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>> No. 84569 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 7:57 am
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Theresa May to face leadership challenge

UK Prime Minister Theresa May will face a vote of no confidence in her leadership later on Wednesday.

Conservative MPs will vote between 18:00 GMT and 20:00 GMT.

The challenge to Mrs May's position comes after the required 48 letters calling for a contest were delivered.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-46535739
Expand all images.
>> No. 84570 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 9:22 am
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>>84569
All I want for Christmas is a New PM.
And some money.
>> No. 84571 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 9:34 am
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I want to get off MR BONES WILD RIDE
>> No. 84572 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 9:41 am
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I think May's getting of this ride very shortly.
>> No. 84573 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 9:46 am
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She obviously sees the logistical and political impossibility of delivering Brexit. Any replacement would be cornered into accepting whatever shite deal is on the table at the time.

Pack your rice, literally
>> No. 84574 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 10:20 am
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I really want her to quit and issue a statement saying that a Leaver needs to grow a pair of bollocks and take charge instead of sniping from the sidelines and saying the negotiations are going terribly without being able to propose a viable alternative or running away at the first sign of taking responsibility like David Davis did.
>> No. 84575 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 10:54 am
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PLACE BETS NOW!
>> No. 84576 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 10:57 am
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Tory party Christmas party tonight.
>> No. 84577 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 12:02 pm
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>So far, 147 Tory MPs have publicly said they will vote for her, with 32 against, according to BBC research. She needs to secure the votes of 158 MPs to survive.

She'll be fine unless Corbyn grows a bollocks in the next 24 hours.

>>84575
I'd like to see what happens with Mogg as PM. Not that I'd want to live in that timeline but I bet it would be entertaining.
>> No. 84578 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 12:11 pm
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>>84575

There are some worryingly short odds for some disastrously awful people on that chart. Gove and BoJo at 6/1? Those are rice-packing odds.

Could we have Penny Mordaunt, please? If we're going to have an awful bastard in charge, we could at least have a really fit bastard with a magnificent rack.
>> No. 84579 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 12:33 pm
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>>84578
It would be nice to have a MILF in charge. She'd probably make a complete hash of it but not more so than the others; apparently Raab is the front runner and he only realised the other week that quite a lot of goods come and go through Dover.

I'm sure Esther McVey was making noise recently about challenging Theresa May for the leadership, but she's such a vile little titwitch that I doubt she'd get the required two nominations.
>> No. 84580 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 2:18 pm
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>>84577
Would it be entertaining? I've seen politicians express patrician contempt for serious issues a great many times and I've never once found it amusing, not even when it happens to other other countries, let alone my own.

Actually, pic related did elicit a noise somwhere between a shocked gasp and a slight giggle.
>> No. 84581 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 3:10 pm
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>>84580
>Would it be entertaining?

Yes.

Now that we have that conundrum solved, you lads reckon a better Withdrawal Agreement can still be hammered out? I'm skeptical considering we have a political declaration to end free movement i.e. one of the fundamental pillars of the EU. Norway seems shit in comparison even if we will have to work out how a future trading relationship will solidify.
>> No. 84582 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 3:32 pm
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>>84581

I believe it can only be worse.

Has anyone figured out how to solve the problem of stopping freedom of movement between NI and ROI without ripping up the Good Friday Agreement yet?
>> No. 84583 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 3:59 pm
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>>84582
My reckoning is we can always twist RoI's arm into requesting some exemption to free movement. The whole border argument seems like a red herring for me, nobody in GB gives a monkeys these days about NI, Eire needs us more than we need them and the other EU states don't give a toss about Ireland.
>> No. 84584 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 4:02 pm
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>>84582
I'm sure I read of somewhere in Europe, I think someplace Slavic, where two countries don't even have the border on the map confirmed. They have certain roads for travel for locals between the two countries and certain roads for international travel. Something like that could be feasible.

>>84583
This, pretty much. People are exaggerating how much they care about Ireland because it's a useful pawn for them.
>> No. 84585 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 4:19 pm
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Where is the hero we deserve?
>> No. 84586 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 4:37 pm
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>>84583

Nobody ever gave a monkeys about NI until the bombs came over here.
Although I'm tired of brits talking about a 'return to the troubles' over fucking brexit as if the whole of NI are hungry for violence. There was a significantly different political and social environment that understandably lead to trouble kicking off when it did, whereas now most of the gangs are just thugs or severely delusional.
>> No. 84587 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 6:12 pm
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I get the feeling that she'll win tonight, and the only solution will be to remove the head or destroy the brain.
>> No. 84588 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 6:20 pm
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>>84587
Are Labour ahead in the polls yet? What a useless Tory enabling clown Jeremy Corbyn is.
>> No. 84589 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 6:45 pm
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>>84588

It's quite incredible really, he's absolutely useless, he still somehow hasn't got them on the backfoot to the extent that the opposition that's giving her difficulty is from within her own party.

