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>> No. 10199 Anonymous
15th December 2013
Sunday 2:24 pm
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What is the ingredient that makes bread heavy, sour smelling and moist? I much prefer the lighter and whiter (even when wholegrain) variety but I'm finding it hard to distinguish the two before I buy.
Is there any benefit to this extra ingredient?
Expand all images.
>> No. 10200 Anonymous
15th December 2013
Sunday 3:15 pm
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That sounds like it's more to do with the baking process than the ingredients, strictly.
>> No. 10201 Anonymous
15th December 2013
Sunday 3:29 pm
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As >>10200 says, it's a question of process rather than ingredients. Fluffy white bread is made using the Chorleywood process, rather than more traditional leavening. The easiest giveaway is the shelf life - Chorleywood bread typically lasts several days longer than traditionally made bread, which will be reflected in the best before date.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chorleywood_bread_process
>> No. 10202 Anonymous
15th December 2013
Sunday 3:31 pm
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>>10201

Breadlad here.

>Chorleywood bread typically lasts several days longer than traditionally made bread

What? I'm sorry, but proper bread lasts fucking ages.
>> No. 10203 Anonymous
15th December 2013
Sunday 3:50 pm
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>>10202
Define "proper bread", "lasts" and "fucking ages".
>> No. 10204 Anonymous
15th December 2013
Sunday 4:06 pm
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>>10203

That. If you're attempting to make a soft, moist loaf and sell it sliced, then a traditional bread has a shelf-life of a couple of days, while a Chorleywood loaf will keep for over a week. The Chorleywood bread starts off with a much higher moisture content and retains that moisture for longer due to the smaller and more consistent air bubbles. The Chorleywood loaf is likely to go mouldy, whereas a traditional bread will just go rock hard. A very dense and glutinous loaf made traditionally can keep well, but that's not what most British people want to eat.
>> No. 10205 Anonymous
15th December 2013
Sunday 6:25 pm
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The Germans know their bread, I find. Lovely stuff but different to the local tastes or common supermarket sliced.
>> No. 10206 Anonymous
15th December 2013
Sunday 9:19 pm
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>>10200
>>10201
Are you sure its not yeast?
>> No. 10207 Anonymous
15th December 2013
Sunday 10:16 pm
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My partner works in bread. The ingredient which makes some bread smell 'cheap' is calcium propionate. It's a very effective preservative. It's found in cheap white and brown bread.

Other posters are right about the chorleywood process to an extent. Chorleywood is more about cost rather than shelf life. It is much quicker and uses less energy than more traditional processes.

The biggest other factor in shelf life is the cleanliness and modernity of the factory. Newer factories use better air filters, clean rooms, and UV irradiation to increase shelf life without negatively impacting the texture an flavour of the bread.
>> No. 10209 Anonymous
15th December 2013
Sunday 10:52 pm
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>>10206

Chorleywood bread is made with yeast, but rather than being allowed to prove naturally over the course of many hours, the dough is vigorously worked by machine and so can be baked within an hour of mixing. The yeasty flavour of a traditional loaf is the result of this slow fermentation. All commercial leavened bread uses yeast of the saccharomyces cerevisiae species, and while different strains of yeast will influence the flavour and texture of the bread, the process is a far greater influence. The basic ingredients of a traditional and Chorleywood loaf are essentially the same, with the main difference being that Chorleywood breads use more yeast (to compensate for the shorter fermentation time), and flour made from low-protein British wheat rather than the higher-protein imported wheat that is needed to make a good loaf using traditional methods.

>>10207

The shelf life of Chorleywood bread is substantially improved by microbial control, but most traditionally-made breads just don't stay moist enough to spoil under normal conditions and will go stale long before microbial spoilage occurs. Of course all bets are off for other bakery products or breads made by hand under genuinely unsanitary conditions.
>> No. 10210 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 1:05 am
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It's like wikipedia in here now.
>> No. 10211 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 1:40 am
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https://www.youtube.com/v/VQAIoSC3kAQ

Sorry.
>> No. 10212 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 1:51 am
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>>10210
I just fucking learned a lot about bread. I like it.
>> No. 10213 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 1:59 am
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>>10212

You could have just read the wiki article on it as that's what everyone else does and copy pastes here. Every single time.
>> No. 10214 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 2:22 am
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>>10213
That's horrible. I thought I was in the presence of intellectuals.

