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>> No. 438151 Anonymous
28th July 2020
Tuesday 11:47 am
438151 The New Adventures of Mid-Week
Now that all the excitement has died down I thought it time we redo the mid-week thread. What are you two up-to?


I've organised a date for the weekend but have come to realise that I'd better keep something of a conversation going unless I want to be stood up. This is going to be tedious. I might want to think about doing some work today as well.
Expand all images.
>> No. 438152 Anonymous
28th July 2020
Tuesday 11:58 am
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I may have to hide this thread simply due to that photo. I can already imagine the sort of tedious cunt that would put that on a workplace whiteboard.
>> No. 438153 Anonymous
28th July 2020
Tuesday 12:08 pm
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You can't have a regular thread with both an image and a YouTube video, it uses up far too much screen space.
>> No. 438156 Anonymous
28th July 2020
Tuesday 10:17 pm
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I found a really nice wooden cupboard/chest with full joints in an 'antique' shop. Dovetails across the top edges an some kind of weird stepped mortice tenon on the sides. It looks like an old piece of furniture that's had a modern sand over. They're asking £300 for it, which feels like a huge amount of money for something i have little judge of quality for - especially when some items i've previously bought from the same shop have reapeared with an increased pricetag. The furniture is a bit big for my needs but it loooks really nice. I can't justify the purchase and i could probably make an adequate version for myself if i ever got around to actually doing it.
>> No. 438157 Anonymous
28th July 2020
Tuesday 10:48 pm
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Something recently compelled me to check up on a forum I was quite active on between 2006 and 2013. The place is now almost polared and it seems to be about a handful of posters who have completely shitted the place up, they've full on drunk the Kool-aid of coronavirus being a hoax, microchips in vaccines and in general posting a lot of things that are antisemitic and borderline racist. They also seem to really have it in for Scottish people.

I want to go back to the before times.
>> No. 438159 Anonymous
29th July 2020
Wednesday 9:32 am
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Finally got myself a hair appointment for Friday.
I have longish hair so I don't really have the luxury of sitting infront of a mirror with a pair of clippers.
>> No. 438164 Anonymous
29th July 2020
Wednesday 3:02 pm
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>>438159
'Finally' as in they have been booked solid until now? Or finally as in you finally got around to it?
>> No. 438173 Anonymous
29th July 2020
Wednesday 4:05 pm
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>>438164
A bit of both, I avoided it when they first reopened because no doubt they would have been fully booked and only now just got round to do it.
>> No. 438174 Anonymous
29th July 2020
Wednesday 4:29 pm
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>>438173
I'm avoiding them too, I just don't know how long I should wait so I was hoping you'd be able to provide a report. Things back to normal by now you think?
>> No. 438180 Anonymous
29th July 2020
Wednesday 5:05 pm
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>>438174
>Things back to normal by now you think?

No?
>> No. 438181 Anonymous
29th July 2020
Wednesday 5:46 pm
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>>438174
I got my hair cut a couple weeks ago, just walked in after work, masks were optional but I chose to wear one, only one other person in there. Bloke cutting my hair had gloves apron and face shield on but it was fine.
>> No. 438183 Anonymous
29th July 2020
Wednesday 6:12 pm
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>>438157
You similarly compelled me to look up a forum I used to post on. I don't know what's worse, that everything is now serious political threads or that I recognise some of the people still posting on it who have all been made mods.

AND THAT FORUM WAS .GS

>>438174
I had to book in advance and wear a mask but it was perfectly fine even on the first day they were allowed to open. Just don't be a dick and ask for anything detailed as they're wearing face shields.
>> No. 438201 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 8:14 am
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I've just got an email about the Debenhams sale. I can see why they're going to shit. They might as well call themselves "Regatta, Craghoppers and a few Dad brands" instead.
>> No. 438202 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 12:01 pm
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I need to find a job. I'm decaying.
>> No. 438203 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 12:54 pm
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>>438202
Work doesn't need to define your life m8.
>> No. 438204 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 2:03 pm
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New Warhammer starter set arrived yesterday. That's at least a year's worth of painting accounted for in one box.

