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>> No. 84569 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 7:57 am
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Theresa May to face leadership challenge

UK Prime Minister Theresa May will face a vote of no confidence in her leadership later on Wednesday.

Conservative MPs will vote between 18:00 GMT and 20:00 GMT.

The challenge to Mrs May's position comes after the required 48 letters calling for a contest were delivered.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-46535739
130 posts omitted. Last 50 posts shown. Expand all images.
>> No. 84744 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 6:56 pm
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Five minutes until the Brexit deal voting begins, lads.
>> No. 84745 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 6:58 pm
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Two minutes until I have to feed the cat, lads.
>> No. 84746 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 7:45 pm
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The deal has been defeated with a majority of 230. Looks like the end of May might be coming early this year.
>> No. 84747 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 7:45 pm
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>PM Theresa May loses MPs’ vote on Brexit deal by 432 votes to 202 - the biggest government defeat in history

Now what?
>> No. 84748 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 7:48 pm
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>>84747

They come back with a similarly shite deal until one of them gets through, or someone gets angry enough to actually float another referendum, or the EU just gets bored and decides for us.
>> No. 84749 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 7:52 pm
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Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn says that he has tabled a motion of no confidence in the government.

Leader of the Opposition Jeremy Corbyn says that the result of tonight's vote is the largest defeat for a government since the 1920s.

After two years of negotiations, this verdict is "absolutely decisive". He says the PM is only trying to reach out now "after it has been so roundly rejected by Parliament".

"No deal must be taken off the table, a permanent customs union must be secured, and people's rights and protections must be guaranteed," he says, adding that the PM has "closed the door on dialogue".

"In the last two years, she's had only one priority, the Conservative Party," he stated.

>> No. 84753 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 8:09 pm
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>>84749
What will he do when he loses?
>> No. 84754 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 8:27 pm
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>>84753
Now, now. We know Jeremy wouldn't have done this unless he'd calculated that he'd most likely lose.
>> No. 84755 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 8:48 pm
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>>84754
So then we have another referendum.
>> No. 84756 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 8:50 pm
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No deal Brexit, fuck yeah!
>> No. 84758 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 8:52 pm
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>>84753

It's masterful, really. Corbyn has just witnessed the worst government defeat in nearly a century, then decided to hand them a victory on a plate within 24 hours. CCHQ must be ecstatic.
>> No. 84761 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 9:09 pm
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>>84758

What else could he have done?
>> No. 84762 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 9:10 pm
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>>84758
It really is quite amazing, when you think about it. We've got a Prime Minister who is trying to run down the clock because she's incapable of negotiating with the EU being enabled by the Leader of the Opposition who wants nothing more than to look like he's doing something meaningful whilst he's actually achieving fuck all; a perpetual loop of kicking the can down the road, in the forlorn hope that things will resolve themselves for you, for as long as you can get away with it.
>> No. 84765 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 9:30 pm
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In the event of a GE:

YELLOW SURGE LIB DEM x SNP COALITION YOU HEARD IT HERE FIRST LADS
>> No. 84767 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 9:40 pm
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>>84765
Maybe we should swarm the Lib Dems.
>> No. 84768 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 10:56 pm
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>>84762

They both want No Deal, its so obvious. Jeremy has to do what he does so his party can't fuck it up.
>> No. 84769 Anonymous
15th January 2019
Tuesday 11:48 pm
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>>84761

He keeps saying that he could negotiate a better deal, but he hasn't put together a concrete alternative plan. He hasn't elaborated on what that better deal might entail, he hasn't provided any evidence that he could get it and he doesn't even have the confidence of his own party, let alone a cross-bench consensus.

He's had over two years to get his arse on a RyanAir flight and start informal negotiations with EU politicians, but he has done nothing of the sort. There are any number of socialist and social democratic parties who would have happily participated in a congress for an alternative Brexit. Corbyn could have been all over the news, surrounded by sympathetic European politicians who want to help him get a Brexit deal that works for everyone. He could have built a united front in opposition to May, Junker and Tusk. He could have made himself a credible alternative.

