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>> No. 16317 Anonymous
2nd November 2018
Friday 5:16 pm
16317 Ryanair's new hand luggage policy slated on social media
https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/ryanair-hand-cabin-luggage-baggage-change-social-media-twitter-facebook-reaction-a8613141.html


Ryanair’s latest change to its cabin baggage policy has triggered plenty of criticism on social media.

Europe’s biggest low-cost airline has reduced the amount that passengers can take through security to the departure gate without paying extra. Instead of one large and one small bag, travellers are restricted to one “mid-sized” bag.

To carry anything more substantial, they will either need to buy Priority Boarding or pay a fee for checking in luggage.
Expand all images.
>> No. 16318 Anonymous
2nd November 2018
Friday 5:29 pm
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>>16317
I guess my Ryanair miles account is going to stay at 0 for a bit longer.

I honestly don't get why airlines make a fuss about checked luggage, since pretty much every time anyone has examined it they've found that restrictive hold luggage policies just results in more and heavier cabin baggage, which both delays boarding and changes the weight distribution of the aircraft.

If they're going to do this, then their pricing will need looking into, because if you're going to advertise a headline price then that needs to be achievable, and I'm not sure a reasonable person would accept the resulting no-fee scenario as realistic. Who flies from the middle of nowhere in the UK to the middle of nowhere in Europe with nothing more than a large handbag? I could see a case for business travel, but then why would any business traveller fly Ryanair when they could fly literally any other airline?
>> No. 16319 Anonymous
2nd November 2018
Friday 6:34 pm
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>>16318

The free bag allowance (40x20x25cm) is perfectly sufficient for a long weekend if you know how to pack.
>> No. 16320 Anonymous
2nd November 2018
Friday 6:43 pm
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>>16319

It's certainly sufficient for a stag do in Riga where all you do all weekend long is get pissed out of your skull and fuck Russian table dancers.
>> No. 16321 Anonymous
2nd November 2018
Friday 7:03 pm
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>>16319
If you're a filthy layabout who wears the same underwear ten days in a row, maybe. Also, that allowance is considerably smaller than the generally accepted standard for "cabin size" bags. In fact, I think it's smaller than the already-smaller-than-usual case I had to pick up for Flybe's non-standard allowance (which is at least explained by the aircraft they use rather than general money-grubbing).

How does this square with online check-in? As I understand it, if you make it to the gate with your luggage intact, the airline is no longer in a position to charge you for anything, while they remain under the obligation to convey you and your luggage to your destination. Certainly any time I've flown with a technically oversize bag in cabin, the worst that's happened at the gate is that I've been asked to volunteer my bag for the hold at no charge, which I generally haven't done due to the general shitshow that is trying to retrieve your bag after the fact. If my bag is in the bin or under the seat in front, I know where it is and I know nobody's going to lose it.
>> No. 16323 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 1:48 am
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>>16321

> If my bag is in the bin or under the seat in front, I know where it is and I know nobody's going to lose it.

Also, I usually put one change of underwear and a fresh T-shirt in my carry-on bag together with all my toiletries, so that if my suitcase is misrouted, at least I will not spend the first few days of my holiday feeling and smelling like a filthy bum.

That said, my luggage has only been lost once, and it was on the flight home. I was coming home from the Caribbean on a KLM flight via Amsterdam, and I guess my suitcase got misplaced in Amsterdam and was put on the wrong flight from there. A few days after I got home, I got a call that they had tracked down my suitcase, and that for some reason it was in Prague. So another two or three days passed until I was told to go back to Stansted and collect it. I was given a £50 gift voucher to compensate me for my troubles and for having to drive 100 miles from Nottingham.
>> No. 16324 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 3:29 pm
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>>16323
>That said, my luggage has only been lost once, and it was on the flight home.
That certainly is the best time for it to happen. Earlier this year my stepdad's case didn't arrive in the Canaries with him. Apparently those first couple of days were not fun.
>> No. 16325 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 5:21 pm
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>>16319

I've done a long (Friday evening to Monday night) in a bag of 55x25x35, and that included electric shaving gear, swimming stuff and my general propensity to overpack.

