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>> No. 19504 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 11:19 am
19504 Instagram couple beg for £9k holiday
https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/instagram-couple-beg-9k-holiday-16530084

Instagram couple beg for £9k holiday while mum funds their lifestyle with two jobs

Because neither of them have a job - instead relying on Catalin's mother to fund their lifestyle by working two jobs - they have turned to the public for financial support.

On a GoFundMe page they have set their sights high, asking for €10,000 (£8,907) to embark on the trip.

According to Catalin and Elena the adventure is worthy of external funding because of the positive impact it would have on their Instagram followers.

"We could write a long text about mental health or global warming," they explain on the fundraising page.

"We could tell you about following your dreams, or how important stepping out of your comfort zone is."

"We could tell you how beautiful traveling is, and it’s benefits, or the fact that most news don’t match reality."

"But we’re going to show you! Less talking more action."

While the pair are undeniably busy when it comes to going on holidays and posting photos on social media, their activeness seems questionable when it comes to the job market.

They have said getting a job would be "detrimental" to their lifestyle.
Expand all images.
>> No. 19505 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 11:45 am
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>> No. 19506 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 11:52 am
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Gosh I'm so angry...
>> No. 19507 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 12:21 pm
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The degree of detachment from reality that some people have, without a hint of self doubt, is truly fascinating.
>> No. 19508 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 12:26 pm
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>>19507
They have 42 thousand followers and their story is trending. If you think IG "influencers" aren't able to raise huge amounts of money for selfish reasons then you're the one detached from reality.
This thread isn't news, it's just clickbait wank.
>> No. 19509 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 12:44 pm
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>>19508

I think I only really have a problem with the fact that apparently they're living off the girl's mum, who has two jobs and forks over the lion share of her income to fund her freeloading daughter and her husband. And that then to add insult to injury, they say they can't be getting jobs themselves because it would cramp their style. Morally, this makes them no better than common dolescum.

Youtube (or Instagram) influencers are essentially freeloaders as well, but their money at least doesn't come from other people who have to work two jobs to fund somebody else's layabout lifestyle, while being left with little money to spend for themselves. It comes from advertising budgets that corporations set aside from the turnover they make on selling their products.

Either these two do what all the rest of youtubescum do and pull in a major commercial sponsor, or I say get a real job. It says in the article that they haven't got that many qualifications, and they probably know full well that if the money from her mum would stop coming, they'd have to work the cheese counter in Tesco's. If that.
>> No. 19510 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 12:57 pm
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>>19509

I haven't seen many people on cheese counters who look just like him.
>> No. 19511 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 1:00 pm
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>>19510

He looks like a death row inmate.
>> No. 19512 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 1:02 pm
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People are donating to them just to insult them?
>> No. 19513 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 1:02 pm
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>>19512

or spam.
>> No. 19514 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 1:03 pm
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>>19510
If he's German why are all of his tattoos in English?
>> No. 19515 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 1:05 pm
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>>19512

People did that when the DJ Dan Single fell off a balcony.
>> No. 19516 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 1:08 pm
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>>19511

but for his soft, gormless eyes.
>> No. 19517 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 1:26 pm
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>>19516

I think the tattoo sentiments are a bit too hippyish too.
>> No. 19518 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 1:34 pm
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>>19515

Kind of sounds like a scam. I'm not sure somebody in that condition would be capable of writing something like that, not even on a computer keyboard.

Also, some git falls off a balcony out of his own stupidity, and expects people to pay for his medical treatment? And all of it after he apparently burned through $21 million of personal wealth within the space of a few years?

