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>> No. 5761 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:35 pm
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Evening, Mumsnet lads.

I'm running low on ideas of what to read to my son [7]. We're working our way through the Mr Gum books and if I can't think of something when we're finished my other half will probably subject him to Enid Blyton. We've read The Hobbit and all of Ronald Dahl's books for children but I don't know where to go next, possibly Harry Potter (although I've never read them so I don't know what they're like) or maybe something by Terry Deary as he's obsessed with ancient Egypt. Goosebumps?

I'd be grateful for any tips. Any books you were particularly fond of from your childhood?
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>> No. 7134 Anonymous
7th May 2020
Thursday 9:21 pm
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>>7133

I enjoyed them but agree with your sentiment. It's been a while since I read them but he's only supposed to be a knob cos his dad's missing, which didn't resonate with me at all since I was very pleased my dad was missing.
>> No. 7135 Anonymous
7th May 2020
Thursday 9:40 pm
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>>7133
A lot of 'book smart' people are educated fools who lack common sense and emotional intelligence. As a swot in school I can safely say that a lot of us were twats.
>> No. 7147 Anonymous
7th July 2020
Tuesday 11:02 pm
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Laddo didn't wake up until about 3:15 this afternoon. Bought him a few Garth Nix books to keep him going and evidently he decided to read a couple of them last night/into the early hours of the morning.

He's watched the Artemis Fowl film on Disney+ and he said it was terrible.
>> No. 7148 Anonymous
8th July 2020
Wednesday 1:05 pm
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>>7147
I'm still punishing myself by trying to finish the Keys to the Kingdom series. Currently in the middle of having stopped reading Sir Thursday about six months ago.
>> No. 7149 Anonymous
8th July 2020
Wednesday 3:33 pm
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>>7148
He's read the first four Old Kingdom books this week so far, plus a fair chunk of the Nome trilogy. I picked up Mister Monday in a second-hand bookshop a few years back and now he's suddenly into Garth Nix again he's asking for all of the Keys to the Kingdom books.

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>> No. 6963 Anonymous
14th April 2019
Sunday 7:43 pm
6963 Books by women
It's dawned on me that, other than a novel written by a former work colleague, I haven't read a book written by a woman in over a decade. This hasn't been a conscious decision, it's just that the books I've tended to gravitate towards happen to have been written by men. However I feel I should make a conscious effort to read some, even if it's just to gain a different perspective on things.

Where should I start? Virginia Woolf? Jane Austen? Fleur Jaeggy? Dorothy Parker? Arundhati Roy? Olga Tokarczuk? Stella Gibbons?
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>> No. 7142 Anonymous
17th June 2020
Wednesday 12:36 am
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>>6964
"Robin Hobb", continuing the long line of female authors writing under male or ambiguous pseudonyms, has a phenomenal body of work in the Fantasy genre, most notably the multiple self contained trilogies in the Realm of the Elderlings universe. Each trilogy tells its own story but they all fit together to form a wider canon. It's a master class in how to write a cohesive universe.
>> No. 7143 Anonymous
17th June 2020
Wednesday 3:29 am
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>>7142
I haven't looked it up, but I heavily suspect Chris Wooding is a burd tbh.
>> No. 7144 Anonymous
17th June 2020
Wednesday 8:37 am
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>>7143

She's not much of a looker.
>> No. 7145 Anonymous
17th June 2020
Wednesday 10:18 pm
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>>7144
Respect women with beards mate, it's 2020.
>> No. 7146 Anonymous
18th June 2020
Thursday 4:34 pm
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The Children of Men by P. Do James is a cracking short read. If you've seen the (excellent) film, the book is interesting for how profoundly different the characters are. It's set in 2021 and some parts are eeriely realistic, such as the trend of treating newborn animals like actual children. Weirdo Americans practically do this already.

It's a novel that leaves me a bit wistful. James evidently could write well about much broader topics than crime and it makes me wonder what else she could've produced had she experimented a little more. I suppose publishers don't share this perspective.

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>> No. 7088 Anonymous
27th April 2020
Monday 10:55 am
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If you had to pick 10 books (or series) that everyone should read at least once in their lifetime what would they be?

