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>> No. 420040 Anonymous
7th September 2018
Friday 8:48 pm
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Time for a new weekend thread.

How goes it, lads?
Expand all images.
>> No. 420041 Anonymous
7th September 2018
Friday 9:13 pm
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Quiet night in for me tonight. Have to go help a friend collect a fridge tomorrow morning that he bought on gumtree. It's one of those American type giant fridge-freezer combos with two doors. You could probably stash one or two bodies in it and nobody would ever know. So we're going there tomorrow morning to pick it up from the lad who is selling his used one.
>> No. 420042 Anonymous
7th September 2018
Friday 9:19 pm
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Van blew up on way home from a long day at work, just been AA'd home with a hole in the radiator. Vet's been, massive bill inbound for horse with new long term diagnosis. Thousand jobs lined up for the weekend. Whinge thoroughly ticked.
>> No. 420043 Anonymous
7th September 2018
Friday 9:39 pm
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>>420041
>we're going there tomorrow morning to pick it up from the lad who is selling his used one.

He's probably pissed in the water filter or ice cube mechanism.
>> No. 420044 Anonymous
7th September 2018
Friday 10:22 pm
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>>420043

It's apparently good as new. My friend said something that the seller has only had it for about a year and really didn't use it much because he was out of the country work wise a lot. And now apparently he's moving to France and naturally doesn't want to burden himself with getting a fridge the size of a compact car across to France. I don't know, my friend has the details.
>> No. 420045 Anonymous
7th September 2018
Friday 10:43 pm
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I'm coding a little doodad I can show to a prospective employer on Monday morning so it's a quiet weekend in for me too. I had a nice session at the gym tonight too since I was the only person there for the last hour and they let me control the sound system. For a brief while instead of light, radio-friendly electronica I got to listen to Pantera and Death Grips - feel free to tell me how awful my taste in music is.

Otherwise I'm a bit lonely and short of cash. Same as half the people in the world I suppose.
>> No. 420046 Anonymous
7th September 2018
Friday 11:19 pm
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>>420045

>I had a nice session at the gym tonight too since I was the only person there for the last hour and they let me control the sound system. For a brief while instead of light, radio-friendly electronica I got to listen to Pantera and Death Grips

At my gym, it really depends. During the day, where it's mostly housewives and single mums frequenting the place, they play 90s boy band music and other stuff from that era. Their daytime staff mainly consists of two male middle aged fitness instructors who also run the place, and three late 20s to early 30something women. Then in the evening, their staff tends to be annoyingly young, early 20s unilads and lasses. That kind of thing. And with that, depending on whose shift it is that night, you either get obscure guitar rock indie music (and obscure not in a good way), or some really weird electronic-dance-techno.

So I basically just keep my headphones on during my exercise and listen to my own playlists.
>> No. 420047 Anonymous
7th September 2018
Friday 11:36 pm
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>>420046

The staff at mine are quite nice in that they always tailor the music to whoever's there instead of just subjecting people to their own fancy. You can tell if there are women in the gym because it'll be the soft-techno-with-vocals stuff I mentioned before. If there are older gentlemen around it'll be classic dadrock and some more musical metal, both of which I'm very amenable to. It's evident when uni-age lifters are the only patrons because they play nu-metal. I don't really mind that either since nu-metal is now old-metal and hence they only know the handful of songs that were actually decent. And they mix in some metalcore and whatnot here and there, it does make a better atmosphere for lifting. The millionaire commies of RATM are always welcome.

In an odd way tonight reminded me of a metal nightclub I used to frequent as a teenlad, occasionally it would be so empty me and the m8s could just request whatever the hell we wanted no matter the obscurity. It's not every day you get a whole gym echoing with Strapping Young Lad.
>> No. 420048 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 12:15 am
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>>420047
>I don't really mind that either since nu-metal is now old-metal and hence they only know the handful of songs that were actually decent

I don't know about that. They seem to listen to bands from that era that people at the time wouldn't be seen dead listening to, like Good Charlotte. Is history being rewritten to make it seem like people actually liked them?
>> No. 420049 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 12:27 am
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Just had a look around the folders that Firefox uses to store browser history information on your hard drive. And that has really reached an impressive extent with Firefox updates the last few years. It used to be that you only had a handful of single flat files called cookies.sqlite or places.sqlite. But now, there are nearly a dozen different folders and subfolders to delete if you want to sanitise your browser, plus close to a dozen tracking files.

Just deleting your history within Firefox is not a safe way to get rid of your sensitive browser history data. On my laptop here, I use a wipe programme where I can manually select files and folders that I want wiped, to make sure they aren't just deleted for explorer access but physically overwritten.
>> No. 420051 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 2:17 am
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>>420049
Who are you trying to hide your porn habits from? The government already know (by way of your ISP) and unless your partner happens to work for them they're not going to be able to get past straight wiping, even if they did get access to your account, since you've created them a separate account because OPSEC 101.

Also, if you're on an SSD then "physically overwritten" doesn't even work as you'd expect it to anyway.

Tip to SSD users: if you're going to partition it, get your sizing right, because shrinking a partition on an SSD can turn into a world of hurt.
>> No. 420053 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 12:47 pm
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>>420051

This is for my old 11'' laptop which still has a conventional hard disk drive. I still go places with it, and it's usually what I take on holidays with me (I don't like tablets, because as soon as I do anything more than surf the web, it really annoys me to have no physical keyboard). So I have an interest in sanitising my laptop so that if it does get lost or somebody nicks it, they don't get to see what places I have visited on the Internet.

I have been thinking about getting an SSD for the laptop, because that might speed it up a little. Although it's full HD certified, it sometimes seems out of its depth juggling ripped Blu-ray movies with other tasks running in the background.

You are right though that wiping on SSDs is a whole different kettle of fish. Depending on the firmware's wear levelling algorithm, there is no guarantee at all that overwriting a deleted file will really remove all traces of it. Because the SSD will scatter any write commands it receives from the operating system all about the SSD's memory cells, as the general concept of wear levelling means that it tries to wear out all memory cells on it evenly.

One thing you can still do is delete files from the recycle bin and then wipe the free disk space on your system partition. This will again not overwrite 100 percent of your free disk space, as the operating system still needs a margin of free memory on your disk to function. But the chances are pretty high that that will destroy your deleted files for good.
>> No. 420054 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 1:16 pm
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Those mountains are all over the fucking place.
>> No. 420056 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 1:44 pm
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I had been drinking for the whole evening/night until about 02:00. Woke up in the morning, yet again with that strange 'What I am? Why I am? Why? For what?' feeling.

It accompanies me for the every single wake up after a long drinking night. I've never figured out an answer to it.

It was raining in the morning. That only amplified the overall atmosphere of incompleteness, melancholy and suspense.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kilHObJfFqA
>> No. 420057 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 1:54 pm
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>>420053

>so that if it does get lost or somebody nicks it, they don't get to see what places I have visited on the Internet.

Encryption would surely be a better move than this deleting ritual you're currently involved in?
>> No. 420058 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 2:23 pm
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>>420057
It's best not to use persistent encryption in the UK because if you lose the keys/forget the passphrase then you can go to prison for years.
>> No. 420059 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 2:28 pm
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Wow, so the old couple next door have got the grand kids round and the walls are very, very thin. I know this because said kids are massively fond of a really, shockingly repetitive, acoustic pop song. Then again, anything would get repetitive after two dozen back-to-back listens.

Sounds like the chorus is "who we are, who we are, who we are", then something about beauty queens and magazines, if anyone's interested.

I might kill myself.
>> No. 420060 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 2:38 pm
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>>420059

>I might kill myself.

Try this instead.


>> No. 420061 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 2:48 pm
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I just got awarded a fantastic contract, the biggest and most interesting I've had since I went self-employed.

So I'm off into The City to treat myself to a new (or preowned) watch, quite possibly a Rolex Master II GMT, if anyone happens to have a nice example on the books. We'll see.

Anyway, I'm wearing trackies and a hoodie so I'm hoping to be snubbed by the salespeople and pull a Pretty Woman on them. I might even lay my northern accent on thicker than usual.
>> No. 420062 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 2:57 pm
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>>420058

As much as I hate to admit it, but it's really best to keep your hard drive unencrypted when you are passing through border security in a foreign country. You will inevitably raise flags if they search your laptop or other device and it's encrypted and you refuse to provide the key/password.

To stay under the radar, it is therefore better to just make sure than when you are travelling, there is nothing incriminating on your laptop. Hence my opinion that wiping sensitive files (on conventional HDDs) is better than encrypting the entire volume.

But you have to be careful how far you take it. I've read recently that it now also raises flags with U.S. border protection if they see you with either a laptop or tablet that has been completely reinstalled just before you went on your trip, or an all new device with nothing on it, like a smartphone. They will assume that you are trying to hide information from them that way. So in summary, it's really best to travel with a laptop or device that has seen some use, but from which you have carefully deleted any and all data that you don't want in the hands of a foreign government.

I've got a friend who travels to the U.S. job wise about every two months (he works for a major British company), and guidelines at his company require that sensitive data and company secrets are permanently deleted from a laptop's hard drive before passing through U.S. border security. Once in the country, the data can then be downloaded again via an encrypted connection off the company's servers here in the UK. This is based on the suspicion that the U.S. government cannot be trusted not to pass vital business secrets on to U.S. competitors. Apparently, the risk of somebody hacking their UK based download servers is seen as less serious than the risk of U.S. border protection seizing company secrets and passing them on.
>> No. 420063 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 3:24 pm
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>>420053
>So I have an interest in sanitising my laptop so that if it does get lost or somebody nicks it, they don't get to see what places I have visited on the Internet.
I think you might need to rethink your threat model there. Unless you're some kind of high-value target, the best value someone's going to get from nicking your laptop is selling it on, and they almost certainly won't care about your internet history.
>> No. 420064 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 3:25 pm
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>>420060
Those fucking sharks.
>> No. 420065 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 3:48 pm
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>>420061
Congratulations lad.
>> No. 420066 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 4:00 pm
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>>420061
>I might even lay my northern accent on thicker than usual

I've noticed that my accent ends up broader whenever I'm in London; everything that's been softened by moving town about five years ago suddenly comes flooding back the moment I leave King's Cross.
>> No. 420067 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 4:13 pm
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>>420066
Oh God I have this. I'm from the Midlands and although my accent is mostly RP due to upbringing when I'm in London the regional part gets amplified by a thousand. It's somehow nice sounding a bit rougher around the edges.

Meanwhile in America I basically turn into Colin Firth.
>> No. 420068 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 4:15 pm
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>>420064

Alright, how about a palate cleanser?


>> No. 420069 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 4:16 pm
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>>420066

I think people just notice it more. In the north west, everyone thinks I sound posh; down south, people make jokes about me nicking hub caps.
>> No. 420070 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 5:04 pm
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>>420067

>Meanwhile in America I basically turn into Colin Firth.

I like the perplexed look on the faces of Murrikins when I let loose in my Norf London accent and they understand zip. One thing people got a kick out of when I was over there was a fake, exaggerated upper class accent that I put on for them. They said it sounded "right out of a Charles Dickens play". Oh well.

I was born and raised in North London, but living in Nottingham now, I have adopted a more nondescript accent in everyday life. With a typical middle management desk job, a heavy North London accent would be kind of a hindrance.
>> No. 420071 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 5:23 pm
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>>420066>>420067

I'm the same. I never had a particularly broad accent (I'm from Newcastle) but it was certainly identifiable, and when I moved to Leeds I found myself toning it down as the Yorkshirefolk - and more commonly the posh southerners that all got in to LCM with me - wouldn't understand me sometimes. Now people are usually surprised when I say I'm a geordie, apparently I just have a fairly neutral but vaguely northern accent.

But you're right, once I get into London, something happens, it just comes back out, the proper geordie twang I haven't spoken in since I was about 13.

I honestly think it's the inbuilt, genetic, northern prejudice against southerners. We put on our best, broadest twang, just to make sure those London bastards know that we're invading their city. I don't actually have any sort of problem with southern people, I think it's just instinctual.
>> No. 420072 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 5:32 pm
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>>420065

Cheers lad.

Only downside is, I'm going to be too busy to fuck about on the internet for a while, so expect there to be a huge drop in posting rates to not notice my absence.
>> No. 420073 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 5:45 pm
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>>420070
Hey me too. Let's meet up. Norf London Notts Ex-Pats!
>> No. 420074 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 6:10 pm
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IMG_20180908_172937902_HDR.jpg
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What's the best way to learn to draw properly?

I never really enjoyed art at school but I've always been a bit of a doodler and I think I'd like to have a crack of either turning it into a hobby or just see what I can do to try and improve at it. I'm guessing either an art class, books or something online like YouTube. It's only really drawing I'd like to improve at; I had a go at sketching a giraffe this afternoon and you can probably tell from the half-arsed colouring that I don't have the patience for painting

>>420071
>when I moved to Leeds

It took me about three years of working in Leeds before I started saying things like "it wa" and "not a right lot". It I ever start calling people love or using us instead of we/our then I'll go and off myself.
>> No. 420075 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 6:13 pm
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5axAu3Nxogg

(warning: listening to them will do your fuckin head in)
>> No. 420076 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 6:17 pm
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>>420075
>(warning: listening to them will do your fuckin head in)

Like a sixth sense, I could tell that just from the thumbnail.
>> No. 420077 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 6:23 pm
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>>420076

Yeah.

Teenage girls can be annoying.

Who knew.
>> No. 420078 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 6:55 pm
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>>420061

What I don't understand is expensive watches. Half past four is half past four whether it's on a 5.99 Home Bargains kitchen clock or a 10K Rolex.
>> No. 420079 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 7:01 pm
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>>420075
The best attempt at an accent is Jesy from Little Mix speaking Jamaican.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOJNk7YiE7c
>> No. 420081 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 7:23 pm
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>>420078
Half past four will soon be quarter to five on the Home Bargains job though. Not him but as a male who is too inhibited to wear jewelery I am rather fond of poncy watches as a discreet kind of flashiness.
>> No. 420082 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 8:14 pm
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>>420081
> I am rather fond of poncy watches as a discreet kind of flashiness

Discretion is key. I've worked with a number of businessmen with expensive watches that aren't ostentatious and don't really try to draw attention to them. On the other hand, I went to uni with a Tory boy who had a ridiculously oversized TAG watch worth several grand and he'd regularly do things like telling any girl who rejected him that the watch was worth more than she was and he could own her if he really wanted to.
>> No. 420083 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 8:20 pm
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>>420081
Mechanical watches are inherently inaccurate whether they're sold by Home Bargains or by Rolex. It's entirely expected a mechanical Rolex will be out by minutes after a couple of months.
>> No. 420084 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 8:34 pm
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>>420078

I've been a fan of watches in general for years, specifically automatic ones. The fact that they're such complex pieces of machinery really appeals to me, and the attention to detail in a top-flight watch makes me very happy. I'd be the first to admit there's no real use for a watch that pricey - most people won't even notice your watch let alone the brand or heritage - apart from it being an enjoyable thing to own.

Functionally, my phone's clock will always be more accurate than any watch I ever buy, and the logical watch to own would be one that is update via radio with an atomic clock. But that's not really the point. It's the one and only piece of jewellery I'll ever wear, so I might as well have nice ones.

The honest truth about Rolex and Omega etc is that they're expensive because they're expensive, that's undeniably part of the charm. Most of the watches in my collection are, in the watch world, very cheap - probably my favourite watch in the world is my Seiko Monster. It's accurate enough and genuinely better made than some of the stuff Rolex were spitting out in the 90s, and cost me £150.

A lot of watch collectors obsess about the accurate timekeeping on their watches, to the extent that they use an app that records the watch ticking away over a certain amount of time, to see if it's slow or fast - and the more expensive the (automatic) watch, the more accurate that will be. It's a genuine concern for people using divers watches to actually, you know, dive, but for most it's just another thing to be nerdy about.