Charles Darwin is turning in his grave.
>> No. 19519 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 1:44 pm
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I still only own one pair of trousers.
>> No. 19520 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 1:57 pm
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>>19509
Yeah, yeah, outrage circus. Using an image of Jeremy Kyle is entirely appropriate.
>> No. 19521 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 2:13 pm
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>>19510
"I'm here for the job interview"

Yeah, can't see this bloke has much of a chance in the regular job market tbh. Not his fault he's been forced into this corner.
>> No. 19522 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 2:50 pm
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>>19521
That's not even particularly true anymore. There are plenty of pierced oddballs and tatted up weirdos in gainful employment these days. Not many lawyers or nurses, but if you're working with your hands or behind the scenes people aren't that fussed.
>> No. 19523 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 2:58 pm
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>>19522

This, I've seen much dodgier looking chefs than that, and some of them even make good money.
>> No. 19524 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 3:21 pm
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>>19521

I worked an occasional weekend job for some time as local crew for concerts in my younglad days, I knew a few people in that business and was able to make some money on the side at various venues in and around London now and then. In the roadie business in particular, you see some very non-mainstream people. Appearance wise, you really wouldn't send them to work at a bank. But if you're the sound engineer for a grindcore band, it simply doesn't matter.
>> No. 19525 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 6:05 pm
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This doesn't seem any more shocking to then when a person begs asks for sponsors for a novelty holiday 'for charity', if anything it is more honest in that the naracism is more transparent.

I've seen friends use the internet to beg for all kinds of things, one for them to pay for their masters another to pay for an operation on their dog. There is one incident that I can think of that seemed remotely noble where a friend raised money for charity in response to a girl he knobbed dying. Clearly it had affected him and it was important for his closer. The rest it seemed like narcissism and begging dressed up as nobler because it was on a website.
>> No. 19527 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 8:16 pm
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It's strange reading about how supposedly profitable working two jobs is. Surely after the taxman has had his way with you we're talking petrol money?

>>19510
In fairness it's not like his face tattoos are provocative. Just those comfortable vibes the kids seem to go for these days which I can't fathom.

>>19525
I'm not sure I would rate asking for money so you can study as a bad thing. Apparently people doing drama and the like write to celebrities.

Hell, where would academic research be without other people getting the chequebook out?
>> No. 19529 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 9:24 pm
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>>19527
>I'm not sure I would rate asking for money so you can study as a bad thing. Apparently people doing drama and the like write to celebrities.

We have this thing called the state, it offers the cheapest credit ever specially for that purpose you don't even need to pay it back unless you can most definitely afford to, if you are asking for money for a degree there is something else going on.

>Hell, where would academic research be without other people getting the chequebook out?

one would assume impartial. As opposed to results being burried until someone comes to the same conclusion impartially decades later, like has been known to happen with both Tobacco and the oil industries.

When people get their chequebook out it makes people think like 'the market' will solve the problem when in reality the state should raising taxes, and be stepping in and handling it. Like when there is a feel good story in America about how people got together to pay for someone's life saving treatment. Or their belief tipping is fine and is better than paying staff in restaurants properly because there might be some mysterious jackpot tipping millionare who walks in. It is a fantasy promoted by capitalism.
>> No. 19530 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 10:49 pm
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>>19529

>We have this thing called the state, it offers the cheapest credit ever specially for that purpose you don't even need to pay it back unless you can most definitely afford to, if you are asking for money for a degree there is something else going on.

I think it's mainly people in the U.S. who beg for money for a degree, to avoid being under shedloads of debt by the time their liberal arts degree is finished. The U.S. educational system basically breaks you financially before you get a chance to pay your loans back after university. And with today's job situation, it's not just people with a degree in history or social science who suffer.


>As opposed to results being burried until someone comes to the same conclusion impartially decades later, like has been known to happen with both Tobacco and the oil industries.

Even with governments as sole sponsors of scientific research spending nothing but taxpayer money to produce results, you're not guaranteed impartiality. At the best of times, your research will be in line with the mainstream current of politics that prevails at the time, because you want to be remembered the next time research grants are to be approved. And research findings that go against preferred or received wisdom are just as frequently buried by disapproving politicians as the findings by Big Oil concerning climate change and those of Big Tobacco regarding lung cancer.

Public or private funding of research, it really doesn't matter, there will always be people in charge who expect loyalty in one way or another from scientists.
>> No. 19536 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 2:03 am
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>>19530

>I think it's mainly people in the U.S. who beg for money for a degree, to avoid being under shedloads of debt by the time their liberal arts degree is finished. The U.S. educational system basically breaks you financially before you get a chance to pay your loans back after university. And with today's job situation, it's not just people with a degree in history or social science who suffer.

