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>> No. 14213 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 12:32 pm
14213 Heinz Woolf, rip
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-42378765

I used to adore The Great Egg Race - it was one of those Friday evening, BBC2 events that any thinking person used to watch (see also, The Adventure Game).

They don't seem to make programs like this anymore - I guess Scrapheap Challenge is the nearest. WHY?
Expand all images.
>> No. 14214 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 1:55 pm
14214 spacer
>They don't seem to make programs like this anymore - I guess Scrapheap Challenge is the nearest. WHY?

TV audiences have become more conservative, because they have more choice. Back when there were only three or four channels, people would take a chance on something a bit outside their comfort zone, because there wasn't much of an alternative. Today, people can just flick over to Dave or More4 and watch something they know they'll like.

Something like The Great Egg Race or Scrapheap Challenge is more expensive than a conventional quiz show and will almost certainly get lower viewing figures.

Linear TV is creatively spent. The economics simply don't allow you to take creative risks. All of the interesting stuff is happening on Netflix and YouTube.
>> No. 14215 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 2:12 pm
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>>14214
>Linear TV is creatively spent. The economics simply don't allow you to take creative risks. All of the interesting stuff is happening on Netflix and YouTube.

Agree with you - one of the weird aspects of modern life is that my family rarely sit together and watch TV - many evenings now, each of us are quietly sitting in a different corner of the house consuming YouTube/something similar. I am happy that we have the choice, the technology is amazing, but something of the communal nature of watching TV is being lost.
>> No. 14216 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 2:53 pm
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>>14215
Is that element of Gogglebox entirely constructed, do you think? Do those families never otherwise watch television together?
>> No. 14217 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 3:13 pm
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>>14216

Plenty of people do still watch lots of linear TV as a family. The problem is that the most discerning viewers are switching to on-demand viewing, which has started an inescapable vicious cycle. Dumber audiences lead to dumber programmes, which chases more intelligent people away to on-demand, which leads to dumber audiences and dumber programmes.

Another major factor is multi-screening. Those families sat around the TV are often barely paying attention, but doing something else on their phones or laptops. When people are using the TV as moving wallpaper, broadcasters have a strong incentive to make programmes that are attention-grabbing and easy to follow. We're seeing more telegraphing, repetition, and explanatory voiceover, because the assumption is that a large proportion of viewers will miss a lot of what's happening on screen.

For non-linear content, the expectation is completely different. If you're watching YouTube on your laptop or you've chosen a programme from Netflix, you're much more likely to be actively watching. You're far more likely to pause the programme if you're interrupted, or rewind if you've missed something. You're also more likely to be watching alone than as a family group, so there's less incentive to target the lowest common denominator.
>> No. 14218 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 5:15 pm
14218 spacer
They don't make Scrapheap Challenge any more, either, do they?
>> No. 14219 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 5:40 pm
14219 spacer
>>14218
Everyone in the country who had the prerequisite skills had already been on it once so they had no choice but to stop making it.
>> No. 14220 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 6:35 pm
14220 spacer
>>14219
Well, it's been ten years, so there must be some new blood.
>> No. 14221 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 6:46 pm
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>>14220
New blood?
I'd put together a team, if only I could find another 3 people my age who know which end of an angle grinder to hold.
>> No. 14222 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 6:53 pm
14222 spacer
>>14221

There has to be something to be said for a .gs team.

I can weld and do electric stuff.
>> No. 14223 Anonymous
16th December 2017
Saturday 7:23 pm
14223 spacer
>>14219
The Scrapheap teams were always mighty impressive at what they could put together - Egg Race was a little bit lower down the difficulty scale, and was done in a studio, but was a very similar idea.
>> No. 14224 Anonymous
17th December 2017
Sunday 3:01 am
14224 spacer
Modern audiences don't like to see people do things well, it makes them feel bad about themselves. They like to see amateurs making a complete hash of things and either being humiliated for their hubris or applauded for their mediocrity. If you were to reboot Scrapheap Challenge, you'd need to have celebrity teams who have no idea what they're doing. The general public hate to see beardy blokes with trade skills, but they'd quite like to see Christopher Biggins cut his thumb off with a reciprocating saw or one of the cheeky girls setting fire to herself with an acetylene torch.

If you want a picture of the future, imagine a C-list celebrity falling over - forever.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNcW2mWXb2E
>> No. 14225 Anonymous
17th December 2017
Sunday 3:21 am
14225 spacer
>>14221

I'm a jack-of-all-trades master-of-fuck-all type of fella, but I do have a high level of laboratory proficiency in both analytical chemistry and biology, which must be a transferable skill for something. I can draw diagrams real good.
>> No. 14226 Anonymous
17th December 2017
Sunday 10:52 pm
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Scrapheap Challenge was a right sham.
They always found exactly the right bits they needed just in the nick of time.
>> No. 14227 Anonymous
17th December 2017
Sunday 11:01 pm
14227 spacer
>>14226
Yeah, like, if they were building a vehicle that needed an engine, they would find exactly the kind they needed in perfect working order in the destroyed shell of a car, obviously planted there by the producers.
>> No. 14228 Anonymous
18th December 2017
Monday 12:13 am
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>>14227

I mean, I'm sure there was plenty of fuckery going on, but you'll find plenty of working engines in real life scrapyards.
>> No. 14230 Anonymous
18th December 2017
Monday 1:31 pm
14230 spacer
>>14224

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKPz583WRpQ

Your future is already here. I think a celebrity version of this would work really well.
>> No. 14231 Anonymous
18th December 2017
Monday 4:49 pm
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>>14224
>they'd quite like to see Christopher Biggins cut his thumb off with a reciprocating saw or one of the cheeky girls setting fire to herself with an acetylene torch.

I'd watch it.

Maybe this is how Gladiators got started in ancient Rome; first came the struggling remake with an outdated format, then they got C-list celebrities in to perform ever more extreme bush-tucker challenges for the ratings.
>> No. 14232 Anonymous
20th December 2017
Wednesday 9:04 pm
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>>14226
>>14227
>>14228

One time they had to make zepplin/hot air balloons, and a team just happened to look in a car boot and find huge sheets of some fucking silvery aeronautical tarpaulin stuff to craft into a balloon.

You just have to picture the real life situation where a man chucked his car away, then got home all like 'Oh crumbs, I forgot that NASA UFO bedsheet shit I drove a falling apart car many hours away to buy from some kind of specialist source. I can afford only to buy a new car, or new UFO clingfilm, but not both.'

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