If you want to know why I personally want to drop 7 grand on a Rolex (that's how much the GMT will cost me) It's partly because I just really like watches and enjoy looking at them during my day, partly because I saw the father figures in my life get 'nice watches' for certain milestones in their careers, so that's stuck with me, and partly because ten years ago when I was stuck in some horrible kitchen somewhere, with some arsehole manager shouting at me because I was wearing my little black plastic casio on the line, despite it being rather handy for keeping track of timings since his oven was fucked and wouldn't time itself. And I remember thinking then, some day I'll have a job where it's not a big drama when I wear a fucking watch to work.

TL;DR - veblen goods
>> No. 420085 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 8:58 pm
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>>420074

Either Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards or Keys to Drawing by Bert Dodson.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Drawing-Right-Brain-Betty-Edwards/dp/1585429201/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Keys-Drawing-Bert-Dodson/dp/0891343377/

https://libgen.pw/item/detail/id/5a1f055d3a044650f50fbabb

https://libgen.pw/item/detail/id/5a1f04db3a044650f506ec33

>>420082

Patek Philippe being the obvious example - they're some of the most expensive watches on the new market, but most people would have no idea.

>>420083

George Daniels built several mechanical watches that could keep better time than a quartz watch. No watch will beat your phone at timekeeping (the internal clock is disciplined to an atomic clock via GPS), but that's not really the point.
>> No. 420087 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 9:04 pm
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>>420081

>I am rather fond of poncy watches as a discreet kind of flashiness

Thanks for the answer lad. I'd be more concerned about all those doctors on scooters that perform instant surgery on the road like.
>> No. 420088 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 9:08 pm
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>>420084
But you have to perform maintenance on your phone every single day or it will stop telling the time.
>> No. 420090 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 9:11 pm
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>>420084

Well put lad, thanks for the 'time' you put into my question

I live in Calderdale, I wouldn't question a mountain bike at 4k

It's all about the fun and joy it brings :)
>> No. 420091 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 9:27 pm
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>>420088

You still have to 'charge' a mechanical watch, you just happen to do it by wearing it.
>> No. 420092 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 9:37 pm
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>>420090

>I live in Calderdale, I wouldn't question a mountain bike at 4k

True enough. I've certainly spent more on mountain and road bikes (and so, so much more on cars, cameras, and music gear, come to think of it) than I ever will on watches. They're certainly the lowest priority on the list of crap I spend my money on - which is daft really, as many of the legendary brands hold their value very well. I'd be the first to admit they're hardly functional. At least you could still get to work or the shops on your Saracen.

If I ever have kids, I'll call it an heirloom.
>> No. 420093 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 10:09 pm
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Where the heck are you getting this cash? I'll shift you gear if that's what's going on, just give me a cut. You can gawp at watches all day and I'll run product, no bother.
>> No. 420094 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 10:33 pm
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>>420093

Hard work and graft with a little bit of desire, usually. Something that socialists don't understand. You have to put in the hard Yakka. Want a fucking expensive mountain bike? Fucking graft it lad.
>> No. 420095 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 11:03 pm
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>>420094
I meant what kind of area do you work in, what qualifications have you got. But it's good to know you can be a bit of a dickhead and still make loadsa' money, stupid cunt.
>> No. 420096 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 11:03 pm
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I've never really seen the point of uber expensive watches either, tbh.

Yes, you probably don't want to be seen wearing a £10 watch from the centre aisle at Lidl. But you really don't have to spend a fortune to have a decent and visually appealing watch.

I have worn various Swatch Irony watches over the last 20 years, and they are very nice, stainless steel cased dependable quartz watches, some of them are even automatic with a mechanical movement. They can be had for around £85 to £160 depending on the model.

You snoblads may snort with derision and say that's still a cheaply made watch. But at least I don't have to worry about scratching it or somebody nicking it off me. And every three years or so, I buy a new one if they have a model that looks nice. They do make quite stylish watches.
>> No. 420097 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 11:10 pm
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>>420096
I'd like to buy a nice simple Swiss Wenger watch, but I'm too concerned that people will keep trying to talk to me about Arsenal.
>> No. 420098 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 11:31 pm
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>>420097

Those are nice watches also.

I guess with me it's just habit. I've had Swatch watches for as long as I can remember. Just went from one to the next every few years or so. I just like their general style. Their cheaper, standard watches in a plastic case and with plastic or vinyl straps look pretty shit (then again, they're only £45), but the stainless-steel Irony range, and preferably also with a stainless steel strap, really offers great value.
>> No. 420099 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 11:38 pm
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>>420049

You should write up a list of those file and folders so the rest of us can script cronjobs to wipe them, or whatever.

>>420053

Also consider running your browser in firejail (Linux) or Sandboxie (Windows). That way once your browsing session is done your whole profile is automatically wiped out. Obviously incognito mode etc helps too.

>>420062

Best practice is to have a "dadtop" image that you install and go through border controls with, then buy a new hdd, reimage that and download your working files from whatever company/cloud server you have them on. Once you're on your way home drop the new hdd into a river/canal/sewer (after a good wiping and a good proper battering, of course), pop your dadtop hdd back in, browse facebook for a bit then go home.

>>420070

Having grown up in North London myself I have no idea what "a heavy North London accent" would sound like; unless you mean some patois from somewhere ghastly like Willesden?
>> No. 420100 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 11:53 pm
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Watching "Glam Rock at the BBC" on BBC Four at the moment. Way before my time, but the very theatrical style of Glam Rock is really kind of amazing.

Oh... nice... "Starman" by David Bowie just came on...
>> No. 420101 Anonymous
8th September 2018
Saturday 11:53 pm
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>>420075
I dunno they aren't particularly annoying. Granted I can't take more than two minutes of that video, but I was laughing with them a few times, and they seem fun enough that I probably would have enjoyed having them as mates as a teenager.

Maybe you actually have to be from North London to think that though. Was it their accents doing your head in?
>> No. 420104 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 12:49 am
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>>420096

Most "proper" watch enthusiasts love watches, full stop. The only thing a watch nerd might turn his nose up at is something like a MVMT or Vincero or Micheal Kors watch, as they're bargain basement quartz movements and Chinese everything else, sold for hundreds. Probably every collector in the world loves the Seiko SKX, and that's cheaper than some of those swatches you mentioned.

There might well be snobs who think a cheap watch means one under two grand, but they're morons.
>> No. 420108 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 1:25 am
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>>420093

I got a job as a dishwasher when I was about 20, because my mate worked there. Taught myself how to chop vegetables at home and then begged the head chef to let me work in the kitchen.

Then I turned out to be really quite good at it, got promoted a couple of times, bombarded the area chef with recipe ideas (this was encouraged by the company), learned everything I could about stock, profits, managing people etc, then begged the ops manager for my own restaurant to run despite only having been a sous chef for about 4 months.

Got given a site mostly as a token gesture, that was slated for closure in half a year, applied my apparent knack for profiteering and made the place worth keeping open again. Ran that place for a year longer than it was supposed to be open, got the area chef position off the back of that when the former area chef was promoted to executive. Did that for a while, until I suggested I'd be more useful as a country wide relief chef, whilst also assisting the exec (who loved me at this point) and focused on turning poor performing sites around while he focused on menus. Did that until the exec left and I just did both of those jobs for a bit, also dipping my toe into other brands owned by the company to dig them out a bit too.

Left there eventually as the overarching company was ruining the chain - still are. Did a few normal Head Chef jobs after that, as I felt I had more to learn on the independent side. Then I found a similar chain and started as executive there. It was mostly designing menus and that. It was running smoothly so I found I got bored.

Ran a couple more restaurants, in more traditional "shouting at Romanians" Ramsey type situations. Then I did some agency work, sold as a head/exec with a proven track record of bringing restaurants back from the dead. I was getting rather good hourly pay for doing that, and eventually realised I could start my own consultancy and get paid about five times more, so I did, and now I get paid to tell new and old restaurateurs alike what they're doing wrong, for money. Next step will be opening my own place(s), both as a legitimate venture and also a test bed and proving ground for more esoteric ideas I'd like to bring to people in the consultancy.

TL;DR: A bit of graft, a bit of skill, a bit of self starterism, and probably more than a bit of luck.

I think most success stories follow the same formula. My only advice would be to find something you're good at and make it work. I didn't want to be peeling fucking carrots forever so I identified my skills and worked on them until I offered someone nobody else in that kitchen could. I never wanted any of this, not really, but I realised I had to make the most of the hand I'd been dealt.
>> No. 420109 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 2:00 am
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>>420108

I really get the impression that in 10 years time you'll be a stonkingly-rich restaurant business mogul who'll be appearing in glossy newspaper magazine interviews.

I'll be combing those interviews for any subtle .gs references, of course. You could maybe chuck in that some lad at one of your gigs had the nickname Crabkiller.
>> No. 420110 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 2:25 am
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>>420109

I appreciate the sentiment, thanks m8.

I don't know if I would go so far as to agree. It's one thing to tell other people how to spend their money, quite another when it's yours/your investors dosh you're playing with. It might be more likely you'll find me in the papers, after I've hanged myself by my apron strings.

At one point a TV company was sniffing around the owner at one of the more fancy independents I worked at. It fell through, but I put a lot of thought into how I could work in .gs references if I had ended up on telly. This site has done a lot to keep me sane over the years, It'd only be fair.

Honestly, a great name for a gastropub, or indeed a national restaurant enterprise, would be the "British Food Association", or britfa for short. Too on the nose?
>> No. 420111 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 3:27 am
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>>420108
>begged the ops manager for my own restaurant to run
Never stand still,
>learned everything I could about stock, profits, managing people etc
never let anyone know how hard you work,
>bombarded the area chef with recipe ideas
get your work noticed,
>I suggested I'd be more useful as a country wide relief chef
carve out a niche for yourself.
>> No. 420112 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 3:52 am
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>>420111

I also have a really good handshake.
>> No. 420113 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 3:54 am
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>>420110
You could say you were an authority on British food, though Companies House might object if you tried to name it British Food Authority.
>> No. 420114 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 3:58 am
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>>420110

> I put a lot of thought into how I could work in .gs references if I had ended up on telly

No combination of the words pie, master, beefy, or loads came to mind?
>> No. 420115 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 3:58 am
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>>420113

I did wonder if I'd get away with it - I don't know if there's a legal definition of 'authority' or 'association', or if it'd be fine in the context of a name for a restaurant/chain. I'd expect Brita to tell me I couldn't use britfa either.

Of course the biggest hurdle would be getting the naming rights off marple. I'd have to give him free vegetables and red wine for life.

I'll sack it all off and launch a pie shop called ladmate's.
>> No. 420117 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 4:02 am
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>>420114


I was going to tell them I was a shed enthusiast, for sure. I also wondered if saying 'u wot m8' all the time would translate. Looking directly at the camera and referring to the demiglace as a 'big, beefy load' might have worked, mind. I'd have been the male N-igella. (fucking wordfilters, man)
>> No. 420119 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 4:10 am
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>>420117

"We make sure our pies are positively filled with great loads of beefiness; these are real pies. The type your grandpa would have had for lunch in his shed."

There, sign me up as executive producer. I'll have us all up in court for thinly veiled obscenity by the end of the week or your beefy load back.
>> No. 420120 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 4:14 am
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>>420119

We'd also have to hire someone with a specific name.

"Chef, I can't find the beetroot"

"How can't you fucking see it? It's marple, Aki!"
>> No. 420121 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 4:34 am
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>>420115
IIRC, it's not the "authority" they'd object to, but the "British".
>> No. 420122 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 4:48 am
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>>420121

There's a restaurant group called "George's Great British Kitchen", though admittedly the signage just says "George's". Or am I missing the point?
>> No. 420123 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 4:59 am
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>>420122
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/incorporation-and-names/annex-a-sensitive-words-and-expressions-or-words-that-could-imply-a-connection-with-government
Point 18, though by the looks of things you'd be fine if you stuck "The" before it so it's not the first word in the name.

According to the other annexes, they may take issue with "Association" or "Agency", but apparently "Authority" looks okay. Go bureaucracy!
>> No. 420124 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 6:57 am
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>>420122

It would be boastful if it said "George's Great Kitchen".
>> No. 420125 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 7:45 am
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>>420108
>Then I found a similar chain and started as executive there. It was mostly designing menus and that.

What is your view on the black pudding tower?
>> No. 420126 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 11:17 am
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>>420108

Somebody from my school went down a similar career path. He was a pizza delivery boy in year 12 while studying for his A levels. We then all belittled him because instead of seeking any kind of formal training after school or going to uni, he just stayed with that pizza place. What nobody expected was that a few years later, he was the co owner, and from that, he worked his way up and was at some point in a position to start his own small restaurant chain. If what I've heard is true, he now has a personal fortune of a few million quid and resides in a huge house in the Essex countryside.

Compare that to a few of my mates, who struggled to find full time employment at all with their sociology or biology degrees after uni.
>> No. 420129 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 4:03 pm
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>>420117
What does n-i-g wordfilter to? I don't habitually fill my posts with racial slurs so I'm unfamiliar with that one.

Also audible mirth at 'marple Aki'
>> No. 420130 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 4:12 pm
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>>420129
Automatic one hour ban.

I was quoting someone.
>> No. 420131 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 5:01 pm
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>>420125

It's a cynical indictment of the British working class. It looks like it was invented by a frenchman for the purposes of satire, but is really just what someone sadly concluded the dreck that visits Farmhouse Inns would enjoy.

Other 'Pubs with grub' on that sort of level, like Hungry Horse (same company), Ember inns, Sizzling, you know the ones - they all make sure you've got enough black pudding, beans, and chips on offer. For whatever reason, it's an unspoken fact in the industry that chavs love black pudding. The tower itself looks fucking disgusting, if you ask me, but it's better than the Hungry Horse doughnut burger, another cynical marketing ploy that is (was?) far more popular than it should have been.

That end of the market is frankly a bit horrifying. I only worked in it tangentially, but it was enough.
>> No. 420132 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 5:03 pm
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>>420129

I think 'nig' is fine, it's n-igel that gets filtered.

I think I set the marple filter, shot myself in the foot there.
>> No. 420133 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 5:04 pm
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I went to school with a lad who dropped out in year 10 to take up a job unloading deliveries of nuts. We all took the piss out of him for pissing his life chances away, joking that he'd be paid in nuts instead of actual money. He wasn't paid in nuts. What he was doing was grafting away. Whilst we were dicking around in school he was busy unloading those nuts and he was earning cold, hard cash for it. He spunked it away on drugs and beer. Last I heard he was living in a poky little council house on some sink estate with more kids than teeth, looking more like someone in their fifties than someone who's just turned thirty.

>>420129
Is it to do with Mr Saville and what happens if you type Are Nige's full name? Bloody nig-nogs.
>> No. 420142 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 10:16 pm
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>>420133

I think there's a fair bit of survivor bias when it comes to people who have dropped out of the education system, either in school or at uni or even from their vocational training.

You hear some spectacular success stories of people who became self-made millionaires despite failing school or uni, and who somehow found their true calling only after dropping out, and some of them like Bill Gates are even among the world's richest people today. I think what you don't hear much about is how the average Joe fares when they drop out. Not finishing school or uni is a dark spot on your CV that you will always have to answer for. No matter which career path you will then take, you will always have to fight the impression that you haven't got the staying power to see something through till the end. And you will certainly have trouble finding even low-level work in the field that you were training for.

