with sex more like a bloke. It had to be fun, and when she was sexually aroused, she wanted to get her rocks off, and fast.
>> No. 418892 Anonymous
22nd July 2018
Sunday 12:45 am
418892 EIN VOLK
FLAMMMMMM.jpg
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VLAMMENWAFFEN
>> No. 418930 Anonymous
23rd July 2018
Monday 12:50 pm
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Working from home today, enjoying the gentle breeze coming in from the balcony door.

I might go for a swim later on.
>> No. 418931 Anonymous
23rd July 2018
Monday 1:00 pm
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Looking for a part time job as my current workplace is closing down in September. Had an interview at a supermarket, group interview, absolutely dreadful. First 25 minutes was spent building a tower out of A4 paper as a team building exercise. As a literal autistic I failed at teamwork and didn't get the job. Such cases.
>> No. 418932 Anonymous
23rd July 2018
Monday 2:34 pm
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Had a sore throat, accidently drank some drugs I was supposed to gargle, now I don't have have a sore throat; take that, big pharma.
>> No. 418933 Anonymous
23rd July 2018
Monday 2:38 pm
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drugs
>> No. 418934 Anonymous
23rd July 2018
Monday 2:39 pm
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Why does "m*dicine" filter to "drugs"?
>> No. 418936 Anonymous
23rd July 2018
Monday 2:57 pm
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>>418931

Team building exercises during a job interview? Crafty buggers.

I applied for a job a while ago and got sent a reply that they wanted me to do an automated phone interview, these newfangled deals where you talk to a computer at the other end and not a human being, and those computers then use algorithms to analyse your answers for certain speech patterns and tone of voice and what-have-you. It said I could do the phone interview any time I liked within one week, day or night, and that all I would have to do to identify myself was to enter the identification number they had given me.

I actually called them back at a different number and asked if they saw no way of letting me do the interview with a human person on the phone, if they weren't going to give me the time of day to invite me to come to them personally.

The woman seemed a little slow on the uptake, and then said she would have to ask her boss if it could be arranged, but that they were now doing the majority of the interviews this way for positions like this one. She was going to call me back from what I understood, but all I got ten days later was an e-mail that the position had been given to somebody else.

Brave new world, eh.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0LaT6qVRpg
>> No. 418938 Anonymous
23rd July 2018
Monday 3:16 pm
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>>418934

Some mad lad started a cunt off trying to claim whatever narcotics he was taking were his "drugs", if I remember correctly.

Most wordfilters evolve naturally from cunt offs.
>> No. 418958 Anonymous
24th July 2018
Tuesday 5:59 pm
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>>418938

But it also means that studying m*edicine at uni is turned into studying drugs. Not that that isn't true for some people.

And indigenous peoples have a drugs man.

You give somebody a taste of their own drugs.

And you have a drugs cabinet at home.


Not the most clever word filter, as they go. I liked when "word filter" itself got turned into "genuinely hilarious joke".
>> No. 418959 Anonymous
24th July 2018
Tuesday 6:01 pm
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>>418936
This is the sort of bullshit that would stop more or less overnight if only idiots could stop playing along.
>> No. 418960 Anonymous
24th July 2018
Tuesday 6:20 pm
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Having a chili risotto as we speak, made from homegrown tomatoes and chili peppers. Fucking delicios.

They're Italian plum tomatoes and Tabasco chili peppers. The weather this year has been perfect for both of them.

I can only recommend growing your own chili peppers as a hobby. It's a lot of fun. And there is something strangely rewarding about cooking a meal for yourself from ingredients that you have grown yourself. On a flat balcony in Nottingham, no less.


Simple recipe for the tomato and chili risotto:

- 1 cup of risotto or parboiled rice
- 1 small white onion, sliced and quartered
- 2 fresh plum tomatoes, diced
- one Tabasco chili pepper
- 2 tablespoons of triple concentrated tomato puree
- vegetable stock
- a hint of diced fresh garlic
- a shot of white wine
- for the adventurous, one or two sliced black olives

