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>> No. 423594 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 5:12 pm
423594 Mid-week thread
New mid-week thread for the new year.

What is, or isn't happening in your life, .gs?
Expand all images.
>> No. 423595 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 5:23 pm
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Got a new job, working out my notice period, vast amount to, do so I'm looking up tentacle school and loitering on .gs
>> No. 423596 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 5:26 pm
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Beer for breakfast. Probably on another slide down the slippery slope unless I step hard on the break tonight and just refuse to buy any more.
>> No. 423597 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 5:29 pm
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>>423596

Sounds like your live is fucked already either way, so there will probably be no harm for you in getting more beer.
>> No. 423599 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 5:45 pm
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>>423597

Lad.
>> No. 423600 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 5:50 pm
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>>423597

Thanks, lad.

"I’m thirty-five years old, and I own a tiny failing business, and my friends don’t seem to be friends at all but people whose phone numbers I haven’t lost And if I went back to sleep and slept for forty years and woke up without any teeth to the sound of Melody Radio in an old people’s home, I wouldn’t worry that much, because the worst of life, i.e. the rest of it, would be over. And I wouldn’t even have had to kill myself.”--- Nick Hornby, High Fidelity
>> No. 423601 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 6:29 pm
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>>423596
When you're gulping down a quarter bottle of Glenn's as soon as you wake up in order to chase away the withdrawals, then you know things are getting fucked.

Hope it works out lad.
>> No. 423602 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 7:47 pm
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Just found a stretch therapy class, can't wait to get my ankle dorsiflexion sorted out.
>> No. 423603 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 7:56 pm
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>>423594
I've managed to stick to my diet for four whole days in a row.

Nailed it.
>> No. 423604 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 8:15 pm
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>>423600

I actually liked the film better than the book, and you even forgive the makers of the film for relocating the storyline to take place in Chicago.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QOwjVVSNOtY

Not sure you could make an honest living as a record shop owner today. Vinyl records may have seen a resurgence in the last two or three years, but it kind of just seems like a very niche pursuit. Then again, if you are good at what you do and you really know how to play that niche, then it could still be lucrative today.
>> No. 423618 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 7:38 pm
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>>423604

The book, and to a lesser amount, the film, were very much of their time. It'd be almost impossible to do a remake of High Fidelity (film) today without either making it a period piece that few of its target audience identified with in any way.

I still got the last (more or less) of the Saturday and Sunday morning vinyl and bootleg cassette tape selling and trading in Camden Market before that bit of the market got burnt down and turned into a series of shitty street food kiosks.
>> No. 423619 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 7:42 pm
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Petition to name Theresa May "The Aluminium Lady".

>>423618
>without either making it a period piece that few of its target audience identified with in any way.
OR WHAT?
>> No. 423620 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 8:11 pm
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>>423619
> OR WHAT?

I was going to say something about making Rob a tech leader heading up a small but superior alternative to Spotify aimed at a niche market, but it sounded so crap in my head that I just gave up half way through the sentence.
>> No. 423621 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 8:35 pm
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>>423620

That's actually the premise of Silicon Valley
>> No. 423622 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 9:44 pm
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>>423620

>making Rob a tech leader heading up a small but superior alternative to Spotify aimed at a niche market

That does sound awful.

By the same token, if the film Clerks ever gets remade, they will also have to think about what to put in lieu of the video rental shop which is adjacent to the convenience store in that 1993 film.

The end of physical media carrier formats is really the death of an entire culture. I remember fondly as a teenlad spending countless afternoons after school in run down, back street, smoke filled, second hand record and CD stores, hunting down obscure B sides of early 80s New Romantic or late 70s Indie acts (this was circa 1990). You would sometimes spend weeks combing those shops in your area for that one rare find. And I just loved the slightly seedy atmosphere in those shops.

Which was something that today's Spotify generation has no hope of ever experiencing, let alone fully understanding. It's great and all that even the rarest limited edition maxi cd version of a minor one-hit wonder is now just a click away. But to somebody of my generation, it almost seems like cheating.
>> No. 423623 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 10:28 pm
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>>423604

There are definitely still record stores doing good business today. There's at least three I can think of in Newcastle, and that's hardly a populated city. Jumbo Records in Leeds moved to bigger premises last year, there's loads in Manchester, Liverpool, basically any northern city. I don't knock about the south as much but I bet it's similar.

Quite likely a remake of High Fidedelity wouldn't work as you'd have to show the shop doing really rather quite well for itself despite all expectations. Maybe you could still have him being angry his shop is full of students and hipsters, though
>> No. 423624 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 11:53 pm
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>>423623

>Maybe you could still have him being angry his shop is full of students and hipsters, though

That in itself could be an entire movie these days.
>> No. 423625 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 2:48 am
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i want to die
>> No. 423626 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 7:11 am
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Last night, on the recommendation of a number of work colleagues, I watched the first episode of Sex Education on Netflix.

There was something about it that was completely soulless and inauthentic. It felt like someone had written a script for an American high school comedy then at the last minute had decided to set it in Wales, despite the fact that no-one in the show had a Welsh accent, and hastily threw in the odd reference to something like a Curly Wurly. The school even had an American-style badge.

It didn't know what it wanted to be. It looked like they were going for a Stranger Things 80s aesthetic with the choice of music, clothes and house décor, but then they'd have mobile phones, computers and DVDs. It didn't feel British. It didn't feel American. Most importantly, it wasn't actually funny.
>> No. 423627 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 8:30 am
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>>423626
It does the same thing with time; ostensibly set in the present they all behave and dress like it's the 70s or 80s with a handful of inconsequential references to mobiles or pornhub. I wonder if it's trying to say something about how our collective unconscious is stuck in the past and colonised by American culture or if it's just idiotic. I'm keeping my mind open but leaning heavily toward the latter.
Gillian Anderson looks good.
>> No. 423628 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 8:53 am
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>>423627
I have the feeling it was written for an American audience. Thinking about it, I don't think anyone in the show (at least the first episode) had anything resembling a regional accent; it was all how Americans think British people sound.
>> No. 423629 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 9:55 am
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>>423625
Oi, that's my schtick. Why don't you fly model planes or get really into decoupage?
>> No. 423630 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 10:54 am
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>>423628
I think maybe two of the girls have slightly non-standard accents.
I fell back asleep after that previous post and had a Gillian Anderson silver fox sexy dream so thanks for that.
>> No. 423631 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 11:13 am
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>>423626

Netflix commissioned House of Cards because their data said that their most loyal customers are disproportionately likely to watch old British drama series and films that starred Kevin Spacey or were directed by David Fincher. They were sufficiently confident that they spent $100m on two series before they had even made a pilot episode.

They're making the TV equivalent of Buzzfeed clickbait. There's no creative vision, just the hard logic of data analytics. It doesn't have to make sense, it just needs to tickle the impulses of their core demographic.

Their algorithm probably said that people who like Stranger Things also like Gavin and Stacey, Masters of Sex, Gillian Anderson and The Breakfast Club. Lob it all in a blender and out plops Sex Education. They're laughing all the way to the bank, £7.99 at a time.
>> No. 423633 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 11:19 am
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>>423631

I see your point but House of Cards was really bloody good, at least for the first three or four years.
>> No. 423634 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 11:31 am
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>>423631
That makes sense. It's the series-length equivalent of Elsagate material.
>> No. 423636 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 11:58 am
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My loudspeakers have started to cough and screech a bit. They don't do this constantly, there can be a week of them working just fine, then it's bollocks.
Slightly annoying.
I got 4 days off and only wish to hide and lay down and do bugger-all. For the last three years my life has been almost stripped of the few bits of serenity and contentment, I do miss those.
>> No. 423640 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 1:07 pm
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>>423636
What do you mean by serenity?
Nothing malicious, just interested.
>> No. 423641 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 1:12 pm
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>>423640
serenity (countable and uncountable, plural serenities)

The state of being serene; calmness; peacefulness.
A lack of agitation or disturbance.

> The state of ... calmness

Pretty much what the bloody dictionary says.
>> No. 423648 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 6:37 pm
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Lads, is it just me or do you get more belly button lint as you get older? I'm starting to think I constitute a fire hazard by the time I get home from work.
>> No. 423649 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 6:39 pm
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>>423648
It depends on how much hair you have, what sort of clothes you wear, and how much of a beer belly you have.
>> No. 423650 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 6:42 pm
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>>423649
Not that lad, but I have all three and yield copious amounts of belly button fluff.
>> No. 423651 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 6:43 pm
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>>423650
You have clothes and hair? Weird.
>> No. 423652 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 6:53 pm
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>>423634
>It's the series-length equivalent of Elsagate material

Is this some form of internet drama that has completely passed me by?
>> No. 423653 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 7:10 pm
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>>423652
No, it's some form of Internet drama that you're deeply familiar with.
>> No. 423655 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 9:22 pm
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I'm struggling with the turn in the weather. It is too fucking cold.
>> No. 423656 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 9:58 pm
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>>423655
I completely agree. Now comes the real struggle of getting out of bed in the morning for work.
>> No. 423657 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 10:11 pm
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Is it just me or are people a lot smellier than they used to be? Not necessarily bad smells, just... more and stronger smells.
>> No. 423658 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 10:17 pm
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>>423657
I've noticed it lately myself but just put it down to bad Christmas gifts. The lifts at work reek of perfume.
>> No. 423660 Anonymous
17th January 2019
Thursday 10:50 pm
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>>423657
I wonder if it is the time of year, or the weather - I also found I could smell everything the past couple of days.
>> No. 423713 Anonymous
21st January 2019
Monday 6:38 pm
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I'd rather smell perfume or aftershave rather than people smelling of old cheese, pot noodel seasoning or straight up BO.
>> No. 423714 Anonymous
21st January 2019
Monday 7:07 pm
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>>423713
>noodel

Lad. Sort yourself out.
>> No. 423715 Anonymous
21st January 2019
Monday 7:25 pm
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hyacinth.jpg
423715423715423715
>>423714

"Mrs. Noodle?"

"It's pronounced noodel"
>> No. 423716 Anonymous
21st January 2019
Monday 7:42 pm
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>>423714
I apologise for the typo.
>> No. 423737 Anonymous
22nd January 2019
Tuesday 12:50 pm
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I've taken up cycling again and am about to go for a spin through the wilderness here. My goal is to get back up to 30 miles a week like I used to do, and lose some 15 to 20 lbs before this spring. But for the moment, I have to work up to that slowly, and this Saturday, I started with about seven and a half miles.
>> No. 423789 Anonymous
24th January 2019
Thursday 11:48 am
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Sort of been watching Daisy Cousen's youtube channel yesterday and today.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZVdjwa-468

Mixed bag, really. She claims to be against socialism and the Progressive Left and radical fishing, which is fine by me, but she then far too often veers into territory that you have to be really careful not to attract Trump voters with.

I'm starting to think the best way to get the most out of her videos is to just have a wank to them with the sound turned down. While picturing her in knee boots swinging a horse whip. I need therapy.
>> No. 423790 Anonymous
24th January 2019
Thursday 11:54 am
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>>423789
Other than your chronic wanking addition, what possibly made you think "that thumbnail is worthy of my attention"?
>> No. 423791 Anonymous
24th January 2019
Thursday 12:00 pm
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>>423790

I like to expand my horizons. And to understand what makes crazy people conservative wingnuts tick, I believe you have to spend some time listening to them.

Which seems reasonable advice especially for people who never venture far outside their own echo chambers and filter bubbles. A problem that affects both left wing and right wing radicals, you see I am not taking sides here. I am of the reviled fence sitter persuasion, which both of them seem to hate in equal measure.
>> No. 423792 Anonymous
24th January 2019
Thursday 12:10 pm
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>>423790
We've clearly got vegans testing the water. They've been insidiously trying to shift the centre ground of discussion here for some time.
>> No. 423793 Anonymous
24th January 2019
Thursday 12:37 pm
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>>423792
>We've clearly got vegans testing the water.
Do they think Big Water's been secretly rinsing it through foie gras or something?

Sorry, not sorry.
>> No. 423794 Anonymous
24th January 2019
Thursday 12:42 pm
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>>423791
But you're mistaking right wing radicals for people who are desiring an open debate. They don't wish to live in a thoughtful, democratic or egalitarian society, therefore they don't have to uphold those values themselves. Look what's been going on right here on .gs for the past couple of days, and not for the first time. It wasn't, and never has been, Stalinists geeing up people in order to deport the Cossacks or execute doctors. The left wing radicals of the early twenty-first century are about as ideologically tied to the Soviet Communists of a hundred years ago as the British suffrage movement of that same era were akin to Robespierre and his lot in post-revolutionary France.
>> No. 423795 Anonymous
24th January 2019
Thursday 12:49 pm
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>>423794
I think the same can apply to black bloc antifa diehards. Would some of those be happy without a group of people to hate?
>> No. 423796 Anonymous
24th January 2019
Thursday 1:44 pm
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>>423795
Except how many "antifa diehards" have YouTube followings in the hundreds of thousands? How many of them give credence to ideas of genocide or baseless conspiracy theory? And even those people don't have a habit of deceiving or quietly infiltrating other groups in order to spread their ideology, indeed their gobbiness is routinely cited as their most irritating trait.

In the United Shutdown of America, when Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez is asked if she's a socialist, she answers in the affirmative, when Steven King is asked if he's a white nationalist he claims he doesn't even know how that's racist. That's the difference between the two sides, none of this "politics is a horse shoe" malarky, at least not since the days of Adolf and Joe went about divvying up Poland.
>> No. 423797 Anonymous
24th January 2019
Thursday 2:15 pm
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At least one other chan has had a recent influx of alt-right morons trying to do their usual thing in the past week or so. I wouldn't be surprised if it wasn't a coincidence.
>> No. 423799 Anonymous
24th January 2019
Thursday 4:29 pm
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>>423794

>But you're mistaking right wing radicals for people who are desiring an open debate. They don't wish to live in a thoughtful, democratic or egalitarian society, therefore they don't have to uphold those values themselves.

Problem is, that is exactly what they accuse the radical left of. Of not wanting to allow controversial dialogue and free speech.

There is an old German (or was it Dutch?) saying. Whenever you point your finger at somebody, the other three fingers of your own hand will point right back at you.

One particularly disgusting technique of denigrating the other camp is when right wing radicals start "teaching the controversy". They can't outright attack and assail your view point, and they know they can't because on many issues, it will have been established as reasonable by a far too great majority of level-headed people, so instead they try to make it look like yours is just one view of two or more competing, perfectly tenable views to the contrary. Cue the wonderful word creation of "alternative facts".

One example is the abortion debate, where - surprise, surprise - all personal freedom ends and they don't care diddly squat about the mother, as long as the would-be life of an innocent baby is protected. As George Carlin used to say though, once you're born, you are screwed and they will no longer give a damn about you. You can grow up dirt poor with not a shirt on your little back, and they will keep yakking about opportunity and economic freedom. But I digress. They know they can't fully declare the arguments in favour of pro-choice null and void, so they have cooked up faux counterarguments like the idea of post-abortion depression syndrom, which is supposed to affect a notable portion of women after they've had an abortion, but in reality has been debunked as utter nonsense. And it also extends to such things as personhood, where, against any and all scientifically accepted standard, they say that an embryo's life begins at the moment of fertilisation. Because a fertilised egg on its own without being attached to the lining of the woman's uterus is not viable, it is overwhelmingly accepted medical opinion that a person's life begins at implantation.

But knowing that they can't outright attack what 98 percent of medical professionals of reproductive drugs will tell you, they make it look like the idea that life begins at fertilisation is equal and equally reasonable compared to the scientifically accepted standard. And thus, you read in some pro-life pamphlets and diatribes that "they believe life starts at conception". And they then take it from there and try to insert their entirely unsubstantiated claims into a debate and try to present them as equal, and to try to attack anything from standard hormonal contraception to the "Abortion Pill".

The Left and their "progressives" are a bit more straightforward, it seems. They will just tell you that because you are a right winger (or simply a person who dares to exist outside of their own echo chamber), by default your opinion must not count, that you are not allowed to even say it, and that you must be deplatformed and be made to check your privileges.

Fuckwits, the lot of them, really. Both right and left wing radicals.
>> No. 423803 Anonymous
25th January 2019
Friday 12:46 pm
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I washed a USB thumb drive last night because I forgot to take it out of the back pocket of my jeans before turning on the washing machine.

To my complete surprise, the drive is still working now, after I put it on top of a radiator over night. Conventional wisdom holds that water is generally the death of thumb drives, even after you've dried them thoroughly.
>> No. 423805 Anonymous
25th January 2019
Friday 1:36 pm
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>>423803
If it wasn't getting any power while wet, it's not beyond the realms of possibility. I don't know how flash drives store memory though, so I can't really explain it like our resident computer whizzes could. Ask in /g/, so we don't end up with walls of (no doubt interesting) text here.
>> No. 423806 Anonymous
25th January 2019
Friday 1:57 pm
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>>423805

Point taken. I was just a bit dumbfounded because the last time that happened to me, the USB drive was completely kaput and nothing I tried was able to revive it. But oh well.
>> No. 423807 Anonymous
25th January 2019
Friday 2:10 pm
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>>423806
Better back up your data to some other device anyway.
>> No. 423809 Anonymous
25th January 2019
Friday 2:31 pm
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>>423805

Too late, wall of text incoming.

There's no battery in a thumb drive, so there's no risk of anything short-circuiting when it's unplugged. As long as you let the drive properly dry out before plugging it in, the water itself isn't a hazard.

What tends to cause problems is a) corrosion and b) mineral deposits being left on the circuit board. There are some very fine wire traces in a thumb drive, so even a relatively small amount of corrosion might be enough to affect the signal flow within the circuitry.

Pure water isn't actually conductive, but the dissolved minerals are. When the water evaporates off the PCB, it tends to leave behind a fine layer of minerals that can cause current leakage.

It's pot luck whether your device will be damaged by water - it depends on the length of immersion, the hardness of your local water and the design of the circuit board.

