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>> No. 10867 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 7:44 pm
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I've just had a lovely Indian curry in a very nice restaurant. I felt a bit adventurous so I ate it with my hands despite my social misgivings. It went surprisingly well and a large portion of it actually made it in to my mouth.

The trouble is that when I looked up Indian food etiquette later wikipedia informed me that it's a small section of society that eats with their fingers and even then there are some very specific rules that I broke, namely that it shouldn't go all over your fingers and you should only use the tips.

I'm interested in food culture from around the world, so shall we have a general food etiquette thread?

Incidentally I've always thought that in Japan you should burp as loudly as you can after the meal as a gesture of appreciation to the chef. Given my general ignorance on the subject I wouldn't be shocked to find that I'm wrong.
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>> No. 10868 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 7:58 pm
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I know in Japan that it's a big no-no to stick your chopsticks erect in your food, even if you're just going off for a quick piss. Upright chopsticks in food is meant to be done as an offering to the dead, so it's pretty poor form to do it at the table with food you're going to eat.
>> No. 10869 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 8:08 pm
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>>10868
Fuck that mate if I need to drain the weasel I'm gonna fukin do it.
>> No. 10870 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 8:11 pm
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>it's a small section of society that eats with their fingers and even then there are some very specific rules

It's not the ones who use their hand to wipe their arse, is it?
>> No. 10871 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 8:35 pm
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>>10870

I don't know enough about arse wiping etiquette to say either way.
>> No. 10872 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 8:43 pm
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>>10867
You ate a curry with your fingers in a decent restaurant and got the sauce everywhere? Christ lads, we've reached ground zero for autism.
>> No. 10873 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 8:45 pm
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>>10871
In many places around that part of the world they don't have toilet roll, so they wipe their arse with their left hand and a bit of water.
>> No. 10874 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 8:48 pm
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>>10872
I bet they don't even know how to use the three shells.
>> No. 10875 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 8:57 pm
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>>10873
Yeah. Indian culture has a bit of a thing about the left hand being dirty and the right hand clean, both literally and figuratively. Life is hard for left-handed folks.

OP, if you were eating with your left hand then, er, don't do that next time.
>> No. 10876 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 9:04 pm
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>>10869
Is it too difficult to lay your chopsticks on the table or across your bowl?
>> No. 10877 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 9:15 pm
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>>10872

Eh? First of all I don't understand how trying to imitate local culture, even if poorly executed or incorrect is autistic and secondly I was pretty accurate with my meatsticks, the thing about most of it going in my mouth was what's known in the industry as a "joke." I understand that people with your condition have a hard time differentiating between jokes and absolutely serious conversation, but you could at least keep your mouth shut if you have nothing constructive to say.

>>10875

Right to pick up the food and stuff, but I used both to tear at the bread.
>> No. 10878 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 9:21 pm
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>>10877
>I understand that people with your condition have a hard time differentiating between jokes and absolutely serious conversation, but you could at least keep your mouth shut if you have nothing constructive to say.


I don't think there's any dificulty in differntiating; for a lot of instances on .gs it's wilful misinterpretation in order to be a snarky cunt for the sake of it.
>> No. 10879 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 9:23 pm
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>>10877
Local culture? You're in Bradford?
>> No. 10880 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 9:34 pm
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>>10877
Haha oh wow. A white boy eating curry with his hands down the local curry house counts as 'imitating local culture' about as much as a child sitting in a buggy making broom broom noises imitates a car.

Were you alone or with others? I'm not sure which would be more embarassing to be honest...
>> No. 10881 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 9:37 pm
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>>10880

Your fear and ignorance do you no credit here.
>> No. 10882 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 11:36 pm
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>>10879
I'm from Bradford, and anyone from around here would think someone is a cunt if they went into a decent curry house and started eating with their hands.
>> No. 10883 Anonymous
3rd August 2014
Sunday 11:44 pm
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>>10881
Shush, I agree with him and he made me laugh.
>> No. 10884 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 12:03 am
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>>10883

Well if we're whipping out our mirthometers that I should probaby inform you that I'm laughing at the both of you.
>> No. 10885 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 12:36 am
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It's considered ill mannered in Britain to use your fork with the tines curving up, or to put your elbows on the table, but consider just how many people give a shit, and even if they do, it's a mild annoyance at most.