He's just useless, I have no idea how anybody could genuinely think he's capable of swinging it.

Hate him all you want, if we had the likes of Blair here now things would be very different.
>> No. 84590 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 6:45 pm
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>>84588

It's quite incredible really, he's absolutely useless, he still somehow hasn't got them on the backfoot to the extent that the opposition that's giving her difficulty is from within her own party.

He's just useless, I have no idea how anybody could genuinely think he's capable of swinging it.

Hate him all you want, if we had the likes of Blair here now things would be very different.
>> No. 84591 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 7:20 pm
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>>84588
>>84589

I'm still holding out hope that Labour are playing the long game. Letting the Tories burn down their own house while ticking along under Corbyn, ready to unveil a shiny new leader and step on the ashes.

The only flaw in this hope is that as hopeless as JCorbs, is they still don't have anybody fucking better.
>> No. 84592 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 7:27 pm
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>>84589>>84590
You can say that again.

Labour are pretty much an irrelevance on Brexit. Every time I've heard them recently they sound like massively cynical opportunists more obsessed with party interests than national interests; the Tories doing the same isn't appealing to anyone so I don't know why they're copying them.
>> No. 84593 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 7:40 pm
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>>84592
>Every time I've heard them recently they sound like massively cynical opportunists more obsessed with party interests than national interests

I disagree. I think it entirely makes sense for them to simultaneously want to abide by the referendum decision while avoiding blithely going along with May's botch job. There are certain aspects of Labour's economic proposals that might be entirely forbidden under both May's deal and the current EU relationship, so I think Labour's current path is a wise one. However, what isn't wise is that this is probably the firsty you're hearing of this because Labour's messaging is bum-rubbish at the moment. I don't think this is entirely the leadership's fault, so calling Corbyn "useless" is silly, but they certainly aren't realising quite how quiet they appear right now.

>>84591
>Letting the Tories burn down their own house while ticking along

I don't really understand what you mean by this. They're angling for a general election and opposing May's deal, what else do you think they should do?
>> No. 84594 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 8:12 pm
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I'm going to call it. She's lost.
>> No. 84595 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 8:14 pm
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>>84593

>They're angling for a general election and opposing May's deal, what else do you think they should do?

To clearly state:
a) what, specifically, is wrong with May's deal
b) their concrete proposal for an alternative deal
and c) why the EU would agree to that deal.

I think I'm reasonably well informed, but I have no idea what Labour want from a deal or how they would go about negotiating it. I believe Juncker and Tusk when they say that the draft transition agreement is their final offer; Labour haven't given me any reason to doubt that. From what I can see, Corbyn is cynically advancing his own political aspirations over the national interest. His opposition to the deal is pushing us closer to a no deal scenario for no obvious benefit.
>> No. 84596 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 8:29 pm
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>>84594
I'd be surprised if there's many more than 100 voting against her.

The DUP will not back her deal so it won't get through parliament. There'll be a motion of no confidence in the government and there will be a general election. We'll enter the perpetual loop of Theresa May staying in power until Brexit is done but not standing as leader at the next general election.
>> No. 84598 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 9:06 pm
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>>84595

I think it is probably a factor 49% of people at last count don't want to leave at all. So if it doesn't seem like most people are suggesting a better idea on how to leave just poo pooing the drawbacks of leaving, there is a obvious reason for it.
>> No. 84599 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 9:15 pm
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>>84583

>Eire needs us more than we need them and the other EU states don't give a toss about Ireland.

This isn't true at all. They're already expanding their ports in the south of Ireland in preparation for suddenly becoming a replacement for Dover, and they're looking forward to the money rolling in by all accounts.