Boil everything together, except for the diced tomato and tomato puree. Those go in when the rice is almost completely done. Stir thoroughly, leave for a few moments and then serve. Decorate with a basil leaf.
>> No. 418961 Anonymous
24th July 2018
Tuesday 6:26 pm
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>>418958
How about we filter the "m" word to "vitamins", and we filter "drugs" to "skank-pops".
Except on /A/ just filter everything to drugs.
>> No. 418965 Anonymous
24th July 2018
Tuesday 8:20 pm
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>>418961
>Except on /A/ just filter everything to drugs.
I like this idea, but only literally. As in, every pattern of characters vaguely resembling a word gets filtered to "drugs". Except the word "drugs" itself, which should filter to "Russian vitamin supplements".
>> No. 418966 Anonymous
24th July 2018
Tuesday 9:33 pm
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>>418965

>Russian vitamin supplements

Intriguing.
>> No. 418996 Anonymous
25th July 2018
Wednesday 9:47 pm
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Nothing much. Watching this old video of a prefrontal lobotomy. It's bloody interesting!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjPwETslJyc
>> No. 419014 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 12:08 pm
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>>418996

It's troubling to think that in its heyday, a Nobel Prize of medical science was given to the inventor of the lobotomy procedure.
>> No. 419016 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 12:14 pm
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>>419014
I'm kind of over it, to be honest.
>> No. 419018 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 12:55 pm
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I had an exam this morning, which was at one of those places where they give training to dolescum.

I have no idea how the doleys do it; being in there for a couple of hours was bleak enough, but if I had to attend a regular course there I'd be close to offing myself. The shutters on the ground floor windows were permanently down, presumably to stop them being vandalised. Every single room had at least two faulty lights which were constantly flickering, apart from the bogs which had those UV lights to stop people finding their veins when they want to shoot up. There was barely any natural light outside of the offices for the people working there. The windows they did have could only open a few centimetres so there was hardly any circulation, just lifeless air. Every five metres or so was a sign warning you not to smoke, listen to music or play on your phone whilst in the building. Almost every surface in the bogs had been blasted with piss and you could smell urine from the corridor outside. The walls were adorned with numerous motivational quotes, but they weren't legible because they were on A5 paper, the text was too small, the flickering lights reflecting on the laminated surface meant you could barely make them out and whoever designed them didn't consider what colour text to use with the various backgrounds; lots of waterfalls, rainbows and pictures of Steve Jobs. There were also posters covering Maths and English topics you'd expect to be aimed at young Primary School children; what an average is, what an apostrophe is. I'd be unsurprised if they made all the doleys write in crayon because they couldn't be trusted with pens or pencils in case they got stabby or tried drinking the ink. Everyone working there was a fat middle aged woman, probably called Sharon, Tracy or Karen, who seemed only just bright enough not to be one of the service users themselves. They barely talked to one another so there was no atmosphere in the building.

Pure despair, that place.
>> No. 419020 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 3:26 pm
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>>419014

The thing is, lobotomies worked. They were imprecise and often had gross side-effects, but they worked. When the lobotomy was first developed, there wasn't much else on offer. Antidepressants and antipsychotics wouldn't be discovered until the mid-1950s and the mood-stabilising properties of lithium were only discovered in the late 1940s. The lobotomy was one of the first treatments for mental illness that actually worked. A lot of people who were incapable of looking after themselves and had been institutionalised for decades got their lives back because of a lobotomy.

The NHS still has two specialised units (at Ninewells Hospital and University Hospital Wales) that perform psychosurgery - effectively a modernised form of lobotomy. We still regularly perform Electro-Convulsive Therapy on a small number of patients.

As someone who has been chronically and severely mentally ill for the majority of my life, I'm not completely repulsed by the prospect. At my lowest ebb, I think I might have agreed to let someone drill a hole in my skull, thread a wire into my brain and burn out part of my anterior cingulate gyrus.
>> No. 419021 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 3:30 pm
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>>419020

>At my lowest ebb, I think I might have agreed to let someone drill a hole in my skull, thread a wire into my brain and burn out part of my anterior cingulate gyrus.

Fair play, but was the procedure consentual usually?
>> No. 419022 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 3:57 pm
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>>419020

I guess you really have to factor in the level of advancement that medical science was at at the time. It's still kind of a horrific thought to have somebody operating on your brain that way, for that purpose.

My brother was a cancer patient and had a malignant brain tumor. They were able to cut it out from his cerebellum, but he had to sign papers prior to the operation that there was a chance that he would be paralysed or experience other kinds of loss of motor function. It's really a sobering experience to be told "either you agree to this or you die".