Went for a lovely walk around Bolton Abbey too, my entire body is aching now though because I made the mistake of power walking to the summit of the big hill with rocks at the top; then had a bit of a panic because it looks a hell of a lot steeper and more dangerous going back down. Got a bit sunburnt as well.

It's mad actually, when did we start having sun powerful enough to burn you in this country? It's never happened to me until the last couple of years.
>> No. 438205 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 2:16 pm
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Add John Hurt to list of famous people I had forgotten were dead.
>> No. 438206 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 3:52 pm
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Watching starlings pick off flying ants here in the back garden as they emerge from the ground.

Who needs the Discovery Channel.
>> No. 438207 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 4:53 pm
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Must have been constipated all week without realising it because I've had about four massive shits today, and I really don't know where it's all coming from. It's not just been a series of small ones, I mean several massive logs. Is this what being in your 30s is like?
>> No. 438208 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 4:57 pm
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>>438207

Bowel movements are helped along by physical activity. It generally tends to speed up your peristalsis.
>> No. 438209 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 7:53 pm
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>>438204
>It's mad actually, when did we start having sun powerful enough to burn you in this country? It's never happened to me until the last couple of years.
I got sunburned recently. It was overcast the entire fucking day.

Explain that one, science.
>> No. 438210 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 7:58 pm
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>>438209

https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/ozone-layer-depletion-chemical-compound-earth-a9445911.html
>> No. 438211 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 8:02 pm
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>>438209

Also, depending on the actual thickness of the cloud cover on an overcast day, up to 80 percent of the Sun's UV radiation can pass right through the clouds.

https://edition.cnn.com/2012/07/10/living/guide-to-sun-safety/index.html

(scroll down to Myth #5)
>> No. 438212 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 8:34 pm
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>>438207
>Is this what being in your 30s is like?

Pretty much. Best start increasing your fibre intake and getting used to eating boring food.
>> No. 438213 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 9:51 pm
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It's just been too hot today.

I want it to be winter now.
>> No. 438214 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 10:17 pm
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>>438212

Also, you will involuntarily start to enjoy eating olives.
>> No. 438215 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 10:19 pm
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>>438214
And your nose (and ear) hairs start to get really long.
>> No. 438216 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 10:25 pm
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>>438213
It's the youths in the /101/ thread wot done it with their callous taunting of the sun. Hangings too good for them.
>> No. 438217 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 10:32 pm
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>>438215

Dinner parties will also gradually feel like a Friday or Saturday night well spent.

Pro level: going home just after 11pm and still thinking you had a cracking evening.
>> No. 438218 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 10:36 pm
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>>438217

You'll also find yourself getting really excited about patio furniture.
>> No. 438219 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 10:37 pm
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>>438218
Actually, varnishing your patio furniture, which I spent a very productive three days on this week.
>> No. 438220 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 11:06 pm
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Why's none of the above been my experience. I've just done more drugs.
>> No. 438221 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 11:29 pm
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>>438220

Don't worry, I've done that too, I've managed to find a healthy balance. I'm not sure there's a more accurate representation of the human condition post 30 than pressure washing the decking while on coke.
>> No. 438222 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 11:32 pm
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>>438220
You might think you're blitzed-off-your-Ritz-cracker after half a bag of Builder's Wisdom, but nothing beats the satisfying high of predictable stool and a bamboo chair.
>> No. 438224 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 11:40 pm
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>>438222

I've been high enough on drugs that I probably almost died, but honestly there's no greater buzz than when you shout at a teenager to pick their litter up and they actually listen to you because they think you're an adult.
>> No. 438225 Anonymous
30th July 2020
Thursday 11:51 pm
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>>438219

Or keeping your mahogany deck tiles meticulously oiled and telling all your friends at your barbecue to be careful not to put scuffs in them.