You might think nobody cares about NI too, but they're still aware of the legal and civil implications of not keeping an open border as they agreed to during peace treaties. I don't believe ROI has any intention of ever asking to close the borders, as it would be political, and potentially literal suicide to do so, as they'd lose leverage, tax loopholes, fuel price balancing, and also risk genuine violence at the border. Also, much like Trump and his wall, who exactly are we expecting to be patrolling the sudden EU-Ulster border?
>> No. 84600 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 9:56 pm
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>>84599
>I don't believe ROI has any intention of ever asking to close the borders, as it would be political, and potentially literal suicide to do so

Exactly. I don't even know why you felt the need to make this post when it obviously comes down to Eire being tied to us in the Common Travel Area. They will be subject to accommodating whatever the big boys eventually agree to and no amount of speeding up ports expansion will change that.
>> No. 84601 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 10:01 pm
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>>84600

Most people who voted leave did so expecting a hard border, so it'd also be political suicide for the UK government to accept a deal without one.
>> No. 84602 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 10:04 pm
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>>84588
They have been for about a month, and most of the Tory support is just Brexiteers concerned that anyone else will stop Brexit because they're part of the Westminster Political Elite Globalist Conspiracy. We don't have a confidence motion in the House for the same reason we haven't had status referendum in Scotland and Northern Ireland or a referendum to ratify the deal. She knows she won't win, so she won't let it happen.
>> No. 84603 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 10:04 pm
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>>84596
>There'll be a motion of no confidence in the government and there will be a general election.

I doubt that on the grounds that Corbyn is the alternative. The DUP and some Tories might block the agreement but in a vote of no confidence Theresa just needs to get out those photos of Corbyn with Gerry Adams. You'd be more likely to see votes for the agreement being pulled out of Labour MPs looking to get the job finished.
>> No. 84604 Anonymous
12th December 2018
Wednesday 10:15 pm
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>>84603
The DUP could withdraw from the C&S and just abstain. Also remember that the Tories also have two extra votes from the sex pests they previously kicked out but restored today.
>> No. 84605 Anonymous
13th December 2018
Thursday 1:25 am
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>>84590
If we had Blair there's a reasonable chance Labour would obliterate itself. I'm not going to deny he'd be better at opposing the government every step of the way, even better on procedure, but in terms of party interest there's a good argument for Labour hiding at the moment and only ever fighting a general election on the issue of Brexit* if they're trying to throw it so the Conservatives are stuck carrying the can.

*I'd argue - somewhat oversimplifying - that Labour's 2017 campaign followed the 1974 model. Conservatives say "this is a single issue election!" on an issue Labour's weak on, Labour cobbles together some bullshit on that and then go "No actually it's about everything but that issue..." and do better than expected. Except this time, Labour lucked out and didn't actually win.

>>84592
Honestly, I respect Labour putting party before country.
They've offered themselves up as a sacrificial lamb too many times trying to do "the right thing" and they never get any credit for it. 1931, 1976, 2008. I don't want to argue the specifics because each one is a massive debate in itself and I tend to personally qualify the actions taken with "this is what current or contemporary received opinion said was the right thing to do, in the national interest, for hardworking families. but it was incredibly stupid" but the point remains. Assume Labour did the right thing, each time their reward was to be wiped out at the subsequent election. Why, now that we're in a massive crisis again, should they throw themselves under the bus to save the public from themselves? Why have a one term Labour government stop the ship from sinking in the worst of times just so the Conservatives can get another 4 terms scaring people with the memory of the suffering under that one-term Labour government, even if the roots were much deeper? Bugger it, let's have 4 terms of Labour scaring people into the ballot box to enshrine PM McDonnell as the defining figure of the 2020s by reminding people of that brief time when all the shop shelves were empty and you couldn't buy Chinese tat off the internet because all the ports were clogged up. Sure, Labour could've helped prevent it - but Thatcher could've helped prevent the winter of discontent, so bugger it, let's get even.

Or at least that's the case I'd put at the moment. As you can probably tell, I spend much more time with my history books than I do keeping up with Brexit so what should probably be some quite frightening ideas seem quite harmless and hypothetical.
>> No. 84606 Anonymous
13th December 2018
Thursday 9:46 am
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>>84605
What's it like being this much of an insufferable ideologue. Does life get any simpler?
>> No. 84607 Anonymous
13th December 2018
Thursday 10:46 am
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>>84604
No, you don't understand. The DUP won't do that because they know what a general election entails and whatever goodies Labour have promised hasn't swayed them on this.