The specific example that triggered me to mention it as begging was someone is Scotland, America suffers from the hyper capitalist problem of crippling the state through propaganda I mentioned.

>your research will be in line with the mainstream current of politics that prevails at the time, because you want to be remembered the next time research grants are to be approved.

Firstly the political isn't necessarily applicable and therefore you are in good favour to get a decent grant anyway as long as you are seen to be making progress.

Although I agree with you there has been political pressure on things the state shouldn't have been influencing like in the 80s it was pretty big trying to demonstrate the dangers of recreational drugs vs their medicinal properties (but now that I think about it a lot of that could very well have been funded by Pharma industry trying to discredit the unpatentable).

But also I think there is a lot to be gained in front running which way you think the wind will change, you might even luck out and be asked to step up to the role of a philosopher king in some state department when the new zeitgeist arrives, as has been known to happen.
>> No. 19538 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 7:17 am
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>>19529

>We have this thing called the state, it offers the cheapest credit ever specially for that purpose you don't even need to pay it back unless you can most definitely afford to, if you are asking for money for a degree there is something else going on.

Why get into even the best, easiest debt if you can find some rich celebrity to just hand you the money anyway?

I know a couple of people who had their pilots licences funded or partially funded by established captains, too. I think it's fine.
>> No. 19539 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 11:57 am
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>>19538

You shouldn't be begging in general. It is a sign of a terribly unhealthy society for that to be the way things are solved and on a societal level unproductive

And For every person who succeeds because of nepotism there is an unknown quantity of people of higher merit who don't succeed because they didn't have the right connections. It is a way of covering the cracks of our society in a way that a) means we don't address the problem and b) perpetuates classism.

If you want to see what the end game of a society run on nepotism is go live in Turkey for a month. The system is a mess and nothing works how it is supposed to and none of the laws mean anything. It is like a cargo cult version of western society.
>> No. 19540 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 12:02 pm
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>>19539

>You shouldn't be begging in general. It is a sign of a terribly unhealthy society for that to be the way things are solved

Agreed, but if the society is unhealthy, then shouldn't we expect to beg? It's not enough to ask an individual to avoid private financial aid simply because it makes us look bad. Me not giving someone a few grand for a business is not going to fix the economy or loan structures that caused them to ask me, is it?
>> No. 19541 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 12:18 pm
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>>19539

>And For every person who succeeds because of nepotism there is an unknown quantity of people of higher merit who don't succeed because they didn't have the right connections.


Self marketing 101. If you don't have the right connections, you're fucked. Ergo, forge connections that benefit you. I don't see how that is unfair, when it's one of the most basic bits of advice that any career counsellor will give you in year ten in school. Not all of it has to be outright nepotism.
>> No. 19542 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 10:01 pm
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>>19540

No maybe you should do something about it though.

>>19541
>I don't see how that is unfair, when it's one of the most basic bits of advice that any career counsellor will give you in year ten in school. Not all of it has to be outright nepotism.

Okay Ben Shapiro. Now imagine people didn't get to go to public school though for a second, grew up on a council estate in a place with fuck all opportunities, now they have been handicapped from the start.
>> No. 19543 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 10:20 pm
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>>19542
Fuck 'em.
>> No. 19544 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 10:39 pm
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>>19541

>when it's one of the most basic bits of advice that any career counsellor will give you in year ten in school

My careers counsellor (they were called careers officers back then) asked me whether I wanted to work in the cable factory or the cooker factory. I think the only advice he gave me was that the cable factory paid four quid a week more, but that I was less likely to get killed at the cooker factory.
>> No. 19545 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 11:34 pm
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Problem with modern society is we like to pretend everyone is special, everyone has a right to do fun and interesting things in their life. We grew up watching American sitcoms and films where nobody ever even goes to work, they just have adventures.

We gloss over the fact that in reality, for much of the population now, as ever, life simply isn't like that. That most of those people are in fact the villagers you have in Age of Empires. They're peasants, serfs, born to work because they are cheaper than a machine and an animal couldn't do it. They live in places like Knottingley, where there is no possible purpose for people even to exist, apart from manning the plants. We think of peasant life as a thing of the past, those black and white films of people in back-to-backs in Liverpool, faces covered in soot staring at the camera because they've never seen one. In schools they teach kids now that because they live in a first world country, they're all well off and have all the chances in the world, when that state of entrapment in poverty and servitude is the absolute norm for the majority of the planet's population.