The galling thing is that most electronic products can be made highly resistant to water damage at a cost of a few pence. Circuit boards for industrial and military applications are all conformally coated - after the components are soldered in place, the whole board is sprayed with or dipped in a waterproof varnish. You might still get short-circuits at the connectors due to water, but inputs and outputs are generally far more resilient than the delicate internal circuitry. Hardly any consumer products use conformal coating, simply because it's an easy corner to cut.
>> No. 423810 Anonymous
25th January 2019
Friday 2:39 pm
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>>423809

This drive that survived the washing machine last night was an old, budget £2.99 4GB generic-brand thumb drive from Curry's. I don't think they even make 4GB ones anymore. Kudos to whatever unnamed Chinese manufacturer that probably produced them at 20p a piece.
>> No. 423811 Anonymous
25th January 2019
Friday 2:46 pm
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>>423809 What tends to cause problems is a) corrosion
It's electrically assisted corrosion that does the fast damage. If a board's powered up, you can dissolve the legs off a flash chip in minutes. On a common TSOP NAND, the legs are 0.2mm wide, 0.5mm across. If you've got 3.3V between adjacent pins, that's plenty to plate the +ve pin onto the adjacent ground pin in minutes. Simple corrosion would take months.
Get the battery out ASAP, dry the unit thoroughly.
I'm currently designing electronics for outboard motors.
Fuck seawater, and fuck electronics.
>> No. 423828 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 1:48 am
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>>423809

>Pure water isn't actually conductive, but the dissolved minerals are

I think we did the experiment once in physics class where our teacher passed a current through a small tank of distilled water and a light bulb connected to the wires at the end of it wouldn't light up. Only remember it very vaguely, but I think that is what happened.
>> No. 423829 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 9:30 am
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>>423809
But in consumer products that do claim to be IP68 waterproof or whatever, you would find this conformal coating stuff, right?
>> No. 423830 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 9:33 am
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>>423829
IP ratings require there to be no water ingress - so I suspect that if you're calling something IP68, it'll be properly sealed. The vapour deposited hydrophobic coatings do work but end up with 'splashproof', 'water resistant' or other slightly weaselly words.
>> No. 423831 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 9:35 am
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Although, if I was making an IP68 product, I'd probably also coat the boards and pack any spare space inside with absorbent stuff, to reduce warranty grumblings if vapour does squeak through the casing.
>> No. 423832 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 10:42 am
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>>423831

so how does it affect water resistance when you change the battery of a smartphone and have to disassemble the whole phone? I've seen kits that come with new sealant, but I wonder if you will be able to reseal it effectively against water.
>> No. 423833 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 11:52 am
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>>423832

I'd never trust it if I'd had it disassembled personally. No doubt you can do it properly but a lot of them involve heating stuff up to pull it off and so on, there's no way you're getting that back the way it's meant if you ask me.
>> No. 423834 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 12:14 pm
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>>423833
What if you'd paid the extortionate price to have it done by the original manufacturer?
>> No. 423835 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 12:27 pm
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>>423834

I probably would probably trust it, on the assumption that they're using a factory-equivalent jig for replacing the waterproofing gasket.
>> No. 423836 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 2:22 pm
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>>423835

Re-sealing something so it's waterproof again seems to be trickier than you would think.

I've got a Swatch Irony watch, it has sentimental value for me, and it no longer works, but there is a repair service in the Netherlands that I have tracked down that claims to be the only one of its kind for Swatch watches, and they say they can remove the watch's movement and relubricate the moving parts, but then when they reassemble the watch, they no longer guarantee that it will be watertight.

The only way to get to a Swatch watch's inner workings is to remove the crystal, as the case has no back cover. Apparently, the crystal is glued in watertight with silicone by a fully automatic machine at the factory so that you get reliable water resistance to 30 metres, but the silicone cannot be replaced with the same degree of accuracy when that repair service replaces the glass at the end of the job. Or maybe they just don't want to be liable.
>> No. 423837 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 4:21 pm
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>>423836

I can't comment in any depth, because the Swatch Irony is such an oddball edge case. I've never had one open, but I've been told that they're held together with a press-fit bezel that is prone to deformation when removed. I wouldn't expect the same issues with a phone, because you're bonding a flat glass screen module to a flat metal midframe.

For what it's worth, no phone manufacturer actually guarantees the water-resistance of their phones, even if they're IP rated. Apple might say that the iPhone X is waterproof to one metre, but your warranty is still void if it gets wet. Any trust you might have in the waterproofing is conditional on the fact that nobody is willing to vouch for it; the phone will probably withstand a brief dip, but you're on your own if it doesn't.
>> No. 423839 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 5:39 pm
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>>423837

As far as Swatch watches though, I have owned many of them over the years and never took them off for a bath or a swim, even when snorkeling to a few metres of depth in the Atlantic. I can confirm that all of the ones I have ever owned withstood those kinds of conditions without a problem. Even after a good few years of owning them.
>> No. 423843 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 7:38 pm
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>>423837

> but I've been told that they're held together with a press-fit bezel that is prone to deformation when removed

The bezel itself does not hold the crystal in, it is more or less just decoration. Going by what you see on youtube, where people have sometimes more, sometimes less professionally taken one apart, you can just lift it off with a very sharp knife. The movement really only seems to be held in place by the crystal which is firmly pressed down and glued to the case, and of course the crown and pushers that are connected to parts inside the movement.

If what you read is true, the standard Swatch movements are actually surprisingly good quality for their price. They're made by ETA, a renowned Swatch subsidiary which produces movements both for the high-value watch market and mass watches like Swatch. You get good value for money, and at their price, they are far superior to cheap Chinese movements and the like.
>> No. 423844 Anonymous
26th January 2019
Saturday 7:51 pm
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>>423837
I think the waterproof guarantee of the phones depends on what country you're in.
In the UK and EU, whatever the small print says, it would never stand up in court.
>> No. 423847 Anonymous
27th January 2019
Sunday 2:44 am
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>>423837
Yes I think you're right - I noticed recently that when you take a phone in to the Apple Store for repair, they spend a lot of time ensuring that it wasn't actually water damaged.
>> No. 423867 Anonymous
28th January 2019
Monday 1:13 am
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>>423847

>when you take a phone in to the Apple Store for repair

Has nobody learned anything.
>> No. 423877 Anonymous
28th January 2019
Monday 5:32 pm
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I've had a handful of different people from the past contact me in various ways in the last couple of days, either a text or a direct message or a facebook wall post thing. All completely unrelated people, who seemingly all decided to think about me and wonder what I was doing on just about the exact same day.

This isn't the first time this has happened, either - does this happen to anyone else? I wonder if I have a doppelganger on telly or something that triggers people's memories.
>> No. 423902 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 12:33 pm
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>On Monday, Shepherd's British lawyer, Rich Egan, received a Nazi death threat amidst torrents of abuse.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-47039077

What exactly is a Nazi death threat and how does it differ from other death threats?
>> No. 423903 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 12:37 pm
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>>423902
He was offered a "relocation" to a seemingly uninhabitable part of the country. Norfolk, perhaps?
>> No. 423904 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 12:37 pm
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>>423902

"I'm going to gas you you fuckin jew" would probably be considered a nazi death threat.
>> No. 423905 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 12:46 pm
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>>423902
The swastika, SS insignia, and "Heil Hitler 88" might be a giveaway.
>> No. 423906 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 2:01 pm
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>>423905
Doesn't that all look like stuff you'd write if you were crudely trying to create an outrageously nazi threat letter?
Surely any true nazi has rubber stamps for these things?
>> No. 423907 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 2:48 pm
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>What exactly is a Nazi death

Possibly a self-administered pistol shot to the head and your body being burned using a dozen gallons of petrol.

At least that would be proper Adolf style.
>> No. 423908 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 3:25 pm
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I'd have thought that any proper death threat would be rather Nazi.
>> No. 423909 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 3:27 pm
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>>423908

As part of a wider definition of Nazism, maybe you are right.
>> No. 423910 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 3:32 pm
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They were either calling him Nazi scum and wishing for his death or they were wishing for Nazis to kill him.
>> No. 423912 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 4:08 pm
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>>423909

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUxyg_DFMfM
>> No. 423914 Anonymous
29th January 2019
Tuesday 6:00 pm
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>>423912


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATkUqWssSGc
>> No. 423921 Anonymous
30th January 2019
Wednesday 12:08 pm
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5 days off? Bugger to that, slave, get back to work. Got 1 day shaven off me.
I'm not pleased even if I'm going to shake that day back to me in the future.

In other news, the weather is again awful here. The forecast says it's not going to improve this time.
>> No. 424016 Anonymous
5th February 2019
Tuesday 11:46 am
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Still in and out of bed with a bad cold. The worst thing is that my voice is almost gone and I can't talk for more than a few minutes at a time without feeling pain in my throat.
>> No. 424023 Anonymous
5th February 2019
Tuesday 2:32 pm
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>>424016
I hate that.
Then after I've barely recovered my voice usually would attain this pleasant hoarseness that makes it sound good and a relish to actually talk.
Hope you'll be alright soon lad.
>> No. 424048 Anonymous
6th February 2019
Wednesday 12:41 pm
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>>424023

It seems to be getting better today. I was able to talk to my boss on the phone this morning for ten minutes, but then I really had to end the phone call because my throat began to hurt again.

Still feeling all around shit though. I will not be going back to work before mid-next week.
>> No. 424052 Anonymous
6th February 2019
Wednesday 3:38 pm
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>>424048
A bit inconsiderate of him to keep an ailing fellow on the phone for ten minutes. Did you sound that good?
>> No. 424064 Anonymous
6th February 2019
Wednesday 7:31 pm
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>>424052

I had to talk him through where I left off on the main project that I am working on right now. Give him the status quo of my progress up until last week when I got sick. He could have just checked the latest Samepage workflow stats on our intranet, but he asked for some clarification on a few details.

I did excuse myself after close to ten minutes because I both thought he was being a thick cunt and my throat was starting to hurt again.
>> No. 424224 Anonymous
15th February 2019
Friday 11:13 am
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Fuck. I am sick again, after three or four days where I thought I was nearly back to my old self. And I am just as bedridden again as I was last week.

I suspect I caught it from those two little kids who were sitting behind me with their mum on my bus to work yesterday. They were coughing and sneezing the whole time, and ignored with abandon their mum telling them to put their hands in front of their mouths.

Little chav germ farms.
>> No. 424225 Anonymous
15th February 2019
Friday 12:54 pm
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>>424224
Serves you right for taking the peasant wagon.
>> No. 424226 Anonymous
15th February 2019
Friday 1:32 pm
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>>424225

Stop killing my planet by going to work in your own car.
>> No. 424235 Anonymous
15th February 2019
Friday 6:56 pm
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>>424226
Whadda you gonna do about it? Skip school? And pretend it's a form of protest? And get all your little buddies to join in too? I'd like to see that! Ahaha!
>> No. 424241 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 2:09 am
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>>424235

Source for future Simpson images
https://frinkiac.com/?q=OH,%20YEAH?%20WHAT%20ARE%20YOU%20GONNA%20DO?%20START%20YOUR%20OWN%20CASINO...
>> No. 424242 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 7:17 am
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>>424241
That site is fucking amazing.
>> No. 424243 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 9:12 am
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>>424241
>> No. 424244 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 11:00 am
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Last Monday I shouldn't have been on call but I was - for a multitude of reasons, one of them included my workmate being a late lazy bumder who forgets things. I rang him intending to give him a bit of bollocking yet instead simply told that he'll have to take up my on-call shift on Friday as a restitution.

It was a fun night for him. The precious irony of the situation is that he received this torrent of calls at night because of something he'd done wrong a day earlier and having been warned about the consequences, chose to ignore and carry on.

I made a mighty alright arrangement it seems. Didn't have to suffer because of someone's unwarranted stubborness.
>> No. 424247 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 12:04 pm
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>.gs Christmas party
>> No. 424250 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 1:35 pm
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>>424235
Thanks, I quite like finding rubbishy Simpsons images though. I found it quite interesting that 'sugar' apparently means 'suck' in Danish/Norwegian/Swedish. You learn something new every day!
>> No. 424251 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 1:38 pm
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>>424250
Also just confirmed it's Swedish. 'Avsugning' is apparently their word for blowjob.
>> No. 424255 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 2:25 pm
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>>424250
>deliberately using low quality images

I understand. I too purposefully self sabotage so no one will miss me too much when I am gone.
>> No. 424258 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 2:35 pm
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>>424251

It gets even funnier when it's in a language with a character set that differs from standard English. Like the crossed out "ø" in Danish (ALT+0248) or the "ß" (ALT+225) character in German.

I think the German "ß" has been phased out the last couple of years, I remember my German teacher in school saying something to that effect, and that a double "s" is now preferred in its place. Thus, "Scheiße" should really be spelled as "Scheisse" nowadays. If I am correct.
>> No. 424279 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 6:19 pm
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>>424258
This isn't correct. In 1996 the Germans had a spelling reform whereby they defined in what circumstances you could use the letter 'ß'. This did lead to some 'ss' being replaced by 'ß' and vice versa, but it is inaccurate to say that the scaharfes S is being fazed out. 'Ss' and 'ß' are not interchangeable.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%9F#Usage_in_the_reformed_orthography_of_1996
>> No. 424280 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 6:35 pm
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>>424258
>>424279
AIUI, it's the Swiss that have mostly stopped using it. It's still very much a thing in Germany and Austria.
>> No. 424283 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 7:07 pm
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>>424279
Not least because that sense is spelt "phased".
>> No. 424292 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 9:15 pm
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>>424279

Kind of seems un-Germanly inefficient to put the same letter three times in a row. Or maybe it's the same kind of overengineering that they do with their cars.

Best to just follow orders then.
>> No. 424293 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 9:20 pm
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>>424292
Grammatikbefehl ist Grammatikbefehl.
>> No. 424295 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 9:36 pm
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>>424293

>Grammatikbefehl

That quite looks like it would be a German word.
>> No. 424297 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 12:50 am
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>>424279
Typical Germans, trying to bring back the SS.
>> No. 424309 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 12:00 pm
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>>424292
What kind of over-engineering?
>> No. 424315 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 1:43 pm
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>>424309

Not him, but the Germans put a lot of money into building cars to last. The 190 is 30 years old but it's genuinely difficult to find an example today that doesn't work, the majority of them look genuinely brand new. You can only do that by spending objectively too much money while building your car. Don't get me wrong, I love that they did it and I can't think of anything more exciting than a car that lives that long purely because it was built that way, but it's not something you see any more.

The germans are also excellent at the other sort of overengineering, like putting two different types of boot struts in the Phaeton to get the boot lift 'just right', or spending millions in r&d finding the exact right door close sound on the Golf. They're all mad bastards and I love it.
>> No. 424316 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 1:44 pm
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>>424297

>Typical Germans, trying to bring back the SS.

Not quite. As one of my German lawyer friends explained to me once, today's German Criminal Code has a whole section of its own that forbids the display of Nazi symbols, including flags, certain runes and signage, public performance of old Nazi propaganda songs, the wearing of historic Nazi uniforms in public, or even the Hitler salute, all on pain of imprisonment or a considerable fine. Plus you will be put in a database of known neo-Nazis and be kept under watch.

Reminds me of a funny story I read a while ago -

https://www.lsxmag.com/news/german-camaros-get-v8-but-no-ss-badging/

>In an article on Auto Motor und Sport, it is stated that the V8 powered Camaro will cost 38,990 Euro, or about $55,000. While that’s a lot of cash for a Camaro, the real story here is that in Europe, GM will drop the “SS” badge leaving the Camaro just… the Camaro.

>Now to us Americans, SS means simply “Super Sport” and it is a badge that GM has been applying to performance cars for decades. But in Germany, “SS” has a different, far less positive connotation – that of Hitler’s elite “Schutzstaffel.”


>>424309

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overengineering

>Overengineering (or over-engineering) is the act of designing a product to be more robust or have more features than necessary for its intended use, or for a process to be unnecessarily complex or inefficient.
>> No. 424317 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 1:53 pm
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>>424315
> The 190 is 30 years old
W201 right?
That's something I'd like to drive.
>> No. 424318 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 2:20 pm
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>>424315

>The germans are also excellent at the other sort of overengineering, like putting two different types of boot struts in the Phaeton to get the boot lift 'just right', or spending millions in r&d finding the exact right door close sound on the Golf. They're all mad bastards and I love it.

The irony is that it wasn't always like that. At the start of industrialisation, Britain was the unrivalled champion of good quality, mass produced consumer and industrial goods. Our level of craftsmanship was second to none. At some point then, the Germans realised that they had some catching up to do, so they started doing a similar thing as all of East Asia did from the 1970s onwards, i.e. they made imitations of British products. German engineering and build quality in the 19th century were slipshod and patchy at the best of times though, to the point that their stuff had to be labelled as "Made in Germany" if they wanted to sell it in Britain, to help consumers tell solid British quality from shoddy German imitations.

The Germans did catch up eventually though, and the stigma of "Made in Germany" eventually turned into a mark of quality, and I guess through their Teutonic obsession with detail, they eventually surpassed us. And then of course when you add to that the decline of virtually the entire British manufacturing sector in the second half of the 20th century, it's no wonder that German engineering has such a good reputation today.

One of my neighbours at my old flat owned a 2001 Audi A8 with the big V8 engine. It had over 120,000 miles on it and both looked and ran like new. It did look overengineered in a few places, but you get what you pay for. The Germans really do make good cars.
>> No. 424319 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 3:23 pm
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>>424317

That's right. I really like them a lot, and because they're so long-lasting they're not actually that expensive, at least here in the UK. They're timeless looking things too, they really don't look out of place on the road in 2019 the way that most cars that age do. I'm not really a Mercedes type of bloke but I do love those ones.

>>424318

My Skoda Octavia VRS (built by VW of course) had 250,000 on the clock when I sold it. I bought it from a taxi driver who put 220k on the clock in the time he had it and when he retired he put a bigger turbo and a blow off valve in it, remapped it and lowered the springs, the rest of the engine was exactly as it came out of the factory, bar a couple of rubber hoses he'd never had to replace a thing.

Remarkable really, and it'll still be going today despite having an extra 120 horses running through it.

As for the british manufacturing point, as a Land Rover fan I lament the decline daily. I still maintain the 300tdi is an excellent engine, people complain it's too agricultural but that's exactly what it was supposed to be, and it's a lot more reliable than people like to say it is. There's hundreds of thousands of them still running today. Even if you treat them like shit and don't look after them, they still run, they just belch out smoke when they do. I won't defend the rest of the car's build quality but the engine is a survivor.