I know somebody who attempted a degree in computer science because for as long as he could remember, computers were his thing. And he had good marks in it throughout school. But somehow, he just didn't adapt well to university life and decided to quit when he began to fail more and more exams. He still wanted to do something in the field despite failing uni, and I guess he was able to freelance for a while, but at a very low level, and it was usually just coding jobs. He was always told that they preferred to hire people who had finished uni full time for the big, lucrative jobs. So at some point, he then opened up his own one-man PC repair service, even rented a little shop for it. I understand he now just about gets by, but there really isn't much net profit to be made that way. It pays the shop rent and puts food on his table, but his take-home is a fraction of what senior employees with a finished computer science degree can hope to make.
>> No. 420145 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 10:28 pm
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>>420142
How do you come to fail the exams? "Failing" the coursework is par for the course among the terminally lazy but how does someone with two brain cells to rub together fail the exams? Especially as you say he knew enough to do some paid coding work. I don't get it.
>> No. 420146 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 10:36 pm
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>>420142
Reading that gave me a cold sweat.

>>420145
I get easily stressed and don't fit in easily, nor do I communicate my anxieties until I'm hurtling towards the ground without a parachute. My failures weren't remotely coding related though.

Still, might be getting a job as a pot washer soon and I hear that's the way to do it! I hate everything about me.
>> No. 420148 Anonymous
9th September 2018
Sunday 10:54 pm
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>>420145

I think he overestimated his abilities. It's one thing if you have been a computer whiz kid ever since you can remember. And it doesn't matter if you can assemble a PC blindfolded and with your hands tied behind your back, or if you can code in ten different programming languages. You are taught a great deal of theory behind computers as such, from applied physics and theoretical maths to overarching concepts of computer science itself. And so then when you go into those exams thinking it's going to be a piece of piss for you just because you've coded since you were a weelad, then that can be a dangerous assumption. He did tell me that he realised that all the theory that didn't have to do with the hands-on stuff really bored him.

Also, I've got an economics degree and I, too, was able to do the odd bit of coding work during uni, despite never having visited a single course or lecture on how to code in C or Java. Unless things really get kind of complicated, anybody who has a bare minimum of analytic (and mathematical) understanding can, with a bit of practice and experience, deliver code that can earn them money.

And I think sadly, that's also one reason why a lot of software is so piss poor, and contains countless bugs and errors and security risks. It's pretty easy to type up and/or throw together some code. As I said, it doesn't take much to be able to do that. But to really have a deeper understanding what you are doing, it's not enough to simply teach yourself bits of programming language or copy and paste libraries or code snippets you've found online. And it's also not enough to take a course in "computer programming for liberal arts", which my sociology friend considered doing and then going into programming himself.
>> No. 420149 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 1:57 pm
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>>420062

It really amuses me the US Border Patrol is using precisely the same logic as an insecure girlfriend. "This is a viable way to hide something, therefore you must be hiding something."
>> No. 420152 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 2:21 pm
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>>420149

The UK is far worse. You can be sent to prison for having something encrypted and refusing - or being unable - to produce decryption keys for the authorities.

I have an MSATA drive somewhere with a linux install with an encrypted /home on it. This is reasonably common practice, enough that it prompts you to do it during the OS install. I'm pretty sure I've forgotten the password to it at this point - I should really find the drive and destroy it, as the other alternative is literally risking prison time for it being in my house. What a fucking nightmare, especially considering the most controversial thing on it is my fucking CV.
>> No. 420153 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 2:43 pm
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>>420152
Some guy was sent to prison recently for not giving out his Facebook password.
>> No. 420154 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 2:47 pm
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>>420152

Unless police search your home for some reaosn, you should be ok.

A good idea is probably to commit no crimes that could result in a search warrant against you.
>> No. 420155 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 2:57 pm
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>>420152

I see the point you're making, but it's not really the same. It's not like we have coppers walking around coffee shops randomly checking people's laptops and arresting them for suspiciously clean installs.

Not that I'd put it past them, obviously.
>> No. 420156 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 3:00 pm
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>>420153

Goes to show how utterly pointless Facebook is.

Personally, I have no social media accounts whatsoever. No Facebook, no Twitter, no Linkedin, Instagram, nothing. This is by choice, because I don't see the point, never have, and likely never will.

Problem is, apparently that too is now suspicious. U.S. authorities can now ask you to tell them your social media handles, and if you say you don't have any, that could be a problem when you want to enter the country.

I have a slight suspicion that I am already on some kind of list, because on the three flights I took last year around Europe, I was "randomly selected" for an explosives trace check on two of them. Bit of a coincidence. And on one flight before that, I had a sticker on my suitcase from which I inferred that airport security had examined my luggage. I don't know what the fuck they want with me, all I am is a law abiding citizen who just refuses to have his name show up anywhere on the Internet.

I kind of think next time I'll have a bit of fun with them, by breaking open an old firecracker and rubbing my hands on it right before a flight. Probably a bad idea though.
>> No. 420157 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 3:43 pm
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>>420154
And make sure you have no neighbours because the police may pursue them but search your house by mistake.
>> No. 420158 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 3:48 pm
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>>420156

Frankly you probably do look suspicious if you don't have social media, I mean the only other info they have on you is your posting history on obscure "anonymous" imageboards. Being that they are anonymous, you've probably spoken more freely than you would on social media, and engaged in plenty of trolling. This probably paints you as some sort of anarchist serial pedo.

I mean god knows what kind of profile somebody would build of me if all they had to go on was my posts from this place.
>> No. 420159 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 4:08 pm
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>>420158

>Frankly you probably do look suspicious if you don't have social media

And frankly I'd rather look suspicious without social media than have a Facebook account and just be uncomfortable with it.

I just don't like not having control over what people know about me. Which is kind of a moot point considering the government pretty much knows everything I do online, but still. I guess what I mean is, I don't want people, regular people, being able to gain information about me behind my back that I don't want them knowing. If there's something you want to know, ask me. But don't run around me like that.

And if authorities think I am a wrongun because of that, then to me that has more to do with them being an Orwellian state than with our world today being a social media dominated society. I'm very much in favour of a free democratic society, and warding off threats to it. But the problem these days is that supposedly democratic governments around the globe have turned this idea into a complete farce.

So go on, put me on a list to have me checked for explosives everytime I get on a plane. You will not find them on me, because there never will be any. I am a peaceful, law abiding citizen who would never do such a thing as blow up a plane. Or blow up anything really. That just isn't me. It's just sad that you are wasting the taxes I pay you on this kind of paranoia.
>> No. 420160 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 5:36 pm
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>>420159

I would advise you to put on a FB page with some clean, wholesome images, a pleasant profile pic and everything set as private. No friends, no followed pages, nothing. Anybody looking you on FB will just see the front page and be happy with that. Ignore all friends requests, many of them will be bots anyways.
>> No. 420161 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 5:47 pm
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>>420160

That would still go against my desire of non-existence in the digital realm.

You would be forgiven for thinking I have been dead for years, because the last documents on the web with my name are from nearly 20 years ago, and are only there because I cannot get hold of somebody who would be in charge of deleting them from that server. I have essentially wiped my slate clean. I don't exist. And I am not just going to give up that kind of anonymity.
>> No. 420162 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 6:00 pm
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>>420160
And make sure not to enable facebook platform, for apps and use as a login authority on third party sites. The usual cookie wrangling, hosts file and adblockers will have much more effect than what you're giving up to FB.
None of this will mean that Facebook or anyone know anything more about you, and it acts as a mild decoy.
I did this, and don't regret it.
>> No. 420163 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 6:06 pm
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>>420161
Well, fair enough. But it's not paranoia that makes people check facebook profiles, as some daft fuckers do post stuff. I don't think you get to whine about that. Whine about FB's 3rd party data collection as much as you like, though. Fuck all you can do about it, that I can see.
>> No. 420164 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 6:26 pm
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>>420163

My issue isn't with Facebook. And not with Big Data nicking my personal information off my Facebook profile. My issue is with the general idea of divulging information to strangers indiscriminately on the web. Even with Facebook's various privacy settings, you will always still advertise something about yourself, even if it's the fact that you even so much as exist.

Back in the old days before the web, it was perfectly acceptable if you didn't want to be listed in your local phonebook. Which was arguably the social media of its time. My nan had her phone number removed after my granddad died and she ended up living in the house by herself. And nobody raised an eyebrow at her for saying she'd rather people didn't know she was still alive, than some "weird person" calling her that she didn't care for.

In its own way, it's like that with me today and my unwillingness to exist on the web. The government know all they could possibly want to know about me. They know where I am employed, how much money I make, how much taxes I pay, my bank account balance, where I live, where I go on holiday, and sadly, what I look at online and who I talk to on the phone. I don't think they can justify considering me "suspicious" just because I choose not to divulge any personal information to the public at large on the Internet.
>> No. 420165 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 7:03 pm
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>>420164
In the same way that living an isolated in a hut in the Montana mountains also isn't 'suspicious'.
It's somewhat unusual, though. Wonder if there is or isn't any correlation between this kind of unusual, and being worth a look if you cross borders? I imagine GCHQ have some numbers? I'd hope so.
Some members of my family have no social media footprint. Mine goes back to USENET in '88. I get swabbed pretty much every flight and have SSS on my ticket about two flights out of three. Probably because I tend to book late, fly alone and turn up late and sweaty, rather than my massive and frankly tedious net footprint.
>> No. 420166 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 7:42 pm
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I've never been asked to "explain away" my lack of education going all the way back to my GCSEs, but I have been semi-detained for extra question (to the point of the flight being delayed) because of a bunch of Saudi Arabian business visas.

Presumably the system flagged me up as the world's whitest radicalised Shamanismist with a serious alcohol problem in the world. Or something.
>> No. 420168 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 9:04 pm
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I'm friends with a few ex cons (the reality of the kitchen game - we'll hire anyone and institutionalised people seem to find the atmosphere pretty similar) two of them were pretty heavy drug dealers, and whenever I would hang out at their houses or vice versa, I'd find that I'd be stopped by the police, sometimes unmarked, sometimes not, with odd reasons like "Oh your back light was out but it's back on now"

Maybe it was coincidence, it was always on empty B roads so maybe they were hoping to catch drink drivers or something, and they never searched my car or anything, just asked if I'd finished work at. But it did start to feel like I had "known associate" next to my name on the ANPR. I don't even know if that's a thing, seems like a stretch for the level of policing in this country.
>> No. 420170 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 9:38 pm
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>>420168

>But it did start to feel like I had "known associate" next to my name on the ANPR. I don't even know if that's a thing, seems like a stretch for the level of policing in this country.

It's very much a thing. The ANPR system is far more pervasive than most people realise. Nationally, there are 27 million ANPR reads per day, which leads to 25,000 hits against the Police National Computer. Data flows in both directions between ANPR and the PNC. Any investigating officer can place a marker against your vehicle if you've been identified as an associate of a criminal; conversely, you can be identified as a suspect based on bulk analysis of ANPR data.

https://www.app.college.police.uk/app-content/investigations/investigative-strategies/investigative-strategiesanpr/
>> No. 420171 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 10:02 pm
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>>420170

Christ. I was sort of hoping it wasn't true. I did notice after I moved away from the area I didn't get it again, despite still visiting these lads now and then. I'm not sure why they never took it further than basic harassment, though, they could have gotten an arrest out of it if they'd searched my car the first time. Likely they were after the lads I'm talking about though, hoping they were with me and carrying.
>> No. 420173 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 10:09 pm
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>>420168

I was once stopped by French motorway police going from Germany back to Calais and then back to Britain on the Eurostar. I gathered from their slightly patchy English that I fit the profile of a potential drug trafficker. Single young male with UK number plate, driving along a French motorway in the middle of the night, probably coming from the Netherlands and on the way back home.

I had been doing nothing of that sort in the Netherlands, in fact, I was really coming back from visiting a friend who was studying in Bremen at the time, and I was driving over night hoping to catch the first train in the morning and that way beat traffic. Which is what I told them, but they seemed to doubt the story even when I showed them a picture on my phone of me and my friend with the Bremen town sign in the background. From what I heard them say, they were insinuating that I still could have stopped in Amsterdam to buy drugs either way.

They asked for permission to search my car, which I gave them to avoid any further trouble. They then apparently briefly considered getting a canine unit to the scene (they said something to each other about "demander les chiens"), but for some reason then just told me to drive home safely and drove off again.

Why am I telling you lot all this? Well, about two years ago, I was stopped by a police car here in Britain because somehow I managed to cut them off at a stop sign. They asked how I think it could have happened that I cut them off, and then asked me point blank if I was on any kind of medication or substance that they should know about. I am in fact on mirtazapine, but I didn't feel like telling the cops that. They said my eyes looked kind of glazed, I just said I hadn't been getting much sleep lately, which was actually true. So anyway, they went back to their car and were talking to their headquarters over the radio, obviously having their police database queried for anything to do with me, and I actually overheard on the squeaky little speaker that the person said "was stopped on suspicion of drug trafficking near the French border".

So they administered a drug wipe test and of course it came back negative, but they kept drilling me with questions, all the while pretending they hadn't just got info that I was once stopped for potential drug trafficking.

I hope the fact that I came back clean twice on both of those stops will mean that they will in the future leave me alone with drug suspicions. I don't do drugs and have no plans to take it up or traffic in them. I'm kind of puzzled that French authorities apparently passed their information about me on to them, I think that's a major data privacy breach, but oh well.
>> No. 420174 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 10:17 pm
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>>420173

Don't EU police forces have an agreement to share information?
>> No. 420175 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 10:26 pm
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>>420174
One advantage of Brexit, then.
>> No. 420176 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 10:36 pm
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>>420174

Yes, but information about somebody just because they were stopped and no signs of drugs were found?
>> No. 420177 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 10:52 pm
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>>420176

All the French cops will have written is 'suspicion of drug trafficking', no explanation why, none of your reasons for being there.

Whether that's right to do or not, probably not - but it's likely perfectly legal. Sadly even crimes we're merely suspected of will stick with us, especially with foreign cops.

It doesn't do much to strengthen my trust in the constabulary. It was mostly fully eroded by the time they stopped me multiple times on the way home from work - honestly I assumed they were going to 'discover' a way to fuck me over straight from their own pocket if it kept going on. It was never even the same cops, It was ridiculous. But since I worked with a lad who used to sell drugs, and we got on well enough that I'd go to his house to play call of duty, they'd not leave me alone.

Changed cars and city and all sorts since then, and it doesn't happen now, but it's always in the back of my mind whenever I see a copper now. That whatever I do or say, even going 3mph over the speed limit, they'll be asking me how much coke I've got in the boot. ACAB.
>> No. 420178 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 11:45 pm
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Just popping in to say that I reported a true story about myself and an encounter with the police on this very board about a year before Snowden and recieved over a hundred replies telling me I was a cunt, to go fuck myself etc. At the time the percieved wisdom was that nobody who had failed their GCSEs but was too unfit to get into the fucking army could possibly have any interest in surveilling the music taste and browsing history of the people around them.

Fuck you and fuck this site.
>> No. 420180 Anonymous
10th September 2018
Monday 11:55 pm
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>>420177

>All the French cops will have written is 'suspicion of drug trafficking', no explanation why, none of your reasons for being there.

That's what I mean though. If they stop me and find no incriminating evidence, then they should not put that incident in their database in the first place. Evidently, as that information then gets passed around European police databases, it will paint suspicion on me where there shouldn't be any. I was stopped because French police mistakenly thought I was a drug trafficker. Fine. It happens. I was maybe in the wrong place at the wrong time. But I evidently was no drug trafficker, so that should have been the end of it.
>> No. 420181 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 12:12 am
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>>420178
>recieved over a hundred replies telling me I was a cunt, to go fuck myself etc.
Ah, the traditional .gs welcome. Also, go fuck yourself, cunt.
>> No. 420182 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 12:14 am
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>>420178
What the hell are you rambling about.
>> No. 420183 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 2:14 am
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>>420178

There's absolutely no way you got 100 replies, britfa.gs is dead and has been for half a decade.

