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>> No. 26241 Anonymous
16th March 2018
Friday 7:12 pm
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So I've got a weird one here, I'm self employed and work a full time day job, I'm also a fitness nut obsessed with weights and running, I do nothing I enjoy and sleep 3-5 hours a night. I look like a zombie and suffer from constant fatigue, How do I allow myself to have free time? There's ALWAYS something productive I could be doing. Can't justify having more sleep or playing a game that requires anymore than 10 minutes attention, when I could be working out or growing my business.
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>> No. 26243 Anonymous
16th March 2018
Friday 7:31 pm
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Been there, done that, lad.

Let me tell you right now - you can justify more sleep and more downtime, because you literally need it to continue functioning.

Burnout is a very real thing - corporations invest millions in ensuring their leaders do not burn out. You don't have that luxury. If - when - you hit the wall, your business is directly in jeopardy. You need to act now to preserve it.

You're asking for advice, which hopefully means you're willing to act on this - for the next seven days, you will get eight hours+ sleep a night. Try and take an hour a day to do basically nothing, too, though I appreciate you might not be able to do both. Just try it for one week. If you don't feel better, then you can try something else. But I suspect you'll find you're more effective than ever if you do this.

You need to sleep just as much as you need to eat or breathe. You're harming yourself by forgoing it. Just trust me on this one. I lost a good chunk of money and a good chunk of sanity doing the same thing you're doing. Something has to give - and if you carry on down this path, that something will be your revenue. It may mean you have to offload some busywork to someone else, or slowing your expansion down. I understand both of those things probably sound unthinkable to you, but it's what's needed. As I say, you need to act now, or you absolutely will burn out.
>> No. 26244 Anonymous
16th March 2018
Friday 8:01 pm
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3-5 hours a night? Fucking hell, I'm surprised you haven't dropped dead. Get some kip, all the guns and business in the world isn't worth sacrificing your health.
>> No. 26246 Anonymous
16th March 2018
Friday 9:45 pm
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>>26241
I've been there and done that with that kind of mentality - it isn't the best approach to building your business and will end in tears. As you say, you look and feel like a zombie. You're too driven to think that resting or looking after yourself is "useful" time, but that way madness lies.

You clearly want to take some good care of yourself, hence the fitness - try and associate mental fitness with that too. By having proper rest, slowing down just a touch and making time for your mental health, you'll grow your business faster.

Have spent many years of my life self-employed so I know exactly where your head is at.
>> No. 26248 Anonymous
16th March 2018
Friday 10:00 pm
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>>26246

It's usually counter-productive to work at the expense of sleep. There's a reason why lorry drivers have a tachograph in the cab - sleep deprivation severely impairs your judgement and concentration. Sometimes you've got no choice but to cut back on sleep to meet a crucial deadline, but if you're chronically sleep deprived you'll start making expensive mistakes without realising it. Before you know it, you're working all hours for no real benefit, because your productivity has plummeted due to fatigue. You'd get more done in less time if you just caught up on your sleep and set a more sensible schedule.

Personally, I'd bin off the gym and get more time in bed. You only need about an hour of moderate exercise per week to stay healthy. You can get that exercise by just doing household chores or walking to the shops. Time spent sleeping would have a much more positive impact on the business than time spent in the gym.
>> No. 26249 Anonymous
16th March 2018
Friday 10:08 pm
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You could speak to a therapist, not because you're unwell, but because they'll help you figure out why you're working so hard. Once you figure out why you're working so hard, you'll be able to figure out how to learn how to switch off. This is just an idea, I've not been in your shoes before.
>> No. 26254 Anonymous
16th March 2018
Friday 10:59 pm
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>>26248
>It's usually counter-productive to work at the expense of sleep.

You're right, and I'm not the OP, but I found that I often did my best work between 10pm and 2am, because it was so peaceful and quiet, I didn't have any distractions and I just like working at night. Still do. If you have a work/lifestyle which can support that pattern, its really alright - what the OP describes is quite different though. Agree completely with all your other points though.
>> No. 26258 Anonymous
17th March 2018
Saturday 12:35 am
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>>26254