What would you consider the 'peak' of British automotive quality? I'll admit that other than stuff coming out of Solihull I've never paid that much attention to UK cars.
>> No. 424321 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 3:48 pm
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>>424319

>What would you consider the 'peak' of British automotive quality?

I think the Jaguar E Type was arguably the peak of post-war British automotive engineering. It, too, had its quirks and weaknesses, but I think it was one of the last British cars that ended up becoming the big legends that everyone still remembers today.

What certainly didn't help the British car industry was the part-nationalisation of big chunks of it into British Leyland, as well as all the union strikes of the 1970s, because the latter in particular disrupted the workflow between different factories. The Rover SD1 is still today seen as emblematic of this era, because it just had all around horrible build quality. And the old joke about Jaguars at the time was that you needed to buy two of them, because one would always be in the shop.

I think the British car industry for a long time never fully recovered from the British Leyland era, and then of course almost all the traditional British car brands were up for grabs and bought by new foreign parent companies beginning in the 90s (?). A more recent Lotus, Mini, or Jaguar is a decent car to buy these days, but again, it's foreign owned now, and we probably couldn't have done it ourselves without the foreign input of capital, technology, and manufacturing know how. We were just too far gone as a car industry nation by the end of Leyland.
>> No. 424330 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 12:49 pm
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>>424319
> Even if you treat them like shit and don't look after them, they still run, they just belch out smoke when they do.
I have a /101/ moment here. The cars with such 'innate' reliability are a blessing and a curse at the same time. Mostly because of folks who buy the car and then do bugger-all to maintain it - as if reliable means indestructible and nullification of the laws of physics.
An acquaintance of mine, living somewhere in Russian Far East recently lamented how hard it is to find a well-maintained Mark II on sale there, exactly because the car has a reputation of being sturdy and many owners don't really bother themselves with providing even some minimum care for it.
>> No. 424332 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 1:31 pm
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>>424330

I'm with you there. It hurts my soul to see a mistreated car, particularly a classic, but any car, really.

Most people wince when they see a scratch or a bump but it's rusty arches and rattling engines that do it for me.

I've had a few cars that I've effectively screened potential buyers of because I didn't want them going to some idiot who would neglect them or some kid with too much money who would crash the thing. When someone comes to look at a car that's been in perfect working order for longer than I've been alive, it certainly feels like I'm inspecting the buyer more than they are the car.

The days of people understanding what preventative maintenance is have long passed, though, and I suppose it doesn't help that there's really not much work you can do yourself on a modern vehicle. Other than extreme luxury brands, most cars are effectively disposable now, and I can't see much in the way of 'future classics' about either.

I remember reading a great article (or maybe it was a youtube video) about how the Chrysler PT Cruiser is one of the best used cars you can buy as they were all bought and owned by an older generation who still understood they needed to maintain and religiously service their vehicles. As a result the cars all run as new. I suppose a Skoda or the Volvo is a similar situation.
>> No. 424334 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 1:48 pm
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>>424330

I vaguely remember reading something about why Russians kept buying Ladas after the fall of the Soviet Union, which talked about different definitions of "reliability". Ladas broke down often, but they were cheap and simple to fix and they rarely went catastrophically wrong. The engines needed a lot of looking after, but they would run forever if you did look after them. A modern engine will keep going despite massive neglect, but they're built to such fine tolerances and they're so highly stressed that they tend to fail spectacularly. The Lada was less reliable in the western sense that it wouldn't always start in the morning, but it was more reliable in the Russian sense that it would rarely break so badly that you couldn't fix it.

I used to do a bit of motorbike touring as a lad and I always rode small Hondas, mainly a tatty CB250. A big tourer with shaft drive and water cooling would have been lower maintenance (and a lot more comfortable), but it would also be far more likely to leave me stranded. The little Honda needed a lot of fettling, but it absolutely refused to die. At one point it had no starter motor, it was running on one cylinder, the clutch cable was bodged together with a loop of barbed wire, the chain was flapping about even with the tensioner all the way out, the left fork leg was making grinding noises over every bump, but it still got me to the next town.
>> No. 424335 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 2:02 pm
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>>424332

As you said, many people today don't know much about cars anymore.

But it isn't just because today's technology makes them unserviceable for the experienced layperson (this isn't strictly true anyway; the bar has been raised a bit, but it can still be done). Depending on which car brand you look at, some 60 percent of all new cars nowadays are financed. Which means that you are looking at a financing plan that will run for about five years, and after those five years, you are expected to toss the old car off a cliff and buy finance a new one, effectively.

The typical Merc or Land Rover buyer of old was a person who bought the car with all their own money and looked after it well, precisely because if you spent over £30,000 out of your pocket on a new E class Mercedes in the early 90s, you expected the bloody thing to not be a writeoff after five years. Nobody was going to spend that kind of money on a car that didn't promise durability and value stability for at least a decade, and more.

But if your time frame is five years today and the car technically isn't even really yours because you're on a plan, then what does it matter if the engine breaks down beyond repair at 100K miles. The fact that it does is only assurance for manufacturers that buyers will have all the more reason to get a new car after five years.

With today's technology and advancements in material science, you would effectively be able to build a car that could last 50 years. If you look at the Mercs that were built 25 years ago, many of them, with a minimum of proper care, look like new cars still. The W124 E class as well as the early 90s C4 Audi 100 are considered two of the most durable cars that were ever made. The reason we don't see new cars like that anymore is that it's simply not good business if your model of revenue depends on being able to sell people a new car every five years. As a car manufacturer, you are not getting back the extra money you would have to spend on more corrosion resistant sheet metal or more wear resistant engine parts. Because nobody cares anymore if a car is going to last longer than the five years that you'll be on your financing plan.
>> No. 424336 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 2:05 pm
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>>424334

This is exactly why I'm so I'm love with old Land Rovers too, or anything built before ECUs were a thing, really.

Make all the jokes you want about them breaking down, because when they do I can fix literally any problem on it with a spanner and some patience. In certain environments that's important (a tour of Iraq, say) and in others - my shed dwelling sheltered existence - it's just satisfying and fun. A car you can actually fix yourself is just a big The North Poleno set with explosions in it, and I can't really thing of anything more fun.

Like you say, engines haven't really improved in the last forty or so years - there's about four (combustion) production cars with something other than a cylinder engine - we've simply built more volatile ones now that we can use computers as a life support system to stop the thing blowing itself apart - but when the system fails that's exactly what tends to happen.

I'm not particularly saying we should go back to the "good old days", modern cars are safe and effective and 99% of drivers don't want to work on their own cars and likely wouldn't be good at it anyway, and as much as I love old tractors I also love the GTR, which is entirely a computer controlled car. But there's something to be said about maintaining a vehicle with your own hands, and also knowing that you could still drive it in the apocalypse. Fuck, a TDi can run on vegetable oil if the fuel stations all stop working.
>> No. 424337 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 2:10 pm
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>>424336

> Fuck, a TDi can run on vegetable oil if the fuel stations all stop working.

I think you need different injectors though, and the fuel system has to be modified slightly to allow a higher fuel pressure. Something about vegetable oil being either less, or more combustible than diesel fuel, I forget.
>> No. 424338 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 2:11 pm
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>>424336

>just a big The North Poleno set

Fuck's sake lads.
>> No. 424339 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 2:20 pm
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>>424337

That's true, at least for 100% veg oil. The 2/300tdi will run 75% veg and 25% derv in the summer with no issues at all, apart from probably having to change your filters more often. The biggest problem is that the oil will near-solidify when it's cold enough, so you have to run it 50/50 in the winter, or get heated fuel lines.

I think you're right that you need wider injectors, though modifying the fuel rate is as simple as turning a screw, I owned a Discovery with the fuel system already uprated and never had to fuck on with the injectors in the time I had it, so I never really figured out the difference. But as I worked in a restaurant who had to pay people to take old oil away, and had the space, time, and patience to filter it at home, I had free fuel for about a year. It was fantastic even if I did smell like a mobile chip shop.
>> No. 424340 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 2:38 pm
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>>424334
I can attest to the Lada part. It was - and largely is - also expedient to do so given the sheer quality of the local roads. More so if you are an inexperienced driver: you'll fuck up and driving a Lada that fuck up will probably be cheaper to fix. Unless you happened to bump into X7.

Still, a well-maintained Lada and one that isn't are two big differences.

>>424335
Not really a fan of 'a new car every 5 years', just as not a fan of 'a new phone every year/two years'. Sod it; it's yet another /101/ moment even if I understand why it happens.
>> No. 424341 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 2:39 pm
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>>424339

>It was fantastic even if I did smell like a mobile chip shop

I understand that is indeed one of the drawbacks.

I had a W123 Mercedes 240D once. It was mind bogglingly slow, 0-60 in nigh on 20 seconds, if that, but it was a fun car nonetheless. Everything about it felt like the car was carved from one piece. I've read that there are still some running in North Africa and the Middle East with over 500K miles on the odometer. And the serviceability of the W123 was always legendary, so any polar dweller with a tool box can fix it.

Mine had problems starting up after cold nights in winter, to the point that sometimes I had thick black clouds of smoke forming behind me and then wafting down the street to the anger of my neighbours before the engine would eventually spring to life again. Being an old diesel engine, the battery was humongous, which meant that a battery in good nick would allow you to turn the starter for a good five minutes before the voltage would get too low. And thus produce five minutes' worth of those thick black smoke clouds.

The W123 diesels had no catalytic converter, so you really weren't doing any damage, except to the environment.
>> No. 424342 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 3:48 pm
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>>424341
Old mercs seem to be fun no matter how fast or slow they are.
I'm also told that new ones aren't even nearly good, especially after MB allegedly shifted their focus onto providing cars to 'Arabian princes and similar folks'. I don't recall exactly why that implied that the cars had started to get worse.
>> No. 424343 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 4:06 pm
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>>424342

>I don't recall exactly why that implied that the cars had started to get worse.

For me it implies a focus on style over substance.

An old Merc could (and was and still are) be relied on to keep you going in polar conditions, or any conditions really - there's a reason old Mercs are so very often used by taxi drivers globally.

A Ice King with 300 cars in his garage doesn't give a fuck if his AMG can stay alive for 100k miles, it's going to be lucky to get driven for five thousand miles before he gets rid of it or gets it gold plated or some shit. It just needs to have all the bells and whistles and make a load noise when you put your foot down, and you're willing to pay through the nose for that. The same is true for the more everyday 'very expensive merc' owner. Build quality doesn't matter when you can just send it back to the garage and tell them to sort it out no matter the cost. It's a model that works for the manufacturer, the dealership, the approved garages, and the owner of the car as they'll barely notice the running costs anyway.

As pointed out earlier in the thread, cars simply aren't expected to last very long now, and there's no sense in building them to defy those expectations.

I do wonder about something like a modern work truck like a Hilux, though - are they still built to last? I don't have much experience with them, but you'd have to assume they're still sold on their heavy duty capabilities.
>> No. 424344 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 4:46 pm
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>>424343
> I do wonder about something like a modern work truck like a Hilux, though - are they still built to last? I don't have much experience with them, but you'd have to assume they're still sold on their heavy duty capabilities.
Same question. One of the former bosses of the company I'd worked for drove one. I remember wondering if it's still the 'top choice for the technical of all the tеrrоrists and militant groups around the world'.
It looked alright even for someone who isn't exactly into SUVs, though AFAIR the modern Hilux is classified as a LCV. No idea about its practical value. The chief surely didn't drive it haul stuff - he didn't need to, there was a fleet of Kangoos [0], Citans [1], Traffics and Transporters for that.

[0] A rather delightful LCV, lots of leg space and a clear view from the cabin. I appreciate that.

[1] More or less re-badged Kangoo. I liked it a bit more than the base model for some reason; unsure if it's just the hypnotical value of the tri-star at its front.
>> No. 424345 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 4:57 pm
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>>424344

>Kangoo

My grandad has an MPV Kangoo, I'll admit I really do quite like it. It's perfect for him to stick his electric scooter in the back, and it's huge really, my first thought was that you could very easily use it as a day van for camping in and all that.

The MPV configuration is great if you go to the dump a lot, as my grandad does (he has a fair bit of land) It's got all the room of a van without actually being a van so you don't get told to fuck off from the dump with it.

His is also the apparently quite rare petrol automatic. Wouldn't be my first choice but it's still got plenty of grunt.
>> No. 424346 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 5:02 pm
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>>424344

Newer models do seem to be used by ISIS, though I suppose only time will prove their continued effectiveness.

I will admit that between the famous Top Gear indestructible Hilux and their more modern reputation for being the ideal technical platform, I'm really quite enamoured with them. A straight up pickup truck is not something I can ever really justify having but I still think they'd be fun. Certainly a better financial decision than a Defender (the british army's choice for a technical/troop car, really)
>> No. 424347 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 5:23 pm
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>>424344

I just don't think that pickups make a lot of sense in the UK - they don't make efficient use of space and all your stuff will get soaked or nicked. There's nothing fun about a Kangoo (apart from the name), but they're immensely practical. You get a van-like loading bay with the practicality of five seats, they're no harder to park than a small car and they have a ridiculous number of little storage spaces.

I saw this in my Youtube feed and thought you lads might enjoy it:


>> No. 424348 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 5:44 pm
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>>424342

restoring an old 190 2.6 if you are interested :^)
>> No. 424350 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 5:46 pm
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>>424347
> and all your stuff will get soaked or nicked
The aforementioned chief had some sort of a kung [0] over the cargo compartment, making it essentially a large SUV. Picture for reference attached.
I've most assuredly seen at least four such vehicles, so it's probably a factory-made option.
> There's nothing fun about a Kangoo
It's a nifty little car that's practical and doesn't look ugly. In its role it is very alright.

[0] There's certainly a proper English word for that yet I can't recall one for fuck's sake.
>> No. 424351 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 5:47 pm
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>>424350
>kung
>[0] There's certainly a proper English word for that yet I can't recall one for fuck's sake.
It's just a sort of clicking sound.
>> No. 424352 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 5:48 pm
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>>424347

There's certainly been times in my life I wished I had a pickup, but for the precious few times per year I actually need to move a big pile of branches or rubble or a Rational oven, a trailer makes much more sense. You can always get a hard cover for the bed, too. They're definitely too big for this county though, I can't disagree there. My neighbour has a Ford Ranger and it's fucking massive, quite literally taller and wider than a minibus. He's a landscaper though so it sort of makes sense, though his work is nothing a transit with knobbly wheels couldn't handle, really.

It's one of those things that would actually be Nice To Have when you need it, but most people don't often need it.

4X4's in general can be useful in some parts of the UK, never really fully necessary as our roads are comprehensive, but when I lived out in the sticks it was fantastic to be able to cut off about 30 minutes of traffic by cutting across Ilkley Moor every day.

>Regular Car Reviews

I think the stuff about the PT Cruiser I was saying before actually came from this channel, now that I think about it.
>> No. 424353 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 5:49 pm
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>>424348
Quite. That'd prolly make a decent thread in /mph/; looks like we've commandeered the mid-week general for our car bollocks again. Not too good.
>> No. 424354 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 5:50 pm
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>>424350

Yeah, if I was to buy a Hilux it would be a Hilux Surf which looks like that but is actually a straight through SUV (ie you could climb from the back seat into the back)

I too was trying to remember the word for that thing. In Land Rover world you'd call it a Hardtop.
>> No. 424355 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 5:51 pm
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>>424351
Negative. It's a big enclosed cargo/personnel compartment, frequently installed on some military lorries in post-Soviet countries.
>> No. 424356 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 5:57 pm
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>>424353

Perhaps we need to make the /mph/ equivalent of a weekend thread, a megathread where we can just post car thoughts as they come to us.
>> No. 424357 Anonymous
18th February 2019
Monday 6:00 pm
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>>424356
Why not. Even if it dies later.
>> No. 424360 Anonymous
19th February 2019
Tuesday 12:13 pm
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>>424357

>Even if it dies later.

/mph/ as such is slow even on a good day. Not sure this will boost posting.


>>424354

I've never really understood what people need SUVs for. If you are landed gentry or a farmer, yes, it's conceivable that it has its advantages for you. But for the majority of owners, it seems to be little more than a statement of "because I can". Especially if you live in the middle of a city.

They're the sort of idiots that you then see pulling into the Lidl car park in their VW Touareg or Audi Q3 and going in with two or three Bags for Life. How the fuck are your Bags for Life going to make up for the gallons of extra fuel that your Chelsea tractor needlessly burns?
>> No. 424361 Anonymous
19th February 2019
Tuesday 12:47 pm
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>>424360 I've never really understood what people need SUVs for

It's nice to be high up so you can see further.
It's nice to have space to carry whatever crap you want around without thinking about it, as well as a bunch of people.
They feel (but aren't particularly) safe.

If the purchase price, running costs and green stuff don't matter, you can see the point. Add to that some status and cheap leasing, and off you go, SUVs fucking everywhere.

(I use mine to tow a 3.5t trailer, carry stuff around the smallholding and generally be a dogsbody. It's not really a joy to drive, if there's any alternative. When I lived in t'city, I tended to run a transit. Nobody fucks with a tranny...)
>> No. 424362 Anonymous
19th February 2019
Tuesday 1:39 pm
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>>424361

>It's nice to have space to carry whatever crap you want around without thinking about it

I'm not sure whatever crap you want to carry around with you, but I have a bog standard midsized four-door saloon and I've never felt that it didn't offer me enough space to put my belongings. I also have cream leather seats, which means I have to be very careful what I put in the passenger or rear seats so it won't scratch or stain the leather. This really only leaves the boot to transport many things, and yet, I have never felt that it didn't offer enough space.

Also, keeping your boot littered with junk that you don't immediately need where you are going with your car that day is a waste of fuel in the long run.


>Add to that some status and cheap leasing, and off you go, SUVs fucking everywhere.