I don't even remember your post, but if it really was a year ago, this was exactly when I was being pulled over all the time and strongly suspected why, so I'm sure I'd have agreed with you.

The fact you mention Snowden and your general tone, I'm assuming you said something a bit mental. Care to explain further, though? Jog our memories?
>> No. 420184 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 3:00 am
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>>420183

He said a year before Snowden, not a year ago from today.

Then again I remember being called a lunatic in the late 90s for talking about Echelon and Carnivore, so I had a lot of smug "I told you so"-ing to do when the NSA leaks happened.
>> No. 420185 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 3:44 am
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>>420184

>He said a year before Snowden, not a year ago from today.

Oh yeah. Probably explains why I don't remember then. That was a while back.

...Emily?
>> No. 420186 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 3:49 am
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>>420180

I agree with you entirely, but that's not how the gendarme, or any rozzers, think. In their mind you were still a smuggler that just got lucky, or didn't happen to have anything in his car at that moment. That's how police think. They're typically not very educated and rather prejudicial - so once they've decided what you are, that's just what you are. Just because you were clean that means nothing to that sort of people - they can't possibly have been wrong, you were just lucky. Better call it in and make sure you don't get away with it next time!

I might sound like I have a grudge, but it's just the honest reality of it. If there's anything worse than a jobsworth, it's a thick jobsworth, and the world's police forces are full of them.

The only good ones are the ones clever enough to get into crime themselves.
>> No. 420187 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 8:01 am
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>>420186

Much like the army, I imagine that being a copper is just what happens when you fail all your GCSEs and lack the social skills and personality to work front of house in the budget leisure and service industry.
>> No. 420188 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 10:31 am
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>>420187
Joining the Army is far more beneficial than that.
>> No. 420189 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 10:40 am
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>>420186

I'm just not sure how that is squared with the presumption of innocence. I don't think it's in the people's best interest when overzealous coppers see you not as an innocent citizen who was wrongly suspected, but as a criminal who just got lucky that day.

But I guess as a cop, you begin to see everybody that way. Because on the one hand you are trained to be sceptical, and on the other hand you do have to deal with actual criminals every day.

Still doesn't make it right. Because that kind of attitude has turned us into the country with the world's highest per capita density of CCTV cameras, and it also brought us the Snoopers Charter, PNR databases and the whole lot. The government no longer thinks everybody is generally innocent. We are all suspects.
>> No. 420191 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 11:14 am
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>>420189

>I'm just not sure how that is squared with the presumption of innocence.

It doesn't. Coppers are prejudiced. It's part the personality of the people who want to be coppers, and part confirmation bias, as you've pointed out.

>I don't think it's in the people's best interest when overzealous coppers see you not as an innocent citizen who was wrongly suspected, but as a criminal who just got lucky that day.

I agree entirely, but, in my experience at least, it happens all the time - and I don't even look dodgy. I can't imagine what it must be like to be black or rough looking etc. I would go as far as saying there's certain people who end up as criminals simply because they've learned from a young age that they're already seen as criminals by the police, and by extension a lot of society. I've seen it happen. Schoolmates got hassled just because of their postcode or their colour, obviously that's going to quickly form an anti-authority streak.

>The government no longer thinks everybody is generally innocent. We are all suspects.

Precisely, and the terrifying part is most people don't notice, and even those that do don't care. I'll get angry about it here for a bit, or rant about it for an hour when I'm drunk, but that's the extent of it, because I know it's already too late.

I know it's trite to reference 1984 at this point, but the atmosphere of that book matches our society entirely, if you remove the higher drama of storytelling.
>> No. 420192 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 12:38 pm
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>>420191

>Precisely, and the terrifying part is most people don't notice, and even those that do don't care. I'll get angry about it here for a bit, or rant about it for an hour when I'm drunk, but that's the extent of it, because I know it's already too late.


I think the worst kind of attitude is when people think they have "nothing to hide". That's what you hear from people a lot who express their indifference towards the issue. They will say that the government can snoop around in their personal (digital) data however they please, because they've got nothing to hide.

Well, I don't think the issue should be if you've got "nothing to hide", but that you have a right to hide your most private matters from the government. I am a law abiding citizen, but the government can go fuck itself if it thinks it has the right to nose around on me based on the vague possibility that I might have committed a crime. Well, I haven't. And the presumption of innocence requires that you believe me, until you are able to present compelling evidence against me to the contrary.

There is a price you pay. If you give the people their privacy like that, some crimes will never be detected, and nobody will ever be held accountable. But the alternative is a digital panopticon where citizens must fear with everything they do that somebody is watching, and tracking every move they make. And it's a long accepted fact that that has a great chilling effect on democracy itself, and especially on such things as freedom of speech.

And shut up about militant daft woggery already. Nearly every daft militant wog that has ever been was known to authorities before they committed daft militant wog acts, and became known not thanks to the government keeping records of what you wanked to online two weeks ago, but good old fashioned police work.

I am old enough to remember the days when the world was split up into the "free", "democratic" West and the multinational gulag that the former Communist Bloc was painted to be. One of the key arguments for the West's superiority over communism was that supposedly, the West left its citizens alone and they were free to go about their lives without secret police keeping them under constant watch (as we now know from declassified government documents, that, too, was kind of a bold faced lie). But now with the Communist Bloc long gone, and thanks to modern technology, the so called free and democratic West keeps tabs on its citizens on a global scale that would have been the wet dream of East German Stasi or Romanian Securitate officers. And it all happens largely unchallenged by its people.

One of my friends is a historian and he told me he sometimes thinks maybe it's not such a good thing that the "West" as an economic model and a model of government and institutions remained as the only survivor of the Cold War. During the Communist era, the West constantly had to portray itself as the better, more humane alternative to communism. At least in theory. And it had to give its citizens certain freedoms and a certain level of economic prosperity that would guarantee that there would be no socialist revolution in the West. But with that now gone, there is no more potential alternative to the Western model. The West no longer needs to justify itself. Even China is now more a one-party capitalist country than a communist state. So the "West" now reigns supreme as THE model of government and economics. But in the corridors of power, there are no illusions that there will never be a straw that will break the camel's back, and so they have to keep mass surveillance on their citizens so they won't revolt on a large enough scale to topple the system itself. And THAT is why there is mass surveillance. Not to catch pickpockets on CCTV, but to be prepared when the revolt comes.
>> No. 420193 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 1:14 pm
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>>420192
The phrase is "bald faced lie". "Bald" being used here as in "bare, uncovered", much like all of our sins are laid bare whenever the coppers go to Facebook and ask for your data to be handed over on a platter. Whinge ticked because of my own pedantry, sorry.
>> No. 420194 Anonymous
11th September 2018
Tuesday 1:25 pm
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Cartoon of the Day-Pedants' Revolt.jpg
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>>420193

> Whinge ticked because of my own pedantry, sorry.

That's ok. Probably had some sort of Freudian slip thing going on in my head when I wrote it or something.

As you said, Facebook is now a key means of investigation for police. And that, too, makes me uncomfortable. But I think it's also one way the public has been conditioned to think they've got nothing to hide. With many of us sharing such a large part of our lives publicly on social media, it might seem to many as an antiquated idea that you should have the right to decide what the government gets to see, and use against you.

There was a South Park episode on precisely that kind of thing a few years ago. Can't find it now.
>> No. 420195 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 11:38 am
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>>420192
Some interesting stuff is happening in Russia right now. People being jailed because of 3-5 year old posts on VK (basically Russian FB with better search, used to have tonnes of pirated audiofiles and porn) with some stupid political/religious memes. It has reached a point where articles 'how not to get jailed for a VK post' have started to appear in an even relatively mainstream online media outlets.

I do wonder if this will affect the nothing-to-hide attitude that is present there too but colour me sceptical. Very sceptical.
>> No. 420196 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 5:05 pm
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>>420195

>I do wonder if this will affect the nothing-to-hide attitude that is present there too but colour me sceptical. Very sceptical.

As I said, the issue to me isn't if you've got something to hide or not. It's that the government in a supposedly free country like ours should have no right to intrude into the most private areas of your life like it does nowadays, and just because of the assumption prevalent these days that everybody is a suspect and just might have something dodgy going on in their private life.

I was in Cuba years ago on a study tour of the whole country with my university. And one scene we witnessed was that a chap in his Lada was suddenly pulled over by police in the street in Santiago de Cuba. For no particular reason at all, police just wanted to have a look around his boot to see if there was anything illegal in it. One of our professors knew a bit about Cuba as this wasn't his first time there, and he told us that that was a very common occurrence. Police just randomly picking out motorists for a complete search of their car. Without suspicion, without probable cause, without you as a Cuban citizen having any right to protest against the measure. Just a random, indiscriminate measure to see if somebody who may not have given any reason for suspicion at all was dodgy.

It kind of doesn't come as a shock when it's a second- or third world socialist shithole like Cuba. But if your attitude is really that you've got nothing to hide and that authorities are welcome to any and all of your personal data, then you are in fact saying that they have the same rights as those police officers in the street in Cuba, and that you have as little rights as the poor chap in the Lada who was stopped.
>> No. 420197 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 5:21 pm
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>>420196

I don't believe there's any sort of 'probable cause' in the UK either, is there? Couldn't police here do basically the same thing?
>> No. 420198 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 5:34 pm
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>>420197

I think they do need permission from you to search your car. And if you refuse to give your permission, they are going to need a search warrant. Which again they will only get if they present compelling suspicion against you to a judge.

But maybe lawlad can better explain the details.
>> No. 420199 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 5:45 pm
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>>420198
An officer can claim to smell cannabis and then has watertight reasonable suspicion to search your car under the Misuse of Drugs Act.
>> No. 420200 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 5:56 pm
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>>420199

Yes, but in general, they can't just indiscriminately fuck with you out of whim. I'm sure if a PC says he smelled Cannabis and there verifiably wasn't even one crumb of weed inside your car, then that could come back to bite them as an abuse of police power.

Those police officers in Cuba could just pull you over and search you without any kind of suspicion at all. Just because they felt like it, and because it was one of the government approved ways of keeping citizens under watch.
>> No. 420201 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 6:03 pm
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>>420200
How can anyone realistically verify the last of any hypothetical cannabis wasn't just smoked in the vehicle? Hint: they can't.
>> No. 420202 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 6:16 pm
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>>420201

The burden of proof still isn't on you to prove that you are innocent and that there has positively been no cannabis inside your car, but on police to prove that you did actually have cannabis. And I'm pretty sure that you could bring on a case where a PC would have to explain his actions, after claiming that he smelled cannabis, but you and other witnesses said there couldn't possibly have been any inside the car.
>> No. 420203 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 6:20 pm
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>>420202
To convict, sure. To search, not in practice.

TPTB know it's a bit of a sham but the police continue on regardless.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/police-stop-search-cannabis-marijuana-smell-drug-policy-guidance-hmic-report-a8105061.html
>> No. 420204 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 6:47 pm
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>>420202

>The burden of proof still isn't on you to prove that you are innocent and that there has positively been no cannabis inside your car, but on police to prove that you did actually have cannabis.

No it isn't. A stop-and-search is an investigation, not a punishment. Police officers aren't psychic; they can't be expected to only ever search guilty people. You might not have any cannabis in your possession, but you might still reek of it. Can you prove that you didn't smell of cannabis? Can you demonstrate that the officer had no reasonable grounds to suspect you of committing an offence under the Misuse of Drugs Act?

You might not like it, but that's the law.
>> No. 420205 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 7:13 pm
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>>420202
What you are saying basically amounts to "the police should risk punishment if they wrongly investigate someone". It couldn't possibly work like that even if the alternative opens up a massive avenue for abuse.

We need to move away from the idea that suspicion = guilt. Your idea would simply legitimise it if not for the fact that no crime could be investigated in the first place.
>> No. 420206 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 8:17 pm
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>>420200

>I'm sure if a PC says he smelled Cannabis and there verifiably wasn't even one crumb of weed inside your car, then that could come back to bite them as an abuse of police power.

I admire your optimism, but I really don't think any copper will get in trouble for this unless it's a very clear and specific targeted harassment against one person (i.e. he somehow keeps smelling weed in his ex wife's new boyfriend's car, that sort of thing) And even then, I'm not convinced.

Basically the only difference between our police and Cuba's in this regard, is that ours just have to make sure they remember to say they smell weed before they indiscriminately search you.

Listen to the copper at 2 minutes in to this video - they way he says 'possible smell of cannabis as well' as if he's getting one over on them should tell you all you need to know. He'd talked to them for the first two minutes of the video without ever mentioning the apparent weed smell, but as soon as they've pissed him off by legging it, he wants to see how much he can fuck them.

I choose this example deliberately - a lot of people say these lads deserve everything they get, climbing buildings and running away from coppers etc, but the reality is all they do in this video is civil trespass, whereas, in my mind, the biggest crime committed here is a copper suddenly "smelling weed' when he's been pissed off.


>> No. 420207 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 9:29 pm
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>>420206

> climbing buildings

Pfft. That's nothing. You haven't lived until you've climbed a disused 500 ft electrical tower somewhere in Russian East Bumfuck.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_x7-Mmr_Lk4
>> No. 420209 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 9:51 pm
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>>420207
I mean it's more exposed and so might trigger someone's fear of heights, but in terms of danger and climbing difficulty that's relatively tame. You'd have to be careless to fall off a ladder and some flat girders like that. Less dangerous than Ally's video above IMO and this recent one.


>> No. 420210 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 9:52 pm
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>>420198 >>420200 >>420202
You have to be white and relatively rural to be this oblivious and to swallow the fairy tale impression of this country sold in schools. I'd think even toffs know better.
>> No. 420213 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 10:15 pm
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>>420209

It does kick it up a notch.

Sadly, Channel 4 have removed their documentary called "Don't Look Down" both from youtube and all4. I was going to post it here, but it's nowhere to be found now.

But here are a few clips of it:

https://bit.ly/2QquOtm

Scared me shitless when I watched it on TV. I mean, I have been kind of afraid of heights my entire life anyway, but just seeing other people do these things on camera really gave me a cold sweat.
>> No. 420215 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 10:17 pm
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>>420210

I think you just have to be white (or the right sort of brown) and not working class, to be honest. My girlfriend grew up in a 'nicer' area of the same city as me, and has an markedly different view of the police and the justice system than I do. The police to her are people who help you, who you're supposed to seek out if you're in trouble. To me they were people who drove around my estate looking for people to nick, and when someone took my bike at knifepoint they seemed convinced I was lying and had just sold it/lost it/chucked it in a river. There's many more and worse examples but I don't want to turn this into a Four Yorkshiremen sketch.

Now that I've grown up, and admittedly am now very much middle class, financially at least, I'm aware the police as a whole are mostly just normal, slightly ineffectual people, but I don't think that initial impression of authority ever really leaves a person. We've talked here before about how you can't really teach a person to be streetwise, you just have to have been raised in it - and I think the same goes here.
>> No. 420216 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 10:25 pm
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>>420215

>To me they were people who drove around my estate looking for people to nick, and when someone took my bike at knifepoint they seemed convinced I was lying and had just sold it/lost it/chucked it in a river. There's many more and worse examples but I don't want to turn this into a Four Yorkshiremen sketch.