Pic unrelated.
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>> No. 7127 Anonymous
30th April 2020
Thursday 8:43 am
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>>7126
Alright there, Keith
>> No. 7128 Anonymous
30th April 2020
Thursday 8:53 am
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>>7127
Gone too soon.
>> No. 7129 Anonymous
3rd May 2020
Sunday 7:55 am
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>>7125
It's a fascinating book. I live in an area of Hampshire that is surrounded by MOD land - they own tons of the place (and give it to eco warriors to manage when they're not using it).
>> No. 7130 Anonymous
3rd May 2020
Sunday 9:24 am
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>>7126

>Technological Slavery - Theodore J. Kaczynski

You're on a list now.
>> No. 7131 Anonymous
3rd May 2020
Sunday 9:29 am
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>>7130
I remember reading it at the time it was published - if you didn't know who the writing was by, and what he was up to, it's actually well written.

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>> No. 7076 Anonymous
19th January 2020
Sunday 10:07 pm
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When I am supreme ruler anyone who annotates a book will be strung up from the nearest lamppost.

I was just about to start reading Nights at the Circus but when I've opened it up I've found out that an absolute mouthbreather has underlined passages of text or circled words they've needed to look up, like pinions, Nordic and hubris. This is the second book I've bought like this; the previous occasion was The Debt to Pleasure, which was mainly comments about how they hated the protagonist. I know there's the risk when you buy second-hand books, but for actual fuck's sake.
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>> No. 7082 Anonymous
21st January 2020
Tuesday 7:57 am
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>>7079

Wasn't House of Leaves based on a similar idea?
>> No. 7083 Anonymous
21st January 2020
Tuesday 1:18 pm
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>>7082
They're both terribly gimmicky but at least HoL doesn't come with faux-aged looking pop-out bullshit.

>>7081
I hope you manage to stay awake long enough to enjoy it, it's a good book. Wise Children is probably more easy reading, in my opinion.
>> No. 7084 Anonymous
21st January 2020
Tuesday 7:21 pm
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>>7079
I got up to finishing the introduction, because it was like reading notes on a lecture. Then the novel proper began and I got bored trying to keep track of the two parallel stories happening to the protagonist and the margin-scribblers.

I think it's the most effort-intensive book I've ever read, starting with having to remove it from the separate sleeve it comes in, to dealing with all the inserts and a fucking code-wheel, to not only reading two stories at once but keeping track of the colour of the ink they use in order to date precisely when in the story they are writing the note. Christ.
>> No. 7085 Anonymous
22nd January 2020
Wednesday 4:30 am
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>>7082

I remember people I sort of respected posting on facebook that HOL was the most mind-fucking book they'd ever read. I didn't read it, but I also wasn't sure what to make of such a statement.
>> No. 7086 Anonymous
22nd January 2020
Wednesday 11:22 am
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>>7079
>conceived by J. J. Abrams

I guess that tallies up with all the posts calling it gimmicky bullshit.

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>> No. 5456 Anonymous
4th April 2014
Friday 3:02 am
5456 Vurt
This was really good.
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>> No. 7044 Anonymous
3rd September 2019
Tuesday 1:09 pm
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https://www.wired.com/2015/04/silk-road-1/
https://magazine.atavist.com/he-always-had-a-dark-side

These aren't books though. Doesn't make it worse, it's well written.
I'm sort of guilty rooting for the DPR. Less so with PLR; still, mildly fascinated.
>> No. 7054 Anonymous
11th October 2019
Friday 5:40 pm
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Geoff Thompson's Watch My Back. Quite brutal stuff in there.
>> No. 7055 Anonymous
13th October 2019
Sunday 3:25 pm
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If we were the other place I would have posted the usual 'What I have / What I expected / What I got' strip.
I had thought it would be another 'tales from the operating suite' kind of book. It wasn't; turned out to be a memoir of some fellow on his path to becoming a neurosurgeon, interwoven with a guide on meditation.
Its official site calls it 'part memoir, part inspiration, part practical instruction'. I find this description fitting.
>> No. 7056 Anonymous
14th October 2019
Monday 8:51 pm
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Started reading Old Wizard Moore's Jerusalem. Really enjoying it. Best thing I've read in a while but only 10% into it according to my kindle so will see how it progresses.
>> No. 7074 Anonymous
4th January 2020
Saturday 12:23 am
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It's standard Jon Ronson fare, but it's making me re-evaluate how much time I spend on the internet. In particular, whether I need to have my phone almost always with me when I'm at home which I'll be checking constantly. It's a bit of a waste, 4eally.

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>> No. 6943 Anonymous
8th February 2019
Friday 12:03 pm
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How do I go about writing a book?