A couple that I was friends with used to do that, especially the woman. Fucking annoying.
>> No. 438226 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 12:01 am
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Trying to cut down the weird evergreen that's in my garden. It's an ugly thing that's been growing horizontally taking up space and as it's non-native, not really contributing to the local ecosystem. I don't really have the right tools for it or the budget to get it done professionally so I am making a mess.
>> No. 438227 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 2:49 pm
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>>438226

The blackberries in the back garden here are coming nicely. They originally grew from random seeds probably shat out by a bird, and we decided to dig them up and put them in a different spot where they will have more space. Our neighbour just warned us that blackberry tends to grow profusely and quickly turns a garden into wilderness, but I quite like the idea of not having to drive out to a country road to pick blackberries.
>> No. 438228 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 3:40 pm
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>>438174
Wasn't too bad, had my temperature taken but didn't have to wear a mask since they have face visors etc
It's nice to finally have my head lighter though.
>> No. 438229 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 4:01 pm
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>>438227
I've had that problem with the raspberries but not the blackberries. Something like thirty raspberry suckers to one, maybe two blackberries from three of each plant this year.
>> No. 438230 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 4:21 pm
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Bit on the warm side today isn't it lads.
>> No. 438231 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 4:41 pm
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>>438230
TOO FUCKING HOT
>> No. 438232 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 4:53 pm
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>>438229

We were planning to plant a hedge towards our neighbour to the left who is a right cunt and we just want to see as little of him as possible. We were going to go with cherry laurel because it tends to grow densely, but its fruit are poisonous, and he has little kids that might pick and eat them. As much as we hate him, it's not a chance we want to take. So then I had the idea to just move the blackberry bushes there. There are just four of them now, but in time they should grow into an impenetrable hedge.
>> No. 438233 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 5:05 pm
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>>438231
The heat has got to everyone; it's like cunt off city today.
>> No. 438234 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 5:07 pm
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>>438232
A very messy hedge, plus if you're going to prune them annually for better harvests they'll be quite thin for a large part of the year. I know mine aren't really dense enough one-bush deep to hide the neighbours. Maybe if you double them up?
>> No. 438235 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 5:27 pm
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>>438234

I've just read up on one technique to multiply your blackberry bushes, and that is by tying canes to the ground, where they will spontaneously root in the soil and form new plants. Maybe in time they will grow thicker that way.
>> No. 438236 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 5:41 pm
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>>438235
It'll take some time but yes that should work.
>> No. 438237 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 6:58 pm
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"Sorry for the short notice but I'm going to cancel our date I'm going through some stuff etc etc."

Fucking women.
>> No. 438238 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 7:04 pm
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>>438237

>I'm going through some stuff etc etc.

Writeoff.
>> No. 438239 Anonymous
31st July 2020
Friday 7:46 pm
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>>438237
Something something mental slags.

RELENTLESSLY PURSUE HER.
>> No. 438244 Anonymous
1st August 2020
Saturday 9:43 pm
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IMG.jpg
438244438244438244
I have... "made use" of some of my garden fruit. Yes, the sediment level is fucked.
I have no idea if this counts as wine or cider so I don't know if I should age it a few months (I have some oak chip to add) to drink at room temperature or stick it in the fridge and drink it on hot days.
>> No. 438246 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 3:29 am
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>>438244
Those look great.
>> No. 438247 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 11:05 am
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>>438246
It tastes almost as good as it looks if quite sour. I'm not sure if that's just how it tastes, a result of being fermented "on the pulp" or if some lactobacillus got in there. Next batch I'll do off the pulp and be more rigorous about sterilising.
>> No. 438248 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 2:07 pm
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>>438247

It's worth investing in proper winemaking equipment. I did a few years ago, I've got over £500 worth of equipment in the basement, from a fruit press to an electric filter pump and a lever operated corking machine. It's an expense worth taking on if you want to make wine that's as good as what you find in shops.

An overly sour taste in your finished wine can be caused by too much acid in your fruit, or too little sugar added when you bottle it.

Lactobacillus is normally good, because it converts harsh tasting malic acid into lactic acid by way of malolactic fermentation. Lactic acid improves a wine's taste, and you'd have to allow your malolactic fermentation to go on for quite some time before the lactic acid becomes unpleasant.

As a rule of thumb, white grape wine and most fruit wine should have no more than 7g/l of acid, and the optimal acidity also depends on your alcohol and sugar content. It's called the "harmony triangle" of winemaking, it's basically the idea that acidity, alcohol and sweetness must all be in proportion to each other. Also, red berries often have quite high natural acidity, so you need to make sure you water it down enough when you start your wine.