Social profiling is very much a thing, whether you like to admit it or not. But having known many people from the lower and lowest classes, some of them through volunteer charity work I used to do -- in all defence of the coppers, a lot more shit tends to go down on council estates and among dolescum than between middle class people. There is just a level of dysfunction that is more prevalent among the lower classes, which leads to crimes and offences that just aren't very often found in slightly better of families.
>> No. 420218 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 10:37 pm
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>>420213
I guess for most people the consequences of that lifestyle are instinctively obvious, but maybe a compilation of when things go wrong is a good counterbalance to a diet of Ally Law videos.

https://www.liveleak.com/view?i=715_1513068362

Don't watch if death makes you squeamish.
>> No. 420219 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 10:45 pm
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>>420210
> You have to be white and relatively rural to be this oblivious

Ahh, the typical Britfa poster.
>> No. 420220 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 11:00 pm
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>>420216

I agree. There's no avoiding that crime is higher the lower down the rungs you go, and I'm not about to blame the coppers or society for all of that. All I know is I never committed any crime as a kid, or teenager, but still very much felt like I was seen and treated as a criminal by the police. Right or not to tar a kid from 'the estate' with that sort of brush, it's what's given me my anti-authoritarian streak, and what pushed a lot of other kids my age into crime. Might as well rob houses if they already think you do, sort of thing.

I know it's more complex than that, and I don't discount the effect of the criminal element we grew up around, either - I'm sure they set my worldview in motion just as much as the rozzers.

All I can say is once you've seen a copper headbutt your neighbour while shouting about money, it's hard to look at either of them as an adult role model.

Of course the solution to this is to just end all poverty. Simple, innit.
>> No. 420221 Anonymous
12th September 2018
Wednesday 11:53 pm
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>>420218

I think it's mainly a trend in eastern Europe, in countries like Russia and Ukraine, where young lower class people have little to live for anyway. So they go and seek these thrills, partly because if it goes wrong and they turn into pulp after a 500 ft fall, it's not like they've thrown away much.

As I said, I have always been a bit afraid of heights. Even getting up the old observation tower near where I grew up, which was open to the public, was a struggle for me. And it was barely 200 feet tall, made from solid limestone, and had chest-high walls around the platform at the top.


>All I know is I never committed any crime as a kid, or teenager, but still very much felt like I was seen and treated as a criminal by the police. Right or not to tar a kid from 'the estate' with that sort of brush

One of my friends at uni was from a council estate. He told me that most of his old friends his age at the estate (he was a mature student, about 26-27 when he started uni) were either chronically unemployed or in jail, and had fathered half a dozen kids with various different women. My friend was the first person from his estate in living memory to have gone to uni. And he said it was a rough journey. He always had the dream of becoming a barrister, which he achieved eventually, but he had to live with the stigma of being from dolescum chav upbringing not just during school, but all the way into uni. He just always felt like other students, some of them with very wealthy parents, looked down on him like he didn't fully belong in their circle.

And my friend saw some serious shit growing up, from police chasing all sorts of criminals across the estate playground about once a week, to two of his mates arguing over how to split the profits from stolen goods and one of them then slicing the other's face open with a broken bottle. But he himself always knew that he didn't want that kind of life for himself, so he studied his butt off, and then first started an apprenticeship at a bank and then later after he got his A levels he then went to uni to study law. But as I said, it was a rough journey for him, and I imagine it really is incredibly hard to escape that kind of life and build a better future for yourself.
>> No. 420222 Anonymous
13th September 2018
Thursday 1:29 am
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>>420221

>But as I said, it was a rough journey for him, and I imagine it really is incredibly hard to escape that kind of life and build a better future for yourself.

I can attest to that, certainly, and if I didn't have a mum and grandparents with their head screwed on, I'd have been fucked, I'm sure. On the other side of that coin though, looking at all the chaos around you and realising you want no part of it is a huge fucking boost to your enthusiasm at school, work ethic, etc.

I remember when I was in sixth form, most of my mates I'd grown up with just couldn't understand what I was bothering with it for, as they all had 'careers' already. Most of them are either in prison or dead, now, but it's hard to deny the appeal of being a 16 year old who's wondering what car to buy with his drug money when he passes his test.


>He just always felt like other students, some of them with very wealthy parents, looked down on him like he didn't fully belong in their circle.

This rings very true, also. There's something about the way you grow up that you can never truly shake off. I'm well spoken, well read, quite witty and affable, educated, and yet I know I'll never truly gel with someone who grew up rich - we'll get on just fine, I can still sell them on a contract for my work, but I will always 'click', have that unspoken connection to people who grew up the way I did, and I'm sure the same is true for those in the upper echelons of society. You're bred for socialising with your own kind, sometimes intentionally, sometimes not.
>> No. 420223 Anonymous
13th September 2018
Thursday 1:36 am
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>>420222

I'll add too that these days, pardon my hubris, I'm a lot better off financially than a lot of the upper class people I've worked with - I know this from conversations as well as the conclusions I can draw as I deal with their businesses. They're paying me, desperately begging me to save the business they've half destroyed, yet somehow there's a small part of my brain that still thinks they're somehow better and inherently more successful than me. It's certainly not a conscious thought, but I'm very much aware it's there.
>> No. 420224 Anonymous
13th September 2018
Thursday 7:22 am
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>>420221

I know this feeling, but my experience is a bit different. My family is split in two, one side having a long history of criminal records/mental illness and the other being more well-to-do, 'respectable' working class.

I've made a decent career for myself and things are looking good for the future, but I've not set my roots in firmly anywhere just yet. For me, I often find it difficult to get along with both groups of people -- the ones who grew up rough and the ones with more comfortable upbringings.

It probably says more about my personality, than anything, but sometimes I think that it owes in part to this feeling that I'm still suck in between both worlds. I remember developing two accents, one to speak to my Cambridge-educated personal tutor, all those friends whose dads were barristers and doctors, then another to speak to my family and people back home.

It could be that I've still not escaped my grubby hometown, but I find myself not really able to identify with the 'lifers' here, either. They're the people I seem to run into the most nowadays, the ones who were born here but just about 'made it' in the sense that they went to one of the more mellow secondary schools and they've got a job they can (just about) tolerate and one or two kids.

The people I seem to 'click' with are middle class kids trying to rebel, or very self-aware working class. I guess, people who are in a similar state of transition (or maybe insecurity).
>> No. 420225 Anonymous
13th September 2018
Thursday 8:31 am
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>>420222

>There's something about the way you grow up that you can never truly shake off.

I can't really be friends with anyone who has never had their head kicked in. There's an almost childlike naivete to a lot of middle-class people who have never had anything properly bad happen to them. I work with quite a lot of rather posh people, but my friends and family are all somewhere on a spectrum between "a bit rough" and "absolutely degenerate". The people I work with are all very nice, but I wouldn't trust any of them in a difficult situation.
>> No. 420226 Anonymous
13th September 2018
Thursday 9:33 am
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>>420225

I'm >>420224. I can see where you're coming from, but I've got to say I think whether that sort of experience toughens or traumatises you is down to degree, whether you've got the right sort of emotional tools, and what you're conditioned to. If I reflect on it, I'd say I know more people who've become less stable because of that kind of trauma, rather than more competent.
>> No. 420227 Anonymous
13th September 2018
Thursday 10:21 am
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I don't know what I am. I guess it's whatever you view as your baseline. I'm definitely not council estate class, but I've always found middle class people to be a bit grating and definitely a different sort of person from myself.
>> No. 420228 Anonymous
13th September 2018
Thursday 10:38 am
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>>420215
> We've talked here before about how you can't really teach a person to be streetwise, you just have to have been raised in it - and I think the same goes here.
Do you know perchance if that thread is still around somewhere and any specific keywords to look for if I wish to find it?
>> No. 420230 Anonymous
13th September 2018
Thursday 11:45 am
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>>420227

I think the problem isn't the middle classes as such. It's when you've had an overly sheltered upbringing.

One of my mates from uni grew up in a nice house in a small town in the East Midlands. His dad was a company head physician at a major industrial plant and his mum was a primary school teacher at a private school. It's wonderful when you are lucky enough to grow up in a family where nothing bad ever happened to him. They never had money problems, his dad worked 40 years straight at that company, his parents had a very harmonic marriage, and he always got along fine with his bigger sister. The picture perfect family.

But it also meant that my friend was utterly and mind bogglingly sheltered. He had very little of an actual clue about life itself, even for a 20-year-old student who was really just as wet behind the ears as everyone of us. It's difficult to name examples, but although he was a quite intelligent lad in his own way, he was just out where the buses don't run when it came to anything to do with how real life works. From the way he tried to talk to girls to simple things like how to treat a shop assistant with respect so the poor lad didn't ponder flat out kicking your teeth in. He also hadn't worked a single day in his life at age 20 (besides school work experience), so that kind of made it even worse.

He only very gradually grew wiser to the world as we progressed through uni together, but still to this day he has ways about himself where you just think, get off your island already and join the rest of us here in reality.

I grew up middle class as well, but in North London, which meant that even if you were born into a decent family where both parents had jobs and you lived in a relatively nice house, like I did, then you still saw some pretty messed up shit around town. Also, both my brother and I worked various jobs here and there during school from about age 15, which my parents thought was preparing us for life in the real, adult world. And it did.
>> No. 420234 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 3:24 pm
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At the races at the minute. Really struggling to understand the appeal.
>> No. 420235 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 4:06 pm
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>>420234

I take it you're not a race-ist.
>> No. 420236 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 4:43 pm
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>>420235
They just... run. It's a bit better if you have a bet on (I'm slightly up on the day) but it's not very exciting. You can't even see them for most of the racecourse so you're just watching big screen. My horse in the last race had a heart attack before it started so it's probably glue by now.
>> No. 420237 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 5:06 pm
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>>420234
The horses are for show. You're supposed to gawk at the buxom ladies from the council estate on their dressing-up day.
>> No. 420238 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 5:10 pm
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I had lunch with my dad's wife today - I don't say 'stepmother' as I didn't grow up with her or anything, also she's only about eight years older than me. She runs a consultancy and I'm fairly new to doing the same thing, so I wanted some advice.

Anyway, it was very...tense. She seemed very interested in telling me how different I was to my dad, how he's never held a proper job in his life, not like me, very impressive etc. It felt pretty clear where she was going with it. I don't often misread this sort of situation, but I hope I have this time. She's very attractive, though.
>> No. 420239 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 5:19 pm
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>>420238
If your dad's such a bum, how'd he get a fit, self-supporting, much younger wife?

Go on... do it, it's all mad and Greek like.
>> No. 420240 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 5:40 pm
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>>420239

I'm not entirely sure, he left my mother when I was a baby because he 'couldn't handle the pressure' and I've only really known him since I was 14 or 15, and he's just one of those charismatic people who can talk their way to what they want and always seem to win people around - I confess I'm quite similar there, but obviously I picked up a work ethic along the way.

They have kids together, too, both teenagers now. It seemed he made a good house husband, and now he no longer really has that responsibility, she seems to be starting to wonder how he gets to go and do whatever he wants all week while she has to fly across the country to do business. To that end I represent a younger, independent version of him who probably clocked more working hours before my teenage years were up than he has in 58. It sort of makes sense that a driven career woman would be drawn to that.

It could also just be that she likes to play away and has watched to many of those 'stepmom' videos on pornhub.

Either way she's out of luck, a few years ago I would already be shagging her right now while making her call me Daddy, but sadly I seem to have settled down a lot since then.
>> No. 420241 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 5:56 pm
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>>420240

> It sort of makes sense that a driven career woman would be drawn to that.

Did you really mean it doesn't make sense?

Because career minded businesswomen don't usually go for Lebowski type layabouts like your dad seems to be.

One reason why many of them end up as childless spinsters is that their standards are quite high and they struggle to find a partner who is equal to them, or marry up to somebody of even higher status, as many women still tend to do. Women don't usually like to marry down or even be with somebody long-term who doesn't have his shit together in a similar way.
>> No. 420242 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 6:05 pm
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>>420241

I think >>420240 means it makes sense that she likes him, not his dad.
>> No. 420244 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 6:16 pm
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>>420241

As >>420242 says, I meant that this is probably the reason she seems to want to bang me.

>Women don't usually like to marry down or even be with somebody long-term who doesn't have his shit together in a similar way.

True enough, she met him young, in her twenties, when she was still a student, I believe. Back then he was probably just the cool older bloke who was doing his own thing (dossing about France and riding a motorbike). That's probably the highest status imaginable at that age, but I'm sure it's not now.

I'm too old to want revenge on my shite dad by shagging his wife, and not old enough to be starved of other options for like-minded female companionship, which is why I'm posting this here instead of /emo/. It's interesting though, innit?

Alright, I can't absolutely guarantee I won't shag her for the wrongness factor alone, I'm only human ffs
>> No. 420245 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 6:31 pm
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>>420241
>Women don't usually like to marry down

The only woman I know who I'd class as a career woman is married to a shop assistant. She regularly rings him up and emasculates him in front of the rest of the office because she's on a major power trip.
>> No. 420246 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 6:58 pm
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>>420245

I worked with a career woman with a bit of a dosser husband (he's 'looking into making a youtube channel' was one of the things I heard from her) She also had him work for us for a bit, which went about as well as to be expected. Unsurprisingly she shagged her boss eventually.
>> No. 420247 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 7:28 pm
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>>420244
> I'm too old to want revenge on my shite dad by shagging his wife

I wonder if you're that much older than me or if I've just missed the boat on being a bitter cunt. I still spot my dad money for smack and play odd betting games with myself over which day he'll finally OD on. If he had a wife who wanted to shag me I'd be pissing up her arse and sending the cunt the polaroids.

Sage ticked for definite rage.
>> No. 420248 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 7:44 pm
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>>420247

I'm 29. He left long before I was a conscious human, and I didn't see him again until my early teens - and I only did that because my mum wanted me to. We're only in very light contact now, he basically just doesn't try very hard, and I genuinely don't really care. To me he's just some bloke that was an arsehole to my mum three decades ago - admittedly that's enough to warrant a bit of revenge, but she's a smart woman and got over him in that time, she didn't even really go into the extent of his arseholery until I was an adult, but he was more pathetic and spineless than cruel or violent. I think I 'won' when he visited me at work and saw what I'd made of myself. I could see jealousy in him then.

I doubt I'd feel bad for shagging her at all. I've slept with married women before and I suspect I feel more guilt about those than I would this. The only real thing stopping me, besides me just not being as much of a fanny hound as I used to be, is that I quite like my half-sisters and wouldn't want to upset them. I doubt they'd ever find out but y'know.
>> No. 420249 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 7:49 pm
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>>420248
I'm sure a good shagging would set them right if they ever did.
>> No. 420250 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 8:08 pm
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>>420249

Never change, britfa.gs
>> No. 420251 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 8:21 pm
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>>420246

>he's 'looking into making a youtube channel'


It's kind of beginning to look like that's the new shorthand for a work shy layabout or somebody who for whatever other reason hasn't got a proper nine to five job and a steady monthly income.

Ten years ago, somebody like that would have said he's a budding novelist and working on his first book, or that he had "taken time off to reflect and find himself". So nowadays the excuse is that you've got your youtube channel, which is going oh so well you don't need to spend your days as a nine to five cubicle slave.

Some of the most prolific youtubers really have turned this into a career for themselves. But just like not every pretend book writing dole fiend will turn into the next J.K. Rowling, there is probably a considerable failure rate of "youtubers" who for one reason or another don't achieve the goal of turning it into a fulltime career. Either because they are really shit at it, or they realise that in order for it to pay all their monthly bills, plus the work and effort that goes into making your videos, they would have to give it much more than they can be arsed.

All that said, one youtube channel that's really, really pretty good and that I follow is the one by the 8 Bit Guy. He's a stay at home dad tech geek in Texas who left his daytime job to focus full time on youtube, and it appears that that is really going well for him.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_sxTwD4lVs

In this video, he sheds light on his day to day routine:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PjzOvcymzI
>> No. 420252 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 9:15 pm
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>>420251

>there is probably a considerable failure rate of "youtubers" who for one reason or another don't achieve the goal of turning it into a fulltime career. Either because they are really shit at it, or they realise that in order for it to pay all their monthly bills, plus the work and effort that goes into making your videos, they would have to give it much more than they can be arsed.