Also not op but I have also always done my best work, and my brain is most active, through the 10pm -> 6am window. This probably stems from having to use the dialup internet after midnight when it was only half a pence a minute instead of 2p a minute or whatever it was during the day.
>> No. 26263 Anonymous
17th March 2018
Saturday 1:54 am
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>>26258
Christ I'd forgotten about that. Remember when we used to think people with broadband were like Olympian gods?
>> No. 26268 Anonymous
17th March 2018
Saturday 2:21 am
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>>26258
You're probably right that that is exactly where I learned it from - in my late teens I used to aspire to a thing called BT Midnight Line - it was something like 500 quid to install and another 500 quid per quarter, but all the calls were free between midnight and 6am. I regularly used to get £1000 phone bills in those days.
>> No. 26293 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 2:04 am
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>>26268

Then you're a much much older lad than me. By the time I was ruining my my GCSE coursework marks by staying up hacking until 6am every damn night Telewest Broadband were offering a flat rate all you an eat (but we might disconnect you every two hours) dialup deal for about £12. My mother, being about as mathematically useful as an abacus with no beads refused to pay that amount and instead paid roughly twice that despite my religious fucking adherence to the post-midnight rules. For God's sake I used fucking usenet where you log in once a day and download a days worth of messages once a day ... imagine reddit but with 24 hour lag. Those were the days.

Obviously once I left home my mother installed fiber optic broadband for her to fuck around on friends reunited and facebook and take about a thousand cocks from people she used to know from school. Septuagenarian slag that she is.

I don't know if I should tick sage or just try to smash my own head in with a saucepan at this point.
>> No. 26294 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 2:17 am
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>>26293
>an abacus with no beads
>fucking usenet where you log in once a day

Those were indeed the days. I once spent almost £1000 on one of these modems, a Trailblazer, because it had a special UUCP protocol mode so that I could download internet news (usenet) and mail at 9600 baud, rather than the prevailing 2400. First proper tech investment I ever made, cost me the fucking earth but saved a ton of cash on the phone bill. I think I still have it somewhere.

We have veered off into a /g/ thread when we should be helping the workaholic OP. Unless you're him. In which case, please don't smash your face in with a saucepan, I think we might have figured out why you're working so hard.
>> No. 26296 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 3:01 am
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>>26294

I'm not OP so don't worry and let me bash my own head in in peace. I've been a topsy-turvy fucked up workaholic since I was about fourteen, only I was spending all my time on reading every single back issue of Phrack and trying to find a single extant copy of the MS DOS Int 21h programming interface reference manual (that I bought on Amazon for a quid a few years ago just as a sort of trans-temporal gift to me twenty years ago) in the any of London borough libraries.

I'm entirely off topic here, and veering wildly into meta-/g/ territory as you said. As a 50% business owner and co-founder of my own company the only advice I can offer to OP - who is probably about a decade younger than I am, is to try to enforce a routine on your day. As a father I have had to work hard on diving my day into "hours daddy works, hours daddy plays with lad, daddy must be off the computer by 10pm, daddy must be in bed by midnight, daddy must not inject methamphetamine into the vein under his cock because there's a $500k deadline coming up in four days time and daddy really doesn't have time to eat or sleep or drink anything that isn't tepid Stella until daddy can put that $50k dividend into the new car or new wedding rings or whatever else it is that mummy wants this time".

Jesus the more I write the more I want to just go and find that saucepan.

> I once spent almost £1000 on one of these modems, a Trailblazer, because it had a special UUCP protocol mode so that I could download internet news (usenet) and mail at 9600 baud, rather than the prevailing 2400.

I haven't googled so I'm just using my own brain here but I'd guess that was between 1988 and 1993...... at which point I believe you could have bought a new car, or a least a decent deposit on one with that kind of money. Even in the late 90s a grand was a lot more money than it is now.
>> No. 26297 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 3:09 am
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>>26294>>26296

I was going to post a story about waiting for me mam to get off the phone so I could go on Habbo Hotel or Totse but I think I've been shown up by you lot.
>> No. 26298 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 3:25 am
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>>26297

Ignore us ancient nerds. I remember a mate of mine trying to get his rocks off on habbo hotel (he was an original Yahoo Chat don) and all these idiots talking "leetspeak" with afros and whatnot and the whole pool closed thing.

It was years later when I was well into my twenties when I found wtf 4chan was and if I'd known what it was in 2003 then I would have rm'd it off the face off the planet in a heartbeat.

Moot would have been, ah ha, moot.
>> No. 26299 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 3:26 am
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>>26296
>between 1988 and 1993

Spot on lad - I could have spent the money on far more "useful" things. NO REGRETS AT ALL (to cross over into another thread).
>> No. 26300 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 3:31 am
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>>26298

I know I'd have enjoyed the whole newsgroup era very much, but I'm glad that my 12 year old self was only really posting under forum names, and not my full name and email address a la usenet.