40x20x25 is a bit on the small side, though. They really do want to force you to either bring nothing extra or buy a baggage upgrade - even for a three night weekend.

4 pairs of socks, 4 underwear, two shorts/trousers (depends on climate), 6 t-shirts, and if you're going somewhere a bit nippy a jumper to pop on in the evenings.

Once you've got all that in there bad there isn't a lot of space for your super mini secure toiletries kit, extra keks for when all that foreign food makes you shit yourself, light rain coat if it starts pissing down. Extra socks.

No wonder traveling gives me a panic attack.
>> No. 16326 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 5:28 pm
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>>16325

Why do you need six t-shirts for four nights?
>> No. 16327 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 5:33 pm
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>>16326

Because you don't know how to eat with decorum, rain, someone bumping into you with a pint of lager in their hands. If you go somewhere hot enough you need a buffer of tshirts so that you can hand rinse the sweat out of one and hang it up to dry while you wear a reserve.

If I'm going somewhere really hot I'll average 1.5 shirts per day, assuming I have a sink I can rinse a shirt in and a warn and windy place to dry it.
>> No. 16328 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 5:47 pm
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>>16326
If you're going out in the day and again in the evening, you'll want two tops.
>> No. 16329 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 6:10 pm
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>>16326
>>16328

Unless you want to be a stinky Pete.
>> No. 16330 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 6:42 pm
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>>16326

I just returned from Gran Canaria where I spent a week in what by our standards would be considered warm mid-summer weather. And yet, I didn't pack more than about six or seven T shirts, although I went through at least two fresh shirts and underwear a day. I bought some hand wash detergent there in a supermarket and turned my bathroom sink into a rolling laundry shop, pretty much soaking the day's clothes in detergent and warm water every night when I got back from my daily activities and took a shower. Due to the warm weather and constant wind, they were ready to wear again by the following afternoon.

I also actually only wore one single pair of cargo swim shorts the whole week. They were just as good for going to take a swim in the Atlantic as they were for strolling along the beach walkways or going to have a drink at night in the entertainment district.

You can travel light and not end up looking and smelling like a filthy bum.
>> No. 16331 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 6:47 pm
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>>16330

That's the way to do it if you've got the nous (you'd be surprised how many lads don't).

More importantly though, how were the potatoes in red sauce?
>> No. 16332 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 6:55 pm
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>>16330
>I bought some hand wash detergent there in a supermarket and turned my bathroom sink into a rolling laundry shop
You see, some of us go on holiday to get away from things like this.
>> No. 16333 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 7:04 pm
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>>16332

I am a bachelor and do all my own laundry at home. I think I can tolerate soaking a few items of clothing every night in a bathroom sink on holiday.
>> No. 16334 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 7:09 pm
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>>16331

>That's the way to do it if you've got the nous (you'd be surprised how many lads don't).

I maintain that it should be mandatory for a lad to spend a few years living by himself in his own place without being able to delegate all that kind of household work either to their mum or their live-in girlfriend or wife. That way, I was able to teach myself how to cook, wash up, iron, do laundry, sew on a button and clean house, and I actually do a better job of it now than some of the lasses that I have been in relationships with.
>> No. 16335 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 7:13 pm
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>>16334

I agree, though I've still never worked out how to iron properly. I've even looked up tutorials, I just seem to push the creases around. I gave up trying in my mid twenties.
>> No. 16336 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 7:41 pm
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>>16335

Start with the sleeves. That's what many lads get wrong. If you iron the shirt's body first and then do the sleeves, you will just wrinkle up the whole rest of the shirt again.

Also, always make sure that the section of cloth you are ironing is perfectly flat on the ironing board. While you are doing the sleeves, take great care to ensure that both the front layer and the back layer of cloth are flat on the board.