Sorry, I've lost where I was going. >>19544 just got me ruminating a bit.

Most people won't have the privilege of doing things like those two in the OP are doing, but we live in a world where it's normalised in all the media you grow up watching and everything you read and see on the internet. It's such a cruel state of affairs honestly. No wonder people are so morbidly depressed. So many youngsters go through student life and then have the crushing realisation that really, they're just going to slog it out in the same office until they're old, grey, overweight and balding.
>> No. 19546 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 11:47 pm
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>>19545

I see where you're coming from, but I've always seen it a different way. Maybe it's just because I'm depressingly cynical (and I am) but I see social media, particularly instagram, as a microcosm of someones life - just because I see someone only ever post pictures of sunny beaches, I don't ever assume that's their life - in fact, the more I see posted on the internet, the emptier I assume their actual life is.

I can always imagine the fanciest celebrities taking a painful dump because they ate too much cheese, or the most powerful players crying in a darkened room at night, because of the weight on their shoulders (or their bruised egos, in the case of the current selection)

Maybe I'm just not easily fooled, maybe I'm just too old to be sucked in to any of this. Maybe I'm just too weird - if anything I have aspired to some britfa.gs poster's lives more than any other. But I struggle to imagine being sucked in by this sort of thing, even though I think the two wasters we're on about are well above even a lot of the real 1% - celebrities and hedge fund managers still have to show up to work, sometimes.
>> No. 19547 Anonymous
21st June 2019
Friday 1:13 am
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>>19545

>Problem with modern society is we like to pretend everyone is special, everyone has a right to do fun and interesting things in their life.

>So many youngsters go through student life and then have the crushing realisation that really, they're just going to slog it out in the same office until they're old, grey, overweight and balding.


You're not wrong. There is that idealised idea of a life where you can "make an impact" or where what you do somehow matters profoundly. And where your workplace every day is pretty much going to be one big hipster party with desks. Well, in all likelihood, what you do will very profoundly not matter, you will just be another entirely replaceable and disposable member of the tens of millions of the country's workforce, and don't let your 10k-plus half-hearted Instagram followers fool you about that. Your financial existence is going to hinge on showing up neat for work some time between 7 and 9 am every weekday depending on your line of work and staying there in one place until the evening, and following your boss's orders, getting pestered by coworkers and customers, and counting down the days till your next holiday in rural Vietnam and eventually retirement. While mentally preparing for the moment when you will be made redundant from your present job, again. How special are you now.

And not to be slagging off Millennials, again, but their culture of instant gratification together with the belief that was instilled in them since they were toddlers that they are all specialer than the rest is to blame. Your work life isn't going to be a hipster utopia where you single-handedly save the world from your desk. If you want to have any kind of decent salary at all with which you will be able to buy a new camera or drone for your youtube channel now and then, It's most likely going to be boring, dreary, repetitive, hard graft with every penny ever-increasingly hard earned.
>> No. 19548 Anonymous
21st June 2019
Friday 1:24 am
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>>19547

In fairness to millenials (because I am one), it wasn't exactly by choice that they were raised with those ideals. They didn't grow up and actively decide they were going to be profoundly more important than the generations before them.

They (we) were raised on that stuff, spoon fed it since the earliest age. The 90s were a maddeningly optimistic time, when you look back at it now. Things can only get better, they said. For perhaps the first time in history people thought hang on, we might just have cracked this whole poverty thing, more people than ever can live a decent life. And then at some point it all came crashing down.

And by "at some point" I mean at precisely 8:46 AM September the 11th, 2001. The culture we have seen rise up since then is deeply hedonistic and nihilistic. Our heads are collectively buried as deep in the sand as we can get them.
>> No. 19549 Anonymous
21st June 2019
Friday 3:05 am
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>>19545

>It's such a cruel state of affairs honestly. No wonder people are so morbidly depressed.