Dear Leader is literally propping up the government by being a bogeyman.
>> No. 84608 Anonymous
13th December 2018
Thursday 12:29 pm
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>>84606
I'm not being an ideologue, I'm being ludicrously partisan (while also holding my party in some contempt), ridiculously fatalistic, a touch misanthropic and I'm even being a bit silly, but I'm not being an ideologue. Tony Blair could come back tomorrow and promise the next Labour government is going to stick to current spending plans and I'd still get my arse to the polling station in 2022 to give blue team the red card. My ideologue days are over.
>> No. 84616 Anonymous
17th December 2018
Monday 7:33 pm
84616 spacer

Please use the sharing tools found via the share button at the top or side of articles. Copying articles to share with others is a breach of FT.com T&Cs and Copyright Policy. Email licensing@ft.com to buy additional rights. Subscribers may share up to 10 or 20 articles per month using the gift article service. More information can be found at https://www.ft.com/tour.
https://www.ft.com/content/908cad70-0228-11e9-9d01-cd4d49afbbe3

UK Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has tabled a motion of no-confidence in Theresa May’s leadership after she announced MPs would not vote on her Brexit deal until mid-January.

Critics suggested the move was a gimmick given that there is no binding mechanism for parliament to declare no-confidence solely in a prime minister, as opposed to the government itself, which could trigger a general election.

In his statement, Mr Corbyn told parliament that Mrs May’s “deal is unchanged and not going to change”.
Please use the sharing tools found via the share button at the top or side of articles. Copying articles to share with others is a breach of FT.com T&Cs and Copyright Policy. Email licensing@ft.com to buy additional rights. Subscribers may share up to 10 or 20 articles per month using the gift article service. More information can be found at https://www.ft.com/tour.
https://www.ft.com/content/908cad70-0228-11e9-9d01-cd4d49afbbe3

The move came after Mrs May fended off opposition demands to hold the vote on her Brexit plan — originally scheduled last week, but pulled after the prime minister admitted she would lost by a “substantial margin” — before Christmas.


https://www.ft.com/content/908cad70-0228-11e9-9d01-cd4d49afbbe3
>> No. 84617 Anonymous
17th December 2018
Monday 9:05 pm
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>>84616
Lad.
>> No. 84618 Anonymous
17th December 2018
Monday 9:08 pm
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>>84616
I'm not sure what's going on here. Has he just failed to get the motion in the terms laid down in FTPA or is he deliberately just pulling a stunt?
>> No. 84619 Anonymous
17th December 2018
Monday 9:31 pm
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>>84618

As per usual with Corbyn, he's doing something that looks brave and principled but is actually pointless bordering on counter-productive.
>> No. 84620 Anonymous
17th December 2018
Monday 11:05 pm
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>>84616
>Please use the sharing tools found via the share button at the top or side of articles. Copying articles to share with others is a breach of FT.com T&Cs and Copyright Policy. Email licensing@ft.com to buy additional rights. Subscribers may share up to 10 or 20 articles per month using the gift article service. More information can be found at [...]


Is that not a breach of GDPR or some shit, forcibly injecting stuff into your clipboard?
>> No. 84621 Anonymous
17th December 2018
Monday 11:09 pm
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>>84620

No, it's just twatty.
>> No. 84622 Anonymous
18th December 2018
Tuesday 1:54 am
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>>84619
She's denied it time to be heard in Parliment.

Corbs knew that would happen, but it's the shot he played for.
By refusing it, it makes her look like she's running away.
>> No. 84623 Anonymous
18th December 2018
Tuesday 4:20 am
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Theresa May seems like a timid Thatcher from my pov as an American
>> No. 84624 Anonymous
18th December 2018
Tuesday 8:14 am
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>>84619
What I can't tell is whether Corbyn is genuinely doing the smart selfish thing (trying to avoid being in power while doing so would be a liability) or if he's really, genuinely, honestly an idiot who thinks 'we need to know a no-confidence would work'
Either way the no confidence motion in the PM seems counterproductive. It seems like the kind of thing important enough to unify the Conservatives a little (at least to vote it down) while being ineffective at anything else. The only possible logic I can see is if they hoped some Conservatives would vote against May.