And as a family, we saw other brain tumor patients at the cancer ward where my brother spent a good deal of his time off and on. Some of them ended up in a wheelchair for life, and had to come to grips with the fact that it was the only alternative to the other option of dying from the tumor.

My brother was quite lucky in that he only had a bit of numbness in his right leg and had trouble signing his name neatly for a few months after the operation. But he very well could have turned into a paraplegic.

He did die a pretty horrible death though a few years later when the cancer came back. Fucking awful tragedy. If you've seen it once, you don't wish it on anybody.
>> No. 419024 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 5:11 pm
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>>419021

Healthcare as a whole wasn't really consensual until very recently. Well into the 1980s, the attitude was that "doctor knows best". Patients weren't really offered choices about their treatment, the treatment was rarely explained to them and consent forms were just a legal formality. It was quite common for people to be prescribed medication without being told what it was, what it did or what the side-effects might be. It was common for people to go into hospital for "an operation" and wake up after surgery with no real idea as to what had been done to them. The deference we showed to doctors was really symptomatic of the deference we showed to anyone in authority.

I don't want to sound like a cheerleader for lobotomy, but it has to be viewed in the context of the time. Mental healthcare as we know it didn't really exist until the 1970s. When Thatcher closed the long-term mental hospitals in 1983, they contained a weird mish-mash of "patients" - some of them had schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, some had fairly moderate depression or anxiety, some were learning disabled or autistic and some were just unwed mothers. They weren't really hospitals at all, just pseudo-prisons for social undesirables. A lot of the backlash against care in the community was motivated less by concerns about patient care and more about a desire to preserve the old "out of sight, out of mind" approach - people just didn't like seeing nutters in public.

Lobotomy was revolutionary because it opened up the possibility of meaningful treatment for serious mental illness, at a time when the default was to just lock people up forever. Once we had seen that serious mental illness could be treated rather than just contained, it pushed us to develop the drugs and behavioural treatments that now form the backbone of mental health care. When Moniz developed the lobotomy, it was an effort to liberate the straightjacketed inmates of lunatic asylums. The procedure was often used abusively on people who today wouldn't necessarily be regarded as mentally ill, but the same can be said of the entire mental healthcare system of the time. Lobotomy has been unfairly scapegoated for the wider failings of society.
>> No. 419025 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 5:27 pm
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>>419014
> It's troubling to think that in its heyday, a Nobel Prize of medical science was given to the inventor of the lobotomy procedure.

That's nothing m8. In 2014 Malala Yousafzai got a Nobel Prize for receiving one.

>>419024
> The deference we showed to doctors was really symptomatic of the deference we showed to anyone in authority.

Everything you said in that paragraph still goes in a pretty huge number of countries around the world, especially that last sentence. As someone who was brought up under the soft and comfy "if you don't want this procedure we have to let you go" NHS I find the whole thing both mildly terrifying and vaguely fascistic.
>> No. 419026 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 8:12 pm
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My left knee was making cracking noises at the beginning of the week, yesterday I did a long walk and now the knee cap is stinging when from about a right angle until it's straight. I hope it's just my frail body being strained and not one of those things where my knee just explodes for no real reason.
>> No. 419028 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 9:52 pm
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>>419024

>I don't want to sound like a cheerleader for lobotomy, but it has to be viewed in the context of the time. Mental healthcare as we know it didn't really exist until the 1970s. When Thatcher closed the long-term mental hospitals in 1983, they contained a weird mish-mash of "patients" - some of them had schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, some had fairly moderate depression or anxiety, some were learning disabled or autistic and some were just unwed mothers.


I think there was a BBC documentary a while ago on that exact topic. It's troubling when you think that until quite recently, locking people up like that was not only quite acceptable, but really normal procedure.

My granddad's brother had a learning disability because he fell some four to five feet out of a ground floor window and hit his head quite severely on a concrete slab below as a toddler. He wasn't a complete vegetable, but he remained on the level of a ten year old for the rest of his life, and spent much of it in such an institution because he required almost around the clock care. It was just the way things were at the time. If you weren't right in the head and couldn't look after yourself, you were institutionalised.
>> No. 419029 Anonymous
26th July 2018
Thursday 10:03 pm
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>>41902

Do you have access to a stationary bike? Generally any pain free, low impact movement that'll get blood into the joint will help you.
>> No. 419033 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 2:40 pm
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Fuckin hell, my car burns through petrol at these temperatures like it's nothing. With the air conditioning running and what-have-you.