Also, ironing a shirt means to gently pass the iron over the cloth. You are not trying to scrub your shirt or anything. And keep holding the cloth flat while you are moving the iron along, to avoid pushing new creases into it.
>> No. 16337 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 9:08 pm
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>>16334

I agree, but I basically learned in-house as I was raised by a single mother who certainly wouldn't let her son grow up to be "one of those men who couldn't use a washing machine, sew on a button, or a decent healthy meal for a whole family".

Ironically, with my first live-in girlfriend it was I was doing all the explaining to her, as she'd lived with her parents until she was 24 and didn't have a clue about anything from paying bills to which end of the toothpaste tube to squeeze.

Sage for real rage over the toothpaste fucking memories. Good god the pain.
>> No. 16338 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 10:26 pm
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>>16336
>ironing a shirt means to gently pass the iron over the cloth
What? Bollocks. You do realise you're trying to flatten something out, right? That involves pressure. If you can't get a crease out you probably aren't pressing the iron down hard enough.
>> No. 16339 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 11:07 pm
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I think we're about to have a cunt off about ironing and I've never been so excited.
>> No. 16342 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 11:21 pm
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>>16339

Did someone say cunt off
>> No. 16343 Anonymous
3rd November 2018
Saturday 11:23 pm
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>>16338

Well the iron itself isn't weightless, is it?

Normally, the weight force of the iron pressing down on the cloth is very nearly enough to get the creases out. If you feel you must apply additional pressure, do so very gently. For stubborn creases, don't push down harder, but instead put the iron on its steam setting, or dampen the cloth with a water spray bottle.

Am I really the only lad here who knows how to iron his own shirts?
>> No. 16344 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 1:03 am
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>>16343
> Well the iron itself isn't weightless, is it?
Well it is if you are ironing in space!
>> No. 16345 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 1:12 am
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>>16344
Oh, Tim. One trip to the ISS and suddenly you're an expert on space.
>> No. 16346 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 1:32 am
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>>16345

At least as men we build stuff and went to the moon, not like women who go 'ooh my fanny hurts, put up a wardrobe'

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 16347 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 11:59 am
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>>16346

Careful now.
>> No. 16349 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 12:52 pm
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>>16346

That seemed like too obvious a joke to be ban worthy, really
>> No. 16350 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 1:47 pm
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>>16346
Female mod on the rag again?
>> No. 16351 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 4:17 pm
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>>16346
>At least as men we build stuff and went to the moon
Yeah, and look at the fucking state we left it in. Six times we landed, and six times we left the bottom of the LM behind. Alan Shepard blasted three golf balls and just fucking left them there.
>> No. 16352 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 7:18 pm
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>>16338
>>16343

Modern decent steam irons do the pressure basically by them selves, by the combined weight of the oven and the force of the steam.

I've never had to really push on a shirt, but then again I hang dry my shirts and don't leave them stored rolled up in a ball.
>> No. 16353 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 7:49 pm
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>>16352
> oven

Have I triggered a bizarre wordfilter or am I going deranged?
>> No. 16354 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 7:57 pm
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>>16353
Even electronic brain pancake crystal elderly.
>> No. 16355 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 8:16 pm
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>>16354
So's your jaffa-cake.
>> No. 16356 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 8:27 pm
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>>16354

Bark satchel open earwig? Sideways ostrich meeting.
>> No. 16357 Anonymous
4th November 2018
Sunday 10:19 pm
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>>16356

Mornington Crescent!
>> No. 16358 Anonymous
5th November 2018
Monday 11:24 am
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Right. Hold it there!
>> No. 16633 Anonymous
26th November 2018
Monday 6:31 pm
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Ryanair is at it again:

https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/airline-flights-pay-extra-to-sit-together-split-up-family-algorithm-minister-a8640771.html