There's a massive rate of failure for this sort of thing, and "looking into" starting a channel is probably a sign you've already failed. It's the equivalent of 'thinking about writing a novel' - i.e. you're never really going to fucking do it. I can't imagine there's a single successful youtuber who just sat and thought about it for a few months. They just started making content, and got better at it along the way.

I can't imagine a worse idea than starting a channel from scratch with the idea from the start that it's going to be your career. I'm sure 90% of the channels on YouTube only have a handful of views and subscribers. You'd be better off becoming a professional roulette player.

I'd never start my own channel, but if I did, my instinct would be to film myself over and over until I got a format down, then record five or ten 'episodes' of whatever it was so I could have consistent releases for a while. I've seen friends and colleagues start channels that are typically one video of them talking for fifteen minutes about what they're going to do and how they're going to do a video every x days, and then a video three weeks later apologising for not uploading more often.

While typing this I remembered I've made exactly one YouTube video, which I made for this site, presumably as part of some weird /iq/ thread.


>> No. 420255 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 10:00 pm
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>>420252

>I can't imagine a worse idea than starting a channel from scratch with the idea from the start that it's going to be your career. I'm sure 90% of the channels on YouTube only have a handful of views and subscribers.


I guess, again, much the same way that J.K. Rowling didn't set out to lay the foundation for a global media franchise when she was a single mum on benefits and started writing imaginative children's stories, the fact that you actually end up being able to turn it into a career is due to you being good, and maybe even really fucking good at it. If you're a shit writer to begin with and have no talent, then your idea of just crapping a succesful bestseller novel out of your arse is probably never going to materialise.

Personally, I still think the Hairy Harry Potter books are trite, poorly written drivel. But evidently, millions the world over loved them and the movies that were made from them, enough so that J.K. Rowling became one of the most spectacular selfmade millionaire stories in living memory. But again, this is not likely something she set out to do. She just happened to be a good storyteller, and things developed from there.

And you have to have a compelling story to tell, the same way if you are writing a novel or managing your own youtube channel. Just blabbering daft nonsense into a poorly held smartphone camera will only end up earning you a handful of subscriptions, most of which will probably be your mum and dad and nan and uncle. You have to be an expert at something, either real or perceived, and be able to talk about that something in a way that is relevant, graspable, relatable, and draws in viewers who will come back and find the overall experience of watching you pleasant enough and worthy of repeating.

I think the reason why it looks so easy is a special kind of survivor bias. Few people take the time to have a look at the failures who give up after three or four videos because it's just not working out and their videos really are shit. Most Youtube users subscribe to the already massively popular channels, which are popular for many reasons. And the idea that they could do that too then doesn't seem as far fetched to them as it really is.

That said, I happened to actually click on some of the channels that I had on my Youtube recommendation list at the bottom of the page the other day. There seems to be a niche for late teen to early 20something lasses talking about the most irrelevant things imaginable, and it still earns them thousands of subscribers. My guess is that half of the subscribers are middle aged men indiscriminately fapping to girls like that, no matter if they are talking about their latest curling iron disasters or feminine hygiene products that should be avoided.
>> No. 420256 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 10:11 pm
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>>420255

You're right, I can't even fathom how channels 'become' popular, but I suspect a lot of it is to do with people sharing with each other, and also the dark magic of the YouTube algorithm.

Tom Scott recently did a few videos on just this topic, they're worth a watch if you're interested in this sort of thing, he's more self aware than most of these people who just say it's all about perseverance and staying true to yourself.


>> No. 420257 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 10:46 pm
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>>420255
Absolutely they are trite, but poorly written drivel?

I don't understand a lot of hate that Potter gets. JK Rowling is a good writer and the books are enjoyable, even if you strip away all the magical setting - I'd probably even find 'Harry Potter Goes to the Shops' entertaining if she wrote it. The sheer volume of terrible fan fiction is testament to the fact that wizards do not a good story inherently make.
>> No. 420258 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 10:49 pm
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Actually thinking about it the series gets worse as it goes on until it does become something like terrible fan fiction. But my point stands because even the best writers need an editor.
>> No. 420259 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 10:55 pm
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>>420257

I certainly enjoyed them as a child, and haven't reread them so can't really give you a proper opinion on how well written they are, but certainly well enough to capture the imagination of a 10 to 15 year old, which is about how old I was when I read them.

It's probably telling that I can remember more of the specifics of the Artemis Fowl books and things like that than the specifics of Harry Potter, but I certainly don't remember thinking it was shit.

Anyone reading them as an adult can fuck off anyway.
>> No. 420260 Anonymous
14th September 2018
Friday 11:07 pm
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>>420256

I think there are always a few steps that you really should follow, but in the end, it's just down to luck and being in the right place at the right time, and for whatever reason succeeding at drawing a significant audience that turns your youtube channel into a success. As with many new product ideas, why exactly a product idea takes your target audience by storm isn't always completely clear. You just know that it does, and then it's up to you to ride that wave for as long as it lasts.




>>420257

Well ok, I was just speaking for myself. I got my older brother one of the Harry Potter novels for Christmas once (he was 30 at the time but said that even as a full adult, something about the stories spoke to him). Anyway, so while wrapping presents, I read roughly the first five, maybe even ten pages of it. And I can honestly say it did absoltely nothing for me. It made me understand even less what the whole fuss was all about. And this was at the height of the craze, when everybody was really losing their shit over Harry Potter.

Then again, I have never really enjoyed reading any kind of fiction books at all. I did buy the whole Hitchhiker's Guide cycle all in one volume once, admittedly because it was only £5 from the bargain bin at HMV, as a hard cover no less, but although it was one of the most hilarious things I had ever read, I just couldn't bring myself to read the whole 800-plus pages and sort of began to lose interest after a little over 100 pages.
>> No. 420262 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 2:02 am
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My back's killing me. I desperately need a massage, to the point where I'm wondering if I could actually go to one of those wank parlours that's open at this time of night and say something like "actually, I just want the massage, no really, honestly, why do you keep winking and nudging me, please fix my muscles".

I remember searching for 'massager' on Amazon a few years ago, and couldn't distinguish which ones were for actual massages and which were supposed to be sex toys. It seems more obvious now, has anyone used anything like the thing pictured?

I could just get the missus to do it tomorrow but to be honest, she doesn't put the effort in. and also she's going to dump me when I fuck my stepmum
>> No. 420263 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 2:08 am
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>>420260

> Then again, I have never really enjoyed reading any kind of fiction books at all.

That's probably the problem. I have a friend who's so far on the spectrum he's almost off the other side (not suggesting you are) who ingests and digests academic textbooks like the rest of us read Viz but who simply "doesn't get" fiction and considers it a waste of his time to read.

Probably more hilarious than how badly written and full of plot holes the Harry Potter series is, is how rabidly the fanbase defends these glaring deficiencies. You ever want a good giggle go wandering down r/harrypotter until you find a thread pointing out a plot hole and watch dozens of rabid marple haired 30 stone "potterheads" do the most incredible mental gymnastics so they don't have to admit what a talentless hack their favourite (and probably only) author is.
>> No. 420264 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 2:39 am
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>>420262

Hit the gym m8. The vast majority of back pain is caused by poor core strength. In most cases, you can cure it in a matter of weeks with some basic bodyweight exercises. If you can afford it, see a physiotherapist.
>> No. 420265 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 2:46 am
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>>420264
>Hit the gym m8.
I thought we already established in the dog thread that hitting things wasn't appropriate.
>> No. 420266 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 3:12 am
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>>420264

This is almost certainly the root cause of it. I have a hernia right now and I'm pretty hesitant to lift, well, anything. I was going to the gym four or five times a week previously, and stopped cold turkey as I've been afraid of twisting my stomach up etc. It's definitely weakened me, I had a good core, and it's a bit depressing how quickly you lose muscle mass when you're not using it for a few months.

I should probably go back and do calisthenics and bodyweight stuff until they stuff everything back inside me. Admittedly I've likely been a bit too nervous about the whole thing, I bet I could still do low weight, high rep work type stuff too. But the way my doctor described the pain of a contorted stomach put me off a little bit.
>> No. 420267 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 4:40 am
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>>420262

We'll "fix your muscle" all right. ;)
>> No. 420268 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 4:43 am
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Apparently it's very common for kids to aspire to be professional youtubers now. A lot of channels with about 200,000 subscribers (like skate channels) are having a hard time and thinking of quitting now because they get demonetised left, right and centre, (e.g. if they ever swear) and Youtube won't promote smallish channels (send out notifications etc.) when they're supposed to.
>> No. 420269 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 9:01 am
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I'd like to do a YouTube channel, but Christ I'm not delusional enough to think I'd be able to quit my day job. I think if I ever started thinking about SEO and how to push up subscriber numbers and that sort of bullshit it wouldn't be fun anymore and almost certainly impact the quality of my output.
>> No. 420270 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 9:16 am
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>>420257
>The sheer volume of terrible fan fiction is testament to the fact that wizards do not a good story inherently make.

Fat lasses. I know a handful of people who wrote Potter fan fiction when they were younger, often involving gay sex, and they were all hefty heifers.
>> No. 420271 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 10:18 am
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>>420266

Walking for about an hour a day usually does the trick, especially if you walk over rough, uneven ground. Walking requires a surprising amount of core muscle engagement and shouldn't put too much strain on your hernia.
>> No. 420272 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 10:51 am
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>>420259
Y'know I was going to say something about not dismissing them as 'children's books' because some of my (and the nation's) best-loved books were written for children, but I deleted it because the post I was responding to didn't actually mention it.

So now I invite you to say the same shit about Roald Dahl, Lewis Carroll, Enid Blyton, CS Lewis, Marjorie Blackman, etc.
>> No. 420274 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 11:30 am
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>>420272

There's nothing wrong with children's books, but they're for children. Reading them as an adult is, at best, a guilty pleasure. If you're an adult and your favourite book is a children's book, that implies a certain level of stuntedness. There's nothing wrong with Ribena and chicken nuggets, but I'd make certain judgements about any adult who seems overly keen on them.
>> No. 420275 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 11:35 am
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>>420274

That's because you're a joyless cunt though, lad.

Indulging your inner child is healthy, as long as it's not a constant preoccupation.
>> No. 420277 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 12:02 pm
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>>420274
Woah, woah, woah. What's wrong with Ribena?

Let's say I've popped to the shops to grab a meal deal and I'm at the fridge to pick a beverage. I don't go for fizzy pop or an energy drink because I'm not an overgrown manchild. I don't go for a water because that's just a bit too joyless to have with a meal, especially as I drink several glasses per day. I don't go for the Innocent smoothies because whatever flavour you get always tastes of banana and it'd be gone in two swigs. The chilled coffee drinks don't interest me whatsoever. Where does that leave me? Oasis or Ribena. There's nothing wrong with either, you cunt.
>> No. 420278 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 12:11 pm
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>>420277
Jamie Oliver.
>> No. 420279 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 12:14 pm
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>>420272

I remember in the 90s lots of people would bash on Enid Blyton and make puns about her being a "blight on" literature and say all of her characters were totally bland placeholders apart from George who had a little bit of personality. I think their placeholder quality is what makes the books quite so immersive so you feel like you're there.

I re-read Five Go to Smuggler's Top, in ebook form, out of nostalgia and bad OCR changed Sooty's name to Booty all the way through. I had visions of the character being a sassy black lady.
>> No. 420280 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 12:39 pm
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>>420274

Kind of a double edged sword there, because people who write children's books are almost without exception adults themselves. Would you also make "certain judgements" about writers, authors, who have turned it into a viable career?

It's actually a pretty difficult thing to do, writing a children's book that will actually be read and enjoyed by children. Because even more so than adults, children lose interest in something pretty quickly when it starts to bore them. An adult reader of a book will be prepared to suffer through a few boring and lengthy pages of a novel if they think the novel itself is worth reading, but when children get bored reading a story, they will likely put the book to one side and not bother taking it up again at a later time.

Being an adult and writing about situations that an adult can find themselves in really doesn't take much imagination at all, by comparison. But putting your story in a kind of language that children will relate to and find compelling and will come back to requires much more talent and skill. Because you essentially have to leave your adult mind behind and see the world with children's eyes again.


>>420279

I pretty much grew up on repeats of the Famous Five TV series when I was a weelad in the mid-80s. When I was about ten years old, my friends at school and I would sort of reenact the episodes we had seen the night before in the school playground and even assume the names of the characters.

Good times. Good times...
>> No. 420283 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 1:00 pm
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>>420277
Sugar-packed shit m8
>> No. 420284 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 1:08 pm
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>>420280

>An adult reader of a book will be prepared to suffer through a few boring and lengthy pages of a novel if they think the novel itself is worth reading

Maybe not so much if they're hoarded tens of thousands of ebooks and can think

>Screw this. Next.

One of my friends was allowed to watch all the Nightmare on Elm Street films etc so he would tell us the plots and we'd play Freddy Kruger. He was particularly fond of this scene and having us re-enact it.

[
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waiA1uSgK3w
>> No. 420285 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 1:20 pm
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>>420278
That twizzler thieving twat serves those freakshake abominations, designed for people devoid of personality, at his restaurants so he's got no authority on this.

>>420283
Naturally occurring sugars?
>> No. 420286 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 1:51 pm
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>>420285
These things don't even look appealing. They don't look nice. They don't taste nice.

I'm not sure why they're so popular, seems to be the kind of thing people buy just to post on Instagram.
>> No. 420287 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 1:58 pm
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>>420286
>seems to be the kind of thing people buy just to post on Instagram.

Think you've cracked it, M4.
>> No. 420288 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 2:15 pm
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>>420286
I'm not going to go on a lengthy onslaught about dead twigs in vases people but they're specifically aimed at the type of person who has very little going for them in life; people who try to fill this void by latching onto crazes like this so they actually have something to talk about rather than facing up to the fact that they're not very interesting. They mainly seem to have moved on to gin laced with all sorts of sugary crap at present.
>> No. 420289 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 2:34 pm
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>>420285
> Naturally occurring sugars?
In Ribena and Oasis? U wot m8
>> No. 420290 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 2:55 pm
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>>420289

Did you know fruit has sugar in it?
>> No. 420291 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 3:24 pm
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>>420290
Ribena has added sugar and still has less sugar than fruit juice. It relies on multiple artificial sweeteners.
>> No. 420292 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 3:55 pm
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>>420290

That's the big sleight of hand of advertising. When it says that fruit juice or fruit based products of some kind only have "natural" sugar, or "no added sugar".

Fundamentally, the sugar that's relevant here is nearly always a combinations of fructose and glucose. These are the two monosaccharides that are present in nearly all sugar containing fruit, and they are pretty much exactly the same thing as your bag of table sugar that you have in your kitchen cupboard. Which is usually saccharose, a combination of fructose and glucose.

Also, honey isn't for some reason healthier than sugar. Its main constituents are still fructose and glucose. So when a product claims to have no added sugar but only added honey, it's again the same thing and makes it no more healthy than plain sugar.

What's really unhealthy though is high fructose corn syrup, which is produced in huge quantities in the U.S. and is the American food industry's main sweetening agent. Its high fructose content compared to conventional table sugars which have an almost even glucose-fructose ratio is problematic because the human body tends to be able to convert glucose more readily into energy, whereas fructose has a tendency to be stored as energy in your fat cells. And because high fructose corn syrup is so widely and universally used in processed foods in the U.S., it's a fair statement to say that it significantly contributes to the obesity crisis in the U.S..
>> No. 420297 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 7:48 pm
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>>420292

>it's a fair statement to say that it significantly contributes to the obesity crisis in the U.S..

No, poor diet choices and being lazy and feckless leads to obesity in the majority of cases. Much cheaper and better to make something from fresh rather than scoff processed ping food.
>> No. 420298 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 7:57 pm
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>>420297
In some parts of America you can't even buy fresh food. Cheap stores like Dollar General come in and undercut all of the local grocery stores but all they sell is heavily processed crap.
>> No. 420300 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 8:25 pm
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>>420298

That is true. And it's one reason why poor people have a much higher risk of obesity in the U.S., but I think that's also the case in Britain.