For now, add a bit more sugar to your wine, and then see if that improves the taste.
>> No. 438249 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 3:18 pm
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>>438248
It's already thick with sugar but noted. I just started the second batch with less sugar, a higher percentage of blackberry, some tea for tannin and some chipotle because fuck it why not?

>you'd have to allow your malolactic fermentation to go on for quite some time before the lactic acid becomes unpleasant.
I managed to do that a couple of times with my rice wine already.

I can't afford any of that equipment but I'll try to keep the rest of that in mind.
>> No. 438250 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 3:44 pm
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>>438249

I didn't spend the 500 quid all in one go, but my hobby gradually expanded, from humble beginnings, when I tried to ferment a big bucket of cherries from my nan's garden for the first time with quite rudimentary means. The resulting cherry wine was a good start but was really kind of thin and mediocre tasting. And that's when I started gradually buying all the semi professional equipment I've got today.

You could have occasional luck finding used winemaking equipment on eBay or Gumtree. I once got a few used glass carboys from somebody for five to ten quid each.
>> No. 438251 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 3:54 pm
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>>438250
Okay.
There's no real reason I can't just add sugar at a later date if the aim is to sweeten it rather than just give the yeast more to ferment, is there? It seems like something that can be done right up until the last minute.
>> No. 438252 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 5:23 pm
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>>438251

Yes, if there is still some yeast in your wine, then adding sugar will probably feed the yeast, creating carbon dioxide, which can even cause a sealed bottle to burst.

That's why a filter pump is one of the basic pieces of kit you should invest in. With sterile filter pads, you have a good chance of getting every last cell out, and then you can safely add more sugar. There are hand operated so called simplex filter pump systems. Can't remember what I paid for mine back in the day, but it's not hugely expensive.
>> No. 438253 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 5:28 pm
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>>438252

I thought the yeast stopped producing co2 around the point there's too much alcohol in the mixture for them to be active. Alternatively it can be pasteurised or in some cases people put Campden tablets in to kill everything.
>> No. 438254 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 5:38 pm
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Got some ball deodorant today. It works very well. Previously on a day like today I'd be smelling my knackers by 2pm if I bent over, but they've remained neutral all day.
>> No. 438255 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 5:57 pm
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>>438253

Even if a yeast's alcohol tolerance threshold is reached, the yeast doesn't die off completely (it usually does though above 18-20%). Meaning it's enough if you have a handful of yeast cells still hanging in there at 14 percent to turn your wine into sparkling wine if it gets additional sugar.

Pasteurisation is not the best idea, even just heating your wine to 65°C, commonly the temperature threshold where yeast dies, will kill much of the flavour.

A bit of campden is in every wine you buy in a shop, around 0.05 to 0.1 g/l, because it inactivates yeast cells and prevents oxidation of the wine. But to really kill off the yeast and other microorganisms, you'd have to add so much of the stuff that it becomes undrinkable.
>> No. 438256 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 6:11 pm
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Does anyone want to swap neighbours? Mine were out in their garden last night with their kids until gone 1:30am and now they're out again, this time blasting out Baby Shark.
>> No. 438257 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 6:19 pm
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>>438254
Some what now?
>> No. 438258 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 6:41 pm
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>>438257
You can get stuff for your balls to make them less pongy.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/stores/Below+The+Belt+Grooming/page/0586E6AF-F90E-4141-9258-3448AE66D6DE?
>> No. 438259 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 6:54 pm
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>>438255
So I can drop some sugar into a glass of flat to make it bubbly?

I was confused as I'm sure I remember hearing last year about CO2 shortages affecting the price of beer but given that it makes the stuff in the process of brewing it doesn't seem to follow.
>> No. 438260 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 7:19 pm
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>>438259
CO2 naturally carbonates beer if it's bottled or kegged with extra sugar to allow it to carry on fermenting.
On an industrial scale beer is fermented entirely in large vessels, and then carbonated artificially CO2 when bottling, and in pubs it's dispensed using CO2 tanks to pressurise the kegs.
>> No. 438261 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 7:45 pm
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>>438258
This doesn't sound very healthy, lad. Your balls are a balanced ecology with bacteria keeping fungus at bay.
>> No. 438262 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 7:51 pm
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>>438258
Yeah but - if your balls are stinking by 2pm then you have something else wrong with you lad. Couple of days, same pants, I hear you, but if you're showering in the morning your nads shouldn't smell 6 hours later.
>> No. 438263 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 8:19 pm
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>>438261>>438262