Having said that, a lot of Indian food isn't meant to be eaten with your hands, especially southern stuff, which is very likely what you had. I also know that in more formal restaurants over there you'd be expected to use cutlery anyway (or more accurately, a spoon. Forks basically don't exist in India). What did you eat?
>> No. 10886 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 12:39 am
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I really like Japanese food etiquette, especially around sushi. It's all about respecting the food, and the chef, both ideals everyone on the planet should strive for, as preparing food is the most noble profession.
>> No. 10887 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 12:41 am
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>>10886
Another poster turned me onto Jiro Dreams of Sushi, a rather nice documentary about a well respected sushi chef. I do recommend it if you've not seen it.
>> No. 10888 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 12:47 am
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>>10887

I've seen it a few times. I think it should be required watching for all cooks, it's really inspiring.

I like to make my chefs watch this bit if they moan about me telling them to chop something more neatly or the like. https://www.youtube.com/v/vFP5xD2l3ro
>> No. 10889 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 12:54 am
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>>10885

Dolpiaza. There were forks and spoons provided. To be honest I just saw it on an episode of Come Dine With Me, some Indian bird asked them all to eat with their hands and some white bloke was having a bit of a teary over it. I suppose I've assumed it was a bigger thing than it actually is, I realise that it was a bit of a faux pas now and probably won't do it again in the near future, but I don't really think anyone noticed or cared.

What I want from this thread is interesting quirks about and tips on foreign cultures regarding food. I've always been interested in travel and I've never had the opportunity to do so until now, so I want to go somewhere interesting and different. I know we have a lot of knowledgeable bods on here so I was hoping to get the opinions of people who have actually been to places and have experienced the cultures.

One of the things I'm especially interested in is related to your first sentence, for example is the information in >>10886 a custom more honoured in the breach? It's all well and good googling for information, but that doesn't come close to comparing with the first hand experience.

For the record I actually enjoyed it more than I usually would have done by eating it with my hands. It was probably a psychological thing but it's definitely something I'd consider again if I could get some experience with the subject. I did feel a bit self conscious while I was doing it, but as I said it's unlikely that anyone noticed or cared. I don't know whether the poster calling me autistic has a point or not but I think a short trip to India or thereabouts would make me a bit more confident either way.
>> No. 10890 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 1:04 am
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>>10889
>To be honest I just saw it on an episode of Come Dine With Me

You're just giving the other lads ammo now.

>It was probably a psychological thing

Purely psychosomatic, but if it makes something tastier that's not a bad thing.
>> No. 10891 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 1:06 am
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>>10890

I had hoped that /nom/ would be above such antics.
>> No. 10892 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 1:10 am
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>>10891
I think most people just use /*/sfw/ these days and don't actually know which board they're posting on half of the time.
>> No. 10893 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 1:11 am
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>>10889

>but I don't really think anyone noticed or cared.

This is almost certainly correct. One thing I can guarantee above all else in any restaurant in the world, is that as long as you're spending money, and not causing them to lose any money, you can do whatever the fuck you want.

>for example is the information in >>10886 a custom more honoured in the breach?

I would say yes, because etiquette in general is a big part of Japanese culture. It's also a generational thing, and it depends where you are. Some trendy twenty somethings in Osaka probably aren't really going to care if some gaijin dips his rice in his soy sauce, but then older or more serious people might get upset. It's the cultural equivalent of watching someone dollop tomato ketchup on their steak - it is on some level offensive to anyone who likes the taste of steak, but at the same time nobody's going to kick you out on the street for it. Well, actually, I probably would kick you out on the street for the latter one, but I'm not as polite as most Japanese chefs.
>> No. 10894 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 1:18 am
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>>10893

Are you one of the cheflads? You must have some interesting stories about foreign customs you've seen in your restaurant and this would be the perfect thread to share them in.
>> No. 10895 Anonymous
4th August 2014
Monday 1:26 am
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I have a tendency to eat with my hands when alone all the time, especially cuts of meat. I think it's a habit I picked up from watching a slightly odd friend eating the dinners his Nan would make him after school, he was adamant the best way to eat a steak was with your hands.

And while he was "slightly odd", I did just remember he's half Libyan so that's probably got more to do with it. Sorry, Steakm8.

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