I really think this is the main culprit. It has been made far too easy to own big cars like that. SUVs are really the 40'' TVs of the roads nowadays.
>> No. 424363 Anonymous
19th February 2019
Tuesday 2:06 pm
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At the moment - big bottle of Argon, welding gear, bunch of metal. However, it varies all the time - I'm self employed, and often need to move stuff too big for a car. (That said - a lot of SUVs aren't really that big inside, even a little van will do that job far better, which is why I also have a van...)
Parents can end up lugging a fair amount of crap, as well as bodies, around. Couple of buggies, dog, bit of shopping, and you're running out of space.
I'm not particularly het up about SUVs. People driving them like cunts - that'll annoy me, but people driving a vehicle that's 20% bigger than it needs to be for that particular trip, not so much.
People driving when they could be cycling or walking, as they're only moving themselves, and for a short distance, seems like something I'd rather discourage.
>> No. 424364 Anonymous
19th February 2019
Tuesday 2:22 pm
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>>424363

>At the moment - big bottle of Argon, welding gear, bunch of metal. However, it varies all the time - I'm self employed, and often need to move stuff too big for a car.

That's different then. It's tools and equipment that you need to earn your living.

What I was talking about was people who really don't need an SUV at all and who still choose to get one simply because they can and because leasing is cheap as chips.

What annoys me the most about it is the school run mums who drive their kids to school in those huge cars and cause traffic disturbances both because they are really out of their depth handling a big car like that, and because there are simply too many of them.

Before I am accused of being a bigot, yes, my four-door saloon probably also burns more fuel than a VW Polo. But it's still a matter of scale. Some SUVs are double the weight of an entry-level saloon, and many of them have powerful V6 or even V8 engines that probably still use twice the petol that my humble saloon with a turbocharged four-cylinder engine needs. And in inner-city traffic with loads of idle at traffic lights and pedestrian crossings, the difference in fuel consumption only goes up.
>> No. 424367 Anonymous
19th February 2019
Tuesday 7:00 pm
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>>424364

>What I was talking about was people who really don't need an SUV at all and who still choose to get one simply because they can and because leasing is cheap as chips

You perhaps should have said that instead of "I don't get why anyone would need an SUV".

Anyway, I do think it's a bit of a shame that so many 4x4s will never tow anything or see any mud. You see so many new Discos that are insanely capable offroaders but are stuck doing the school run.
>> No. 424368 Anonymous
19th February 2019
Tuesday 7:13 pm
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>>424363

>That said - a lot of SUVs aren't really that big inside, even a little van will do that job far better, which is why I also have a van

Exactly this. I had a nose around a neighbour's Qashqai a few years ago and I was shocked at how inefficiently it made use of space. It's tall and chunky, but it's no bigger on the inside than a mid-sized hatchback. A big estate or a Kangoo-style minivan would be far more practical, but they've gone massively out of fashion these days.
>> No. 424369 Anonymous
19th February 2019
Tuesday 11:46 pm
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>>424368

>Exactly this. I had a nose around a neighbour's Qashqai a few years ago and I was shocked at how inefficiently it made use of space.

One of my coworkers had a Toyota RAV-4 once and that car is really also much tinier on the inside than you would think looking at it from the outside. It has trouble competing against cars like a Golf Plus.


>a Kangoo-style minivan would be far more practical, but they've gone massively out of fashion these days

People carriers have gone out of fashion because, well, they are people carriers. It's difficult to be a cool dad or mum with a Kangoo or Espace. Especially on the school run.
>> No. 424371 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 1:11 am
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>>424369

Is there anything in the world more tragic than a cool dad?
>> No. 424373 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 6:45 am
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What's the best way to get a career in IT if you've no experience or decent qualifications?

My brother-in-law is a mid-twenties NEET who has now decided he wants to work in IT because he believes he's good with computers; I've seen no evidence of this as the one he self built was riddled with issues and all I've ever known him do on a computer is download things with shitloads of malware. His GCSEs are poor, I think he did a BTEC at college and didn't do brilliantly on that either, he has questionable personal hygiene and he's on the spectrum so he's got limited social skills and he also struggles with things like following instructions. He wants to work for the local council because his mum has convinced him that if he goes there he will be mollycoddled and they'll never get rid of him no matter how inept he is, but I wasn't sure if he'd be better with some form of apprenticeship.
>> No. 424375 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 10:34 am
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>>424371

>Is there anything in the world more tragic than a cool dad?

It's tragic, but I guess the "cool dad" mindset is that you've given up, but not entirely. You've got to respect that.
>> No. 424376 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 10:55 am
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>>424373

> he believes he's good with computers

I believe I'm good with computers, but I would never entertain the idea to go work in IT, because I really do not have any sort of formal training or job experience in that field.

Being "good with computers" is one thing, but it's not going to be a self description that is going to wow employers. And even local councils have recruitment standards, which actually tend to be more rigid than in the private sector.

Especially if he's socially challenged and can't just blag his way about in the job world, he is really going to need some sort of formal qualification in the field. I would indeed suggest an apprenticeship. Without something on paper that says he's qualified, the only IT equipment he will be in contact with on the job will be the till at McDonald's.
>> No. 424377 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 11:20 am
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>>424373

He sounds like the ideal candidate for an apprenticeship, if he has the support to work an entire year or more on under four quid an hour, at least.

However an IT apprenticeship is a competitive position. I have a fully established career and have a lot of real world experience with computers as a lifelong hobbyist, but I still wasn't able to secure myself a position (I suspect age is a factor for me, or they're scared that someone high up in his current career would just get sick of working an entry level position, or maybe I'm just shit too, who knows) so unless he can demonstrate prior knowledge, or at the very least, a passion for working with computers, he will not make the cut there.

If you think he could actually convince someone he's got a bit of enthusiasm and drive, an apprenticeship is designed for NEETs as much as it is kids fresh out of school.
>> No. 424378 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 12:26 pm
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>>424377

>an apprenticeship is designed for NEETs as much as it is kids fresh out of school.

Time is of the essence though. If he's in his mid-20s, then he really shouldn't be bumbling about anymore and get to it. Most employers are reluctant to give entry-level positions, which he would then have to apply for after his apprenticeship, to somebody who is older than 30. Especially if he spent a few years as a NEET prior to the apprenticeship and thus didn't gather basic job world experience like almost everybody else. So if he starts an apprenticeship at age 26 or 27, that means he will be 29 before he actually enters the job market. Other people will have both a university degree in computer science and six years of job experience under their belt by that time. So any job that he will be doing likely isn't going to be demanding or pay a fortune. But at the moment, the main concern will indeed be getting him out of his NEET existence and into wage slavery the job market.
>> No. 424379 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 12:34 pm
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>>424376>>424377
I think an apprenticeship is his only hope. I'm not saying he's completely unemployable, but he's incredibly awkward and inept.

He's living with his Mum and I don't think he's even signing on any more because he got fed up of being sanctioned. The only work he's actually done since leaving college 7/8 years ago was a stint at Deliveroo but there were complaints that he was too slow delivering and he wasn't quick enough at claiming shifts when they became available to make it worthwhile.

Seriously, I have no idea what would actually be a viable career for him.
>> No. 424380 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 12:38 pm
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>>424378

>So if he starts an apprenticeship at age 26 or 27, that means he will be 29 before he actually enters the job market.

An apprenticeship is a job and pays a wage, it's just poorly paid because you're still a trainee. His age and lack of work experience is a problem, but the industry is still crying out for people with the right skills. Unemployment is at record lows and wages are rising, so it's not a bad time to be entering the labour market.

Another option might be the Cisco networking certifications, which are reasonably straightforward to acquire and fairly sought-after by employers.

What BTEC qualification does he have?
>> No. 424381 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 12:46 pm
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>>424379

>7/8 years ago was a stint at Deliveroo but there were complaints that he was too slow delivering and he wasn't quick enough at claiming shifts when they became available to make it worthwhile.

Either he just really couldn't be arsed, or this points at deeper problems. Could even be a learning disability type of thing, and many young people with learning disabilities end up spending years as NEETs and on benefits.

An apprenticeship could be quite a shock for him, because people are going to expect him to think on his feet and pull his own weight from day one. It might be slightly unfair to judge him by extrapolating from a mediocre work attitude he apparently displayed seven or eight years ago, but he is going to have to cut that shit out completely now to have any sort of chance at all in the job world.
>> No. 424382 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 12:48 pm
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>>424380
>What BTEC qualification does he have?

It's media studies or film studies, something like that. I think he got the lowest grade, rather than a distinction or however they're ranked.
>> No. 424383 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 12:58 pm
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>>424381
As I said, he's on the spectrum. He's also dyspraxic, so he can struggle with co-ordination and following tasks with several steps.

The Deliveroo gig was about two years ago and that's literally the only work he has managed to get in the past 7/8 years. He does apply for jobs but he's never actually been successful in one he's had to have an interview for.
>> No. 424384 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 2:18 pm
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>>424377
My council offers IT apprenticeships at £15k/year for over 18s.
>> No. 424385 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 3:19 pm
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>>424384
I've had a quick look on here - https://www.findapprenticeship.service.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsearch and there's some decent ones there: NHS offering £21k for software development, going up to £30k after two years, whilst they put you through a degree, a civil engineering firm offering £18k whilst they put you through a degree, the NHS offering £20k for a HR apprenticeship, Aon offering £20k for an Investment Consulting apprenticeship, BAE offering £18k for a software apprenticeship and there's other big names like Ernst & Yong plus I'm sure the Civil Service have a fast stream apprenticeship.

If I was 18 I think I'd be very tempted by some of these rather than university.
>> No. 424386 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 4:45 pm
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>>424383

You might want to get in touch with Turning Point (not that one) or Remploy. Your brother is disabled within the meaning of the Equalities Act and is entitled to support in finding and maintaining employment.

https://www.turning-point.co.uk/

https://www.remploy.co.uk/
>> No. 424387 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 4:50 pm
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>>424383

>He's also dyspraxic, so he can struggle with co-ordination and following tasks with several steps.

Oh boy.

>The Deliveroo gig was about two years ago

Again, oh boy. It is then to be assumed that he will not handle an apprenticeship much different than he did the Deliveroo job. None of this will make it any easier for him.

There are special government-subsidised career qualification programmes for mentally challenged young people. I'm deliberately not saying disabled. You don't have to be a mong to be accepted into them. But for people who are just somewhat differently abled.

A bog standard apprenticeship in the IT field might just be too much for him and put him too far out of his depth. As I said, even as an apprentice, they will expect you to pull your own weight from day one. Within reason, but they still will.
>> No. 424388 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 7:36 pm
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>>424387
I realise I've made him sound like a complete and utter mong, but if you met him you'd just think he was awkward and a bit gormless rather than a full on speccy cunt.

I have the impression he wouldn't want to use something like Remploy even if it is the best thing for him. Oh, well. Then again, he's not really my problem. He's only really going to be fucked when his Mum dies.
>> No. 424389 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 8:40 pm
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>>424388

If he struggled to be a mediocre Deliveroo employee, then the day-to-day routine in an IT job may just not be a good environment for him.

A lot of Aspies work in IT because computers simply appear to be a field that they gravitate towards, as programming a computer means structure, repetition, and precise instructions with no implied meaning or irony. In that respect, the Aspie mind actually seems better suited for IT than that of regular people. But even as somebody who is on the spectrum, you have to be able to handle being full-time employed and not being a burden on your coworkers and a drag on your employer's quality of service.
>> No. 424390 Anonymous
20th February 2019
Wednesday 8:56 pm
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>>424379
HMRC do a lot of apprenticeships (my local HMRC call centre put out about 100 apprenticeships for customer service roles last year that had a starting salary of £18k), and from the reports of people I know who work there, they are very accommodating towards people with special needs. I think they have people whose whole job is just dealing with web chat enquiries which seems like it'd be an ideal job for someone on the spectrum.
>> No. 424402 Anonymous
21st February 2019
Thursday 6:32 pm
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Thankfully my cold and flu are subsiding now with every day that passes. I've still got a pretty nasty cough and bronchitis, but I will probably be able to go back to work next week.

I dread going back though, because I have been on and off work for almost three weeks now. There will probably be a mountain of things that I need to get caught up on.
>> No. 424408 Anonymous
21st February 2019
Thursday 7:20 pm
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I bought a second-hand paperback from Amazon for about £3 including delivery. It was an ex-library book which was published in 2017 and only borrowed once, during August last year.

I'm assuming the library was shut down due to government cuts and they offloaded all of their stock, but it seems like a terrible waste.
>> No. 424409 Anonymous
21st February 2019
Thursday 8:01 pm
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>>424408
Amazon has 3rd party sellers for second hand stuff in the same way Ebay does, so maybe stolen or bought for a quid from a car boot from some one who did and flipped?

I only suggest that because AFAIK Library funding is ring-fenced, as it is often the only access to the internet someone who is unemployed has to look for work, but that is probably far too forward thinking for any Tory run council.
>> No. 424410 Anonymous
21st February 2019
Thursday 8:07 pm
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>>424408

The only people who go to libraries these days are homeless people who want somewhere warm to masturbate and book dealers picking up cheap stock. I buy a lot of ex-library stock and the dates between stamps are often staggering, particularly for non-fiction. I bought one recently that was marked as withdrawn in 2018; the last loan date was 1993. It had been sitting on a library shelf unborrowed and unread for 25 years.
>> No. 424411 Anonymous
21st February 2019
Thursday 8:08 pm
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>>424409
There was a stamp on the back page saying something like 'excess stock', which seems peculiar for a book they'll have bought brand new a couple of years ago. A lot of the cheap second-hand books on Amazon are ex-library stock.
>> No. 424412 Anonymous
21st February 2019
Thursday 8:12 pm
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>>424410
Most libraries have electronic scanning systems these days, so stamping the book is optional. However, this was a children's book for my daughter and there's no way a child would want to take a book out without stamping it; it only being borrowed once seems quite sad. It was in pristine condition other than the library stickers and stamps on it.
>> No. 424413 Anonymous
21st February 2019
Thursday 9:13 pm
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>>424411

Not every new book proves popular with library customers, and so maybe the library decommissioned books that nobody seemed to want to check out.

Or the library bought several copies of a book and then realised that fewer copies would be enough to meet demand.

Library shelf space is finite after all.
>> No. 424414 Anonymous
21st February 2019
Thursday 9:26 pm
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Not remotely my type of music but 'Better Now' by Post Malone is an absolute banger and I am still listening to it months later.

Really like the idea behind the song too, I'm sure many can relate.
>> No. 424415 Anonymous
21st February 2019
Thursday 9:27 pm
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>>424408
A lot of out of print stuff that I've bought belonged to libraries at one point.
>> No. 424422 Anonymous
22nd February 2019
Friday 5:50 pm
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Google keeps rubbing it in my face that today would have been Steve Irvin's birthday.

Fine, Google. You win. I just read the article about him on wikipedia. There. Happy now?
>> No. 424423 Anonymous
22nd February 2019
Friday 6:19 pm
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>>424422

I loved the bloke but I don't get why they've chosen this, his 57th birthday, to celebrate. He died 13 years ago. There's no significance to these numbers, why wasn't it last year or next year?

This keeps happening, there's facebook memes that go DID YOU KNOW JURASSIC PARK CAME OUT 126 YEARS AGO and I'm WITH NOTHING TO SAY BECAUSE I AM A CUNT. I find it difficult to explain why the arbitrary lack of significance, even a round number, annoys me, it's like just walking up to someone and going LAST TUESDAY WAS NINE DAYS AGO. You'd just wonder why that needed to be brought up.
>> No. 424424 Anonymous
22nd February 2019
Friday 6:22 pm
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>>424423

Good grief that wordfilter is a blast from the past.
>> No. 424426 Anonymous
22nd February 2019
Friday 7:07 pm
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>>424423 

It's uncanny how much his daughter takes after him. If you watch her for a bit, she has all the mannerisms of her dad, including the annoyingly upbeat kind of demeanour in a few places. 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2kPPJiDdmY

I'd still let her hunt my crocodile IYKWIM
>> No. 424427 Anonymous
22nd February 2019
Friday 8:13 pm
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>>424422
The way he died still seems really weird to me. It is such a freak accident. Looking at a stingray you wouldn't think it could kill you.
>> No. 424428 Anonymous
22nd February 2019
Friday 8:23 pm
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>>424427

He was presumably one of very few people knocking about who would have known the dangers involved, too.

The world was definitely better off when that mad bastard was still here, but I suppose it's hardly that surprising he eventually got done in by nature.
>> No. 424429 Anonymous
22nd February 2019
Friday 8:32 pm
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>>424427
Yeah, he always seemed so harmless.
>> No. 424430 Anonymous
22nd February 2019
Friday 9:01 pm
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>>424427

>It is such a freak accident. Looking at a stingray you wouldn't think it could kill you.

I don't know, those barbs look pretty sharp. And I think they are essentially made of calcium phosphate, which is also what gives human teeth their hardness. Getting hit in the chest cavity by a stingray because you were swimming on top of it is therefore probably a bit like getting stabbed with a serrated knife. Not a very likely thing to ever happen, but if it does, you are fucked.
>> No. 424431 Anonymous
22nd February 2019
Friday 9:12 pm
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I've been stung in the foot by a stingray before, it was fucking excruciating even then - I can't imagine what a more sensitive area would be like. The lifeguard was telling me about an unfortunate lad who got stung in the groin. Apparently he was in hospital on morphine.
>> No. 424432 Anonymous
22nd February 2019
Friday 10:35 pm
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>>424431

I was on holiday in Barbados a few years ago and had a chat with a local fisherman about dangerous fish in the local waters. He said that fishermen back in the old days used to remove a stingray barb when it stung you in the side of your lower leg by poking a long thin knife into the wound, thus widening the wound and ideally preventing bits of the serrated edges from remaining lodged in the wound where they could become infected as you then pulled the barb out. The whole wound was then rinsed with 50 percent rum and stitched up. All without anaesthetic, which was of course excruciatingly painful. Nowadays, he said they just go to a local hospital.

It apparently doesn't happen very often though, because most locals know how to handle a stingray. He said it's mostly unwitting tourists who get stung in just a few feet of water while going for a dip.
>> No. 424433 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 12:12 am
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>>424427

I suspect there might have been an element of complacency involved. If you've spent your entire career wrestling with massive crocodiles, you might eventually lose the healthy fear that most of us have for animals with pointy bits.