>>84622
Didn't he say if she rejected giving it time in parliament he'd table a real confidence motion?
>> No. 84625 Anonymous
18th December 2018
Tuesday 9:18 am
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>>84624
117 MPs voted against her last week, although that was a secret ballot and whether they'd do the same in a recorded for is another thing. Even if they would, it's very unlikely that they'd do the same in a binding FTPA motion. You can expect all 316 of her colleagues to back her in one of those. Even if the DUP abstain then that vote goes in her favour 317-315. Maybe Boris could be talked into switching because it gives him a shot at No 10, and it's tied at 316 and the Speaker votes to keep the government in.
>> No. 84626 Anonymous
18th December 2018
Tuesday 2:22 pm
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>>84624

If he thought he had any chance, he should have gone straight for a real confidence motion - it probably wouldn't have worked, but he might have capitalised on a low point in Tory unity and gained the advantage of surprise. This phoney confidence motion just forewarns the Tory whips and gives them time to get the back benchers into line.

I think he suffers from a self-delusion that's common to dissenters and radicals - he's spent so long "fighting the good fight" that he believes his own bullshit. Now that he has a modicum of power, he's faced with the constant dissonance between his own self-image of ideological purity and the difficult realities of politics. Actually achieving something would require compromise, it would require pissing off some of his loyal supporters in order to forge a wider consensus, it would involve him being called a sellout and a traitor and a closet Blairite. I think he's too old and cantankerous to do the difficult work of building a new self-image as a leader rather than a rebel.
>> No. 84627 Anonymous
18th December 2018
Tuesday 7:41 pm
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The SNPand Lib Dems are sabotaging the no confidence motion.

Please explain what the fuck is going on here boo-lads.
>> No. 84628 Anonymous
18th December 2018
Tuesday 7:54 pm
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>>84627
What? No they aren't, unless you mean they are pushing for a real, election-triggering one, which isn't exactly what I would call sabotage.
>> No. 84629 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 12:40 am
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>>84627
Oh Jeremy. Come back when you've grown some balls and can do a proper no-confidence motion.
>> No. 84630 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 1:35 am
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If we've learned anything in the past week, it's that we now have a government that cannot govern and an opposition that cannot oppose. Much as I hate it, we can finally say BROKEN BRITAIN without being hyperbolic.
>> No. 84631 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 6:59 am
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>>84630
I only learnt the other week it isn't pronounced hyper-bowl.
>> No. 84632 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 10:44 am
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>>84631

I still hear a lot of people pronounce it that way, I'm sure that's how I learned it from my English teachers in school. I know it's not right, but it seems like a word that people commonly mispronounce, but are not often corrected on it.
>> No. 84634 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 1:19 pm
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Labour despises Jeremy and yet loves Theresa May... want to know why? Theresa is a Blairite (gramscian eurocommunist) whilst Jeremy is an old fashioned bearded 50's commie. He has not learned to be a hip slimy Blairite creature yet and thus they shun him. I can only hope that he achieves final victory and sends the blairdrones to the gulag, it would be much more than the Tory clowns could ever achieve.
>> No. 84636 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 1:27 pm
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>>84634

>final victory
>gulag

Satire is dead, because the idiots are satirising themselves.
>> No. 84643 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 4:55 pm
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We've moved on from Jeremy and his army of vile trots hating Jews to... Jeremy and his army of vile trots hating women again.

Fabulous.
>> No. 84644 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 5:06 pm
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>>84643

Even my annoyingly feminist pet woman said "But she is a stupid woman through."

Moral high ground point scoring same as always.
>> No. 84645 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 5:48 pm
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>>84643
The one solace I can take in a no-deal scenario is that you'll be forced to live here too. Do you just thrive on the politics of tedium?
There are fun ways to tear Corbyn apart. Every single member of parliament is a contemptibly boring incompetent. They would be overpromoted if they were in a joke chamber like the Scottish parliament or - and here's a real punchline - the Welsh assembly! We have a government of complete idiots, I'd bet my house on our chancellor not knowing how money is created and - this is practically cheating - I'll bet our foreign secretary can't get more than 40% of the countries on a map. I couldn't even tell you who's in the shadow cabinet because they're all non-entities who don't get any news time because they've got no ideas, leading a party split between the sort of freaks who get nostalgic for Blair's "new deal on welfare" because it was a prudent policy that makes them feel all warm and responsible inside, and a disparate bunch of LARPers who think Britain has any business giving a toss about Israel-Palestine unless there's a chance to flog fighter jets, backed up by any other tom-dick-and-harry who recognises Blair is a PR disaster in 2018 and probably a vampire to boot. Nicola Sturgeon is taking the lead and trying to get some things done, but that's okay because she makes up for it by being completely fucking insufferable, leading a party locked in competition with the Blairites to see who can be more pointlessly tedious on bread and butter issues, opposed by regional branches of the parties available for viewers outside Scotland with less name recognition than the average Shetland taxi driver. Despite being deeply split, the Labour party doesn't even have the fight left in it to go back to the shite old days of 2016 when it was in open warfare. It's cowed, it's broken.