Dip your balls in yoghurt.
Or yakult if you're some sort of dairy hating ponce.
>> No. 438264 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 9:34 pm
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>>438263
Just don't do what I did and use a Müller crunch corner. Those chocolate flakes are like sandpaper by the end of the day.
>> No. 438265 Anonymous
2nd August 2020
Sunday 9:37 pm
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>>438264
You clearly should have used the peach flavoured one - would have made your scrote smell sweeet.
>> No. 438266 Anonymous
3rd August 2020
Monday 3:21 am
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>>438262

I work outside, and walk/half run about 15 miles a day, and it was hot as fuck. I will not be shamed for my sweaty balls.
>> No. 438268 Anonymous
3rd August 2020
Monday 3:30 pm
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>>438266
Postlad?
>> No. 438269 Anonymous
3rd August 2020
Monday 3:40 pm
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>>438268
Don't be daft, since when as anyone ever seen a postman run.
>> No. 438270 Anonymous
3rd August 2020
Monday 5:29 pm
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>>438269
All my local posties have those electric-boosted bikes now. They don't even have to walk.
>> No. 438271 Anonymous
3rd August 2020
Monday 5:37 pm
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>>438268

Operations manager at an airport. I don't always work outside but times are tough.
>> No. 438272 Anonymous
3rd August 2020
Monday 8:48 pm
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>>438271

Do we have two airportlads on here, or are you also the lad who has made a number of insightful posts about air travel?
>> No. 438280 Anonymous
3rd August 2020
Monday 10:49 pm
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>>438272

I don't think we have another airportlad, but I'm definitely not the only one to have made aviation related posts here, there's a few avgeeks I think - I would assume the other two are the ones being insightful, where I am more likely to rant for six paragraphs about IATA mishandling yet another industry crisis, or about how commercial pilots are all objectively bad people.
>> No. 438281 Anonymous
3rd August 2020
Monday 10:52 pm
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>>438280
>commercial pilots are all objectively bad people.

Go on...
>> No. 438282 Anonymous
3rd August 2020
Monday 11:24 pm
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>>438281

I mostly only say that because it was a funny way to end a sentence, I don't have anything prepared, but - it's a job that above all else, requires two basic things; a propensity for extensive rote learning of methodical sequences of events, and a lot of fucking money. Some mental acuity and skill is required, but not as much as most people assume - basically a successful pilot is someone who really, really likes boring checklists and has rich parents. And that combination really only really breeds one personality, which is uptight, stubborn, snooty, and deeply uncreative.

You can't just spring a new loading plan on a pilot, no matter how well or how clearly you explain why it's better this way, if it appears to them that your decision didn't take four weeks of planning and a strict cross-reference of "The Rules", they will shut down. You might think a pilot should be able to think on their feet, but they really can't, and aren't trained to - every emergency situation is rehearsed, is enacted step by step.

That in itself doesn't make them bad, but take that rigidness, that inability to accept that there might be more than one method to reach the same result, or, god forbid, a better result entirely than the one they're familiar with - combine that with a privileged upbringing, a set of parents willing to drop 120 grand on their kid's training for a job, then combine that with society's view of that job as an aspirational, elevated position - and you end up dealing with largely middle aged men with the minds of spoiled children who would throw a fit if you try to embellish their bedtime story instead of reading it word for word.

I was too hasty to say "all" pilots, some are actually great, you can usually tell straight away the ones who are in it because they just fucking love planes, and you can certainly tell the ones who took a loan out to fund their licenses (though even those ones can sometimes turn into cunts by the time they're actually flying)

These nice ones aren't necessarily rare, but they're certainly outnumbered and overshadowed by their self-important, and often quite clueless counterparts. The bad ones have no interest or knowledge whatsoever of the operation beyond their flight deck - they know how to drive the plane pretty well but sit on the ground, angrily confused as to why you have to find and remove a passengers bag if the passenger isn't travelling, completely unaware of the mechanisms or even just logic involved in the whole process.

I think 'entitled' is a very overused word to describe difficult people, but there is no better substitute here.