>>420297

>No, poor diet choices and being lazy and feckless leads to obesity in the majority of cases.

Not always. I lived in the U.S. for two years on a work visa with my former employer, and my diet really didn't change much from what I was used to here in Britain. My daily routine and work schedule were also largely the same. And I don't think driving 10 miles to work in the morning in my car in the U.S. really made all that much difference over taking a bus to work here in the UK. Something they put in their food over there just makes you put on the pounds, and I gained well over a stone during my time there.

Also though, portions at restaurants over there are often disturbingly large if you're not careful. My coworkers took me to a hamburger place there after my first day of work, and although I only ordered a hamburger with fries chips and some salad, there was more food on my plate for dinner that evening than I normally would have eaten back home in an entire day. So I always kept an eye on portions when I was eating out, and when I cooked for myself, I tried to largely avoid TV dinners and other highly processed ready made foods. I tried a bangers and mash kind of TV dinner once, but at 99 cents, it just tasted like gloop with snot. You probably could have used the mashed potato as wallpaper glue. And it had tons of ingredients in it that really didn't sound like they belonged in a healthy serving of mashed potato. And the sausages tasted so bad and rubbery that I barely managed to eat one of them whole.
>> No. 420301 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 8:42 pm
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>>420300
I know people who've stayed over there and had to order children's portions whenever they went out, but even they were too large for them.
>> No. 420302 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 8:46 pm
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I've decided to watch A View To A Kill tonight, in a few minutes.

Really not the best film in the Bond series, nor is it a good Roger Moore Bond. But it features a pretty great performance by Christoper Walken, and an absurdly toned Grace Jones who seems like a gazelle on steroids in the martial arts scenes.
>> No. 420303 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 9:01 pm
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>>420300

Scope creep there, lad. I was talking about healthy food not brown food. If you get fat from scoffing like a Prader Willi it's nothing to do with the sugar type.
>> No. 420304 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 9:28 pm
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>>420302
So you were watching at x40 speed? How can you possibly appreciate a movie like that?
>> No. 420306 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 9:45 pm
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>>420292

>What's really unhealthy though is high fructose corn syrup, which is produced in huge quantities in the U.S. and is the American food industry's main sweetening agent. Its high fructose content compared to conventional table sugars which have an almost even glucose-fructose ratio is problematic because the human body tends to be able to convert glucose more readily into energy, whereas fructose has a tendency to be stored as energy in your fat cells. And because high fructose corn syrup is so widely and universally used in processed foods in the U.S., it's a fair statement to say that it significantly contributes to the obesity crisis in the U.S..

That isn't true. Granulated sugar is sucrose (which is a 50/50 bond between a fructose and a glucose) High fructose corn syrup isn't pure fructose or even higher in fructose is 'cheep' sucrose. It is the 50/50 glucose and fructose, the same qualities as it occurs in sucrose, but not bonded together.
Fructose occurs in absurd quantities in apples (about 60% 25% glucose 20% sucrose, 5% other) (so when you break down the sucrose we are talking about 70% fructose).
I'm afraid you've fallen for the same boggy man 'soft drinks are full of poison' crap that counter culture has been pushing since the 60s.
The problem is not high fructose corn syrup but the way it is liberally applied to everything because it is cheap due to corn subsidies, has low impact on the body feeling satiated and has for lack of a better term an ‘addictive mechanism’.
Now all sugar has addictive mechanisms, if you don't eat as much as you are accustomed you go through an insulin crash HFCS isn't any different which makes you want more. The difference in how it is absorbed now, if you tried to eat 5 apples in one go you'd feel fairly full, if you drank half a litter of cola you wouldn't (same calorie content), the sugar itself doesn't satisfy hunger, In an apple it is the fibre that does that (i.e. our stomach feeling full) our bodies never evolved to separate the 2 concepts so it isn't a shock we get fatter when we make food and drinks more high energy for the volume of food the type of sugar is entirely inconsequential.
>> No. 420307 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 9:48 pm
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>>420303
You can put those goalposts back where you found them, lad.
>> No. 420310 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 10:05 pm
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>>420307

Fuck the goalposts, it's what happens in the scrum.
>> No. 420312 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 10:18 pm
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>>420306
>It is the 50/50 glucose and fructose, the same qualities as it occurs in sucrose, but not bonded together.
This isn't quite correct. The two commonly used grades of HFCS contain 42% and 55% fructose. 55 tends to go into drinks.

Worth noting that the "high-fructose" part refers to the fructose content being higher than usual for corn. Corn starch breaks down mainly to glucose, and the manufacturing process for HFCS converts some of it to fructose.
>> No. 420316 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 10:22 pm
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>>420310
No point being a hooker if you don't like touching balls.
>> No. 420321 Anonymous
15th September 2018
Saturday 10:47 pm
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>>420306
Today I learned that the sugar in apples is 110% sugar.

I hate to be that bloke but can you please proofread your posts, I'm finding it hard to understand your writing.
>> No. 420335 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 6:41 am
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I had an objectively enjoyable time yesterday, looking at art and various museum exhibits. For some reason though I still carried a feeling of dread in my chest and had frequent bouts of total awareness of my own mortality. Rather tainted the experience, frankly.
>> No. 420336 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 9:01 am
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>>420321

I rounded up a load of numbers to the nearest 5% no great mystery there.
>> No. 420339 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 12:44 pm
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>>420312

It's also worth noting that some kinds of fruit have a much higher fructose-glucose ratio. A fully ripe apple can have a fructose-glucose ratio of 6 to 8, meaning it will contain six to eight times more fructose than glucose (or 85% to 15%), and ripe mangoes will still have a ratio of around 3.

Eating an actual apple will probably still give you less "bad" fructose than drinking a glass of apple juice. Due to all the fibre and other carbohydrates contained in an apple, you will probably not manage to eat more than two apples at a time without feeling full. But to obtain about a 200 ml glass of apple juice, you have to put some four to six apples through a juicer.

What matters, then, is that an apple has a much lower glycaemic index than a glass of apple juice, i.e. an apple affects your blood sugar level much less than a glass of apple juice, while they will feel about equally satisfying.

Also, the problem isn't that you should make a resolution to not eat fruit anymore, but it's that sugar is added to all kinds of processed foods without the consumer being fully aware of it. Sugar has a property of acting as a flavour enhancer, which can mask the fact that you are actually using low-grade, low-quality other ingredients in your processed food. It works in a similar way as salt, which is another inexpensive flavour enhancer. If you buy Lidl's cheapest instant chicken soup in a sachet for 29p, it will contain about a third more salt than Knorr's brand-name chicken stock. Because that way, the actual chicken stock content of your sachet from Lidl can be reduced and it still tastes - vaguely - like chicken soup.
>> No. 420341 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 1:50 pm
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Why don't you cunts just read the labels
>> No. 420344 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 5:20 pm
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>>420341
Reading is for boffs, init
>> No. 420345 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 5:51 pm
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>>420341

Too busy reading harry potter with my Ribena and chicken dippers lad.
>> No. 420346 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 8:41 pm
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Today I bought a 2001 Daewoo Matiz in Dark Orange. 0.8l of power.
>> No. 420347 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 8:55 pm
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>>420346

I like those cars. They look like guinea pigs.
>> No. 420348 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 9:34 pm
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>>420346
T H A T ' L L B E T H E D A E W O O
>> No. 420349 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 10:24 pm
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>>420346

I genuinely love bargain-basement cars. Fabric seats, scratchy plastics, manual window winders, the lot. They seem to burst the bubble of consumer capitalism - you owe the bank £40k for your BMW, I paid £800 for my tinny little shitbox, but we're both stuck in the same traffic jam.
>> No. 420350 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 11:15 pm
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>>420349

One of my brother's mates was known in school for driving the cheapest possible cars he could find. And I mean, the cheapest possible. One time, he got a late 70s Rover for £100. This was around 1990, so the car was well over ten years old by then and in a sorry state. It miraculously still had a few months MOT and an engine that would start, and it got him to school in the morning. Except not for long. About eight weeks later, the car just died in the middle of the road on the way back from school. It simply went out and try as he did, he couldn't bring the engine back to life. I think there were some serious electrical problems, and something that would have cost far more to fix than the 100 quid that he paid for the car in the first place. So he decided to have it towed to the breaker's, and I think he even got 100 quid for the car from the breaker or something. So it was a zero sum game for him. 100 quid spent buying the car, and 100 quid back when he sold it.

Personally, I agree completely that there is no point buying a car for 40 grand and then selling your soul to a a bank for a loan. The car isn't yours and never will be. It may be your name in the papers, but as far as the bank is concerned, your car is collateral in case you default and stop your regular payments. And then your 5 series Bimmer with the big engine in your driveway will just disappear into thin air.
>> No. 420351 Anonymous
16th September 2018
Sunday 11:38 pm
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>>420350
Wow, a car just over ten years old...
>> No. 420352 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 12:02 am
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>>420349>>420350

I've had a lot of cars over the years, but I've always bought them outright. I'd much rather drive around in a £300 micra for a year while saving up ten grand for a nice second hand sports car.

The thing I never understood about buying a BMW or Merc or whatever on finance is that 90% of people go for an utterly uninspiring motor anyway, like the 1.8 BMWs that honestly are probably outperformed by that lad's Daewoo on power to weight. You're paying all that money for brand recognition.

I bought a 325ti for less than two grand and it's all the car I'll ever need in terms of speed and fun. It's ugly as fuck but that adds to it for me, you don't see many of them about. Between that and the other old cars I've had, RX8's, Celicas, Skoda VRS, 350z, Merc SLKs, even Land Rovers and Rangies, I've always typically had the sportiest and most eye catching cars of any of my mates/colleagues, and rarely have I broken ten grand to get one. By the time I've had my fun I can sell it and get at least a very good chunk of my money back. In the case of some, I even profit. Certainly no car I've ever owned I've spend more on than I would have on finance.

I'm mechanically minded though, so I'm capable of dealing with the pitfalls of owning an older car. Not that a 2005 mid to high-end car is much of a money pit, most of these cars (most) are solid. Don't talk to me about the RX8.
>> No. 420353 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 12:16 am
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>>420349

This is exactly how I feel filtering through traffic on my shite motorbike.

Albeit slightly wetter.
>> No. 420354 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 1:06 am
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>>420353

I used to cycle to work and I got there about ten times faster. I understand why motorists hate bikes so much, as I sailed past hundreds of gridlocked cars with my smug little cycling cap on.
>> No. 420355 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 1:34 am
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>>420352
Yeah, the paying for brand recognition thing goes all the way to the top end of the market as well. Take the Nissan GTR for example, at £80,000 new it can embarrass prestigious super cars many times its price, some times ever classics worth millions.

>RX8
Did you have trouble with the wankel engine after 60,000 miles?

Also do you watch Wheeler Dealers - it's a great show about fixing up classic cars and selling them on for a profit. Free view channel 37.
>> No. 420356 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 2:34 am
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>>420351

I take it you've never owned a 70s Rover. British cars of that era were shockingly awful by modern standards. It wasn't unusual to see a brand new car on the dealer's forecourt with visible rust in the wheel arches. After three or four years, you'd expect to need holes patched up or replacement body panels to get your car through an MOT. Most BL cars left the factory with rattly panels and loose bits of trim and started disintegrating almost immediately. On cold winter mornings, you'd hear a chorus of struggling starter motors as the owners fruitlessly tried to start their cars before the battery went flat.

A modern car will run for ten years with no major maintenance, but that's only because the Japanese revolutionised the industry in the 1980s and massively raised our expectations of quality.


>> No. 420357 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 4:08 am
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>>420355

>Take the Nissan GTR for example, at £80,000 new it can embarrass prestigious super cars many times its price, some times ever classics worth millions.

The GTR is my end goal, really. I'd genuinely rather have one over a Lambo, and I'm at a point in my life where a (used!) supercar isn't just a dream anymore. Depending on how my next job goes, it might be something I'm looking at relatively soon. It's the one car I'd be tempted to finance, but with careful saving I might not need to. I can't imagine needing another car after that, except maybe a Land Rover or a van for the weekends. They don't have much space for groceries.

>Did you have trouble with the wankel engine after 60,000 miles?

Stationary gear bearing failure, which isn't quite the apex seal failure that's most common, but it's still wankel related, obviously. I bought the car for about £900, one owner, at 72,000 miles, and it still hot started and worked fine for a few thousand miles.

I knew fully what I was getting into, though, I was well aware of the problems and had budgeted five grand into repairing it. I also wouldn't have even thought about buying one had I not lived in Leeds at the time, which is where Rotary Revs, the best place in Europe for rotary engines, is. Seriously, in my visits there I saw lads from Germany, Spain, France, all bringing their cars over to get this lot to work on them. If I wasn't just down the road from such experts, I would never have bothered.

Anyway, it cost me £3800 to get the engine rebuilt, with a 100k mile warranty from RR, some electrical work, a new head unit, and new (refurbished) wheels and a new midpipe. It was worth every penny. That car was probably the best car I've ever had, but it was the only car I've ever had that I couldn't work on myself (Even the Range Rover I could change a gasket on), and I really didn't like that feeling of knowing I had to take it to a specialist even to tweak something basic like timing or fuel intake.

I sold it for about 7k on ebay, as that Rotary Revs rebuild certificate is worth it's weight in gold. I wish I'd kept it as a track toy, I've never had anything that handled better, apart from an MX5, which is not surprising, it's the same chassis.

Anyway, I certainly had more fun in it than I ever could have in a financed repmobile. I'd recommend every petrol head to own one at least once, but it's not something you can do when you're short on cash. The wankel is a beautiful thing, it feels like you're driving a four wheeled superbike.


>Also do you watch Wheeler Dealers

Love it, I've bought a couple of motors because of them. Haven't seen any of the show post Ed China though, I've heard it's bad now.
>> No. 420358 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 12:16 pm
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>>420356

>I take it you've never owned a 70s Rover. British cars of that era were shockingly awful by modern standards.

This also had a lot to do with union strikes in the 70s, before ARE Maggie went and sacrificed the unions on the altar of capitalism. Coordination between different BL plants had always been less than exemplary, but with all the strikes and what-have-you going on from the second half of the 70s, it meant that little actual work got done in the factories, and product quality suffered badly.

There is a famous anecdote about former PM James Callaghan, who was given a Rover SD1 specially made for him with bulletproof glass and all the trimmings. When he tried to roll down the power window next to his back seat the first time they took the car out, the window reportedly fell in his lap, and he later said to the driver, "Don't bring this car again!"

Rover in particular never fully overcame its quality and reliability issues. Even up until the early 2000s before they went tits up, they were known for shoddy build quality and inattention to detail. I call an S-reg MG F my own, and although it's a fun little car and I love it to bits, build quality is only so-so even for a 20-year-old car. I've spent years ironing out the niggles and today it's in pretty good nick, but it has been difficult. When I bought it six years ago with just over 50K miles, it was like a rattle on wheels, and everytime you went on a cobblestone road, you could identify about ten different sources of rattling noises. I have fixed about 95 percent of them now, and my car feels like any well put together late 90s roadster. But again, dozens of weekend afternoons were spent getting it to where it is now.
>> No. 420359 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 12:18 pm
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>>420358
The Rover 75 was pretty tasty.
>> No. 420360 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 12:33 pm
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>>420358
My dad is something of a R75 connoiseur, while they have had their selection of faults, none of them have had build quality issues. I think it's essentially a BMW underneath, which is why the quality wasn't as bad as its predecessors.