I've got a loose idea in my head an undercover officer infiltrates a group, possibly someone like the Democratic Football Lads Alliance, only for it descend into a farce as it turns out 90% of the members are undercover officers who don't want to blow their cover. So far the end result in my head is that the organisation ends up gaining lots of members because the officers make the group seem much larger than it would be otherwise and they're so adept at bureaucracy that they run the group far more efficiently than it would otherwise be. This is the point where you tell me this idea has already been done and far better than I could ever hope to write it. but I'm not entirely sure where to go from here.

Thanks, lads.
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>> No. 7060 Anonymous
25th October 2019
Friday 12:04 pm
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G K Chestertons The Man Who Was Thursaday might be worth a read. It sounds essentially the same but the ending - more a mystery around who's undercover and who's not, and a bit of talk about anarchy. It's pretty short. Might be helpful.

I've always wondered about writing; whether you should have something to say that your characters revolve around or if it should be nothing more than a story. I can see both aproaches being boring for a reader.

How well does screen writing theory translate through books? The anatomy of a story kind of thing?
>> No. 7061 Anonymous
25th October 2019
Friday 1:52 pm
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>>7060
It's the same basic theory but the way most screenwriters phrase it all makes me cringe.
>> No. 7062 Anonymous
25th October 2019
Friday 2:22 pm
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>>7060
I've never seen anybody reference Chesterton outside of the early Deus Ex fandom but I welcome it. It's like he stepped in from an alternate dimension where Arthur Conan Doyle wasn't insufferably dull.

>How well does screen writing theory translate through books? The anatomy of a story kind of thing?
Screen writing theory is (with the exception of modernist filmmakers - you know the ones) largely based on classic literary structure. Joseph Campbell constructed the model of the "monomyth" or "hero's journey" that has been so ubiquitous throughout the ages that it's difficult to shake it when watching film or engaging with formulaic prose once you're aware. That's not to say it's tacky or overdone, just overly reliant on plot linearity rather than individual character exposition to flesh out the book/film universe.
>> No. 7063 Anonymous
25th October 2019
Friday 6:32 pm
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>>7061
You have to chat bare shit in the visual arts, it's the only way.
>> No. 7064 Anonymous
26th October 2019
Saturday 1:27 pm
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>>7062
> I've never seen anybody reference Chesterton outside of the early Deus Ex fandom
Not who you're responding to but DX was how I got exposed to Chesterton's work.
There's something else I'd read written by him, something that was quite profound and even more so given that it was written a hundred years ago. Can't fucking recall what.
Sage for veering off-topic.

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>> No. 7049 Anonymous
23rd September 2019
Monday 4:08 pm
7049 Everyday writing
How to hit the sweet spot between being too terse and milling the wind with unnecessary embellishments?

I can't help but notice that I'm lacking in clear expression of my thoughts sometimes. Add the perception that the texts I write and my speech seem somewhat... torn. Like a mosaic assembled from shite glass pieces instead of being fluid like water, perhaps covering area a bit excessively yet getting where it should get.

I cut the bullshit and it's the aforementioned mosaic. I add a bit of fluff and it's a load of bollocks.
Help lads. Some folks write really bloody well, I could read their posts all night. What's the trick?

Immediate sage for crass autism. Also not sure if this should go here or in /uni/.
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>> No. 7050 Anonymous
23rd September 2019
Monday 5:23 pm
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What immediately stands out about your post is that you don't seem to understand how paragraphs work, or what they're for. It's not just breaking sentences up for easy reading; the sentences are placed together in a paragraph to carry a through-line thought or idea from beginning to end. What you've got there is two paragraphs split into four, with the ideas only just about in order.
>> No. 7051 Anonymous
23rd September 2019
Monday 6:38 pm
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Despite his rather lacklustre ability to knock out flaccid suburbanite horror on an annual basis, Stephen King's "On Writing" is a cracking read for anybody looking for a bit of guidance on how to tackle the ennui that clings to writers just like you, '80s drug binge notwithstanding.

Give it a look.
>> No. 7052 Anonymous
24th September 2019
Tuesday 11:14 am
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>>7050
Noted.
> with the ideas only just about in order.
The irony innit? This stuff is one of the reasons I posted this request.
>>7051
I'm not a writer in a sense that I don't write books. That's why the 'Everyday writing' post title.
I'm looking for a method to improve my shitpostingwriting overall as well as fleshing out what's on my mind better.
Would that book still be of use?
>> No. 7053 Anonymous
24th September 2019
Tuesday 11:33 am
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>>7052
I think you'd be better off learning about speech and rhetoric. Have a look on here https://www.thegreatcourses.co.uk/ for some lecture series that appeal to you then go to piratebay and download them.

