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>> No. 26536 Anonymous
26th April 2018
Thursday 7:14 pm
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I'm starting to worry a bit about my Dad.

He retired about a decade ago after doing manual labour all his working life and he seems to be slowly falling apart ever since then. He's been diagnosed with osteoporosis and has the bone strength of someone twenty years older than him, which has led to having lumbar surgery. He's on the borderline of having blood pressure and cholesterol issues. I saw him at the weekend and he seems to be developing a bit of a stoop; he's not frail by any means but he's no longer the big strong man I remember from growing up.

Anyway, it's more his mental state I'm concerned with. He's always been a bit on the slow and forgetful side but it is noticeable that he's becoming even more doddery. When I speak with my Mum she jokes about it and how she's having the same conversation with him repeatedly, but that's always been the way she deals with things. It's weird, but ever since I can remember I've always expected that he'll go senile one day.

I'm not entirely sure what I'm aiming to get out of this thread. Obviously the next step is to broach with my parents about setting up Lasting Powers of Attorney in case they're ever needed but that's all I can do, really.
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>> No. 26537 Anonymous
26th April 2018
Thursday 8:18 pm
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>>26536
>Anyway, it's more his mental state I'm concerned with. He's always been a bit on the slow and forgetful side but it is noticeable that he's becoming even more doddery. When I speak with my Mum she jokes about it and how she's having the same conversation with him repeatedly, but that's always been the way she deals with things. It's weird, but ever since I can remember I've always expected that he'll go senile one day.
Sounds a bit like my nan. Dementia is frustrating, not least because during onset the poor bugger doesn't realise it's happening, and actually trying to get them to be tested can be a battle in itself. In her case, it took several assessments and eventually a very public fall before the diagnosis was made. If you can, have some serious talk with your mother, because she will almost certainly bear the brunt of it and it will be distinctly unpleasant.
>> No. 26546 Anonymous
29th April 2018
Sunday 3:36 pm
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>>26537

My granddad started becoming "funny" as he himself called it when he was about in his late 60s. One of the first warning signs that I noticed was that he was confusing the names of his grandchildren. Calling me Alan, while my actual name isn't even remotely similar. But more worryingly, my granddad didn't have any grandson called Alan at all. Nobody in our entire family was called Alan.

And then things like, one of his rituals for many years used to be popping down to the newsagent's down the street every Sunday morning to get the paper, but when his dementia started, he would call my nan on his mobile phone halfway to the newsagent's and say that he couldn't remember where he wanted to go.

My granddad was fully aware what was happening to him, and it depressed him noticeably as the illness progressed. He was a financial manager in his working life, so he used to be somebody with a sharp mind for numbers and all the small details, and when he got dementia, all of that sharpness of his mind faded away. My nan stuck by him, which was hard enough. He then died of a heart attack suddenly about two years later, so at least he died before the dementia turned him into a complete mental vegetable.

Dementia is a shit way to go. Because it destroys the person you used to know slowly one day at a time. And the more intelligent and sharp a person used to be while they were in good health, the more shocking the effects will be.
>> No. 26553 Anonymous
29th April 2018
Sunday 10:39 pm
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Dementia is shit. I've seen lots of people in the ward, pieces of meat without any higher mental functioning, kept alive only by invasive treatment without any chance of recovery. Why keep those meatbags alive is beyond me. I already signed a DNR and in case something bad happens my cardiologist has the unofficial order to just administer a lethal dose of Oramorph by mistake. I hope he has the balls to do that if it is needed.
>> No. 26554 Anonymous
29th April 2018
Sunday 10:56 pm
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>>26536
>she jokes about it and how she's having the same conversation with him repeatedly
Yep, that's early dementia. Sorry dude. Good that you are planning for it now.

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