I might sound bitter, angry, or even jealous here - I swear I'm not. I've never had an argument with a pilot, it's not worth the effort. They tried to throw their weight around when I was new, demanding to speak to my supervisor. But if I actually ever gave them my supervisors number to call, or passed them my radio, they would always back down immediately. It doesn't take very long at all to lose respect for people who act like that, and it is, unfortunately, a great many of them - and certain airlines seem to breed it worse than others, I can't say I'm too cut up about BA pilots losing their jobs, put it that way.
>> No. 438283 Anonymous
3rd August 2020
Monday 11:27 pm
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>>438282

I didn't know I had that much to say, fucking hell. TL;DR it's a class thing
>> No. 438285 Anonymous
4th August 2020
Tuesday 12:01 pm
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>>438282

>That in itself doesn't make them bad, but take that rigidness, that inability to accept that there might be more than one method to reach the same result, or, god forbid, a better result entirely than the one they're familiar with

Isn't that dangerous when you're on board and in charge of an airplane? I think I saw on an episode of Seconds From Disaster that inflight safety procedure standards were amended after a particular air disaster, when it emerged that part of the reason why the plane may have crashed was that cabin staff were afraid to tell the flight captain when they observed that there was something wrong with the plane. Something to do with knowing your place as a lowly glorified waitress.


>combine that with a privileged upbringing, a set of parents willing to drop 120 grand on their kid's training for a job

Does being a pilot really still pay well enough to justify it as a lifetime investment? I mean, compared to other careers like a corporate executive, where you spend between £30K and 40K on a bachelor's and master's degree but often go on to earn an upper five-figure, or often even a six-figure income. You hear a lot these days about airlines cutting costs.
>> No. 438288 Anonymous
4th August 2020
Tuesday 4:34 pm
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>>438285
>Does being a pilot really still pay well enough to justify it as a lifetime investment?

No it does not - and there are literally multi-year waiting lists for jobs, even if you get past the interviews; it's something that people really really want to do. A co-pilot on a regional airline is earning areound £40k, it goes up one you're a captain and goes up further when you get to 737s and suchlike. In the old days the transatlantic routes were the best paid, but not at the moment.

It isn't the high paying specialist job it used to be - you do it because you love it, travelling, the lifestyle. Many airlines effectively run their pilots on zero-hours contracts..
>> No. 438289 Anonymous
4th August 2020
Tuesday 5:38 pm
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>>438285

>when it emerged that part of the reason why the plane may have crashed was that cabin staff were afraid to tell the flight captain when they observed that there was something wrong with the plane.

Things have definitely improved since then, the purser (cabin manager, head trolley dolly) is pretty much just as legally responsible for safety on board, and communication between them and the captain is very much encouraged.

Emergency procedures are just mostly checklists now, if a cabin crew member alerted them to an issue there'd be a list to flick through to verify and/or fix the problem, not to mention planes are covered in sensors more than they ever have been, there's not many issues that could/would escape the flight deck computer's attention, but who knows.

>Does being a pilot really still pay well enough to justify it as a lifetime investment?

What >>438288 said, basically no. There are (or were, pre covid) airlines that would entice pilots into their pool with big money, but even then - especially then - there's a waiting list like you wouldn't believe. I've heard cargo pilots get a good gig, but I don't really interact with many of them (the ones I do are gruff eastern europeans who smoke in the cockpit, no point asking them) to verify.

60k-100k as an experienced captain on a profitable type rating (737 or 321) is about right, but it's the lower end of that estimate these days, you'd be doing very, very well to hit six figures now as a career captain. My ground based colleagues and people in roles such as mine end up better paid than most of our pilots, even without factoring in their upfront costs, simply because there isn't a queue around the door for our jobs like there are for theirs. It's a bit weird really.

Most people reading this probably earn more than a relatively inexperienced first officer on a regional airline like Eastern or Flybe (RIP), especially if you factor in that they're paying for their own training/type ratings, which they often do.

Personally I don't see the appeal of sitting on your arse for 3 hours staring at nothing or following a line on a chart, I get the views are nice and all that but it's a lot nicer to go home to my own bed after work every day.
>> No. 438294 Anonymous
4th August 2020
Tuesday 9:42 pm
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I thought I'd try Tinder again after many years.