Hear hear. Older people often characterise millennials as being entitled and grandiose, but in my experience it's very much the opposite - they're burdened with a crippling sense of inadequacy about being normal.

The baby boomers grew up in a world of entirely realistic expectations. A man was a success if he held down a steady job and put food on the table. A woman was a success if her house was clean and her kids got a couple of o-levels. A lot of people didn't have particularly great prospects, but nobody thought any less of them for it.

Millennials grew up with an infinitely greater burden of expectation that is simply unrealistic for most people. They're told in school that a steady job isn't good enough - they need to fulfil their maximum potential. They go to job interviews where being competent and qualified isn't nearly enough - they get asked questions like "how would your unique skills and experience help make Bloggs Abrasive Ltd the best supplier of abrasive papers and compounds"? They work for companies that claim to be passionate about commercial hygiene solutions. They drink cups of coffee and bottles of fruit juice that purport to be fulfilling some kind of profound social purpose - this isn't just a cup of coffee, it's an organic fairtrade coffee in a recycled cup that conserves natural resources and lifts African farmers out of poverty.

They've been raised in an ever-growing ocean of bullshit, but nobody has had the decency to tell them. They can't remember what life was like before the bullshit flood. From the minute they're born, they've been under constant pressure to be exceptional in everything they do. A lot of young people have literally never heard an adult tell them "It's absolutely fine to be average. We're all just bumbling through life and if you can get to the other side without doing anything truly awful, you've done OK".

To be honest, I'm surprised that so many of them survive to adulthood without topping themselves. I had a mediocre childhood and a bloody awful adolescence, but I wouldn't swap it with the kids of today.
>> No. 19551 Anonymous
21st June 2019
Friday 6:47 am
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>>19548
90s optimism was always a bit delusional, looking back at it. 9/11 just kind of confirmed it, and even that didn't kill off a lot of the delusion - it just underscored that the world was still not a very nice place. I'd say it lingered on domestically with a bit of dystopain war on terror until 2008. Back in the 90s though, we might've thought we'd cracked poverty, but we also decided that (for example) unemployment benefit had to be conditional, regardless of if there were jobs or not, and the state had no capacity to move things in a direction that created jobs - it could only make people employable and pray the market looked favourably on them. It's always stood out to me as a very bizarre time, a sort of postmodern modernism, an unstated delusion that all of history was hurtling towards New Labour: Because Britain Deserves Better. A sort of complete failure to account for historical context - as though ideas and policies could only be right or wrong forever - the natural consequence of the end of history.

I want to emphasise I'm not really trying to make a political point or put the boot into Blair. Sticking my cards on the table, I only came to this sort of view because I've never quite gotten over the cognitive dissonance that modernist modernism was also nonsense and that history is not hurtling towards Concordes, tower flats and moon landings. The odd thing is, I'm too young to have been raised in the environment when that was actively being sold or believed by serious people, so it's hard to figure out where I picked it up from. The only thing I know is, it's lead down a historical rabbit hole and a half.
>> No. 19553 Anonymous
21st June 2019
Friday 12:19 pm
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>>19548

>And by "at some point" I mean at precisely 8:46 AM September the 11th, 2001.

I've heard it put even more succinctly, that the 90s ended on September 11. And there is some truth to that. I was already in my mid-20s in 2001, so I remember a fair bit about growing up in the 90s. I think the general optimism came from the fact that the Cold War had ended in 1990 (you can't imagine the sigh of relief that everyone breathed over that if you weren't really there). It was a wonderful time to be a teenager and young adult, because not only did we no longer have to worry about global nuclear war, but there was definitely a sense that with the fall of the Iron Curtain, the world was coming together in peace and harmony again.

And then of course from the mid-1990s you had this wonderful emerging world of the Internet, which suddenly gave rise to a whole new aspect of modern life as we still know it today. The possibilities seemed endless, and the Internet boom was a large part of what drove global economies to new prosperity and allowed even workers in more humble jobs to get a piece of the pie. Life really was good in the mid to late 90s.