I'm reminded of Colin McRae crashing his helicopter or Michael Schumacher skiing head-first into a tree; spending most of your adult life in a racing car might warp your sense of what constitutes danger or recklessness.
>> No. 424434 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 12:32 am
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>>424433

I saw something on TV once where this guy was swimming with great white sharks in South Africa all without a cage or other form of protection. He said he had been doing it for many years without a problem and that he knew how to behave when in the water with them. Even touched their fins as they swam by. And I remember thinking, how the actual fuck can that seem like an even remotely good idea to a sane person. And I keep thinking one day there will be something on the news about him having gotten eaten by those sharks.
>> No. 424435 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 12:03 pm
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>>424433
>spending most of your adult life in a racing car might warp your sense of what constitutes danger or recklessness.

Couldn't agree more in both of those cases. The McRae case was particularly reckless. I feel for Schumachers family and the impact it has had on them, but flying an unmaintained helicopter, at dangerously low levels around a forest, while carrying a mate and a couple of kids, while your license and experience isn't up to date was particularly stupid.
>> No. 424439 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 5:27 pm
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>>424433

I completely agree.

I was thinking the other night, about how back in the day part of Steve Irwin's mystique was the fact that he so very obviously should have had his arm bitten off by a croc by now; but he hadn't, because he knew what he was doing, he had some kind of animal placating natural gift. It was that sense that most ordinary people would have been killed long ago, but he was Steve Irwin, he was different.

But that probably wasn't the case at all. He was more likely just one of those fluke cases who had been extraordinarily fortunate, while attempting self-evidently suicidal feats on a near daily basis. It was both a shock and a disappointment to hear that something so relatively mundane got him in the end, but really it was just his luck running out.

Got me thinking about how much we can really trust people's own supposedly rational judgement.
>> No. 424440 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 5:44 pm
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>>424439

>Got me thinking about how much we can really trust people's own supposedly rational judgement.

Whenever I train people for elf n safety I make the point that cutting corners or ignoring procedure is incredibly efficient and cost effective right up until the point that it isn't, at which point you find yourself dead or in prison because someone else is dead.

I'm also reminded of how people like my grandad will not bother to turn the power off when they're working near (or on) live mains. He's survived nearly 90 years doing so, sure, but all it takes is one slip up for an entirely needless accident. He was a fireman so maybe that idea of being inoculated to the idea of danger is there with him too.
>> No. 424441 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 6:18 pm
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>>424439

I think he was genuinely skilled, but that skill caused him to under-estimate the risks involved. I'm told that there's a bathtub curve for accidents in dangerous jobs - inexperienced workers have loads of minor accidents because they don't know what they're doing, more experienced workers have fewer accidents because they know what hazards to avoid, but the most experienced workers have the most serious accidents because they get complacent.

Anecdotally, I've noticed that gradual slide into complacency myself. I started out with a healthy degree of fear and respect for my workshop machinery, but eventually it just becomes furniture that happens to have moving parts and a motor the size of your head. You almost have to consciously remind yourself that everything in your workshop has the capacity to mutilate you.

There's a level of skill where you don't really have to bother with most safety precautions, because you know how to push the limits and get away with it. There's a temptation to take shortcut that you know have a smaller margin of error, because you just don't make many big errors any more. There's a temptation to remove the safety guards on a machine, because they get in the way and you're not daft enough to chuck your hand into a spinning blade. You take the safety guards off and everything is fine, for a bit. One day, perhaps many years down the line, you're a bit tired and a bit distracted and the machine is being a bit temperamental and you're working on something a bit tricky and the phone rings and BANG, you're on your way to A&E with some part of your anatomy wrapped in a bag of frozen peas.

Irwin's death was widely regarded to be a freak accident - fatal stingray attacks are almost unheard of - but it's the kind of freak accident that becomes almost inevitable if you spend long enough doing dangerous things.
>> No. 424442 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 6:26 pm
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>>424440

>I'm also reminded of how people like my grandad will not bother to turn the power off when they're working near (or on) live mains.

One of my school friends went on to become a trained electrician, and he told me that a healthy young person in good nick has a very good chance of surviving a 230V jolt from the mains without any lasting damage. A lot of people apparently pass out from it and don't really understand what has happened to them until they come around again, but I digress. The point is, he told me that it's one of those hot stove and negative reinforcement things. Once you've had a 230V electric shock one time, you will take that kind of danger very seriously and try to make very sure it doesn't happen again.

Steve Irwin was probably just playing it too fast and loose, together with unbelievable luck that had prevented him from getting seriously injured from handling dangerous animals. Maybe it gave him some sort of unwarranted sense of invulnerability. Well, until the day his luck ran out.
>> No. 424443 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 6:44 pm
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>>424442

>he told me that a healthy young person in good nick has a very good chance of surviving a 230V jolt from the mains without any lasting damage

True enough in the right circumstances (rubber soled shoes etc) but still not something I'd particularly like to try for the sake of not having to bother to flick the breakers off when I'm working around the house. I've seen someone survive a 230v shock and it didn't look like something he should have survived.

I got bit by a 100v capacitor and that was enough for me, I suppose a lot of American electricians probably work live don't they?

I suppose you're right though, I've burned myself a few times professionally to the point that I probably appear quite foolishly comfortable around hot oil and flash pan fires and such, though in reality I've just learned how to deal with them safely.
>> No. 424445 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 7:13 pm
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>>424441
>One day, perhaps many years down the line, you're a bit tired and a bit distracted and the machine is being a bit temperamental and you're working on something a bit tricky and the phone rings and BANG, you're on your way to A&E with some part of your anatomy wrapped in a bag of frozen peas.

If you think about it, the Birdseye peas packing factory must be one of the best places in the world to have a workplace accident. I mean, by default, your lost fingers will go into a zip-lock bag and those big freezer trucks are ideal for transport. Even if you do lose them they'll soon turn up in someone's shopping still alive and perhaps even a little nourished.

Must be why Captain Birdseye doesn't have a hook hand or peg-leg.
>> No. 424446 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 7:15 pm
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>>424443
>>424444
The other day I touched the grille of my bug zapper, which has AA batteries so can only be a couple of volts - not even while it was on, just having the residual charge in it - and it burned my thumb so badly for about an hour I felt like a right jessie. I'd probably shit my pants if I was ever tased or got a shock from the mains.
>> No. 424451 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 7:26 pm
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>>424443

>I've burned myself a few times professionally to the point that I probably appear quite foolishly comfortable around hot oil and flash pan fires and such

In my home town, somebody managed to set a whole house on fire that way once. 18th century half timbered wooden structure, set ablaze like a stack of matches so that you could see the embers in the sky from two miles away. It was in the paper the next day that the occupants, a Mideastern family, had tried to cook one of their traditional dishes in the kitchen and the ensuing flash fire then quickly engulfed some wood panelling and exposed timbers.

Sometimes when I fry up a chicken breast and I am particularly bored, I deliberately provoke a flash fire in my pan, but it's usually small and contained and only lasts a few seconds. And the materials around my cooking area aren't really that flammable. One time, it threatened to get a little out of hand, but it then died down again on its own and I was merely left with a smoke filled kitchen and a chicken breast tasting of burned oil.
>> No. 424454 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 7:34 pm
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>>424446

>which has AA batteries so can only be a couple of volts

These devices usually work by means of a voltage multiplier, which is a circuit that ramps up the operating voltage to around 2,000 volts. So even your battery powered device will operate in that kind of range. The reason why this didn't send you flying through the room is that the bug zapping grid only draws a handful of milliamps. Which is enough to zap insects and burn your finger superficially, but can not do you any actual harm.
>> No. 424456 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 8:09 pm
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>>424443

I've taken a number of whacks from mains voltage. I really wouldn't recommend it, but it'll only kill you under fairly specific circumstances.

There are three basic ways that electricity can kill you - it can stop your heart, it can give you fatal burns or it can suffocate you due to contraction of the respiratory muscles.

It takes a minimum 30mA of current through cardiac muscle to cause fibrillation. That's relatively unlikely if the path to earth is through your feet, because of the resistance of your shoes and the relatively large area that the current is passing through. It's substantially more likely if the current passes from one hand to the other across your chest, hence the old one-hand rule - if you have to work on live equipment, keep one hand in your pocket.

Burns aren't really an issue at 230V, because the minimum resistance of a human body is about 500Ω. This gives a power dissipation of about 100 watts, so you'll suffer no more than a superficial burn. At 25kV (the typical voltage for overhead railway power lines), that increases to 1,250,000 watts, which will give you life-threatening internal burns in a matter of milliseconds.

Suffocation is a very real risk if you touch a live conductor with your palm rather than your fingertips. The current causes your hand to involuntarily contract around the conductor, you're not dissipating enough current to blow the fuse or breaker, so your whole body will just go completely rigid until someone breaks the circuit or you die of hypoxia. This is why an RCD is so important - it'll break the circuit if more than a couple of milliamps leaks to earth, preventing this uniquely awful cause of death.

When someone touches a live conductor and gets thrown across the room, that's usually a good sign. The involuntary muscle contractions have broken the circuit in a matter of milliseconds, minimising the damage. The fact that they were thrown across the room indicates that there was current passing through their legs, so the current path wasn't across their chest. When someone working on a piece of electrical equipment suddenly goes very still, that's when you need to worry.
>> No. 424466 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 8:40 pm
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>>424451


>I deliberately provoke a flash fire in my pan

That's something you do often in a professional kitchen. It's not always deliberate but it usually is, waitresses seem impressed by your fearless command of the elements.

Whenever the pan catches fire and stays on fire, I've noticed that the young cooks will usually stand there and stare at it in panic, or start looking around for an adult or the nearest fire extinguisher (my god I don't even want to imagine what would happen there) while the more experienced lads will calmly dump the pan and it's three feet column of flame in the sink and throw a tray on top of it, because they don't have time to fuck about. The even more experienced management types like myself will just wander over with a damp cloth and put that on it, because we're not mental.

The real old school grizzled line cooks just point and laugh at it and goad the others into panic.

I think I lost the point of my post somewhere along the line there, but I've always been proud of the fact I don't freak out when there's a fire, in my mind I can't think of anything more dangerous than to panic in a situation like that. I've always been like that but I think it's just something my family (a lot of emergency services and medical professionals in there) have instilled into me.
>> No. 424467 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 8:43 pm
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>>424456
>At 25kV (the typical voltage for overhead railway power lines), that increases to 1,250,000 watts, which will give you life-threatening internal burns in a matter of milliseconds.

I don't need to hear this, I'm already scared of the trains themselves.
>> No. 424469 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 8:43 pm
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>>424466
I would like to know whether there is any culinary benefit, whatsoever, to making the pan do that - I've always assumed there was, but I can also totally understand the need to impress passing waitresses.

I'm a lot better than most with fire, like you, partly because as a kid I was a full-on pyromanic and (almost, but not quite) set fire to the shed on a number of occasions, but also because I grew up in the seventies, and this sort of thing was on TV every night (back when we used to regularly cook chips in an open pan of boiling fat on the stove). Good times.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrSqXWzB2KU
>> No. 424472 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 9:16 pm
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>>424469
Not cheflad, but it does depend on what you're cooking. There's the obvious flambe if you're using brandy and sometimes just getting a char on the food. I was a KP for a while as a teenlad and the head chef would often set pans on fire and just bang a lid or a dishcloth over the top. Leave it a little bit and just carry on cooking it as long as it wasn't burnt butter. He fancied himself as Keith Floyd, but was just a piss head and he often shouted at the wait staff to go and top his glass of wine up at least 3 times during dinner service.
>> No. 424473 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 9:21 pm
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>>424469

>I would like to know whether there is any culinary benefit

Not really. There's a culinary benefit to having a screaming hot pan (malliard effect, faster cooking meaning food doesn't dry out) but the fire only really happens as a side effect of that. When you do flash the oil like that you're certainly introducing considerable extra heat into the pan for a couple of seconds, which you could definitely use in a controlled manner with enough practice - it's really good for cooking and opening clams, I've found - but ultimately it's never necessary and you're risking burning the oil every time. In a hot enough pan doing the thing where you flip the food by shaking the pan, it's going to happen whether you want it to or not really.
>> No. 424474 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 9:22 pm
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>>424473

>malliard effect

Erm, obviously I meant malliard reaction. Oops
>> No. 424475 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 9:26 pm
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>>424469

>I would like to know whether there is any culinary benefit, whatsoever, to making the pan do that - I've always assumed there was, but I can also totally understand the need to impress passing waitresses.

If you overdo it, your meat will have a taste and smell of burned oil.

Maybe cheflad can shed yet more light on it, but there really shouldn't be any culinary merit to allowing your pan to catch fire.
>> No. 424476 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 9:34 pm
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>>424467

As long as you're not climbing on top of the trains, you'll be fine. The platform edge is an absolute minimum of 2.75 metres from the overhead line (usually significantly more), so you're at no risk of getting shocked unless you're nine feet tall.

>>424469

Best chip pan PIF:



Worst chip pan PIF:


>> No. 424477 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 9:39 pm
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>>424476

I remember all of these chip pan demonstrations and I think I've seen about four live ones by various local fire brigades. It must have been such a serious and prevalent problem in the 90s because they really pushed the information hard. I'm glad they did though as I'll never forget it.

As far as horrific safety films go, this is the top of my list:


>> No. 424479 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 9:46 pm
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>>424477

I recognise that one from the thumbnail and I'm not pressing play, because I'd quite like to sleep tonight. The Canucks seem incredibly hardcore about workplace safety, in a way that is both admirable and deeply unsettling.

Chip pan fires are still a major issue, mostly for older northern pissheads. They shamble in from the pub, stick the chip pan on and promptly fall asleep on the couch.
>> No. 424480 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 9:51 pm
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>>424477
Making it a young, attractive, made-up woman really is cheating. I don't think I'd notice if most of the chefs I've met had their faces melted, and they'd be too pissed to care anyway.
>> No. 424481 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 9:58 pm
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There is, of course, the infamous German forklift truck one. I don't even need to link it, you all know what I'm on about.
>> No. 424483 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 10:05 pm
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>>424480

That's exactly the point. Chefs are exactly as you describe, but we're also massive perverts. If the video was some grizzled hungarian prick getting his face burned off we'd probably enjoy it, but seeing some poor girl go from fuckable to slightly less fuckable in the blink of an eye is memorable.
>> No. 424484 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 11:01 pm
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>>424481
Klaus, what a legend.
>> No. 424485 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 11:27 pm
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>>424481
In case it wasn't obvious, that one's not an actual safety film.
>> No. 424486 Anonymous
23rd February 2019
Saturday 11:30 pm
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>>424481

I think there is a sequel knocking about somewhere on youtube. Can't find it at the moment.


>>424483

>t seeing some poor girl go from fuckable to slightly less fuckable in the blink of an eye is memorable

Usually it's indeed the other way round, e.g. while sipping a pint down at the pub.
>> No. 424500 Anonymous
25th February 2019
Monday 4:49 pm
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>>424483
>Chefs are exactly as you describe, but we're also massive perverts.

Yeah I still distinctly recall flirting outrageously with one of you in one of these threads not that long ago. Something about carrots and eating me out whilst sat on a counter, it left quite an impression. Utter filth.

And yes, I did have a moment with my showerhead about it. You're welcome.
>> No. 424501 Anonymous
25th February 2019
Monday 5:01 pm
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I can smell a barbecue. It is nice out.
>> No. 424502 Anonymous
25th February 2019
Monday 5:24 pm
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>>423594
Boring and uneventful
>> No. 424507 Anonymous
25th February 2019
Monday 7:28 pm
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I tried making a potage bonne femme, and instead of its usual flavour, something went wrong and it tasted like viscous, slightly chunky water. My pepper shaker proceeded to fall apart when trying to add pepper, resulting in a little white pepper mountain on top of my flavourless mess. Tried to gently remove the pepper, only to sneeze it all over the soup.

To the Tesco for a pizza and some cans it is, then.
>> No. 424511 Anonymous
26th February 2019
Tuesday 12:34 am
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>>424456

> I've taken a number of whacks from mains voltage. I really wouldn't recommend it, but it'll only kill you under fairly specific circumstances.

I must have taken half a dozen at least and one of those was in the shower from an electric shower head. That one, at least, really should have been the end of me. I don't even know where the earth was, I was standing on a tiled floor.
>> No. 424512 Anonymous
26th February 2019
Tuesday 12:38 am
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>>424500

I remember that, it's the most erotic this site has ever been.

You were lucky, though, the standard offer is usually just bending you over the flour sacks after hours.
>> No. 424537 Anonymous
26th February 2019
Tuesday 4:09 pm
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>>424511

One of the electricians who installed the alarm system at my parents' house said he'd been zapped about a dozen times. The most dangerous was apparently while he was installing a set of those motion activated floodlights on a roof. He lost his balance due to the electric shock and fell down nearly ten feet into a hedge. Which luckily softened the impact and he walked away with little more than a bruised elbow and some scratches on his arm.
>> No. 424542 Anonymous
26th February 2019
Tuesday 4:48 pm
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Watching "Crikey It's the Irwins" here.

Steve Irwin's son Robert takes so much after his dad, it's unreal. Carbon copy not even touches it.

I have a feeling we will be hearing and seeing a whole lot of the new-generation Irwins for years to come. And we will be happy to.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D13UMe6et5Y
>> No. 424575 Anonymous
26th February 2019
Tuesday 10:39 pm
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I'm doing 9 to 5 hours for a couple of weeks and it's fucking grim. It's not even work, it's just training and seminars and that, but the schedule is wiping me out. It's hard to get up, despite me having much earlier shift work in the past, the traffic alone is exhausting, and by the time I get home in the evening I'm nodding off on the sofa by 7pm. And then I feel like I've wasted my evening as I have to get right back up and go back in. Not to mention the weekend feeling like a distant dream.

No wonder so many people are fucking depressed if this is their schedule.
>> No. 424576 Anonymous
26th February 2019
Tuesday 10:45 pm
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>>424575
What a way to make a living.
>> No. 424578 Anonymous
26th February 2019
Tuesday 11:15 pm
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>>424575

That sounds grim.

Good though that it's only going to be a couple of weeks. That kind of schedule can really get to you.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykdmnS-MtXI
>> No. 424579 Anonymous
26th February 2019
Tuesday 11:25 pm
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>>424578

>That kind of schedule can really get to you.