I would never search for how bread is made, unless I had a reason. So gaining information in a random way has its perks.
>> No. 10216 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 2:28 am
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>>10214

There are a select few users who see the use of words they don't know as verbose, among other idiosyncrasies.

Try not to startle them, they might tell you to fuck off.
>> No. 10217 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 2:45 am
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>>10216
Is the person I replied to one of those people?

Anyway, I was thinking about this yesterday. I think I learnt more on the internet, than at school. I might have learnt the basics at school, which helped me learn other things on the internet, but I definitely learnt more on the internet than I ever could at school.
>> No. 10218 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 2:50 am
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>>10217

He appears to be one of those people who doesn't believe that people can just know things without referencing Wikipedia.

Browsing this website made me appreciate a well structured paragraph. I was horrible at it before I got banned a few times.

I learned how to make soup from a lad on /nom/ years ago, which is useful. I have no idea why I was so apprehensive about trying, in hindsight.
>> No. 10219 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 5:44 am
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>>10218

If you have set the bar low enough you can learn from anyone and anything. Especially as it sounds like you were barely able to survive on your own.
>> No. 10220 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 10:15 am
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>>10213

This is a really facile criticism. An encyclopaedia is supposed to be a collection of concise summaries of various topics. For obvious reasons, a concise summary of a topic is going to cover largely the same ground as the corresponding encyclopaedia entry; If the two don't have a good deal in common, then one or the other has probably failed. If people were actually copying and pasting or blatantly cribbing then you might have a point, but I don't see that as being the case. There are only so many ways of describing a set of material facts, and an even smaller subset of descriptions that are clear and concise.

>>10219

You're a hateful little snob and you're making the world a worse place. To chide people for their ignorance and also chide them for trying to learn is an absolutely miserable attitude that smacks of insecurity. Being knowledgeable doesn't make you a better person, it just makes you lucky - lucky to have had the right educational opportunities, lucky to be raised with values that respect rather than denigrate the pursuit of learning. It's smug and complacent to judge people based on what they know; What matters is whether they're trying. It takes immense bravery to admit to your own ignorance and ask for help, and I have boundless respect for anyone with the courage to do so in the face of snide little bastards like you.
>> No. 10221 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 11:13 am
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>>10220
>To chide people for their ignorance and also chide them for trying to learn is an absolutely miserable attitude

Hear, hear. I agree with all of this paragraph and would also like to echo the sentiment that you, >>10218, are a nob.
>> No. 10222 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 11:20 am
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>>10221
Does your second post reference point to the right one?
>> No. 10223 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 11:58 am
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>>10219

Tell us your brothy secrets, oh innate soup chefsagelad.

We are not worthy of your genetic recipes and well seasoned alleles. Cast us not into the shadow of ignorance, oh great and creamy one.
>> No. 10224 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 5:31 pm
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Soup wars?
>> No. 10225 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 7:10 pm
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Did we ever get the recipe for that bread-bowl soup?
>> No. 10226 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 7:15 pm
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>>10225

I don't believe we did.
>> No. 10228 Anonymous
16th December 2013
Monday 9:50 pm
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>>10225
Or those fucking Thai fusion crabcakes.

I have been waiting fucking forever you utter cunt
>> No. 10229 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 10:46 am
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>>10228
I remember watching him bigging it up on numerous occasions. I want that recipe. I must know its exotic parameters. It was promised. I don't even fucking like crab!

Post the recipe, thaicrablad, you bastard.
>> No. 10230 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 10:50 am
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Crabs and .gs have a long history.
>> No. 10231 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 10:57 am
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>>10225>>10226
I had that in Reykjavik recently. I am not normally the kind of cunt who takes photographs of his dinner in a restaurant but it's not every day you see soup in a bread roll.