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>> No. 6796 Anonymous
4th October 2018
Thursday 12:37 am
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What features of book covers are a tip-off it's going to automatically be a terrible book? I think good-looking people, models and six-packs.
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>> No. 7022 Anonymous
16th July 2019
Tuesday 5:22 pm
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>>7021
The threads are leaking again! It's much better than that, I assure you. Naturally I won't be sharing since I don't want Charlie Brooker to nick it.
>> No. 7023 Anonymous
16th July 2019
Tuesday 5:30 pm
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>>7022
Mate, saying "dibs on Konnie" didn't actually make her your fiancé.
>> No. 7024 Anonymous
16th July 2019
Tuesday 5:51 pm
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>>7023
Close but no cigar. It's actually about a team of gay Scottish footballers who moonlight as costumed superheroes in their spare time. It's called 'Power Bottom Rangers'.
>> No. 7025 Anonymous
16th July 2019
Tuesday 6:31 pm
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>>7024
I wasn't keen on that episode of Black Mirror.
>> No. 7026 Anonymous
16th July 2019
Tuesday 6:38 pm
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>>7025
It's been terrible ever since the yanks got hold of it to be fair.

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>> No. 7008 Anonymous
25th June 2019
Tuesday 4:43 pm
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Have you ever read a book where someone's attempt at a local detail was wrong and threw you out of it? I was reading pic related and for the UK bits, the South African author had been busy name-dropping Eastenders and things, then there was a bit in a hospital and she said it had Laura Ashley couches. In any hospital I've been the seating just has to be waterproof. Laura Ashley would definitely look out of place, unless private hospitals are different or something.
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>> No. 7012 Anonymous
25th June 2019
Tuesday 6:17 pm
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Olaf Stapledon tries to imagine the history of humanity over the next two billion years but many reviews recommend you skip the first four chapters or so because of how laughably inaccurate his account of the near future is; the book was published in 1930.

France and Britain end up in a catastrophic war, with Germany seen as the main peacebroker of Europe. Nuclear power is discovered but it is then all the research is promptly destroyed so it can never be used as a weapon of war, so First Man ends up building a religion and rituals around coal powered aeroplanes until everything goes to shit when they run out of sources of energy.
>> No. 7014 Anonymous
26th June 2019
Wednesday 12:47 pm
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>>7012
>First Man ends up building a religion and rituals around coal powered aeroplanes until everything goes to shit when they run out of sources of energy.
>laughably inaccurate

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>> No. 6989 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 12:24 am
6989 Realm of the Elderlings
This series has had an odd draw on me. I don't recall how I got on to the books, but I started with Assassin's Apprentice almost when it came out, read on with Liveship Traders and the Tawny Man and then it slumbered.

About a year ago I learned that Fitz and the Fool was done, read the trilogy, realised that I'd missed Rain Wild Chronicles and read that and now I'm working my way backwards again through Liveship Traders. I'll have to touch Tawny Man and Farseer again eventually, I think, just for completeness, but the prospect fills me with joy. Re-reading the books with the foreknowledge of what happens and where it goes is a joy in itself, but comparing what I got out of the story when I was basically a teenlad versus what I now realise is going on. I'm gushing, and hence I'm reluctant to touch the confined Tawny and Farseer trilogy again, but outside of Pratchett this is the first time I'm genuinely enjoying re-reading books.

Do you have books you read before, thought done, then touched again and learned something new?
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>> No. 7003 Anonymous
30th May 2019
Thursday 12:37 am
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I should've just picked a picture of Tintagliaa random fantasy trope.
>> No. 7004 Anonymous
30th May 2019
Thursday 5:54 pm
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>>6989
> Do you have books you read before, thought done, then touched again and learned something new?
Some of the books I'd been reading as a teenlad, yes.
A casual glance turned into a full-blown re-read once. There were certain moments I just didn't notice back then due to insufficient life experience.
>> No. 7005 Anonymous
30th May 2019
Thursday 6:48 pm
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I thought Winston was literally shot until i read it a second time.
>> No. 7006 Anonymous
30th May 2019
Thursday 8:22 pm
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>>7005

In my head, I can only hear the name Winston in a West Indian accent.
>> No. 7007 Anonymous
30th May 2019
Thursday 11:51 pm
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>>7006