Average mpg on my 2007 Audi A4 1.8T is around 30 to 35. But at the moment, it's more like 15 to 20. Almost like I'm driving one of them Murrikin gas guzzlers.

Or maybe it has to do with my car running some sort of cheat software like all VWs do. I don't know.
>> No. 419034 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 3:01 pm
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>>419029
Nah, it's alright now anyway.

Throat's taken a dive off a cliff though. A cold, in this weather, lads! Can you believe it! A COLD!
>> No. 419035 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 3:04 pm
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>>419028
When I worked for MIND a number of years back I met an old woman who had spent over thirty years in mental hospitals between the 40s and 70s after having sex with older men when she was a teenager, causing scandals in her town and being locked away by her embarrassed family. Her story was absolutely heartbreaking and the abuses by the staff in the hospitals she told me about were very brutal.
>> No. 419037 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 4:24 pm
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My son had his Year 6 leavers assembly this morning, it was really strange. Most of the kids were crying. Many of the parents were crying. The kids gave emotional speeches along the lines of how Year 6 had been one of the best years of their lives or how much they loved their teachers and didn't want to let them go. This was interspersed with singing overly sentimental songs or picture montages with something cloying like Ed Sheeran playing in the background. At the end the parents were hugging their kids and most of them were crying together.

Has everything gone soft? When I left Year 6 we brought in board games, we probably had the giant telly wheeled in for a bit, we ate party food, we pretended to be drunk off root beer or shandy, we signed each others shirts, we attacked each other with silly string. There was none of this cynical playing with emotions.
>> No. 419038 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 4:53 pm
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>>419037
I'm likely a bit younger than you and mine was sort of like what your son had, but no pop songs and no crying (that I remember). Just earnest, or rather forced, compliments about other students we got paired with on an alphabetical basis. Think we did the shirt thing in Year 6 too.

Dunno', maybe your lad's just going to a school worth mourning, or are a lot of the kids going to different schools? All but two or three from my primary school ended up at the same secondary.
>> No. 419039 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 5:06 pm
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>>419037

Not soft, just artificial. Blame it on reality television, social media, advertising, Americanisation, or any combination thereof.
>> No. 419041 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 5:52 pm
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>>419037
>>419038
>>419039

Surely anyone who bothers to turn up for the last month of the final year is an utter mug anyway? It's even more brain dead than turning up for your last day at work before starting at a new job.
>> No. 419042 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 5:53 pm
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>>419039

My nephew has had three cap-and-gown graduation ceremonies and two proms. He is 11.

I've noticed that when kids play at being pirates or soldiers or astronauts, they invariably put on a weird American accent.

We're raising a generation of narcissistic pseudo-yanks. I blame Rupert Murdoch.
>> No. 419043 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 6:07 pm
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>>419042
>My nephew has had three cap-and-gown graduation ceremonies and two proms. He is 11.
What? What? What the actual fuck?

Is this the doing of stupid millennial teachers egged on by stupid millennial parents?
>> No. 419044 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 6:09 pm
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>>419037

Good fucking grief things like this really boil my piss.

I think the trouble is that the kind of people who end up working in primary education these days, the out of school clubs and general social kind of work like that, are soft headed baby brain pricks in the first place, barely one step above HR women. They are predisposed to saccharine sentimental bullshit by their very nature.

I always forget that I'm not a youth any more myself, so I fail to consider than many people doing those jobs, at a quite high level potentially, could be the same sorts of slack cunt I went to school with and were obsessed with all that American high school type nonsense. The types of people who listened to MCR and P!ATD and shit because it was basically Yank high school: the soundtrack.

Those people are raising our future generations. Britain really is fucked.

Anyway. On a lighter note, I'm off on what would appear to be an authentic actual date with a very nice lassie tomorrow. I mean the last three times we've hung out we've just fucked all night so it hardly counts, but I feel like I can open up to you lot- I think this one might really be something special. I'm properly infatuated with her like I haven't been over any other girl since I was, well, in high school. Wish me luck.
>> No. 419045 Anonymous
27th July 2018
Friday 6:22 pm
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>>419044

Be sure to listen to MCR before the date to put you in the mood.
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