None of the factions in either of the major parties should exist today. They are all wrong. That we stand where we do today is a testament to their wrongness.
But that's okay.
Everything is actually fine.
All we need is to get rid of the bad allotment man and make David Milliband leader and all the bad-bad will go away, Brexit will be cancelled and we'll restore politics to the good timeline where competent management staff ensure nobody has any ideas not justified with policy based evidence, where plucky little Britain can modernise itself for a new age and continue to punch above it's weight in the special relationship, and where the liberal democrats are taken seriously again.
This is Britain and everything's alright.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWkTQvlnDTI
>> No. 84646 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 5:55 pm
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>>84643
Because of one, potentially baiting, post on an imageboard? Do you have no bullshit alarm? Obviously not if that's the kind of guff you're willing to tell yourself.
>> No. 84648 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 5:57 pm
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>>84646

Not being paying attention to the news today then lad?

>>84645

Breathe, mate. Come sit here if you want. I'll put the kettle on. Would you like that? There we are. There we are. Shhh.
>> No. 84649 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 6:07 pm
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>>84646
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has denied calling Theresa May a "stupid woman" during Prime Minister's Questions.

He was asked to make a statement to MPs after facing Tory calls to apologise for the alleged insult. Mr Corbyn said he was "opposed to the use of sexist and misogynist language in any form" and insisted he had actually said "Manc cunt""stupid people".


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-46619689

It's the main headline for most media outlets.
>> No. 84650 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 6:11 pm
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>>84649
>>84648
No, obviously not.

He really dosn't help hiimself.
>> No. 84651 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 6:30 pm
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It baffles me that people could care about this in the internet age when we can have cunt offs about anything from 'let there be light!' to whether Labour could've won the 2010 election. Who cares that Corbyn called the stupid android witch a stupid woman? I'll even grant that it's sexist. If he said it, he should critically reflect on that, but now that one person has drawn his attention to it everyone else can shut up. It isn't entertaining and you aren't going to topple Corbyn because he called the stupid incompetent billy-no-mates robo-cow a stupid woman. You aren't even going to dent him. Nobody will remember this by next week.

I know, in these strange times, you aren't going to topple the leader of the opposition just because his strategy is to tactlessly avoid doing his job as the country teeters on the brink of the abyss because it's governed by a stupid woman, but you aren't going to topple him on something this boring either.
>> No. 84652 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 6:32 pm
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>>84649
I think this says more about the media than anyone else. There were at least three actually newsworthy stories in PMQs today, but the coverage is instead focusing on something Corbyn might have said under his breath.
>> No. 84653 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 7:10 pm
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Lads, the actual story is John Bercow getting called out for being biased against the government and having called Andrea Leadsom a stupid woman a number of months back. Conservative MPs don't really give a fuck about Corbyn right now much like the rest of the country.

I for one hope that weird fruitcake is finally chucked out on his arse.

>>84651
>I'll even grant that it's sexist. If he said it, he should critically reflect on that

What's it like being a man without a cock?
>> No. 84654 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 7:14 pm
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>>84652

The whole thing is embarrassing. We now have a terrifyingly short timeline to prepare for Brexit day, but most of a day in Parliament and an entire day of the news cycle has been squandered on what the opposition leader may or may not have muttered under his breath.

It's an embarrassment for the Tories, because it's so blatantly a distraction from their own crisis. It's an embarrassment for Corbyn, because he has done absolutely nothing to address the situation. It's an embarrassment for the media, who have been taken in by the whole charade.

According to the government's own documents, people are probably going to die in the event of a no-deal scenario. The health minister is bulk-buying fridges to store medicines. The DWP is preparing for a surge in homelessness, poverty and suicide. The army are being put on standby to suppress civil unrest. This isn't "project fear", it's the government's own contingency planning. No-deal isn't an outlandish possibility, it's the automatic default unless parliament agrees to a deal or agrees to withdraw Article 50 within the next 100 days.