Habbo was great, though I was too young then to even want to try and have cybersex. I remember posting in some sort of sex chatroom from my WAP enabled Nokia at some point, though.
>> No. 26301 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 3:42 am
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>>26300
> but I'm glad that my 12 year old self was only really posting under forum names, and not my full name and email address a la usenet.

Thing were very different back then, until the iPhone / Facebook coup in 2007 using your real name on the internet was actually advised against by everyone from governments to childrens' charities.

Back in the 90s it wasn't not only far easier to get an anonymous email address (no backup email and definitely no mobile number needed) but SMTP source spoofing was still very much a thing. I could post to usenet as cookie.monster@seasame.street without all that much hassle if it'd amused me.

While not as easy to code as reddit or irc bots, newsnet / uucp bots were definitely some of the most reliably hilarious. I remember some chap who ran a bot that alerted him every time his name was used so he could pop up in the thread within minutes like some early 90s digital Moriarty/Macavity.
>> No. 26302 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 3:44 am
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>>26299

Then you must be at least a decade older than me or had a very rich dad. You might very well be the owner of the "oldest lad on britfa" medallion. If you'd given me a grand in that time period I would probably have got my calculator out and worked out via decimal points how many penny sweets that amounted to.
>> No. 26303 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 3:52 am
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>>26301

>using your real name on the internet was actually advised against by everyone from governments to childrens' charities.

I tried to avoid it for so long, I really did. The only thing I think I have right now is my facebook, which is so information sparse it might as well not be there. But people my age don't seem to trust you if you don't have a facebook, hilariously.

My real frustration is if I google myself far too many pictures of actual me come up, because it's sort of a thing to do 'press' (very loose term) photos and 'meet the team' type things in my field. All just sat in obscure corners of pages that have no reason to still exist. It makes it hard to disassociate with the flaming wreckages I've crawled out of in the past. I'm not a fan.
>> No. 26304 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 4:03 am
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>>26303

> My real frustration is if I google myself far too many pictures of actual me come up, because it's sort of a thing to do 'press' (very loose term) photos and 'meet the team' type things in my field.

Working in very specialized IT I know where you're coming from. I haven't been involved in that many photoshoots but I've been known to duck behind a colleague when a photo was taken, put in a sick not, and (once) turn up so horribly hung over and probably still drunk that they let me sit the photoshoot out.

> But people my age don't seem to trust you if you don't have a facebook, hilariously.

Sounds about right. I'm old enough to not have any social media but for someone in the 15-25 age group I would imagine that not having snapchat/facebook/instagram would be a massive red flag for anyone you were trying to make friends with.

Sort of like not having a skype in 2012 or an MSN in 2008 or an ulcer in the Kali Yuga God damn communists.
>> No. 26305 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 4:20 am
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>>26304

>I haven't been involved in that many photoshoots but I've been known to duck behind a colleague when a photo was taken

I'm one of the resident cheflads - I did a bit of that back in the day but even since I started being a head/exec/development chef I often get a nice big solo fucking headshot on the site and sent out to industry rags. I did try to protest this once by insisting I have a fag in my mouth but it turns out they found that charming. It's one big incestuous industry anyway so it's amazing how many people on the inside recognise you from this sort of shite. And once you've been namechecked in
a review by one of the newspapers it's all anyone ever sees. There's a particularly horrendous picture of me shaking hands with a dairy farm executive in front of a cow. I hate everything about it.

>Sounds about right. I'm old enough to not have any social media but for someone in the 15-25 age group I would imagine that not having snapchat/facebook/instagram would be a massive red flag for anyone you were trying to make friends with.

It's exactly that. I've been actively criticised for not uploading to my instagram often enough. "I was worried about you".
>> No. 26306 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 4:51 am
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>>26302
>a decade older

Fairly sure I'm not the oldest though.
>> No. 26307 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 4:58 am
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>>26300
>but I'm glad that my 12 year old self was only really posting under forum names

That is exactly why this site exists. I was posting all over the internets in those days, I used the web on its first day because I had the same computer as TimBL (trust me, it lives in the shed as a historical artefact, but I don't have a working screen for it anymore) and my very first website got indexed within the first few months on the two indexing services that existed.