>Passengers first started noticing they were being split up from their party if they didn’t pay more for allocated seating in June 2017, with Ryanair most commonly associated with the practice.
>> No. 16634 Anonymous
26th November 2018
Monday 11:51 pm
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>>16633
>However, Europe’s biggest airline never admitted to changing the way seating was allocated, insisting there was no change and saying that those who don’t pay to choose a seat are “randomly” assigned one.
This is definitely a recent change. In years past, I've had no trouble being sat with the rest of the party, except on two occasions on the return leg of a package when our transfers back from the hotel to the airport were late. When checking in a group, the staff would actively try and seat you together. I suspect what they've done is just take away the ability to assign multiple seats, so when a group turns up each passenger is assigned a seat individually, and the system is assigning them so as to balance the loading.
>> No. 16639 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 12:08 pm
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>>16634

What really irks me nowadays is that airlines assign you a seat at random if you don't pay for a reservation, and that you can't protest that random assignment at check in. There may well be several unreserved seats still that would be more to your liking, but they will tell you that they can't change the random assignment.

I have a habit that I always want to sit in the back of the plane along the aisle, because in the unlikely event that an accident happens, statistically those are the seats with the biggest likelihood of survival. Normally, these are the seats that nobody wants, so you don't need a reservation for them. So for a couple of years, this trick always worked in that I didn't reserve a seat and then went to the check in early enough so that they would still have enough unassigned seats in the back of the plane even if the flight itself was booked out. But now, they are closing that loophole as well and they are trying to make me pay for a seat that otherwise nobody wants to sit in.

So on my last flight, I told the air hostesses on board that I needed to sit in an aisle seat in the back because otherwise I would get panic attacks. Not sure that that's a good strategy in the long run, because they tend to look at you funny for saying it. Like you're somehow mentally unstable and a threat to the plane's safety or something.

But again, I don't see why I should pay for a seat that nobody else wants.
>> No. 16643 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 12:39 pm
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>>16639

I think it is because fat people tend to move in herds, and if they can spread them at random across the plane (or seemingly at 'random' (you can profile these things)) it is better for efficiency. Of course they can't ever say that is what they are doing so they do this.
>> No. 16644 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 2:36 pm
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>>16643
>or seemingly at 'random'
A plane weighing 20t may need to carry around 10t in passengers and luggage, so it's important to balance the load. During check-in, at any given time the airline have an idea of which seats will be occupied, so the next seat to be allocated can be determined with balance in mind. All the airlines have to do to make their wheeze work is prevent check-in staff from allocating multiple seats at once, so a group of passengers will be allocated seats in the interest of balancing the plane rather than keeping them together.
>> No. 16645 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 2:55 pm
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>>16644
Sounds like bullshit
>> No. 16646 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 3:25 pm
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>>16645
That's not what your mum said.
>> No. 16647 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 3:50 pm
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>>16645

I've been on flights on smaller planes with fewer passengers, where people have been asked to move to balance the weight out, so it's definitely not bollocks. Either that or the cabin crew were just bored and playing some insane game of pass the fat man parcel.
>> No. 16648 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 4:24 pm
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>>16645

Aircraft balance is a very real issue. If you don't believe me, take it from Bruce Dickinson. Yes, that Bruce Dickinson.


>> No. 16651 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 6:10 pm
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>>16648

Still blags my head that cunt's a fucking pilot. As if being the singer of Iron Maiden wasn't exciting enough. Like Brian May being a professor of astronomy as well as a legendary rock star.

Bloody overacheivers.
>> No. 16652 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 6:39 pm
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>>16647
That's not really relevant with the horribly crowded ryanair flights.
>> No. 16654 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 6:52 pm
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>>16651
He has a doctorate. That doesn't make him a professor.
>> No. 16656 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 6:59 pm
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>>16651

Stuart Ashen has a doctorate in psychology too.

Also I think I'll be working on getting my private pilots license in the new year, but I'm not very famous so it probably doesn't count
>> No. 16666 Anonymous
27th November 2018
Tuesday 10:58 pm
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>>16651
He was also invited to be part of the 1992 British Olympic Fencing squad, but he couldn't go because of touring commitments.

He's a bit like Richard Branson, into everything but not a knob.

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