It was a mistake, of course, but unexpectedly I get most of my likes from China. Well outside my search distance but apparently the app lets you search from wherever now which rather defeats the point. I'd say most of those are from Hong Kong but I doubt it's women looking to make British friends for when they can move over.
>> No. 438296 Anonymous
4th August 2020
Tuesday 11:15 pm
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>>438294
Presumably its blackmail/spying/personal data theft? I can't see why else you would get so many hits from there.
>> No. 438297 Anonymous
5th August 2020
Wednesday 10:43 am
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As if shit weren't already bad enough, now I've got fucking shingles. I'm in a lot of pain.
>> No. 438299 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 3:48 pm
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>>438294

> but unexpectedly I get most of my likes from China. Well outside my search distance but apparently the app lets you search from wherever now which rather defeats the point.

At the start of the pandemic tinder made the previously tinder plus/gold only "Swipe from any location" feature available to everyone. Apparently they've made it plus/gold only again but they have added a new "swipe globally" feature which allows you to see and swipe on people who have also turned this feature on.

It seems to be part of their continuing pivot from "hookup" app to dating app to what now seems to be some kind of "make new friends globally" app. I mean, it's not like anyone sane is actually going to be hooking up with strangers from tinder given the current climate so I guess they had to do something to remain somewhat relevant.
>> No. 438301 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 6:01 pm
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>>438297
I can empathise. I'm currently having to deal with my first case of gout and it's infuriatingly painful, every time I look at it it twinges.
>> No. 438303 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 6:09 pm
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>>438301

I too suffer from gout, it's fucking awful, not least because it makes me feel properly old.

I've found eating cherries (or drinking cherry juice, I suppose) really does help to soothe an attack. Perhaps the lowest point of my life was hobbling around my kitchen eating Kirsch cocktail cherries out of the jar, but it certainly made it a little more bearable.

Hope it goes down soon for you.
>> No. 438307 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 7:02 pm
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>>438303
I got told this by a Spanish friend. Where can I get cherries, even out the jar? Presumably any reasonably sized tesco? Might try and buy some cherry juice from somewhere too, thanks lad.
>> No. 438308 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 7:17 pm
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>>438307

Tesco will certainly have some sort of cocktail cherries, probably fresh ones too, and I've seen the juice in bigger ones. I recently bought a 1kg bag of dried cherries on the internet somewhere, probably Amazon, but I'm yet to see if they offer the same sort of relief.

It's probably also worth seeing if you can find a bag of frozen ones somewhere - I'd bet Iceland would have them, if not a big Tesco.

I also will bet good money Holland and Barratt will do a cherry powder or pill of some sort. I was thinking of looking myself.
>> No. 438309 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 7:22 pm
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>>438308

I was right about H and B, though predictably not cheap.

https://www.hollandandbarrett.com/shop/product/holland-barrett-cherry-effect-capsules-60030409
>> No. 438311 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 8:41 pm
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>>438308
I remembered that my pal left some bourgeois sour cherry gin mixer at mine last week. 20% sour cherry juice, we'll soon see.
>> No. 438314 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 9:10 pm
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How the hell do two people on this website have gout? What have you been eating?
>> No. 438315 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 9:18 pm
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>>438314

Fillet steak and Rioja for breakfast everyday.
>> No. 438316 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 9:21 pm
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>>438314
The GP told me gout cases are up across the entire practise. Could be a case of less exercise because of quarantine making people more susceptible to uric acid build up in the joints, but maybe I was eating too much red meat and drinking too much wine. Specifically, I was eating a lot of minute steak because I've been on a Japanese cuisine kick of late and have eaten a lot of beef ramen and gyudon beef bowl, which goes great with Gran Reserva IV rioja.
>> No. 438318 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 9:23 pm
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>>438314
Rich man's disease innit, mods are all London poshos.
>> No. 438322 Anonymous
6th August 2020
Thursday 9:59 pm
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>>438318
We literally drink Port for breakfast every day.
>> No. 438330 Anonymous
7th August 2020
Friday 10:14 am
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Decided to give up drinking as for the past month I've been averaging about 15 units a day. I don't have a physical need to drink, I'm just bored and lonely and it kills time.
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