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>> No. 6881 Anonymous
5th January 2019
Saturday 7:04 pm
6881 Why is British literature so shit?
Dickens literally sucks dick.
Why haven't we had a smash hit since good ol' Willy Shakespeare?
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>> No. 6911 Anonymous
7th January 2019
Monday 8:22 am
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>>6901
The Quiet American is a very good film. It's based on a work by Graham Greene, who, incidentally, is a superb British novelist.
>> No. 6912 Anonymous
7th January 2019
Monday 3:25 pm
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>>6911
I've only read his Our Man in Havana. Midly amusing and just had some bits I could relate to.
>> No. 6913 Anonymous
7th January 2019
Monday 5:26 pm
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>>6912

The Travels With My Aunt film was decent. I have the book but didn't get around to it yet.
>> No. 6914 Anonymous
7th January 2019
Monday 6:53 pm
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>>6898
Fair points.
>> No. 6959 Anonymous
24th February 2019
Sunday 6:11 pm
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Dickens isn't a great example of prime British literature. IIRC, Orwell said that he (Dickens) was out of touch with real life because he'd done nothing but write for a living. So he needed to fill pages with melodrama and conversation in lieu of description, which is what I, and probably plenty of others, dislike about him.

I personally will look at a book by a British author before anything else. Not that there aren't plenty of stinkers out there, but other writers don't ever reach the same level of proficiency with their language. I'd even argue that they exceed the best writers in non-English languages, although of course I'm biased.

>Why haven't we had a smash hit since good ol' Willy Shakespeare?

That would be Harry Potter, whether you want to admit it or not.

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>> No. 6918 Anonymous
23rd January 2019
Wednesday 8:49 pm
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I'm tempted to get an Audible subscription for an hour commute every working day. Thing is, I'm a little unsure on how good it is in terms of selection and value-for-money as I'm a tight git with a fear of commitment. Either of you two tried it and can tell me how good the experience was?
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>> No. 6919 Anonymous
23rd January 2019
Wednesday 8:53 pm
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>>6918
My mate wont shut the fuck up about it, he doesn't have the attention span for books for some reason. He says it's great.
>> No. 6920 Anonymous
23rd January 2019
Wednesday 9:16 pm
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I find it's good for long walks where I would like to be reading, but obviously can't do that and cross the road safely at the same time. That and for falling asleep to, I have a small speaker that I connect my phone to and usually listen to a chapter in bed to wind down. It seems listening while lying down with my eyes closed in complete darkness is more effective for getting me to sleep than keeping my eyes open reading in bed, which usually turns into me reading a lot longer than I should and missing a sensible bedtime. I haven't cancelled my subscription since I got it but I try to really get the most out of the fee by buying audiobooks that are at least 20 hours or longer. Anything shorter than that and you'll have burned through that month's credit and be left with nothing to listen to.
>> No. 6921 Anonymous
23rd January 2019
Wednesday 9:20 pm
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>>6918

They seem to have a good range and they have a 30 day trial period, I don't see the harm in just trying.
>> No. 6922 Anonymous
23rd January 2019
Wednesday 11:14 pm
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>>6921
> I don't see the harm in just trying.
That's what Big Audiobook want you to think.
>> No. 6923 Anonymous
23rd January 2019
Wednesday 11:28 pm
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There are over 130,000 audiobooks available on Audible. That selection includes a surprisingly small amount of crap, because recording an audiobook to Audible's standards is relatively expensive.

The basic subscription is £7.99 a month, which gives you a credit to download one new audiobook per month. You can keep that audiobook forever and unused credits do roll over to the next month. It's not cheap, but it's reasonably good value. They have a very generous returns policy - if you don't like a book, you can get your credit back and choose another one, no questions asked.

If you're on a very tight budget, you might want to check out your local library. For the benefit of blind people, libraries tend to have a good selection of audiobooks, although you'll need to rip them from CD. Most libraries also have an online collection of e-books and audiobooks that you can borrow using the Libby app, but the selection is usually limited to a small number of popular titles. You just download the app and log in using your library card number.

Or you could just torrent stuff.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.overdrive.mobile.android.libby

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/libby-by-overdrive/id1076402606?mt=8

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>> No. 6878 Anonymous
2nd January 2019
Wednesday 6:24 pm
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Evening, lads.