That said, The Rover 400 series in the 90s were simply rebadged Honda Civics; the 600 shared a platform with the Accord iirc, so I would guess aside from the K-series engine they were fairly reliable. I guess it's difficult to shake a reputation though.
>> No. 420361 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 12:59 pm
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>>420360

The K series was actually a decent engine, I've got the 1.8-litre, 120 hp MPI variant of it in my MG F. The main worry with it was crumbling cylinder heads, and in the F, owed to its layout as a mid engine car, there were coolant and heat dissipation issues that could result in head gasket failure, exacerbated by poor quality factory installed head gaskets. A popular swap after head gasket failure was a metal gasket from the Lotus Elise.

All that said, the coolant problems were often the result of improper and incomplete bleeding of the coolant system after changing the coolant, or undetected coolant leaks that led to air pockets in the engine's nooks and crannies. With the engine in the back and the coolant radiator in the front, it's really a pretty complex setup. There are essentially four different bleed points in the coolant system of the MGF, two under the bonnet and two in the engine bay, and all of them need to be bled carefully and completely so that all the air will be out of the system. This is often overlooked by DIY mechanics with patchy knowledge of the F's engine, but also occasionally by car mechanics. Not many people nowadays still know how to properly service an MGF. One reason why I do nearly all the repairs myself.
>> No. 420364 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 6:53 pm
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>>420358

The first car I ever joy rode back in the late 90s was a Rover 420 GSi, brings a tear to my eye to think about, so it does.
>> No. 420367 Anonymous
17th September 2018
Monday 10:07 pm
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>>420360

>I think it's essentially a BMW underneath, which is why the quality wasn't as bad as its predecessors.

Not quite, in that they didn't just stick some different looking body panels on a BMW chassis. BMW were more or less working with what Honda had left behind as their involvement in Rover ended. A small selection of mechanical parts will actually fit between a 90s Rover and a BMW, which is good when you have to go find parts for the cars, but it's really no rebadged BMW. The Bavarians were smart enough not to sink any of their relatively expensive proprietary technology in the cars of a subsidiary brand that was struggling at the best of times while BMW owned them.

MG and especially the MGF were worse still though. Although Rover stuck MG badges on the more ambitious model trims of its hatchbacks, saloons and estates, the MGF was in large part really just a hodgepodge of off the shelf parts thrown together from old 1980s and 1970s Rovers and Austins. The MGF has hydragas suspension, for example, which dates back to 1973 in the Austin Allegro. I'm not saying it's a bad system, in fact, it makes for very smooth braking and roadholding in the F. But it was already 22 years old when it was put in the MGF from 1995, until it was retired for its successor, the TF, in 2002, which then had coil springs instead.

What was even worse, BMW spent no real money of its own on MG's model evolution between the first 1995 MGF and the TF which was built until 2005 (and briefly again in 2008 under Chinese management). And BMW always saw the F/TF as a potential competitor to its then new Z3, which meant BMW had an interest in keeping down both the F/TF's build quality and their potential appeal to people that BMW wanted to persuade to buy a Z3.

So the F especially, but also the TF were indeed purebred British cars. But to a large extent, in all the wrong ways. I'd still never sell my MGF though. Because all is forgotten when you take an F that's in good nick for a spin up and down some curvy country lanes, where it really comes into its own and delivers tons of driving fun.
>> No. 420377 Anonymous
18th September 2018
Tuesday 6:38 am
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TEACON 1 TEACON 1 TEACON 1

PLEASE ADVISE!

I nearly got flipping bum rushed by a horde of wasps! Sorry about the terrible photo quality, but as I said this was a TEACON 1 situation; Shedbunker status; compromised, rice status: away on iPhone drying duties.

I suppose an unlikely combination of bad weather, a recently baked cake and a slightly ajar kitchen window had almost doomed me, but fortunately I decided I'd have a coffee several hours earlier than usual and spotted this absolute nightmare just before it germinated into full blown living night terror. Four managed to get in, but I could only catch one of those because of the awkwardly shaped light fixtures they decided to hang around on. Three's managable, especially compared to the thirty-odd on the window, who have all cleared off now I'm glad to report.
>> No. 420385 Anonymous
18th September 2018
Tuesday 11:46 am
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>>420377 The Mrs is one of those daft fuckers who flail at wasps, to maximise the chance of getting stung.
She got stung at the weekend, and her hand is now swollen like a cartoon glove. WTF?
This is just going to make her flail more, isn't it? No amount of rice-packing is going to stop her trying to swipe wasps off me. I suspect I also need to declare a mild teacon.
>> No. 420391 Anonymous
18th September 2018
Tuesday 1:33 pm
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>>420385
I tried to properly zen my way through a wasp landing on my face at the train station the other day, but then it started trying to crawl between my lips at which point I thought "fuck it" and finally flapped at it to get it piss off. Cheeky little yellow bastard, trying to get in my mouth with no warning. At least buy me dinner first.
>> No. 420392 Anonymous
18th September 2018
Tuesday 1:57 pm
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>>420385
You have a legal duty to protect animals from unnecessary suffering. If she's not learnt her lesson and starts trying to hit animals again I suggest you involve the police.
>> No. 420393 Anonymous
18th September 2018
Tuesday 2:38 pm
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>>420392

POTY

WE'VE DONE IT LADS
>> No. 420394 Anonymous
18th September 2018
Tuesday 3:58 pm
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>>420393
Thank fuck for that, see you lads in January. Bye!
>> No. 420413 Anonymous
19th September 2018
Wednesday 1:54 pm
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Just picked up a proper heavy duty side box barrel barbeque, £150 down from £400, just because it was missing some brackets that can be easily fabricated by me.

Used to have great fun with a similar but much flimsier model back in the day, I can't wait to start again. First project will be hot smoked salmon, maybe mussels too once the season for them picks up. And fuck loads of ribs and pork, goes without saying.
>> No. 420415 Anonymous
19th September 2018
Wednesday 2:24 pm
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>>420352
> Don't talk to me about the RX8.
Sorry mate, that's exactly what I would like to talk about. How did it feel on the road?
>> No. 420416 Anonymous
19th September 2018
Wednesday 3:49 pm
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>>420415

It's alright. I did bang on about it earlier in the thread but I'm happy to do it again.

It's genuinely one of the best cars to drive I've ever experienced, it felt much more planted than even something like a Lotus Elise. It's all MX5 chassis and running gear, so the handling is world class. If you've ever driven a mk1 or mk2 MX5, imagine exactly that, but with 230 bhp. I can't overstate how fun the car is to drive.

The only reason they're not hugely valuable classics at this point is the engine. The rotary is a joy to drive, but the maintenance and inevitable rebuilds scare people off, and I don't really blame them. I'm fully convinced if Mazda had put a more traditional engine in the thing, maybe a supercharged version of their MX-5 DOHC block, we'd be looking at them selling for twenty grand, still. Though, saying that, the rotary is part of its charm. It revs up to 12k, for fucks sake.

I think every petrolhead should own one at least once, but you can't go into it expecting the car to be a lucky one that doesn't need a rebuild. It will. I would suggest getting a cheap one at about the failure mark (60k miles), and taking it for a rebuild, rather than buying one off someone that's already had it rebuilt, just so you have the warranty etc.

Even though the cars pre-rebuild rarely go for more than two grand, you really do need to budget AT LEAST another three grand on that for the engine rebuild. You also need to consider that basically the only place worth going to for the work is Rotary Revs in Leeds, so you might need to work that into the cost of ownership too. There's a reason they're mostly track toys these days, and not cars to be relied upon daily.

When you add in the rebuild budget, we're talking a five or six grand car - for that, in terms of RWD coupes/sports we could also be looking at a Nissan 350z, BMW E46 330ci/325ti, Toyota GT86, MR2, even an old Boxster. I'd probably recommend any of those over the RX8 if it was your only car, unless you REALLY don't mind having to take it to a specialist garage for work, and are patient enough to live with everything that comes along with it - constant oil top ups (it uses oil to lube the rotors) having to heat up the engine before driving every time - you risk serious damage if not - and having to hold the revs at 6k for a full minute before turning the car off to purge the oil from the engine to prevent flooding. All that put me off keeping it, I was driving it daily and it just felt like I was looking after a sick child. It more than made up for that on the B roads, but I just ended up fatigued by the specialist maintenance.

They look amazing, too. I love everything about the visual design of them, even the weird rear suicide doors. This was a car designed from the rubber up by one man with a vision, and it shows.

TL;DR get one if your mental constitution and financial situation allows it.
>> No. 420417 Anonymous
19th September 2018
Wednesday 3:54 pm
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>>420416

I totally forgot to mention something important about the drive - the torque is fairly underwhelming, You'll never beat someone off the line in a similarly powered straight 6 or turbo 4 pot. All the pull is in the top end. It's a bit weird to get used to, but basically the car wants you to rev the tits off it. It lives in the 6-8k rpm range, and you're supposed to redline it every so often to keep the engine clean.
>> No. 420418 Anonymous
19th September 2018
Wednesday 4:27 pm
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>>420416
> I did bang on about it earlier in the thread
Bugger. I'm moderately bleary-eyed, kind of glossed over it. Appreciate the detail anyway.
> They look amazing, too.
Catchy, yes.
> get one if your mental constitution and financial situation allows it.
Not in the country I'm residing at now. I've seen RX8 here too though; mildly interested about the maintenance as I doubt there's a repair shop similar to Rotary Revs anywhere around here.
>> No. 420419 Anonymous
19th September 2018
Wednesday 4:59 pm
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>>420416

>The rotary is a joy to drive, but the maintenance and inevitable rebuilds scare people off, and I don't really blame them.

In its own way, the concept of a rotary engine is a much more elegant way of turning combustion energy into kinetic energy and propelling a car than a piston engine. Because you don't have to convert an up and down movement of pistons into a rotary movement, which you need in the first place to drive your transmission and wheels.

But as you say, the mechanics of it are really a problem. I'm not sure they can ever be fixed and the concept improved in such a way that rotary engines will be as reliable and durable as old-fashioned piston engines. The difficulties lie in the fundamental design itself.
>> No. 420420 Anonymous
19th September 2018
Wednesday 5:02 pm
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>>420418

>as I doubt there's a repair shop similar to Rotary Revs anywhere around here.

There's not even any in Europe. I've seen lads from as far as Germany drive over here to get their work done by Revs. It's a little bit mental, but goes to show the lengths people are willing to go to run these things.
>> No. 420421 Anonymous
19th September 2018
Wednesday 5:14 pm
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>>420419

I agree. I think there's probably a great many ways to make the rotary engine more reliable, but the problem is, elegant as it is, it's not particularly useful for anything other than their incredible power to weight ratio, so no manufacturer has any reason to build or research them.

I'm a little surprised they never took off in racing. A rotary F1 would be a fantastic thing to see, but as I understand most motorsports outright ban them, not sure why, possibly just because of the headaches involved in trying to categorise them next to piston engines. It's not like you could run your 1.3L RX8 against piston engined cars with the same displacement.
>> No. 420425 Anonymous
19th September 2018
Wednesday 5:42 pm
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>>420421 It's not like you could run your 1.3L RX8 against piston engined cars with the same displacement.

Well, you could, and you 'd have won Le Mans exactly once. But it would be a glorious sounding once.
Lesser motorsport series do have engine equivalency rules - certainly for forced induction and I'm pretty sure I saw mention of Wankel somewhere.
However, I suspect that bike engines are cheaper and at least as much fun, without some of the maintenance and integration hassles (and there are entire series dedicated to them).
>> No. 420436 Anonymous
19th September 2018
Wednesday 11:37 pm
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>>420421

>I think there's probably a great many ways to make the rotary engine more reliable, but the problem is, elegant as it is, it's not particularly useful for anything other than their incredible power to weight ratio, so no manufacturer has any reason to build or research them.

True. And nearly all noteworthy manufacturers have decades, if not a century of experience building piston engines. They can produce a bog standard, reliable 1.6-litre four-cylinder four-stroke engine effortlessly because it is just something that has such a long engineering history. Nearly all the big problems that ever existed with the concept have been cracked. But reliable rotary engines are still elusive for most carmakers and engine manufacturers. Arguably because they never were more than a marginal occurence and never really found large market demand. So there was never an incentive to commit as many resources to their development as to the evolution of piston engines.

Not to mention that the reputation of wankel engines probably suffered irreparably from the faults of various rotary engine cars in the 1960s and 1970s, when the concept was in its first heyday. If you read up on the RO 80, which was a car by German Audi subsidiary NSU, then they had massive problems with the rotor tip seals early on during production, and were unable to fix the problem reliably even after various revisions. Substantial engine wear and faults began to appear as early as 20,000 miles from new. NSU installed replacement engines for free for a time, but they, too, often didn't last much longer. If what you read is true, the joke was that RO 80 drivers used to salute each other on the road, and signal to each other with their fingers how many replacement engines they had already gone through in their car.

Apparently, later RO 80s had much more dependable engines, but the damage was done, nobody wanted to buy an RO 80 anymore, and together with the cost of all the replacement engines that were given to customers largely for free, it was all such a financial disaster that Audi decided to retire the NSU brand, and for good.

Shame, really. The RO 80 had some revolutionary specs. For example, it was one of the first production cars with a fully galvanised body shell. A concept that Audi later perfected for cars under its own brand name, and which gave its cars from the mid-80s onwards a legendary reputation for body shell longevity. I've seen 30-year-old Audis with barely a speck of rust.
>> No. 420443 Anonymous
20th September 2018
Thursday 3:39 pm
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>>420420
Then it's even more interesting.
This piece of land is not in the EU. Probably means that whoever was barmy enough to buy an RX8 here is going to be fucked up royally sooner or later.
But then again, perhaps I am mistaken and because of some bloody miracle there is a place around proficient enough to deal with rotary engines. Anyway I doubt that.
>> No. 420447 Anonymous
20th September 2018
Thursday 4:38 pm
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>>420443

>perhaps I am mistaken and because of some bloody miracle there is a place around proficient enough to deal with rotary engines. Anyway I doubt that.

It's certainly possible. If you're in some post-soviet part of the world, it'd not be as surprising, since Lada did make rotary cars for a while - whether or not anyone is still interested in maintaining them, who knows, but a place tooled out to fix those could service an RX8, even if it's the only one they've ever seen, it's still basically the same thing.

If you're anywhere else, fuck knows.

All this talk of Mazda, and I completely forgot that they did showcase an RX9 concept a couple of years ago, and told us it was going to be in full production. I'll probably end up buying one, despite the risks.
>> No. 420491 Anonymous
21st September 2018
Friday 10:07 am
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>>420447
> If you're in some post-soviet part of the world
Yes.
I've never heard about a rotary engine Lada IRL though. Read about one, right. But that's the only amount of exposure I've had to it.
I don't recall how many of them were made and how good or bad the engine was. My father has a load of old Soviet car magazines in his garage, maybe I'll flick through them for information.
> RX9 concept
I've seen only a few pics and quite unsure if those were even real. Strongly resembled Mazda6 from the front.
>> No. 420531 Anonymous
21st September 2018
Friday 10:36 pm
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Mango season is picking up. The Iranian greengrocer not far from here had good sized Brazilian mangoes today for £1.50 a piece. Fully ripe and fucking delicious.

I honestly don't know how they survive. They sell 40-pound watermelons for 8 quid a piece during the summer months, and now they've got some of the best mangoes I've seen in a long time for a quid and a half. Even my local M&S here rarely has mangoes this good.

Or maybe it is because they are fully ripe. Maybe the big chains don't buy up produce like this because of the limited shelf life. I'm indeed not sure the one I just had would have lasted much longer, because it really was at peak ripeness. Maybe my Iranian greengrocer gets them at a discount that way, from wherever it is that they get their groceries.
>> No. 420543 Anonymous
22nd September 2018
Saturday 1:53 am
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>>420251
@7:14 Those keys look like a bowl of cereal.

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