It doesn't help that it's in a grotty hotel conference room and the weather's been decent outside. And that half the people in the room want to talk about brexit and the isis lass all fucking day. It's like britfa.gs but people are looking at me so I can't start a cunt off.

I don't think I'll last two weeks. All this for an airport security pass. I'll be mental by the time I get it and will probably nick a plane, or at least one of them suitcase trolleys.
>> No. 424585 Anonymous
27th February 2019
Wednesday 10:12 am
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>>424579

>I'll be mental by the time I get it and will probably nick a plane, or at least one of them suitcase trolleys

Best not to tell that to the people who will be in charge of issuing you that security pass.
>> No. 424587 Anonymous
27th February 2019
Wednesday 10:54 am
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>>424585

They've probably already read this, nanny state innit
>> No. 424605 Anonymous
27th February 2019
Wednesday 5:28 pm
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>>424575

what are your normal hours, if you don't mind me asking?

I had to do normal office hours last year and the commute alone was enough to put me off it.
>> No. 424609 Anonymous
27th February 2019
Wednesday 6:05 pm
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>>424605

I'm a consultant now and self employed so it varies wildly, but I typically don't take a meeting before 11.30am at this point. Some days I can drag out well into the evening, some might be a couple of hours.

For the last four or five years I've been in development and operations roles where I could basically make my own hours as long as my phone was on most of the day and I got everything done. Because I'm a mentalist that work week often was a 15 hour Monday, a 12 hour Tuesday, then a few meetings on Wednesday and the rest of the week was a few hours here and there of site visits or email and phonecalls. But it still changed enough, and I had the ability to change it enough, that I was always happy and never felt stuck in a routine. Before the fancy roles I was doing shift work and it was the same idea there - sure I might have to work a 12 or 14 hour shift, but no one week was the same and you usually ended up averaging out to getting three days off a week.

I think a lot of people thrive when they have a set routine and can plan their life around knowing that they will always, always have the same pattern, but to me that drives me mental. I need variety and novelty, even if it's as basic as sometimes having a thursday off

I agree with you though that the real nightmare is the commute. It's just so fucking awful to have to go to work at the exact same time as just about everyone else. Even if you start at 9.30 and finish at 5.30 then you'll end up probably halving the time it takes you to drive there and back.
>> No. 424619 Anonymous
27th February 2019
Wednesday 10:03 pm
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My girlfriend just returned home from competing in a sport at an international level, something she manages to do part time alongside her rather involved career, to find me sprawled on the sofa wearing only a pair of joggers, eating my second Big Mac and watching other people play video games on youtube. She was still pleased to see me.

Love is truly blind lads. it's the only thing that keeps me from leaving this tryhard bint
>> No. 424621 Anonymous
27th February 2019
Wednesday 10:37 pm
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>>424619

You're a very lucky man. One of my ex live-in girlfriends always complained that she couldn't even leave me alone for two days without me trashing the place.

I never quite understood how a few empty beer bottles and pizza boxes on the coffee table, paired with one or two used plates in the sink and some dirty socks on the bathroom floor, constituted "trashing" the place while she was away, but oh well. I mean, yes, ideally, it shouldn't happen, and it is something that aggravates many women. But it wasn't like the council was going to come and board up the place as a health and safety hazard.
>> No. 424623 Anonymous
27th February 2019
Wednesday 11:12 pm
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I had one of those nights where I fell asleep as soon as I got through the door, but not before devouring a scone and a slice of cheesecake from some posh bakery on the way back from work that practically gives them away towards closing time.

I'm now starving and downing green tea and Skyr in a bed to stave off hunger until breakfast.

Night wasted.
>> No. 424624 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 12:30 pm
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I'm sorry, ladm8s, I think I jinxed the weather when I remarked that it was "absolutely perfect" after walking the dogs yesterday.

>>424623
Can't you just turn night stuff into early morning stuff?
>> No. 424625 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 2:54 pm
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I've been feeling shit all day. I got a call this morning at just after five o'clock from a mobile phone number unknown to me, and somebody started babbling at me in some sort of Eastern European language. I then said "What?" a few times and told them that they probably had the wrong number. The guy then said in barely intelligible English, "Is this not the number of Bogdan?"

Didn't quite manage to fall asleep again after that, so I eventually got up at 6 o'clock to watch some youtube on my computer with a few cups of coffee before going to work at 8:30 as usual.

It turns out sleep mode on my phone wasn't activated. I thought I had set it to be in sleep mode between 11pm and 7am, but somehow that setting must have gotten deactivated again.
>> No. 424626 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 3:14 pm
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I never know what mode my phone's chosen to be in. Could be silent, could be deafening, could have woken up in my pocket and be pounding on the lock screen or writing drivel into some app or other. Days when I've thought how nice and quiet it's been, I've found hordes of silent missed calls. FFS. Is this why people keep whipping their phones out all the time, because they don't trust the fucker to still be working? It all just seems very unsatisfactory. Can you get a case that force-locks all the buttons and screen or something?
Also, why does data keep getting turned off? That's a fair few screen pokes and swipes for my pocket to be getting right, even ignoring the unlock.
>> No. 424627 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 3:34 pm
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>>424575
Add time spent on commuting, evenings wasted on preparing for the next day and that those two days off will fly by lightning fast and there's a nice depression recipe, yes. Even more so when you remind yourself that it's going to be that way day by day, week by week, year by year.
That's the main reason why I've been avoiding it like plague.
Interesting enough, I know a fair amount of folks who almost couldn't live without that schedule. One of them told me that he doesn't know what to do with his week-ends and if he could have more days off he'd rather not.
I can't even remotely fathom that.
>>424619
Not too shabby m8. I don't really get watching others playing videogames though. Always preferred to play them myself.
>>424625
> The guy then said in barely intelligible English, "Is this not the number of Bogdan?"
I call bollocks. Should have been obvious right from your first reply that it isn't the number of some slav.
In case you still have the number, run it through search engines, just so you'd know if it's some well-known scammer.
>> No. 424631 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 5:15 pm
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Had a go at making sushi. Just some basic salmon and rice rolls. It didn't go terribly. I fully expected to end up having to eat some sort of rice mess with a fork but none of the pieces fell apart. Not exactly bite-size pieces but I can work on that.
Hopefully the raw salmon from Sainsburies' fishmonger won't give me food poisoning or brain worms. Have to wait and see.
>> No. 424632 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 5:22 pm
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More updates on the posh bakery lads.

I went in again, it's fucking £1 for a fat slice of absolutely outstanding cheesecake that you'd pay closer to five for normally and 25p a scone, which are not only delicious but also cheaper than scones sold at Sainsbury's.

A true revelation, probably a sad indictment of my life that this has become a significant point of happiness for me now discovered.
>> No. 424634 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 5:45 pm
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>>424627

>I call bollocks. Should have been obvious right from your first reply that it isn't the number of some slav.

Well he kind of seemed like Bogdan was not one of his buddies, but somebody else that he was supposed to call and that he wasn't very familiar with.

Maybe the lad is new to this country and Bogdan is supposed to be one of his contacts. Who knows. It still doesn't answer the question what shady business you are involved in that you have to call Bogdan at 5:04 am, according to my phone. But as long as I was able to establish that I am not Bogdan, I really don't care.
>> No. 424636 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 9:51 pm
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Did a bit of food shopping, filled a basket, paid at the self service checkout, and started to fill the basket back up so I could take it to the car, fill one of the many bags I have that I forgot to bring in, and return the basket. As I was doing so an Asda woman appeared from nowhere and told me that under no circumstances was I to take a basket outside and that I needed to buy a bag.

After a brief but detailed exchange of words about how I have six hundred bags in my car and how I'll definitely bring the basket back in about a minute and a half, I decided to just grab the bottom of my t-shirt, pull it up, and scoop all my shopping into my new makeshift pouch, and sauntered past the woman with my head held high. As I waddled away I could definitely hear the Curb Your Enthusiasm music playing.

I think this confirms that I've reached the age where I no longer give a shit what people think of me, but am also furiously contemptuous of any minor inconvenience or jobsworth.
>> No. 424637 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 10:28 pm
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>>424632
I wouldn't feel too bad, pastries and baked goods are like edible crack for some people and I count myself among them. I used to have to walk home down a gauntlet of a Greggs, an independant bakery, an M&S, a Tesco's and a mini Co-op all offering dozens of different oven fresh snacks. Well, "oven fresh" is stretching things, because it was usually the end of the day and as you've mentioned they're generally getting rid of stock at silly prices. I'm not proud of it but I definitely spent more than one train ride home pulling apart an olive loaf I got for twenty pence. Honestly if that's all I ended up with I'd done okay.

Jeez, I just got nostalgic about cut price baked goods, and you think you've got problems.
>> No. 424638 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 10:33 pm
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>>424637
>some people
Fat people. You're called fat people.
>> No. 424639 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 10:36 pm
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>>424638
I believe the correct parlance is 'real' people.
>> No. 424640 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 10:55 pm
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>>424639
No, fat people aren't really people.
>> No. 424641 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 11:01 pm
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>>424638
Well, I'm not fat, so it's not a terribly accurate title to bestow.

What would you call someone who tries to feel superior to others on the internet just because those others like cheap almond croissants? I'd go with "cunt" but it feels faintly derivitive.
>> No. 424642 Anonymous
28th February 2019
Thursday 11:36 pm
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>>424641
No knead for that kind of language.
>> No. 424643 Anonymous
1st March 2019
Friday 3:45 am
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>>424642

Would you prefer floury prose?
>> No. 424644 Anonymous
1st March 2019
Friday 5:29 am
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>>424642
>>424643
This is starting to take the biscuit.
>> No. 424646 Anonymous
1st March 2019
Friday 9:36 am
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>>424632>>424637
Why bother with pride in this case?
>> No. 424713 Anonymous
3rd March 2019
Sunday 11:22 pm
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Thinking about buying a new smartphone. The Samsung S9 appears to offer what I have in mind, but then again, the S9 is just over a year old, with similar technology, and considerably cheaper.

Decisions, decisions...
>> No. 424714 Anonymous
3rd March 2019
Sunday 11:28 pm
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>>424713
If the S9 has similar technology to the S9 but is considerably cheaper then I'd go for the S9.
>> No. 424715 Anonymous
3rd March 2019
Sunday 11:56 pm
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>>424714

Sorry, I meant the S10. It's Samsung's most recent offering in the S series range. But the advancements in technology over the S9 aren't massive, and the S9 is much cheaper. So in the end, it's down to how much it is worth to somebody to have THE latest smartphone and not last year's model.
>> No. 424717 Anonymous
4th March 2019
Monday 8:41 am
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>>424715

I bought an S7 when the 9 was released and didn't feel like I missed out on anything at all. I can't bring myself to care about bezel reduction or anything like that so it'll be a while before I see a phone that does something new that I actually want.
>> No. 424718 Anonymous
4th March 2019
Monday 8:58 am
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>>424715

How much do you care about the camera? If you don't mind an average rather than excellent camera, you can get an excellent phone for about £200 from Honor or Nokia.
>> No. 424719 Anonymous
4th March 2019
Monday 10:32 am
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>>424718

I just want a camera that makes decent snapshots now and then, like when I am on the go or something. For everything else, I've already got a mid-price Canon Eos.
>> No. 424720 Anonymous
4th March 2019
Monday 11:01 am
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>>424715
>>424717
Samsung have been trying to make up for having betrayed the rest of the industry with the S5, which had a headphone jack, removable cover and replaceable battery but still managed IP67 certification and was more than slim enough for anyone.
>> No. 424721 Anonymous
4th March 2019
Monday 12:45 pm
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>>424720

Ridiculous notion. If those features were as industry breakingly desirable as you make out, a company like Samsung would not hesitate to continue with that style.
>> No. 424722 Anonymous
4th March 2019
Monday 12:57 pm
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>>424721
The industry has been saying that they're getting rid of those features for reasons that include, amongst other things, problems with ingress protection. Most notably, companies that aren't trying to copy everything Apple does are still making phones with those features without issue. OnePlus have shown that you can still ship a desirable phone with a headphone jack, SD card slot, removable cover and multiple SIM capability without much in the way of compromise. Huawei have shown that you can ship a top-notch flagship with a battery that can be replaced (albeit not trivially) without the risk of smashing the screen.
>> No. 424725 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 4:19 am
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>>424722

All of those features come with compromises. Samsung have an R&D budget of about $15bn, so they can afford to develop a (patented) waterproof headphone jack. The overwhelming majority of Western customers don't use a second SIM slot or a MicroSD card, so those features are wasted space. The sales figures for replacement batteries showed that only a very small proportion of people actually replaced their battery when it wore out, rather than just getting a new phone. It's really difficult to engineer a removable rear cover that has reliable waterproofing without seriously increasing the bulk or reducing the stiffness of the chassis; CNC milling the whole chassis out of aluminium and gluing on the screen makes for a thin, lightweight, strong and intrinsically waterproof phone at relatively low cost.

Some people really care about those lost features, but they're very much in the minority. Phone reviewers get genuinely outraged when a new mid-range phone comes out with microUSB rather than USB-C, but most customers couldn't give a shit; USB-C is significantly more expensive than MicroUSB, so it's a perfectly valid design choice for a value phone.
>> No. 424726 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 5:21 am
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>>424725

>outraged when a new mid-range phone comes out with microUSB rather than USB-C, but most customers couldn't give a shit

Indeed, average customers are actively annoyed by USB-C because the universality of micro was so very useful. I have never been in a situation where I couldn't find or borrow a charger for my phone. If I upgraded that would no longer be true.
>> No. 424727 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 6:26 am
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>>424725
>The overwhelming majority of Western customers don't use a second SIM slot or a MicroSD card
This deeply annoys me. It wouldn't be so bad if everyone was using cloud storage with hardly anything kept locally - not something I do, but I can see why it works - but most people I know buy a mid-high capacity phone for more than £100+ more when they could get the same amount of storage for £30 if they just used a microSD card. It's not like they're storing anything where the greater access time is a problem either, just photos, photos, photos.
>> No. 424729 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 7:01 am
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>>424727

Is the microSD thing true? I thought the S10, 9, 8, 7, etc all have them. Certainly my S7 does and happily supports 512gb cards.

I thought this was true of pretty much all Android phones. There's even a native function in current Android OS that will format your card so it's seen as an extension of your phone's inbuilt storage. Whenever you pop in a card it prompts you to do just that. It works very well, too.

Apple don't have any of that, but we all already know about Apple.
>> No. 424730 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 10:02 am
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>>424725
All of this would be useful and informative if the S5 didn't exist. But it did, so it's just the industry gaslighting its customers.

>>424727
>but most people I know buy a mid-high capacity phone for more than £100+ more when they could get the same amount of storage for £30 if they just used a microSD card.
It's almost as if the manufacturers want you to pay them for more storage instead of being able to upgrade on the cheap without greasing their palms.
>> No. 424731 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 11:31 am
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I feel like absolute utter shite, and like a pack of elephants ran over me two times or more. It was considerably worse yesterday, so much that after going to the shop I had to fuck off back ASAP, thinking I'd collapse. Slept well until 16:00. Stuffing a thermometre into my armpit revealed 38.8 Celsius. Eh, wot?

The night was proper bollocks, with me waking up several times because I couldn't handle all the idiocy by brain had been producing under the fever.

No idea what happened to me.
>> No. 424732 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 1:04 pm
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>>424730

How thin, light, and strong is the S5 compared to later models? "Good enough for me" isn't an answer, particularly when plenty of people prefer thinness over replaceable battery, as mentioned.
>> No. 424734 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 1:17 pm
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>>424729

>Is the microSD thing true? I thought the S10, 9, 8, 7, etc all have them. Certainly my S7 does and happily supports 512gb cards.

Yes, the newer phones all still have a microSD slot. And I think that really is a good feature to have, because as has been said, it allows you to buy a more affordable phone with only limited internal storage.

Looking at laptops at the moment, I'd like to buy something like a 12'' or 13'' one, but what really annoys me is that they come only with fixed, non-removable internal storage, usually in the form of on-board flash memory. My current laptop is kind of ancient and only came with an internal 120 GB HDD, but I was able to upgrade it to a 1TB hard drive without a problem. When you look at mid-range 12'' laptops now, a lot of them only come with 64 GB flash memory, maybe 128 if you spend 100 quid more. With Windows installed and a few more memory hungry software applications, you will have used up a good portion of your 64 GB right out of the box. There are tutorials on the Internet on how to solder in more memory, but that of course voids your warranty and a lot of things can go wrong when you are messing with those quite tiny SMD chips.
>> No. 424735 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 1:29 pm
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Ratboy neighbour is playing gabber all fucking day. Not even acceptable gabber like Shitmat.
>> No. 424736 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 1:42 pm
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>>424732
Keep rationalising, lad.
>> No. 424737 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 1:50 pm
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>>424734
>I'd like to buy something like a 12'' or 13'' one, but what really annoys me is that they come only with fixed, non-removable internal storage, usually in the form of on-board flash memory.
Get thee to PC Specialist. Their laptop chassis designs usually come with back panels, and a lot of the parts like storage and memory are pretty much always user-serviceable. Price may be a bit more than the high street but the build quality and part selection more than justifies it.
>> No. 424738 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 1:55 pm
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>>424736

I had an S5 mini until not so long ago, and it was light as a feather compared to more recent, only slightly bigger new phones. I have to say it was convenient to just quickly remove the battery when it froze up. Pressing the off button for ten seconds probably would have done the same job, but not as conveniently. And the ten-second off button should still work on all the newer phones, because that kind of functionality is usually implemented in low-level programming and not in the OS itself. It works the same way on my old Windows 7 laptop, which unfortunately has been freezing a lot lately after a number of Windows updates that I see as the culprit. I think on PCs it's implemented in the BIOS, so it's probably something similar with smartphones.

What I also miss is FM radio. Most newer phones no longer have FM radio chips installed. I love lying on the beach somewhere in summer and listening to the radio with my headphones. True, most radio stations have Internet livestreams now, but with a lot of them, the sound quality via livestream just isn't the same as on an FM radio with good signal quality. The last phone I had with built-in FM radio was a Nokia N73, and it had very good FM radio sound quality.
>> No. 424739 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 3:30 pm
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>>424738
The nice thing about FM radio was that it didn't require data or a mobile signal. Just your headphone cable and a suitable station.