I'm after recommendations, but I can't explain exactly what I'm after. I guess it can be called pop science/maths or perhaps even science/maths humour. Something that uses concepts to explain various matters rather than "Here's 20 wacky scientific facts to boggle your brain!"

I'm considering picking up The Indisputable Existence of Santa Claus by Hannah Fry and Thomas Evans.
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>> No. 6893 Anonymous
6th January 2019
Sunday 10:38 am
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>>6892

It's a mildly amusing conceit - the book explains complicated bits of science using only the thousand most common words in the English language. It's a spin-off from the "Up-Goer Five" comic. Fine if you like that sort of thing, but I don't imagine it would be particularly illuminating.

https://xkcd.com/1133/
>> No. 6895 Anonymous
6th January 2019
Sunday 11:25 am
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I think you'll probably like The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets . It's mostly average but quite enjoyable.

Genome: the Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters was good, though some of the science is dated and the author's awful politics shine through (more pop sci). I really liked Paradox: The Nine Greatest Enigmas in Physics and similarly 13 Things That Don't Make Sense: The Most Baffling Scientific Mysteries of Our Time. Though humour wise I imagine We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe would be better though I haven't read it yet.

A Short History of Nearly Everything and it's unofficial "sequel" An Optimist's Tour of the Future: One Curious Man Sets Out to Answer "What's Next?" were both good.

I actually really want to read The Code Book by Singh. It's about how they deciphered hieroglyphics.

>>6880
His other book I'll think you'll find it's more complicated than that is also good. It's a collection of his newspaper columns.
>> No. 6896 Anonymous
6th January 2019
Sunday 12:12 pm
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>>6893

Reading that comic made me feel like I was being patronised by someone much thicker than me. Sky bag air, indeed.
>> No. 6897 Anonymous
6th January 2019
Sunday 12:17 pm
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>>6893
I don't think comic/webcomic illustrators translate well into books. For example, David Squires' weekly comic in The Guardian is brilliant and topical but I've got a couple of his books and it just quite doesn't work as well.

The again, there's plenty of people who don't succeed when they try different formats; Lucy Worsley may be an excellent historian and TV presenter but her books are below par.
>> No. 6909 Anonymous
7th January 2019
Monday 1:55 am
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>>6878
The Drunkard's Walk by Leonard Mlodinow.

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>> No. 6825 Anonymous
26th October 2018
Friday 11:37 am
6825 The 48 Laws of Power
I'm vaguely intrigued by this book although I haven't finished it yet. Is there an argumentative criticism of it anywhere?
Some stuff in it I've witnessed myself, several points contradict other 'advice' in this book - which I find a bit ironic but I always can rationalise that different situations require different approaches - and some just feel contrived and overboard. Perhaps not at Hollywood though.
It seems to have attracted a noticeable following within the alt-right circles which is... well, curious.
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>> No. 6844 Anonymous
27th October 2018
Saturday 5:03 pm
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Can the federation replicate latinum or do the space jews somehow make it un-replicatable?
>> No. 6845 Anonymous
27th October 2018
Saturday 5:08 pm
6845 spacer
>>6844
That energy has to come from somewhere, it's probably a net loss to replicate it.
>> No. 6846 Anonymous
27th October 2018
Saturday 11:17 pm
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>>6844

In my headcanon replicators can't replicate any elements heavier than iron, since anything heavier than that requires more energy to fuse than is released by its fusion. That's why it's possible to replicate food, but not, say, entire starships. Starships utilise heavier elements.
>> No. 6847 Anonymous
27th October 2018
Saturday 11:57 pm
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>>6846

Chakotay replicates Janeway a Pocket Watch for her birthday in the End of Time special and she chastises him for wasting power. It can be done, it's just greedy on the dilithium and at that time they were on rations which I think he saved up and spunked all at once.

What is interesting is that you can recycle replicated items, but I don't know what the loss conversion is. There will be a loss, that much is obvious. The Star Trek Encyclopaedia would probably know.
>> No. 6848 Anonymous
28th October 2018
Sunday 5:04 am
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>>6846

The gold in gold-pressed latinum is frequently referred to as "worthless" in DS9, so replicators are clearly capable of producing heavy elements economically. I assume that there's some kind of quantum handwaving that makes latinum uniquely difficult to replicate.

>>6847

Voyager is a bit of an edge case, because they're stranded light years from Federation territory. Within the Federation (even on the outer edges), it seems that most things are negligibly cheap - in Explorers (DS9 S03E22), Sisko and Jake built a Runabout-sized starship for shits and giggles.

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