He ought to know that his no-confidence motion will fail, because he hasn't done the groundwork to build support for it. He hasn't established a coalition with the SNP, he hasn't started talks with the DUP and he hasn't courted any Tory rebels. He has squandered the element of surprise by calling a phoney no-confidence motion weeks ago, then tabling the real motion immediately after the Prime Minister invited him to do it.

He stands at the dispatch box shouting about how the Tories are betraying The Many, but it's just as empty as Cameron's Hard Working Families. Behind the platitudes, there's nothing of substance. He doesn't have a plan for Brexit, he doesn't have a plan for Britain, he doesn't have a plan to topple May and he doesn't have a plan to win an election. His entire approach to politics is just wishful thinking. It's exactly the mindset that got us into this bloody mess in the first place.
>> No. 84770 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 1:40 am
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>>84769
>He's had over two years to get his arse on a RyanAir flight and start informal negotiations with EU politicians
The EU made it perfectly clear at the outset that there will be no informal negotiations under any circumstances. You may remember that the government wanted to talk trade early on, and they refused to engage in any out-of-process discussions about it.

>He hasn't established a coalition with the SNP
He doesn't need to. Their position is clear.

>he hasn't started talks with the DUP
The DUP have a formal agreement with the Tories. Apparently they're set to meet early in the morning, so there will be 6 hours during which they'll be considering their position. It's possible they'll abstain so they can say they didn't vote against the government, in the hope that this will force May to fall on her sword, but given their position on Brexit is self-contradictory they face the possibility of losing seats in an election.

At this point, given the defeat was so disastrous, there may well be some Tory rebels who might hold their noses purely because convention dictates that if she loses the vote of confidence then, election or no, she must resign. The Tories would have 14 days in which to appoint another leader and gain the confidence of the House before an election is required.

As for those Tory rebels, given that walls have ears, there will almost certainly be confidential back-channels that have been kept hushed up. If Boris still wants to be PM, he might have to force May out by abstaining in the confidence vote to get there, and realistically he's the only potential candidate that would have any traction with the wider electorate. Outside of shitty memes, most people don't see JRM as a viable PM.
>> No. 84771 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 2:15 am
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>>84769
>Corbyn could have been all over the news, surrounded by sympathetic European politicians
I have my doubts this would endear him to Brexiteers.
But more interestingly: are there actually that many Corbyn-sympathetic Europeans? I always had the rest of the world pegged as being stuck in that Millibandish period when it came to Social Democratic leaders, with most European ones in particular being so pro-EU as to be unwilling to contemplate anything but killing Brexit. But then I can only name about 3 European centre-left leaders who're still around anyway.
>> No. 84772 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 3:07 am
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>>84771

Foreign media portrays Corbyn in a Christ figure way (Or at least did when he first was made leader) when a friend came over from Australia she asked why people don't like him because all they ever got was the image of this charming principled idealist. She couldn't understand how that matched up with his own party disliking him and him losing an election.
>> No. 84775 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 4:06 am
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>>84770

With EU politicians, not the EU. There are a huge number of left- and centre-left parties across the EU who would have been happy to arrange a chinwag and a photo op with Corbyn. As opposition leader, he had tremendous opportunities to build bridges with his European counterparts. While Theresa May and David Davis were making tits of themselves in Brussels, he could have been trotting around Europe building what amounts to a coalition of support for a socialist Brexit. It might not have made any material difference to the negotiations, but the contrast in optics would have been striking.

>84771

>I have my doubts this would endear him to Brexiteers.

Corbyn has fastidiously avoided expressing his true opinion (that he's a Brexiteer and always has been) to avoid alienating his own party. Post-referendum, he had the opportunity to argue that his own views were irrelevant, Brexit was the will of the people and his job was to guide Britain towards a Brexit that works for everyone, not just the bankers. He could have won over a lot of people in the middle without horrendously alienating his core support. Instead he dithered, pissing off pretty much everyone except the hardcore Momentumites.