WHAT'S THAT M8? NO BARS? SORRY M8 CAN'T HEAR YOU OVER THE SOUND OF PETE TONG
>> No. 424740 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 3:51 pm
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>>424738

Most phones still have FM receiver chips, they're just turned off in software.

https://freeradioonmyphone.org/
>> No. 424741 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 4:31 pm
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>>424740

This tends to only work with Snapdragon architectures, which more often than not have FM receivers still built in even if they aren't documented and a phone has no FM radio app preinstalled. Snapdragon boards are mainly used in the U.S., while Samsung's own Exynos chipsets are installed on nearly all European phones, and their more recent revisions have no more hardware FM radio support.

FM radio is a legacy feature anyway. I'm sure it will be dropped by other chipmakers as well in the next few years. Not just because analog FM radio will be phased out altogehter, but also because LTE data plans are becoming more common where people have 10 gig and more per month. Most Internet radio livestreams are still 128 kbps, which means your 10 gig would almost be enough to listen to your favourite radio station eight hours straight every day for the entire month. What is more, people are increasingly accustomed to listening to their favourite stations even when they are outside the station's terrestrial signal range.
>> No. 424742 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 5:06 pm
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>>424741

>Not just because analog FM radio will be phased out altogehter, but also because LTE data plans are becoming more common where people have 10 gig and more per month. Most Internet radio livestreams are still 128 kbps

I'm sure I've had this rant before on here, but it's staggering to me how much better random internet streaming is than national DAB or even DAB+. It's fucking embarrassing.
>> No. 424743 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 5:29 pm
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>>424742

Techmoan did a video a few weeks ago on the plight of piss poor DAB sound quality.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27w3quNTP84

In essence, the problem is transponder bandwidth and the use of thirty year old MPEG-2 audio codecs, which are dramatically less data efficient than modern-day compression algorithms.

Some streams now use the much more efficient AAC codec family, but instead of focusing on better sound quality over MPEG-2 at a given bitrate, they have further reduced the bitrate of AAC streams so that they sound just as shit as the MPEG-2 ones but use less data.

Apparently, some other European countries have made DAB much more user friendly in offering high-quality AAC streams. If I understood the video correctly, it is mainly Britain where DAB is complete shit.
>> No. 424744 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 5:31 pm
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>>424743

>If I understood the video correctly, it is mainly Britain where DAB is complete shit.

Basically accurate. We overcrowded the waves here and it shows.
>> No. 424747 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 6:23 pm
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I've had the worst day at work.

I seldom get bothered by work in any capacity, but today I was apoplectic.

The worst part is the people I need to speak to aren't picking up their phones which means I will have to wait until tomorrow to resolve it and I won't be able to relax tonight.
>> No. 424748 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 7:12 pm
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I don't really know why I bothered to work this out but for roughly the same price as a super size meal from Burger King you could buy the ingredients to make 30 smoked salmon and caviar canapes from Sainsburies.

>30g fresh parsley 75p, 300g cream cheese 75p, 55ml lemon juice 55p, 100g smoked salmon £3.25, 30 canape blinis (135g) £1.50, 50g lumpfish caviar £3.00
Total of £9.80
Supersize meal is always a bit under a tenner I think? Correct me if I'm wrong.

That's 615g of canape, disregarding the lemon juice. I don't know how much a burger and fries weigh but that is probably enough canape to fill you up.

Downside is it doesn't come with a drink but water's near enough free. You could put a splash of the lemon juice in your water if you felt like it. The caviar's definitely excessive, so if you cut that out it's actually significantly cheaper than even a large meal.
>> No. 424749 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 7:38 pm
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>>424748

I see your point, and I do these sorts of calculations all the time, but a supersize meal almost certainly weighs more than that and is definitely more calories.

A better example might be a stew or a chilli. You could probably make nearly 2kg of chilli for that price, considerably more if you're willing to "cheat" by adding rice to your meal.
>> No. 424750 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 7:52 pm
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>>424749
There are lots of much, much cheaper and healthier things you could make for the same price. I think I was just trying to compare something that's really very luxurious and special-occasiony to something some people eat quite often.
>> No. 424751 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 7:52 pm
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I am beginning to feel the effects of age related farsightedness. It has been getting more difficult lately reading small print that is too close to my eyes.

I already wear contact lenses for my nearsightedness, so I have been looking at different kinds of contacts that promise to correct both my near- and farsightedness. A good compromise seem to be bifocal lenses, which consist of a crescent shaped area in the bottom portion of the lens that enables you to read things that are close to you, and the rest of the lens which gives you adequate long-distance vision.

I'm very reluctant to get reading glasses as such, both because I don't want them to make me feel old, and because I am very bad about constantly losing things like sunglasses, keys or other small items.
>> No. 424752 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 8:26 pm
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>>424750

Fair, though speaking from experience, £3 caviar is not fantastic. Might as well lick a tramp's fanny.
>> No. 424753 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 8:28 pm
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Someone asked me in earnest if I was a hacker today, because I had Ubuntu on my laptop.
>> No. 424754 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 8:36 pm
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>>424751

Try monovision contacts. You get a different prescription for each eye; after a few days, your brain learns to automatically switch to whichever eye is sharper. It sounds weird, but it works brilliantly for most people.
>> No. 424755 Anonymous
5th March 2019
Tuesday 8:44 pm
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>>424748

>Supersize meal is always a bit under a tenner I think? Correct me if I'm wrong.

Are you in That London? Around my way, a large meal is about six quid, maybe £8 if you go for an Angus double burger with all the trimmings. If you go for the daily King Deal burger, you can get a large meal for about £4.50.
>> No. 424756 Anonymous
6th March 2019
Wednesday 10:29 am
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>>424751
> age related farsightedness. It has been getting more difficult lately reading small print that is too close to my eyes.
Presbyopia

Almost no-one does bifocal contact lenses. I assume you were softs? Multifocal (i.e. concentric rings) contact lenses are what people are fitted with these days. Think of it like varifocals.

How short sighted are you? You could try taking your lens out of one eye (your non-dominant eye) and this would be in effect monovision. You dominant eye is the one you would use to use a camera or microscope. You can also use the parallax method to determine dominance.

>>424754
Monovision is great if you can get on with it. Caveat is intermediate vision like computer distance will be blurred.
>> No. 424762 Anonymous
6th March 2019
Wednesday 7:37 pm
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>>424753
I have a Kali partition on my laptop. I like to take a look at the wireless traffic on trains sometimes and I've gotten some really funny looks. Particularly when passing through Cheltenham.
>> No. 424763 Anonymous
6th March 2019
Wednesday 7:40 pm
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Ordered a Pizza Hut and remembered I don't really like Pizza Hut almost immediately after ordering it. I don't think I'm actually hungry at all, just tired.

I'll have a go though, it's been about ten years since I had any takeaway pizza other than Papa Johns which always seems to get ordered at management seminars for some reason.
>> No. 424764 Anonymous
6th March 2019
Wednesday 7:44 pm
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>>424762

I had a distro running i3 as the window manager for a while and people got very annoyed with me that they didn't know how to use it.

I do the wireless traffic thing too and it's probable I've been reported to the feds by concerned citizens before, though I suppose I'm beardy enough to look like I'm probably just an innocent nerd.

People also don't like that I have a little display that shows all the DNS traffic on my wifi at home, they like it even less when I point out what their ISP can see.
>> No. 424765 Anonymous
6th March 2019
Wednesday 7:58 pm
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>>424753
I hope you said no and gave them a credible excuse for the toast.
>> No. 424766 Anonymous
6th March 2019
Wednesday 8:43 pm
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>>424762

Protip: if you change your theme to look like Windows, set your terminal windows to white-on-black and use a pretty mono font like Roboto or Droid Sans, nobody gives you a second look. Also, take the damned stickers off your laptop lid. Bonus points for skinning your terminal to look like Chrome. Extra bonus points for skinning it to look like Word. Triple bonus points for dressing like an adult.

If you have to wave a Yagi about in public, buy a Toughbook and a hi-vis jacket. Dirty hi-vis is like an urban invisibility cloak, especially if you look really fucking grumpy all the time.
>> No. 424768 Anonymous
6th March 2019
Wednesday 9:16 pm
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>>424766
I don't have stickers on my laptop and do dress like an adult. I think you're projecting a tad there, m7.

It's not like people glancing at my screen can see I'm specifically using Linux. But doing anything on the command line, no matter what OS and no matter how simple, makes you look like a wizard to most folk.
>> No. 424769 Anonymous
6th March 2019
Wednesday 9:29 pm
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>>424766

Lad, people will think you're a hackmaster if they see anything that looks like a command line, even on Windows.

The hi viz thing is astonishingly true, though. I saw fantastic CCTV footage of a pair of lads who drove up to a pub wearing hi viz, went down to the cellar and loaded his van up with booze, in full view of customers and waiters. One of them had a clipboard.
>> No. 424770 Anonymous
6th March 2019
Wednesday 10:36 pm
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>>424766

>Also, take the damned stickers off your laptop lid

Bet you wouldn't tell Mr. Robot that m8.

alright this is my old music production laptop, I never did any train commuting with this thing
>> No. 424771 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 2:55 am
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Just got in from doing some flyposting for XR. Made some arrangements to do it nearer home next time, I'm getting too old and out of shape to be taking so many night buses home at this hour.

Good larks for a good cause but I'm going to be finding random bits of dried flour stuck to my face until I can take a shower.
>> No. 424772 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:59 am
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>>424771
I didn't follow any of that.
>> No. 424773 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 8:16 am
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>>424772
I think he's working for Apple's UK advertising department.
>> No. 424774 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 8:20 am
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>>424773
Where does the flour come in?
>> No. 424775 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 8:46 am
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>>424774

XR are a group of teenagers and art students from London who think they're fighting the good fight by posting their own propaganda over commercial billboards and adverts.

Flour and water is a very good impromptu glue and the improvised nature of it likely adds to the thrill and faux guerrilla theme of these tourists into activism.
>> No. 424777 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 9:10 am
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>>424775
What is this, Fox News? None of the people involved who I've spoken to so far have been students, just real adults with real jobs and justified fears about the environment. Clearly you're well informed about everything and aren't just angry and bitter about it for some bizarre reason.
>> No. 424778 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 10:45 am
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>>424764
> People also don't like that I have a little display that shows all the DNS traffic on my wifi at home, they like it even less when I point out what their ISP can see.
Feh, so much for having nothing to hide.
>>424769
> The hi viz thing is astonishingly true
We had uniformed folks not too far from here dismantling the entrance door of some poor sod's flat. Looked very professional, exchanged chit-chat and jokes with the passers-by. Think even helped some old lady with carrying her stuff to the 7th floor or something.
In two days word got out that flat had been burgled clean.
>> No. 424779 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 10:55 am
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>>424777
>justified fears about the environment.

If you've fears about the environment why are you harming it with your little teenlad protests?
>> No. 424780 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 11:06 am
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>>424779

Why are you so angry at people working for positive change?
>> No. 424781 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 11:14 am
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>>424771
How in God's name are you too out of shape to sit on a bus?

>>424779
This is a very good point. Think about how many kilometres of glacier are lost every year because of flour.
>> No. 424782 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 11:17 am
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>>424781

It's not the sitting on a bus that's the problem, it's the being awake and lively at 3am while walking from bus stop to bus stop then waiting for them to arrive without freezing.
>> No. 424783 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 11:36 am
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>>424780
Something being done for a worthy cause doesn't necessarily mean that the actions themselves are worthy.

I am concerned about the environment. However, I'm not going to go and join a demonstration where the main aim is to stroke my own ego and engage in a circlejerk with the other demonstrators about how right on we are rather than about positive environmental change.
The best thing about defacing some posters isn't that I did it, it's about showing everyone online that I did.

What's the environmental impact of creating the posters you defaced the billboards with? What's the environmental impact of the local council having to repair the defaced billboards? What's the environmental impact of everyone travelling to the meet up?

I do things like reducing my meat intake, walking more and massively cutting down on consumerism to try to mitigate my environmental impact. You know, things that actually will make something of a difference.
>> No. 424784 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 11:46 am
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>>424783
>I do things like reducing my meat intake, walking more and massively cutting down on consumerism to try to mitigate my environmental impact. You know, things that actually will make something of a difference.
Those things actually don't make any difference beside the amount of damage that corporations and governments are doing out or allowing. Not that you can't simply do both. If you have a better way to stop them than protest then XR would be glad to hear it.

>The best thing about defacing some posters isn't that I did it, it's about showing everyone online that I did.
A bit like when you bragged about what you think you're doing for the environment in that same post? All of your vitriol seems to stem from some bizarre objection to people doing good and feeling good about it. Why shouldn't they? Because you have a dislike of people you can assign to the simplistic stereotypes you're throwing around? Grow up.
>> No. 424785 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 12:26 pm
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>>424777

It's performative.
>> No. 424786 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 12:35 pm
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>>424785
So is being a sourpuss on the internet. Only one of these two performances can help to inspire widespread positive change.
>> No. 424787 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 12:37 pm
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>>424784

How has the environment benefited from flyposting?

Which discussions in parliament, laws, policies have come about because of XR?
>> No. 424788 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 12:46 pm
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>>424784
>people doing good

How exactly is it 'doing good'?
>> No. 424789 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 12:46 pm
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>>424784

>Those things actually don't make any difference beside the amount of damage that corporations and governments are doing out or allowing.

Corporations don't emit CO2 for shits and giggles, they emit it as a byproduct of satisfying consumer demand. The beauty of corporate capitalism is that major corporations are totally amoral - they do whatever will make them the most money. McDonalds in the UK serve British beef and free-range eggs because we demand it; in the US they serve mystery meat and battery eggs because nobody gives a shit.

Persuading a corporation to stop doing something that's profitable is very much a long shot. Changing consumer behaviour so that the ethical choice is more profitable has a proven track record of working.

A couple of years ago, a vegan Greggs sausage roll would be the punchline to a joke. It still seems a bit weird now. Greggs weren't lobbied into it, they weren't compelled by law to offer a vegan option, they didn't decide that selling vegan sausage rolls would have a positive effect on their environmental impact, they just saw the chance to make a pound note and jumped on it. Changing consumer behaviour is by far the fastest way to change corporate behaviour; the marketing industry has given us a spectacularly powerful playbook for how to do that.

The vast majority of environmentalists I encounter are just virtue-signalling halfwits. They don't know how much CO2 is required to produce a kilo of polyethylene, they don't know how many watthours it takes to boil a kettle, they couldn't work out how many solar panels it takes to replace a nuclear power plant, they just have a vague intuition that big business is bad and cuddly little old-fashioned hipsters are good. They're the kind of pricks that own wood stoves and complain about diesel engines, they're the kind of pricks who use wooden toothbrushes but holiday in Goa. They consistently make bad decisions and advocate for ineffective or actively harmful solutions, because they don't understand the basic science of energy and climate change and aren't inclined to learn.
>> No. 424790 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 1:09 pm
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>>424789

>Corporations don't emit CO2 for shits and giggles, they emit it as a byproduct of satisfying consumer demand.

At least that's what Big CO2 want you to think.


>The vast majority of environmentalists I encounter are just virtue-signalling halfwits. They don't know how much CO2 is required to produce a kilo of polyethylene, they don't know how many watthours it takes to boil a kettle, they couldn't work out how many solar panels it takes to replace a nuclear power plant, they just have a vague intuition that big business is bad and cuddly little old-fashioned hipsters are good.

What is true enough is that a lot of them pride themselves in being big business hating environmentalists just because it's the hip thing to be. But If you see it in terms of CO2 produced per unit of a consumer product, for example a large-scale apple orchard in Chile which mass produces for the British market can actually have a smaller CO2 footprint than a small, local orchard in the UK. Much the same way as large-scale industrial operations tend to bring down the cost per unit for pretty much any mass consumer product, the carbon footprint per unit can be reduced by industrial farming. And even if you then factor in that your Chilean apples are brought to the UK aboard an airplane, they can still be more carbon friendly than British apples. When you then also consider that in order to enjoy apples year-round that were harvested in Britain in autumn you have to entertain large climate controlled storage facilities, a plane load of Chilean apples that arrive in mid-winter in the UK suddenly aren't such a bad thing anymore.
>> No. 424791 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 1:18 pm
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>>424789

If you want to make yourself even more unpopular, bring up the (highly arguable) claim that owning dogs produces more CO2 than owning a Land Rover, and that the most eco-friendly thing to do would be euthanising them with a spade.

Or just have no children, like this fellow who has kindly removed himself from the gene pool.
>> No. 424792 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 1:25 pm
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>>424791
>the most eco-friendly thing to do would be euthanising them with a spade.

What about attaching messages to them using flour and water? That's still doing good, right?
>> No. 424793 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 1:27 pm
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>>424792
One can only assume.
>> No. 424794 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 4:33 pm
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Oh, I remember those XR knobheads. They're the ones who wanted to protest about pollution by bringing roads in London to a standstill, so the cars stuck in traffic jams would be polluting even more. A bit like protesting about HIV by going around stabbing people with dirty needles.
>> No. 424795 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 4:44 pm
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>>424789
That's great, you know XR are also pushing veganism in their own ranks? Not in a judgemental way, just that they take it as a given it's a good idea.

>>424790
Cool, so emissions regulations would actually deal with that in a way that makes sense rather than relying on consumers who see the "made in England" sticker and think they were choosing the less harmful product.

>>424794
HIV research would definitely get a lot more donations if enough of the right people got stabbed with dirty needles.
>> No. 424796 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 5:01 pm
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Has XR ever achieved anything? I don't recall any changes made because of them.
>> No. 424797 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 5:17 pm
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>>424791

There's plenty of sound arguments to be made that having children is bad for both the planet and our species. We are arguably already well past the point of sustainability and we're only sealing our own doom if we continue to breed.

It's funny how we can use the same argument when we're talking about badgers or foxes who nick a few chickens, how it's good for them in the long run to control the population. But nobody ever stops to think about the 8bn humans rabidly devouring forests, fossil fuels and fishing stocks.
>> No. 424798 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 5:19 pm
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Big presentation today.

