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>> No. 83894 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 2:30 pm
83894 Good Friday Agreement
Does our resident Norn Irelend lad know what the deal is surrounding the land border with The Republic? As far as I know, troops on the streets is a direct contravention of the GFA, as historically they had a habit of shooting teenagers, as is doing anything which inhibit Co-op between the two nations. That was ratified by the EU and UN(?), so it's not really up for debate (as far as I know) so I have a couple of questions.
1) Why do the DUP want to stir tensions with a hard border?
2) Are my assumptions correct and is there anything else you're aware of people need to know here? It wasn't discussed at all outside warnings from Blair and Major which were dismissed as "Project Fear" despite being, apparently, perfectly valid.
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>> No. 83895 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 2:41 pm
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>Why do the DUP want to stir tensions with a hard border?

It's what they do. They're daft militant wogs in everything but name.

Almost any border check will be a GFA contravention to some one, and you're right, an armed checkpoint will set the place back a few decades.
>> No. 83896 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 3:40 pm
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Last I heard the DUP axed the NI quasi-EU membership because:
1) The Tories were being gobshites and tried handing them a document to sign while telling everyone it was all agreed.
2) They want to remain a part of the UK.

>Are my assumptions correct and is there anything else you're aware of people need to know here? It wasn't discussed at all outside warnings from Blair and Major which were dismissed as "Project Fear" despite being, apparently, perfectly valid.

No, why are you even bringing up troops on the streets?

Anyway, the agreement places no such demand that Northern Ireland remain a part of the EU and while cross border cooperation could be hindered it both remains to be seen how this will happen and the Good Friday Agreement is sufficiently vague* as to open up interpretation.

Personally I'm of the mind that it will be quietly forgotten about and at a push the Common Travel Area might simply see selective searches on arrivals to the UK. That is what Davis, Tusk and everyone else involved seems to be going for.

*latter parts are also not legally binding as they are agreements between governments and political parties but that is another kettle of fish.
>> No. 83897 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 3:54 pm
83897 spacer
>That was ratified by the EU and UN(?)

The GFA has nothing to do with either of these parties. It is two separate documents, one being a bilateral British-Irish agreement and one being a multilateral agreement between Britain, Ireland and the major Northern Irish parties.

The documents refer to EU legislation and stuff, but they do not depend on them, though they will require some adaptation (and subsequent agreement between parties concerned). This has been tested in Belfast court already to my knowledge.

Neither of these documents make reference to a border whatsoever.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/136652/agreement.pdf
>> No. 83898 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 3:55 pm
83898 spacer
Also, there is no requirement that the border is manned by the military. The UK border in Calais doesn't have soldiers, nor does Stansted bloody airport.
>> No. 83899 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 4:34 pm
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>>83898
Land borders are a different animal, most countries have a military presence at their land borders. You're mind is skewed by Europe basically being one giant country. Poland has troops on it's border with Ukraine, the Border Guard.

A renegotiation will be required, but my point was that Blair said it would be an issue before hand and Cameron hand waved it away when he should have been setting contingencies. If Tory hubris is responsible for stirring up the troubles again, hyperbole goes out the window; it would be civil war.
>> No. 83900 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 4:54 pm
83900 spacer
>>83897

The agreement guarantees incorporation of the ECHR in NI law, with direct access to the courts. Either we need to remain under the jurisdiction of the ECJ, we need a special deal for NI, or we need to amend the GFA.

The GFA doesn't directly mention the border, but it does pledge the removal of "security installations", which could be reasonably interpreted as including border checkpoints. It's very difficult to conceive of a border that is soft on both sides but satisfies WTO and EU rules. If we retain tariff-free trade with the RoI, then we'd be obliged under the most favoured nation rule to abolish tariffs on all our imports.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/BRIE/2017/583116/IPOL_BRI(2017)583116_EN.pdf
>> No. 83901 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 5:13 pm
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>>83900
>The agreement guarantees incorporation of the ECHR in NI law, with direct access to the courts. Either we need to remain under the jurisdiction of the ECJ

Not the same thing.
>> No. 83902 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 5:14 pm
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>>83899
> You're mind is skewed by Europe basically being one giant country. Poland has troops on it's border with Ukraine

My mind is certainly not skewed by this. There is no need for it to be the case.
>> No. 83903 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 5:20 pm
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>>83902
Countries that don't protect their borders are seen as failed states for a reason. There are rules about this kind of thing.
>> No. 83904 Anonymous
9th February 2018
Friday 5:30 pm
83904 spacer
>>83903
You're just making shit up now.

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