>I always had the rest of the world pegged as being stuck in that Millibandish period when it came to Social Democratic leaders

Corbyn isn't massively left-wing by European standards. Most European countries have some form of proportional representation, so their political landscape is much more diverse. There's still a significant vein of left-wing Euroscepticism in Europe and a growing left-wing populist movement; a lot of left- and centre-left parties are still seriously hacked off about the Treaty of Lisbon.

By focusing on the neoliberal and elitist aspects of the EU, he could have pitched his Brexit to them as a challenge to that hegemony from which they would directly benefit. He could have sold the idea that Britain outside the EU with a socialist in charge would force the EU to reform, for fear of losing Greece and setting off a chain reaction across southern Europe.
>> No. 84776 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 4:51 am
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>>84775
>As opposition leader, he had tremendous opportunities to build bridges with his European counterparts.
European opposition leaders have no power in EU negotiations.
>> No. 84777 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 6:49 am
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>>84770
>The DUP have a formal agreement with the Tories. Apparently they're set to meet early in the morning, so there will be 6 hours during which they'll be considering their position. It's possible they'll abstain so they can say they didn't vote against the government, in the hope that this will force May to fall on her sword, but given their position on Brexit is self-contradictory they face the possibility of losing seats in an election.

The DUP pledged last night to stand by the government. They'll probably try it on for another £1billion sweetener.
>> No. 84779 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 8:14 am
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>>84777
I'm kind of impressed by how porkbarreling the fuck out of Northern Ireland is such a staple of British minority government.
1979 did it better though.
>> No. 84781 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 11:56 am
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Theresa May omits Jeremy Corbyn from cross-party Brexit talks

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/jan/16/theresa-may-fails-to-reach-out-to-jeremy-corbyn-to-strike-brexit-compromise

This is going better than Jeremy could have ever imagined.
>> No. 84782 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 12:33 pm
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May's the political equivalent of Tub Girl right now.
>> No. 84783 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 1:04 pm
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>>84782
You mean she has mainstream appeal in Japan?
>> No. 84784 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 2:29 pm
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>>84776

>European opposition leaders have no power in EU negotiations.

In the same sense that Jimmy Saville had no power in the British parliament. He didn't have a vote in the house, but he wielded vast amounts of influence.
>> No. 84785 Anonymous
16th January 2019
Wednesday 2:38 pm
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Some spicy takes from the floppy haired goblin man about women in power on the Beeb just now. What an odd little fellow.
>> No. 84868 Anonymous
27th January 2019
Sunday 5:22 pm
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Posted without comment:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djYl8rE6QIU?start=36&end=54
>> No. 84869 Anonymous
27th January 2019
Sunday 6:04 pm
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>>84868

It'd be quite useful if you did offer some sort of comment to an hour long video.

I had forgotten that civilians on telly used to have their occupations broadcast, though. That can't have been for any reason other than classism.
>> No. 84870 Anonymous
27th January 2019
Sunday 6:08 pm
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>>84869
It's not an hour long video. It's an 18-second selection from an hour long video.
>> No. 84871 Anonymous
27th January 2019
Sunday 7:00 pm
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>>84868>>84870
An eighteen second clip of Theresa May being introduced on her first appearance on Question Time? Anon, truly you are spoiling us.
>> No. 84872 Anonymous
28th January 2019
Monday 12:02 am
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I'm guessing that the joke was that only her husband in the audience was clapping for her?
>> No. 84873 Anonymous
28th January 2019
Monday 1:34 pm
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>>84868
Why does she look haggard nearly two decades ago?