I was a gobby little fucking shite in those days and I quickly realised that I needed to rein it in, or everything I said would be indexed and there to see, forever. This site exists, to save all the other gobby little fucking shites from using their real names.

I have never had that much truck with Anonymous (except the suits) but I deeply, honestly, passionately believe in anonymous.
>> No. 26308 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 5:22 am
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>>26307

>This site exists, to save all the other gobby little fucking shites from using their real names.

I'm quite sure this fact has saved my arse many times over. I've discussed some fairly sensitive issues here, from shagging my boss to mild tax fraud. Even a whiff of a screen name might have caused problems.

It's odd that we still manage to feel like a weird little community without identities to back it up.

>but I deeply, honestly, passionately believe in anonymous

My friends mostly don't understand why I get so worked up about encryption and the snoopers charter and all that stuff, which is all the more disheartening when my facebook feed is filled with them commenting on public posts with their varying extremes of political and personal views. What a world we're in.
>> No. 26309 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 5:25 am
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>>26308
>What a world we're in.

I think the Guardian story today about Cambridge Analytica scraping a zillion Facebook profiles is very relevant to this discussion. That is the world we live in. There is nothing surprising about that story, I have been scraping websites for years at work and (mis)using that data - everyone is at it and nobody (consumers) really understands the impact of that.

We are so not encouraging the OP to get more sleep. Pretty sure we are enabling him at this point.
>> No. 26311 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 5:34 am
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>>263>everyone is at it and nobody (consumers) really understands the impact of that.

For my friends at least, it's worse than that - they just don't care. Anything that seamlessly makes their life a little easier is worth their entire identity, apparently. Perhaps they just aren't thinking about it enough to realise the horrifying implications, but I'm starting to suspect they're just not that bothered. I hate to use the 'slippery slope' argument, but we're already halfway down the mountain at this point.

>Pretty sure we are enabling him at this point.

Possibly. If it helps, OP, I'm only awake because I'm unemployed // on self funded sabbatical // semi retired. You should probably get some rest lest you end up like me.
>> No. 26312 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 5:53 am
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>>26311

>Cambridge Analytica

While I'm at it, this in particular reminds me of the all but retired phrase 'sheeple'. It's so fucking accurate now. No dystopian novellist's vision of the future came even close to postulating that society at large might become it's own behavioural prediction algorithm. Or that with a couple of weeks and an AWS account you, or even I, could put together a way to harvest and utilise public opinion as a commodity. Genuinely we're at the "pre-crime" prediction stage of the dystopian novel and we've managed to use it for something even more sinister.
>> No. 26313 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 6:10 am
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>>26312
Scraping Facebook profiles is fucking easy - there are a couple of brilliant books by Tim Shipman, which talk about the recent election and then the Brexit vote. Full of detail, excellent books, genuinely, even if you only have a passing interest in politics.

He talks about a fake "football game" that one of the Brexit groups did - during the process, people shared/gave permission to access their Facebook and that scraped all the persons data, and critically, all of their friends data.

It's a common trick and facilitated by FB being historically sloppy with their APIs (oh and also not giving a fuck about privacy). Separately, I have worked for a company in the charity sector which did exactly the same thing. This stuff is endemic.

Once you have a couple of hundred thousand suckers who have Facebook, you can easily walk their graph and get millions of peoples details.
>> No. 26315 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 6:24 am
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>>26313


>>26313

>people shared/gave permission to access their Facebook and that scraped all the persons data, and critically, all of their friends data.

This is something I only became aware of relatively recently. Here's the 'privacy' page that controls this. From the language they use "bring your info with them" - nice and vague, that - to the fact that I genuinely have no idea whether these checkboxes mean 'yes' or 'no', it's all hilariously shady. When people started claiming the facebook app was listening to people to serve adds, facebook and the rest of your lot were pissing themselves laughing, knowing that there'd not even be any point in doing that, since users give them more data than they'll ever need right there on the page.

I'd say I'm deleting my profile, but it's not like there's any point.
>> No. 26316 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 6:29 am
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>>26315
It is utterly fucked up - the "Platform" thing is a whole other level of obfuscation.

GDPR will help to a certain extent in that the fines are so large they will have to do something. But its still a clusterfuck of a business model and consumers just don't get that.
>> No. 26317 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 11:47 am
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>>26248
>It's usually counter-productive to work at the expense of sleep.

