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>> No. 14523 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 11:18 am
14523 Spanish spies 'tracked Carles Puigdemont via friend's phone'
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/mar/27/spanish-spies-tracked-carles-puigdemont-via-friends-phone

>Sources in Spain’s National Intelligence Centre (CNI) told Spanish media outlets that the surveillance team had used the geolocation service on the mobile phone of at least one of Puigdemont’s companions to monitor his movements, as well as fitting a tracking device to the Renault Espace the group had been travelling in. Twelve CNI agents were involved in the operation.



Just to remind you what kind of world we live in.
Expand all images.
>> No. 14524 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 11:30 am
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>>14523
Quite.

Very poor operational security though.
>> No. 14525 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 11:41 am
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>>14523
A world where the government uses phones to track fugitives? Whatever next, police arresting criminals?
>> No. 14526 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 11:54 am
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>>14525

>Whatever next, police arresting criminals?

The horror.
>> No. 14527 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 12:20 pm
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>>14523
A state moving to quash sedition without bloodshed? You mean to point out how good we have it, correct?
>> No. 14532 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 2:09 pm
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>>14525
>A world where the government uses phones to track fugitives?

Quite the British police have been doing this for years. The just don't announce it publicly because tipping people off that you can track them defeats the point.
>> No. 14533 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 2:44 pm
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>>14532
I have worked with the police in a professional capacity quite a lot over the last year - the amount of data they have access to on people, even normal, average police officers, not like specialist security services, is truly amazing.

They get everything about you nowadays, with little or no effort on their part.
>> No. 14535 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 3:41 pm
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>>14533

There's a whole list of people who have access these days, from your local council to the ambulance service.
>> No. 14536 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 4:41 pm
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>>14535
I know some of you like to think otherwise, but I really don't think councils can access internet history of any sort, not under RIPA and not if the IPA and its ICRs ever enters force. Domains visited are traffic data.

It looks like the government cracked down on council snooping and there are now half decent safeguards for what they can do.

https://actnowtraining.wordpress.com/2016/09/27/ripa-and-communications-data-iocco-annual-report/
>> No. 14537 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 4:41 pm
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>>14533
>>14535

Am I the only one who is genuinely troubled by this?

Why should the government, any government, be allowed to store and keep all that information about me?

And don't give me the whole "TO CATCH THAR TERRISTS AND THEM". I am neither a daft militant wog nor do I plan to ever become one, and nor should it be for a government to say that I might be one without them knowing about it.
>> No. 14539 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 5:12 pm
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>>14536
The part about keeping and making available ICRs has been in force for almost 18 months already.
>> No. 14540 Anonymous
29th March 2018
Thursday 5:39 pm
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>>14539
As a bonus, the parts criminalising exceeding the limits have not yet entered force.

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