Was it all just a lofty dream that came crashing down on September 11? No, I don't really think so. I think it was all real, and that the daft militant wog attacks that day simply brought about a profound sea change which probably would not have happened without those events. And then you had governments worldwide jump on the bandwagon of fear politics, and starting to mistrust everybody and use the Internet to spy on their citizens and become ever more repressive against freedom of speech and what they thought you should and shouldn't access online. The pendulum just swung the other way again.

And to be fair to Millennials again, what we've seen since the early 2000s is the breaking up of traditional work and employment models, where people no longer stay in their job with their employer for years or even decades. We've got a gig economy that requires every single one of us, not just us older folk, to think on your feet and be flexible and always try to reinvent yourself. And it's been said that the 2007/08 Financial Crisis was a shock to the system that is still very present in the memories of people who were young back then. The idea that nothing is safe anymore, and that entire global economies can be brought to the brink of collapse without much of a warning.

So yeah, I'm glad that I was young and had my formative years when I did, in the 90s. I can't say I particularly like being in my mid-40s now. It really isn't always a lot of fun. But I really also wouldn't want to be 25 again in today's world.
>> No. 19554 Anonymous
21st June 2019
Friday 12:32 pm
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People would throw money at you to go to university and if you bought a house, its value just rose and rose and rose.
>> No. 19555 Anonymous
21st June 2019
Friday 12:34 pm
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I don't think it was even too bad of a time to be unemployed if you didn't even have to pretend to look for a job and unemployed people and fake disabled people weren't scapegoat number one like they were just before David Cameron got in.
>> No. 19556 Anonymous
21st June 2019
Friday 1:13 pm
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>>19555

I think much of the Broken Britain debate around 2007-10 was disingenuous. Much of that segment of the population which constituted Broken Britain wasn't at the bottom end of society of their own volition. They were just the symptom of a society where if you've sunk to a certain level, there isn't much hope for you to get back up.

And even with the most benign view on the Tory government from 2010, you can't in all honesty say that Cameron fixed Broken Britain.
>> No. 19557 Anonymous
21st June 2019
Friday 1:53 pm
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>>19556
Nah, come on, Britain is fixed now. That's why we're trying so hard to snap into to pieces, so we've got a project to work on for the new decade.
>> No. 19558 Anonymous
22nd June 2019
Saturday 11:12 pm
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>>19557

And ARE Boris will no doubt do a fine job of it.
>> No. 19559 Anonymous
24th June 2019
Monday 1:10 pm
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>>19549
Thank you.
I'm not exactly millenial (though close) and still your words resonate with my experiences.
>> No. 19560 Anonymous
25th June 2019
Tuesday 11:11 am
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I came across these cunts in the wild. I hate them a bit more now.
>> No. 19566 Anonymous
25th June 2019
Tuesday 4:44 pm
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>>19560
What moment? The moment you're stuck on a crowded Tube carriage with some wanker acting weird? If ever there's a moment to stare at your phone, it's then.
>> No. 19568 Anonymous
25th June 2019
Tuesday 4:50 pm
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>>19566

The moment when his flycatching paid off and a big bluebottle flew in.
>> No. 19569 Anonymous
25th June 2019
Tuesday 4:51 pm
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He's not being quite as entertaining as this now is he?


>> No. 19570 Anonymous
25th June 2019
Tuesday 4:57 pm
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>>19569

or this

https://news.sky.com/story/gay-porn-star-fined-for-threesome-on-tube-after-footage-posted-on-twitter-11624814
>> No. 19572 Anonymous
25th June 2019
Tuesday 7:00 pm
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>>19560

This picture just puts in a nutshell so many things about modern-day life that I deeply despise with all my heart.
>> No. 19576 Anonymous
25th June 2019
Tuesday 10:19 pm
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>>19560
>What moment? The moment you're stuck on a crowded Tube carriage with some wanker acting weird? If ever there's a moment to stare at your phone, it's then.

As was pointed out on the place I took this from, 'they said after taking a picture with an iPhoneX they bought with the money his mum had to work a second job to earn'
>> No. 19577 Anonymous
25th June 2019
Tuesday 10:22 pm
19577 spacer
>>19569

That is wonderfully charming. That would totally make my day.

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