There's a fire in the basement, the floorboards are starting to smoulder and we're all arguing about who farted.
>> No. 84655 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 7:17 pm
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I'm afraid to voice this opinion publicly but I don't really get how you can 100% construe such a statement as having misogynistic intent. It's different to someone using constructions like 'black' or 'gay' where it is a plainly irrelevant characteristic, but 'man' and 'woman' are just how we refer to each other, aren't they? If Corbyn called her a 'stupid person' that would sound quite awkward and distant to refer to someone he is actually very familiar with.
>> No. 84656 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 7:22 pm
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>>84654
>people are probably going to die in the event of a no-deal scenario

Project Fear strikes again. Nobody was immortal when we were a member of the EU so we're not suddenly going to gain the likelihood of dying at some point.

>>84655
He should have just called her a dopey cunt and had done with it.
>> No. 84657 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 7:23 pm
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>>84655
Women are subconsciously assumed to be stupid due to longwinded cultural reasons that aren't worth getting into here, men aren't. It's how we refer to each other, but it also serves to reinforce that sort of expectation, so erring on the side of not putting it like that when you're in a public facing position is prudent.
Mostly it's just twats acting in bad faith though.
>> No. 84658 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 7:30 pm
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>>84657
This. The type of person who doesn't see this is the type of person who claims they should be able to use the word Pakî because it's no different from people calling us Brits.
>> No. 84659 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 7:49 pm
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>>84658

I really don't think that's the same. Calling someone a stupid man or a stupid woman seem entirely equal in my eyes. There's really no intention there, and it's entirely not the same as calling someone the P word - as far as I'm aware there's no basis for calling woman a woman being an insult.

I can't tell if people are cynically jumping on this because it's an easy political point to score, or because they're genuinely that sensitive to perceived sexism that so much as referring to a woman as her gender is deemed an offence - that's absolutely mental, and I honestly don't know how you expect society to evolve beyond gender inequality if you can no longer address a female as woman without it being phlegmatic.
>> No. 84660 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 8:04 pm
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>>84659
People are cynically jumping on it, but there's a real point underlying it. It's just not really worth discussing that point.
>> No. 84661 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 8:09 pm
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>>84659
You can't pretend to be whiter than white and then deal in shades of grey. That's why Corbyn is getting so much shit over it. Next they'll claim he's always been a lifelong feminist, wasn't actually there and didn't say those things.

Corbyn is a disingenuous cunt.
>> No. 84663 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 8:18 pm
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>>84660

>but there's a real point underlying it. It's just not really worth discussing that point.

I'm sure you're right, I still wouldn't get it. I've never not wanted equality for everyone, but increasingly the internet finds ways to assure me that somehow I don't because of what I assumed were entirely innocuous things like saying 'woman' or posting on britfa.gs.
>> No. 84664 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 8:29 pm
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>>84661
>You can't pretend to be whiter than white and then deal in shades of grey
I don't see why not, that's been the purview of every other prick who's held high office in living memory.
>> No. 84665 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 8:41 pm
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>>84663
Don't be like that. That kind of curmudgeonly attitude is how Reddit Atheists end up burning with rage about girls existing and thinking "white genocide" is real. I'm not saying it'll happen to you, obviously, but don't get all surly because people disagree with you.
>> No. 84667 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 9:15 pm
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Former X Factor winner Steve Brookstein has spoken.
>> No. 84668 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 10:19 pm
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>>84667
What can't you say, Steve, hey? What can't you say that you're so bloody desperate to get off your chest?

I can't stand these disingenuous gits who try martyring themselves over nothing, and everything, all at once.
>> No. 84669 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 10:23 pm
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>>84668
YOU CAN'T CALL A WOMAN A WOMAN while Mars and Earth align.
>> No. 84670 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 11:00 pm
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>>84657

I mean, the thing is, right. What is is, is. How do we decide when exactly it's been feminism long enough that we CAN call women woman again, because they've been equal for long enough for it not to be an assumption of inferiority based on socialised gender prejudice. Eh? How will we be able to tell?
>> No. 84671 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 11:04 pm
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>>84654
>it's the automatic default unless parliament agrees to a deal or agrees to withdraw Article 50 within the next 100 days.
The difficulty here is that in Parliament everyone knows this, and everyone agrees, but the stupid woman in charge of deciding what they get to talk about will only give them a vote on the one they don't want.
>> No. 84673 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 11:09 pm
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>>84665

I'm not angry that people disagree with me, I'm angry that the people I agree with seem to be drifting away on a big crusader boat and have left me behind. I harbour precisely zero ill will towards any subset of humanity, and yet every time I blink something else I thought was normal, innocuous language apparently becomes a slur with decades of history I was unaware of (and the rich history is typically entirely anecdotal or nebulous)

I may still be coming across as curmudgeonly, but when people call you a 'performative ally' for going to Pride and having a beer, it starts to weigh on you.
>> No. 84674 Anonymous
19th December 2018
Wednesday 11:47 pm
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>>84670

It would never be long enough, there are power systems in place and now people in those positions now that rely on the stance 'women are being treated as inferior'. Those people will never surrender their ground and will move the goal posts appropriately to justify their existence and consolidate their power. It is an entirely open ended position.