Spent the week worrying about it and then as soon as I stood up in front of everybody, as usual, I just didn't care. Went fine, got a few laughs.

I really need to learn the anticipation is the worst part.
>> No. 424799 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 5:27 pm
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>>424797
I believe that's because most people who claim we should control the global population, usually whilst popping out a few sprogs themselves, really mean "we should stop Africans and other third worlders from having loads of kids" so then we end up in treacherous waters.
>> No. 424800 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 5:48 pm
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>>424799

To be fair, it is also true that less economically developed countries have the highest birth rates. I have no time for hypocrites though.

Theoretically if there's a worldwide maximum of one child per person, we're at a stable 1:1 reproduction level. Aging population will be a problem in the short term but in the long term I'm almost certain the global economy would lift as a result of declining pressure, like after the black death.

I'd also advocate a good pandemic, come to think of it. That would have the added benefit of getting rid of the old and the weak first.
>> No. 424801 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 5:52 pm
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>>424799
But that's a perfectly reasonable argument to make. The birth rate in developing countries is significantly higher than in developed ones, meanwhile us white Brits are struggling to make replacement. Japan's birth rate is well below replacement, and the only reason their population hasn't collapsed yet is because they're living longer.
>> No. 424802 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 5:55 pm
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>>424796

Have they achieved anything since their beginning in October last year and aim to start protesting in earnest next month? Not as such, no. What a waste of time, they haven't even achieved anything in the future yet. You mong.
>> No. 424803 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 5:59 pm
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>>424801

The richest states in India have fertility rates at well below the replacement rate. This leads to a gloriously perverse argument in favour of international development aid - if you really hate darkies, you should give them a load of money to educate their women and provide good healthcare, because then they'll stop breeding.
>> No. 424804 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:14 pm
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>>424801

Looking at a study from 2009; the average Kenyan had a carbon footprint of 0.3 tonnes. The average Brit had one of 9.7 tonnes, Australians of 20.6 tonnes. A lot of the super rich have carbon footprints in the hundreds of tonnes.
In some developing countries the amount is higher than others due to varying levels of development and, importantly, regulation.
So it's a bit more complicated than your solution of "Sterilise all the poor".
>> No. 424805 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:19 pm
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>>424804
If we're proposing a genocide of Australia then I could get behind flooding the country with emus.
>> No. 424806 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:29 pm
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>>424802

I'm sure the posters will change the world by next October m8
>> No. 424807 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:33 pm
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>>424804

Who ever said anything like sterilising all the poor was a solution you dimwit.
>> No. 424808 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:34 pm
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>>424806

There's an interesting theory about why people get so angry about vegans. It says they know they should be doing something similar and feel guilty because they aren't, then they misplace that anger by directing it at the vegans. It's easier to make snide remarks about the skinny chap quietly eating his flavourless boiled seeds than it is to admit you're in the wrong.

Have you ever reflected on why you're so personally aggressively anti-doing-anything?
>> No. 424809 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:39 pm
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>>424808

That's not an interesting theory, it's bollocks. People hate vegans because of the vocal minority who are militant in their the shipping forecast and self-righteous fart sniffing. Social media has only propagated the meme.

As the lad earlier on pointed out, those kinds of people are intolerable precisely because they'll try to shame you for having a bacon sandwich, but probably think nothing of all the plastic packaging their food still comes in, the transportation it takes to get it to your local Waitrose, or the pesticides used in its production etc etc etc
>> No. 424810 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:41 pm
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>>424809

You aren't being very convincing.
>> No. 424811 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:43 pm
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>>424804
These studies combine metrics on fossil fuel extraction, product consumption and fuel usage. Australia is a massive coal exporter so already the claim its average person is emitting 60 times that of a Kenyan is misleading since its largely a consequence of Australia's natural resource profile. Morover these studies neglect what they can't measure. A Kenyan cow that isn't reared by agribusiness, with all its detailed records on fuel and energy usage per head, is still producing a carbon footprint. Everything about these studies overestimates the comparative footprints of Westerners and there's certainly a good rationale for this since they're the places you'd want to coerce into funding climate change solutions. Just take it with a grain of salt, you are not born into sin by being Western.
>> No. 424812 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:45 pm
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>>424808
There's an interesting theory about why people get so angry about Nazis. It says they know they should be doing something similar and feel guilty because they aren't, then they misplace that anger by directing it at the Nazis. It's easier to make snide remarks about the skinhead chap quietly working towards a racially pure society than it is to admit you're in the wrong.

Have you ever reflected on why you're so personally aggressively anti-doing-anything?
>> No. 424813 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:48 pm
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>>424812

Straight to Godwin's law, wonderful.
>> No. 424814 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:49 pm
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>>424813
There's an interesting theory about why people get so angry about Godwin's Law. It says they know they should be posting something similar and feel guilty because they aren't, then they misplace that anger by directing it at Godwin's Law. It's easier to make snide remarks about the inevitable preponderance of internet discourse to arrive at discussions of Nazism than it is to admit you're in the wrong.

Have you ever reflected on why you're so personally aggressively anti-doing-anything?
>> No. 424816 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:55 pm
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>>424808

Another interesting theory is that I have actually worked my whole life to enact change and am embarrassed and frustrated by performative twunts acting like they're the saviours (while asking others why they 'aren't doing anything') and not realising, or caring, that they're being incredibly damaging, so long as they get to post on the internet acting like they're the black bloc of eco warriors.

Just so we're clear, I'm not passively aggressive against this - I am actively aggressive about this. It's detrimental to the cause, and anyone over the age of fifteen should be able to work out why flyposting at 3am is not effective for global industrial policy changes.
>> No. 424817 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:56 pm
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>>424814
Are you really not aware of how totally insane it is to equivocate hatred of vegans with hatred of genocidal fascists?
>> No. 424818 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:58 pm
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>>424816

Ah so you're envious that you're not involved in the circle jerk part of it because you think you should be applauded for things that you've done secretly while telling nobody about.
>> No. 424819 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 6:59 pm
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There's an interesting theory about why people get so angry about Britfa.gs. It says they know they should be doing something more productive and feel guilty because they aren't, then they misplace that anger by directing it into cunt-offs. It's easier to make snide remarks about the slightly camp chap talking about the cornering capabilities of an MX-5 than it is to admit your live is unfulfilling and without purpose or direction.

Have you ever reflected on why you're so personally aggressively anti-doing-anything?
>> No. 424821 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 7:17 pm
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Well, this thread has gone to shit in a hurry.
>> No. 424822 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 7:18 pm
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>>424818

>because you think you should be applauded for things that you've done secretly while telling nobody about.

No, I only mentioned it at all because you pushed me.

I feel like I shouldn't have to point out that this is an anonymous website. I don't actually gain any kudos by posting anything I do here, because, in case you missed it, it's anonymous.

Again, running about in the street putting cool posters up is not in any way useful, and if anything, makes proper activists with potential to actually do something look bad.

It's also fantastically amusing how quickly we went from "You're a dick because you're not doing anything" to "you're a dick because you mentioned that you are, in fact, doing something"
>> No. 424823 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 7:18 pm
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>>424821

It's the megathread, it'll recover.
>> No. 424824 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 7:29 pm
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>>424821
It's the same person who tries to shit up every thread. I've analysed the posts.
>> No. 424825 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 7:35 pm
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>>424822

Are you somehow under the impression that the flyposters themselves are supposed to cause policy change? It does sound like it. It's also very clear that you think you know better than the two hundred academics who signed the letters of support for the movement. You still haven't offered any alternative, only ranted about how everyone else but you is only doing things to try and look good and that's bad.
>> No. 424826 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 8:17 pm
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If .gs was a pub, do you reckon anybody would have got glassed yet?

I feel like the lads in the smoking area would be the most down to earth. That's almost universally the case.
>> No. 424827 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 8:18 pm
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>>424825

>only doing things to try and look good and that's bad.

That's true though
>> No. 424828 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 10:31 pm
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>>424826
All the best people are in the smoking area.
>> No. 424830 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 10:34 pm
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>>424827
It's not only false "it's the young people who are wrong!" type rubbish, if the end result is a net good then it's also idiotic to object to it. It's very hard to take any of the objections here as being in good faith at this point. It's all just coming across as knee-jerk "I don't like thing!".
>> No. 424831 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 10:45 pm
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>>424830

>if the end result is a net good then it's also idiotic to object to it.

The end result is not net good, it makes people take the other, more effective campaigners less seriously when they're all lumped in together.

Despite this being explained to you several times you still refuse to listen, so I'm not sure what else to say.
>> No. 424832 Anonymous
7th March 2019
Thursday 10:47 pm
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Are we all here familiar with the concept of a work wife or husband?

It's been suggested to me that's just a yank thing, and google implies that too, but I've heard the term and experienced the concept loads over here, I'm sure.

Am I a secret yank? Should my girlfriend ever meet my work wife? Am I desperately trying to change the subject of this thread? Who even knows.
>> No. 424838 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 9:31 am
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>>424831

It's been said once before and I asked at the time, for the second time, what a better alternative was. There was no answer. Still, I'm sure you know better than the two hundred academics and all the veteran activists involved. The secret way you're drawing mass attention to people's need to change our consumption behaviours without telling anyone about it, that sounds like a great plan.
>> No. 424841 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 10:32 am
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>>424838
You say veteran activist. I say old crusty.

Potato potato.
>> No. 424842 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 11:20 am
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>>424794
> A bit like protesting about HIV by going around stabbing people with dirty needles.
By the way, have you ever heard any news of raunchy-looking individuals doing that to others in densely-packed areas (shopping centres, cinemas, clubs maybe)?
All whilst uttering 'Now you are one of us' apparently.
>>424797
I've just written a really fine rant in response only to realise that I don't want to post it here. At best we'll have another 're: MRA shite' cunt-off, at worst it'll get me banned.
Off to some other place. Wait, no. I've just finished reading the thread, you managed to underline almost all points without me. Props.
>>424810
His counter-argument is pretty reasonable, why?
>> No. 424843 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 11:32 am
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>>424838
if consumption behaviours need to be changed, let it be by edict rather than by choice. ration meat. people will get used to it eventually. now you might well say that implementing such a policy is hard - but that tends to be the case with effective policies. i don't want to be a pious, moral individual. i eat meat despite thinking it's wrong - but i wouldn't stand against a government policy of rationing or banning meat because such a policy has the potential to be effective. tackling the supply side (even via direct action, which i don't recommend, which also has dubious effectiveness and is very illegal) is far more effective than tackling the demand side of the problem by moaning at people. with exception to questions around smuggling it's essentially a question of applying economistic solutions to moral problems.

Sure, that's dull and depressing - not fun and engaging like most forms of e-activism, but then i have the fire and brimstone mindset that runs directly contrary to most modern feel-good individualist stuff, so whatever. i'm not particularly invested in this either way, i just thought i'd spell out my case.
>> No. 424844 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 11:45 am
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>>424843
Firstly, a government ban/resrticiton on eating meat is far too extreme and raises serious concerns about just how far they can impact your life. The whole point of having a lovely free and democratic society is that we, mostly, live and let live. Secondly, no one wants it and PM Anon would probably find himself protested into a climb down. You could go all Bashir al-Assad about it, but if you're just going to make everything that much worse, what's the point of trying to stop climate change in the first place?

Obviously you're just firing off ideas, but your lack of capitalisation bothered me and frankly it was ill-thought-out.
>> No. 424845 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 11:46 am
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>>424843

Meat rationing is a harsher version of my idea of progress, taxing the hell out of it. If you make it expensive for companies to use formerly cheap meat, they will very quickly figure out how to grow burgers in vats. Similarly a levy on combustion engines will very quickly solve that problem too.

We're capitalists whether we like it or not, so these problems require capitalist solutions.

Close corporate tax loopholes and introduce new ones that reward clean energy and responsible farming. Then before you can even sign the thing we live on a better planet.
>> No. 424851 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 4:17 pm
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>>424832

I've heard it used before at one of my mate's engagement parties, where a lot of his work friends and their partners were present. They all seemed to take it in good faith as a bit of bantz and I felt rather bitter that my girlfriend, at the time, laughed along- Knowing full well I'd never hear the end of it if I ever professed on of my colleagues to be my "work wife".

I don't think it's a common thing though. It seemed to me one of those hideous imported references out of some bland Yank sitcom. These were all deeply tedious cunts who worked in a call centre, and appeared entirely under the thumb of their partners; who were all, every one of them, the exact same sort of fat nasty cow who watches Ru Paul Drag Race and has hideous cat tattoos on their legs. You know the type I mean.

Make of that what you will.
>> No. 424853 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 4:55 pm
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http://noel.world/ Noel Edmonds has lost it.
>> No. 424854 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 5:47 pm
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>>424853
He never had it.
>> No. 424855 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 5:59 pm
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>>424853

>noel.world

Nothing good has come from dropping the three-character limit for top level domains.
>> No. 424856 Anonymous
8th March 2019
Friday 6:08 pm
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>>424855

I disagree.

http://sexy.horse/
>> No. 424993 Anonymous
11th March 2019
Monday 7:35 pm
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Is there a thread dedicated to exercise/getting in shape/ the gym somewhere?

I don't want to make one if there's a perfectly good one to bump but I can't find one.
>> No. 424994 Anonymous
11th March 2019
Monday 7:37 pm
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On Saturday, my IEMs broke.
Yesterday, I found my amplifier full of electrolytic fluid, so I'm waiting for new caps to arrive.
Today, the (thankfully replaceable) cable on my ATH-M50xs broke in the way that the ground doesn't connect properly any more, so I'm listening to music with the centre channel removed. It's quite interesting listening to the bits of the music you normally don't hear.
>> No. 424995 Anonymous
11th March 2019
Monday 8:11 pm
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>>424993
/fat/ has many.
>> No. 425038 Anonymous
12th March 2019
Tuesday 10:18 am
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The wind is gently rocking my garden structure but it seems to be standing up to it quite well. The greenhouse on the other hand has lost three windows and the sliding door just fell off somehow.
>> No. 425109 Anonymous
12th March 2019
Tuesday 7:55 pm
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My mother-in-law has invited herself around for the week. She's divorced and has nothing better to do so she uses up the majority of her leave inviting herself around here, although she always deliberately picks weeks when she knows our kids are at school so she doesn't have to spend too much time with them. It boils my piss. She's always slowly shuffling around audibly, breathing audibly or eating audibly; that's without even getting to the snoring. I feel like I can't properly relax on an evening when she's here and 90% of the conversations I've overheard are her moaning about her work, when I can't really think of much worse to discuss in my free time. She'll take my space on the driveway when I go to work, even though her car is a battered old banger and she'd be able to find a decent place on the street to park when everyone else is out at work. She's always doing things like not bothering to turn the lights out when she leaves the room or putting away dirty dishes in the cupboard because her eyesight is poor. She's been doing this for over seven years and not once, not fucking once, has she offered to look after the kids whilst I have a 'date night' with her daughter. It's only Tuesday and I'm out of my fucking mind. The worst thing about it is that she'll be going out places with my other half whilst I'm at work, so I'm spending hundreds of pounds a year for the pleasure of her coming over.

I don't want her to die, but she needs to get a fucking life.
>> No. 425119 Anonymous
12th March 2019
Tuesday 11:57 pm
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I'm watching an old BBC series called Wings, about the Royal Flying Corps during WW1. It's rather good, and there's an officer who was clearly a big inspiration for Flasheart in Blackadder Goes Forth, at least in terms of his looks and movements. It's a bit uncanny.
>> No. 425127 Anonymous
13th March 2019
Wednesday 3:56 pm
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>>425109
> She's always slowly shuffling around audibly, breathing audibly or eating audibly
I used to have a colleague like that and for the whole time he'd been working along I thought I was in some special kind of hell.
It was almost as if he had a specific intention to do everything as much audibly as he could, including [i]thinking[i/]. Thank god I never had to have lunches with him. People told champing horror stories about those.

[x] /101/
>> No. 425135 Anonymous
13th March 2019
Wednesday 5:20 pm
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>>425127
She doesn't chew audibly, she makes noises that she's enjoying her food. The kind of noises that most people have grown out of when they're the age of two.

She really, really, really boils my piss.
>> No. 425136 Anonymous
13th March 2019
Wednesday 5:41 pm
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>>425135

My grandma used to do this. It was horrific. I ended up just making sure I was never in the room when she ate.

"MMMMM"
>> No. 425137 Anonymous
13th March 2019
Wednesday 5:59 pm
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>>425135
> she makes noises that she's enjoying her food
That he did too, in addition to chewing audibly. I don't even want to remind it myself.
Seems you're in hell right now, laddie.
>> No. 425151 Anonymous
14th March 2019
Thursday 5:35 pm
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My girlfriend and I have been thinking about moving for a while and I've spent a few days just driving around aimlessly finding nice looking areas and that sort of thing.

When I suggested a lovely place overlooking the river and right next to the marina, I mentioned it separately to my girlfriend, my mother, and my closest friend, and they all said almost exactly the same thing - "Yeah but you'll end up spending loads of money on a boat, won't you?"

I don't know where I gained this reputation for being such a financially irresponsible prick enthusiastic, broad minded hobbyist, but I'm not sure I enjoy being so predictable. They're completely right, too, I had already looked up docking fees.

My girlfriend wants to either move to the seafront or closer to the airport, I'm not sure she appreciates just how far my sickness goes, though. I'll either be lost at sea or have a pilots license by the end of the year.

As an aside, I've always held the probably innacurate idea that living on the seafront is a nightmare in terms of your house rotting away from rust and saltwater erosion. But the view would be nice. But then so would being able to walk to the airport.
>> No. 425152 Anonymous
14th March 2019
Thursday 6:01 pm
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>>425151

If the seawater doesn't ruin everything, the seagull plop will. Also, after recently revisiting the seaside town where I grew up (and hadn't lived for about ten years), the first thing I noticed was that the sea STINKS.
>> No. 425156 Anonymous
14th March 2019
Thursday 10:46 pm
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>>425152

Which seaside town?
>> No. 425158 Anonymous
15th March 2019
Friday 12:01 am
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>>425156

>Which seaside town?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0LeL9BUPtA

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