Exactly this. OP, sounds like you may be running yourself for emotional reasons. Get that looked into, then think up more practical recovery schedules. The attached book, Stress For Success, addresses this directly.

"You can only train as hard and as often as that from which you can recover."
>> No. 26318 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 11:49 am
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Reading you lads talk about the state of anonymity in today's world warms my heart a little.

Regarding Facebook- I changed my name for a laugh on new years eve 2011. I never changed it back because I realised the joke name I'd chosen made me nearly impossible to find without being told.

Hilariously, Facebook now thinks that is my real name, and won't allow me to change it back.
>> No. 26323 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 5:13 pm
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>>26318

I can't keep a non-real-name facebook account to save my life. I need some fake ID. I guess you got in just before the cutoff point.
>> No. 26326 Anonymous
18th March 2018
Sunday 5:40 pm
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>>26323

They aren't legally allowed to require your real identity in Germany so use a proxy to sign up.
>> No. 26359 Anonymous
22nd March 2018
Thursday 10:36 pm
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>>26326
I met someone today who claims that if you use a German proxy for Twitter, it filters out most of the nazi/right-wing bots, as they have to by law.
>> No. 26360 Anonymous
23rd March 2018
Friday 12:40 am
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>>26359
>> No. 26361 Anonymous
23rd March 2018
Friday 2:33 pm
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>>26359

Yes, their freedom of speech laws make it a felony to spread Nazi propaganda.

I cancelled my facebook account two years ago. It was just beginning to get on my nerves. I am in touch with all my real friends via whatsapp or linkedin or e-mail or telephone, so I saw no more point in being pretend-friends with some 80-odd people on facebook. And all the shitposting they did.

Also, you may think facebook is the product when you join as a user. A way to connect with people. But in reality, you are the product that is marketed to facebook's commercial clients. You and your personal information, your interests, likes, whatever you post, is just one big giant direct marketing database.

I have no sympathy with people who now cry foul at what is now supposed to be some sort of data privacy scandal. This is what you signed up for when you joined facebook. Precisely this. People doing whatever the fuck they want with your personal information.
>> No. 26362 Anonymous
23rd March 2018
Friday 2:41 pm
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>>26361
Oh my god, this guy's figured it out! He's an unconventional genius!
>> No. 26363 Anonymous
23rd March 2018
Friday 2:53 pm
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>>26361
Of, look, it's this old ill-informed shitpost again.
>> No. 26367 Anonymous
23rd March 2018
Friday 6:38 pm
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>>26363

Pardon? What exactly is ill informed about it? Little bit edgy perhaps but even my mum is cottoning on to the fact that social media is a marketing con.

Tell us again why Facebook is actual an empowering tool of user freedom and connected lifestyle opportunity potentials, shill lad.
>> No. 26368 Anonymous
23rd March 2018
Friday 7:18 pm
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>>26367
>What exactly is ill informed about it?

>This is what you signed up for when you joined facebook. Precisely this. People doing whatever the fuck they want with your personal information.
>> No. 26369 Anonymous
23rd March 2018
Friday 7:32 pm
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>>26367

>an empowering tool of user freedom and connected lifestyle opportunity potentials

It doesn't take much to realise that that in itself is pure unmitigated marketing hogwash.

However, you can't say that Mark Zuckerberg isn't an evil genius, having conned billions of people on the planet into what could well be the biggest racket in history. Only, a racket normally implies fraudulent and/or illegal behaviour. Maybe that's his true genius. Doing all that, and it was perfectly legal.
>> No. 26370 Anonymous
23rd March 2018
Friday 8:18 pm
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>>26369
I wouldn't say perfectly legal. Though, if we use the same old tired bullshit that the likes of Facebook like to spout, we could say they're merely a platform for people to do illegal things.
>> No. 26371 Anonymous
23rd March 2018
Friday 8:36 pm
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>>26370

You're right in that in some cases, providing the premises for a crime to be committed is just as illegal.

Like when you provide a web site where paedos can share kiddie porn. It doesn't matter if you yourself are a paedo and trade said kiddie porn. It's enough that you were involved in that sort of thing by providing a place on the Internet for them to share their filth.
>> No. 26485 Anonymous
11th April 2018
Wednesday 2:34 am
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OP here, I've stopped running as much because I've fucked up my knees (from running too much). I've also stopped setting an alarm to wake myself up when I can afford to do that. I've gained an extra 1-2 hours sleep daily.

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