It was delicious, though a little heavy on the cumin (Icelanders seem to be peculiarly obsessed with cumin for some reason).
>> No. 10232 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 11:21 am
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>>10231
I remember trying this years ago thanks to this site. There was a recipe in /nom/, though really it's something you're free to just mess around with. Nice winter food though, and extremely cheap to make.
>> No. 10233 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 1:50 pm
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>>10231

South Africa's greatest gift to the world.
>> No. 10234 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 2:12 pm
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>>10233
Curry didn't go so well with bread when I've used it in lieu of naan or poppadoms.
>> No. 10235 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 2:13 pm
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>>10234
I sometimes have curry sandwiches the next day if I've got some over from the evening prior. It's certainly nice. I wouldn't have bread and curry as a the prime meal in itself though.
>> No. 10236 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 5:18 pm
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>>10231
>Reykjavik
How is it?
>> No. 10237 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 7:47 pm
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>>10236
Um, nice? Do you want to know something /nom/-oriented about it? (It might not be right to go into other stuff here.)
>> No. 10238 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 7:53 pm
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>>10235
One of my friends has a penchant for instant mash sandwiches.
>> No. 10239 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 8:41 pm
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>>10234

Buttered bread, if it's a proper loaf, goes rather well with a South Indian curry. It's basically soup.

I miss my Mum's curry, why did she have to turn out to be a cow now that I'm an adult? I also miss childhood innocence.
>> No. 10240 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 9:06 pm
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>>10237
No, I suppose. :(
>> No. 10241 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 9:14 pm
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>>10237
There's only really one /nom/ related thing Iceland has to offer and it's not great.
>> No. 10242 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 9:45 pm
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>>10241
Speak for yourself.
>> No. 10243 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 9:50 pm
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>>10241
>>10242
Whenever I see the word Iceland in print, anywhere, or whenever I hear it, I always think of Iceland—the supermarket. I would hear "Icelandic Banks," and I would think, "I didn't know Iceland had a bank," before realising my stupidity. They should really change their nation's name.
>> No. 10244 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 9:50 pm
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>>10241
>It is often eaten with a shot of the local spirit, a type of akvavit called brennivín
Again with the cumin.

Brennivin is horrible, for the record. Ridiculously cheap in the airport, though.
>> No. 10245 Anonymous
18th December 2013
Wednesday 9:55 pm
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>>10242

Obligatory:

https://www.youtube.com/v/9OnOisoA66s
>> No. 10246 Anonymous
19th December 2013
Thursday 1:46 am
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>>10245

I wonder how this would play out since they went through their transformations and other supermarkets moved in on the same budget markets?
>> No. 10247 Anonymous
19th December 2013
Thursday 2:02 am
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>>10246

They still sell batshit insane party food, like the aforementioned "fish, chip & mushy pea stacks", "chicken zingy sliders", "cherry bakewell cones" and a worrying number of products with the adjective "sticky" in the name.
>> No. 10248 Anonymous
19th December 2013
Thursday 2:21 am
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>>10247

Doesn't seem that bad, really. Maybe it tastes okay. I don't mind trying something different. Not as bad as rotten shark meat or deliberately fermented and swollen tins.
>> No. 10249 Anonymous
19th December 2013
Thursday 7:36 am
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>>10247>>10248
I think they put out all sorts of shite in the hope that at least one of them will be a runaway success, like prawns covered in rice crispies.
>> No. 10250 Anonymous
19th December 2013
Thursday 11:09 am
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>>10248
>rotten shark meat
I've not tried Hakarl but did try lutefisk once, which is vaguely similar. It had an overpowering smell but very little taste. A bit disappointing.

Wikipedia warns that
>When cooking and eating lutefisk, it is important to clean the lutefisk and its residue off pans, plates, and utensils immediately. Lutefisk left overnight becomes nearly impossible to remove. Sterling silver should never be used in the cooking, serving or eating of lutefisk, which will permanently ruin silver. Stainless steel utensils are recommended instead.
Which is a bit dramatic.
>> No. 10251 Anonymous
19th December 2013
Thursday 12:02 pm
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>>10248
>deliberately fermented and swollen tins
I've just been reading up about this, I'd never heard of it before.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surstr%C3%B6mming

"Surströmming smells like a dumpster full of fish, diapers and medical waste that has not been emptied for a month in the highest heat imaginable." - some Swedish guy
>> No. 10252 Anonymous
22nd December 2013
Sunday 7:13 pm
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>>Surströmming

Goes well with century egg. Probably.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Century_egg

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