The real damage here is not to Jeremy Corbyn, the real long term damage is to the conservative party, by pretending to be offended they have accepted the paradigm that using a defining class with a pejorative means the defining class is a pejorative, they've moved the 'political correctness' goal posts to the labour side now they can’t go back, rather than simply calling him a hypocrite with unrealistic values.
>> No. 84675 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 12:02 am
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>>84674

What a load of nonsense. I don't know if you've been paying attention, but the Tories' entire MO for the last 18 months has been doing things they supposedly can't do.
>> No. 84676 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 12:04 am
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>>84675
Calm down you're hysterical.
>> No. 84677 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 12:24 am
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>>84676
I don't think I'm the poster you think I am.
>> No. 84678 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 12:29 am
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>>84673
Okay, the jargon is a bit tedious, but remember that that level of jargon is still very much a niche factor in all of this, but it's one right wingers love to exploit to try to inflate any perceived divide on the left.
>> No. 84679 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 12:30 am
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In other sexism news today, a minister on BBC Radio complimented a presenter on her lipstick, saying it matched her microphone perfectly. For some reason nobody seems to be making any fuss over how it's reinforcing gender stereotypes and not the sort of thing a minister should be saying to a broadcaster trying to hold them to account.
>> No. 84680 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 12:51 am
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>>84679
>reinforcing gender stereotypes

It's not though. It's like if I told you your tie matched the sofa you were on. Stop going out of your way to get upset about things people don't care about, for your own sake if no one elses.
>> No. 84681 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 2:41 am
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>>84674

Everyone will have forgotten about this entire episode by boxing day.
>> No. 84682 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 7:04 am
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Irrefutable evidence.

It seems that a number of Tories made a fuss about it because it's given them an excuse to have a pop at bercow for calling people like leadsom a stupid woman in the past.
>> No. 84683 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 7:06 am
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>>84682
I'm less convinced now I've seen The Mail's phonetic walk-through, I thought he was banged to rights earlier.
>> No. 84684 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 7:49 am
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>>84680
>It's like if I told you your tie matched the sofa you were on
It really isn't.
>> No. 84685 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 8:48 am
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>>84682

Why have seemingly intelligent people bought into the framing of this non-story?

Corbyn supposedly mouthed something or other, a day after Churchill's bloated grandson clearly told a SNP MP to "go back to the isle of Skye". He did so unprovoked (in order words, he hadn't just experienced a deranged banshee screeching at him in the moments before).

And all this nonsense follows the week Tory MPs posited the idea of using food shortages against those uppity Irish. This should be a scandal. It's suggestive that European media is still discussing this, while we hopeless Brits have fully devolved into vapid Americans.

And I'm forced to endure all this just when my friends in finance tell me to prepare: the global economy is on the verge of recession. What a pathetic, trivial people the Brits have become. They obsess over a couple of seconds of Corbyn, rather than consider the serious possibility that they will face food riots in 2019 - all of it overseen by R boys, back from Iraq?

Is it any wonder that Corbyn has stayed silent during the last few months, in the face of such pervasive stupidity? But now the papers have found away to rip him to shreds merely for mouthing *something*, you lot are eating it up.
>> No. 84686 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 8:56 am
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>>84685
>Tory MPs posited the idea of using food shortages against those uppity Irish. This should be a scandal.

Nobody gives a shit about the Irish. People pretend to care about the Irish in the same way that people pretend to care about whether Corbyn muttered "stupid woman".
>> No. 84687 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 9:13 am
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>>84686
The UK is circling the drain, and I think it'll come as a shock to you just how few outsiders give a shit about the British.

On the other hand, the bog-munchers have children the world over (thanks, in large part, to the famines worsened by London), and are actually well-liked. The coming months will be an education for you.
>> No. 84688 Anonymous
20th December 2018
Thursday 10:22 am
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>>84687
Here's hoping people like the Scots too.
(I wouldn't if I was them, but I'm not.)
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