This was a challenging wank indeed.
>> No. 84874 Anonymous
28th January 2019
Monday 1:55 pm
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>>84873
She wasn't much better three decades ago.
>> No. 84875 Anonymous
28th January 2019
Monday 2:33 pm
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>>84874

I'd have a go. Uptight Tories are usually filth. Same breed as horsey girls.
>> No. 84876 Anonymous
28th January 2019
Monday 3:12 pm
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>>84875
Never change, resident I'd-shag-anything-me lad of .gs.
>> No. 84877 Anonymous
30th January 2019
Wednesday 12:44 pm
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>>84876
Shag everything that moves. What doesn't, move it and shag after.
>> No. 84878 Anonymous
30th January 2019
Wednesday 5:21 pm
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>>84877
a.k.a. the Jimmy saville method.
>> No. 85216 Anonymous
13th March 2019
Wednesday 7:48 am
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A 32% TARIFF ON BUTTER? THE DAY OF THE ROPE CANNOT COME SOON ENOUGH.
>> No. 85217 Anonymous
13th March 2019
Wednesday 7:49 am
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D1hVTlnWkAAOtaT.jpg
852178521785217

>> No. 85218 Anonymous
13th March 2019
Wednesday 10:07 pm
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>>85216

Never mind butter.... This is gs, we need to know the tarrif on RICE
>> No. 85219 Anonymous
13th March 2019
Wednesday 10:10 pm
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>>85218
And rich tea biscuits. Oh fuck, this is going to stir up the Jaffa cake debate again, isn't it? Truly the end of days.
>> No. 85270 Anonymous
18th March 2019
Monday 5:54 pm
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The House of Commons Speaker has thwarted any attempt by Theresa May to bring back a third meaningful vote to parliament, unless there has been substantial change to the Brexit deal.

In a shock move likely to infuriate the prime minister, John Bercow suggested he believed such a fundamental change would involve a renegotiation at EU level, rather than clarification of the legal advice written by the attorney general, something that had been suggested this week.

Downing Street was blindsided by the announcement and unable to give a response at its regular afternoon briefing for journalists. “The speaker did not forewarn us of the content of his statement or the fact that he was making one,” May’s spokeswoman said.

Bercow made the surprise announcement in the chamber on Monday afternoon, saying the Commons was “being repeatedly asked to pronounce” on the same question.

Quoting from the guide to parliamentary procedure, Erskine May, Bercow said by convention, the question “may not be brought forward again during the same session” and that it was a “strong and longstanding convention” dating back to 1604. He said the convention had been confirmed again many times, including in 1864, 1870, 1882, 1891 and 1912. “Indeed, Erskine May makes reference to no fewer than 12 such rulings up to the year 1920,” he said.


https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/mar/18/brexit-john-bercow-rules-out-third-meaningful-vote-on-same-deal
>> No. 85271 Anonymous
18th March 2019
Monday 7:08 pm
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>>85270
What now then? Shit's weird.
>> No. 85272 Anonymous
18th March 2019
Monday 7:58 pm
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>>85271
We're not getting Meaningful Vote 3: Vote Meaningfully With a Vengeance until there's some substantial change on the table, so after the EU summit at least. Literally any and all options are on the table, up to and including a tactical nuclear strike on Luxembourg.
>> No. 85273 Anonymous
18th March 2019
Monday 8:41 pm
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>>85272
You've got my vote.
>> No. 85274 Anonymous
18th March 2019
Monday 8:47 pm
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At this rate, we're basically fucked, so all we need to figure out is whether we stay or go. I say we relocate to the Costa del Sol since it already might as well be a British colony and we'd be bringing jobs to Iberia which already has crippling unemployment. Obviously we salt these islands before the Germans inevitably try planting a towel in them.
>> No. 85275 Anonymous
18th March 2019
Monday 9:30 pm
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>>85270
He's going on some nutter's list, that's for sure. I like that we have this rule though.

>>85274
Like the Huns and the Vandals? Just roam around the nice bits of the EU ruining them for everyone else? I'll get my vacuum flask.

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