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>> No. 85368 Anonymous
23rd March 2019
Saturday 10:09 pm
85368 How accurate is this article?
I'm not British, sorry about that. Is this editorial at all within the realm of reality or is it just character assassination?

“She was dealt a bad hand.” “She took a poisoned chalice.” From a great distance, it is possible to feel sorry for British Prime Minister Theresa May. She seems so dignified. She seems to be trying so hard. The circles beneath her eyes have grown so much deeper since she became prime minister back in 2016, following the surprise result of the Brexit referendum, the resignation of her hapless predecessor, David Cameron, and an ugly leadership squabble, during which several of her male colleagues metaphorically stabbed one another in the back. Since then, she has always seemed to outsiders the sensible person in the room, the adult who knows what she is doing, the sane person in a madhouse.

Alas, she is not any of those things. She is not sensible, she does not know what she is doing, and, increasingly, she doesn’t seem to be entirely sane either. Outside of Westminster, the extent of May’s responsibility for this crisis might not be fully appreciated. But in truth, almost everything about Brexit — from the nature of the deal she negotiated to the divisions in her party and her country — is very much her fault. The latest development — European leaders have told her that the United Kingdom can have a Brexit extension until May 22, if May can get her withdrawal agreement passed in Parliament, but must crash out of all of its trading arrangements on April 12 if not — underlines this bitter truth. She is not to be pitied: She is the worst prime minister in living memory, presiding over a crisis of her own creation.

The list of her mistakes is not short. She did not have to trigger Article 50, the legal mechanism for leaving the European Union, before making a plan on how to do so: That decision set a two-year clock ticking and has resulted in the cliff edge the country would have reached on the 29th of this month if an extension had not been granted. She did not have to call an unnecessary parliamentary election in 2017, one which resulted in the loss of her majority and forced her to rely on a small, radical, Protestant Northern Irish political party, as well as the extreme anti-European faction within her own party, in order to stay in power.

But her errors go even deeper. In fact, all of the events of the past two years have been shaped by a decision she made, by herself, following bad advice, at the very beginning of this process. Remember that the British did not vote for any particular form of Brexit: Thanks to Cameron’s simplistic, open-ended referendum question, they chose to “Leave” the European Union but did not express any view on what should happen next. When she took office, May could have observed that the vote was very close, that Britain’s commercial and political ties to Europe were strong, and that it would make sense for the United Kingdom to stay within the single market, the pan-European free-trade zone that Britain itself did so much to create — or at the very least within a customs union.

Instead, she chose to leave both of those institutions, a decision that immediately triggered the problem of the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, which was eliminated thanks to E.U. trade treaties but will, if customs barriers are put in place, need to be built back. Her decision also created potential problems for anyone who trades with Britain or works with Britain — and for Brits who trade and work in Europe. But she was not sorry: She accompanied her decision with a speech that called “a citizen of the world” nothing more than “a citizen of nowhere” and immediately alienated a large part of the country.

She went on to alienate almost everyone else. Until this week, nearly three years after the referendum, she made no effort to reach across the aisle and include opposition parties in the planning for this momentous national change. Although the E.U. has been entirely transparent about its negotiating goals from the beginning, she kept hers secret. She tried, and failed, to prevent parliamentary scrutiny of her deal. She does not respond to pleas, advice, suggestions. Columnist Matthew Parris has described her as “the Death Star of modern British politics,” a black void that sucks in people and ideas and never provides a response.
Her secrecy and incompetence have created ill will in Europe, and real anger in the House of Commons, some of whose members have belatedly tried to take control of the Brexit process. They have begged her to try a series of votes, to try to find one version of an exit plan that could pass the entire chamber. John Bercow, speaker of the House of Commons, produced a decree from 1604 in an attempt to prevent yet another vote on her deal, after two had already failed. But she seems to take none of it in. On Wednesday evening, she made a bizarre, crypto-populist appeal, over the heads of Britain’s elected representatives, to the nation: “You the public have had enough,” she declared. “You are tired of the infighting. You are tired of the political games and the procedural rows” — as if the political games and procedural rows were not all entirely her fault. “It is high time we made a decision,” she said — as if she were not the one preventing Parliament from doing exactly that.

Others have contributed to this crisis. Cameron; the Labour opposition leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who has not lifted a finger to offer a constructive solution; an incompetent series of Tory ministers. But May is in charge, and she did not get this job by accident. I once saw a photograph of her at university, wearing a neat skirt and sensible shoes while everyone else had long hair and hippie dresses. She has been doing conservative politics ever since then, and she has wanted to be prime minister ever since then; she spent her whole life, motivated by loyalty to the Tory party, training for this job. Now she has it — and she has used it to steer her country into a humiliating crisis.

The slogan of the “Leave” campaign, back in 2016, was “Take Back Control.” But Europe has now taken back control of May’s botched Brexit. And however it ends, it won’t be a success.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/dont-pity-theresa-may-shes-the-worst-prime-minister-in-living-memory/2019/03/22/405920e6-4ca5-11e9-93d0-64dbcf38ba41_story.html

I hope you all enjoy this image of a man ordering a double whisky and it dovetails with your local customs
Expand all images.
>> No. 85369 Anonymous
23rd March 2019
Saturday 10:45 pm
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May is a diligent public servant but an unskilled politician. She willingly took on the role of delivering Brexit, but she failed to understand the sheer complexity of the task and the irreconcilable differences between the Remain and Leave camps and within the Leave camp itself.

For the duration of her career as a politician, she sought simply to implement whatever she believed was the majority opinion. That was a reasonably effective approach as a cabinet minister, because if in doubt she could simply refer the ultimate decision to the Prime Minister; now that she is Prime Minister, she has nobody to pass the buck to.

Those irreconcilable differences demand a leader, but May has always been a follower. She simply lacks the skills to shape the public debate and create a majority consensus around her deal or any deal. She has no powers of persuasion, because she has never needed them until becoming PM. She sincerely believes in nothing more than delivering on the will of the people, which is precisely why she has failed to deliver a satisfactory Brexit.

May is not competent for the role, but that is not particularly an indictment of her character; rather, it is a reflection of the near-impossibility of resolving the many intractable dilemmas that surround Brexit. May has made an almighty hash of it, it is easy to think of people who are better equipped for the task, but it is difficult to imagine who could do a satisfactory job.
>> No. 85370 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 12:55 am
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>>85369
>May is not competent for the role, but that is not particularly an indictment of her character
This. What is an indictment of her character is that she doesn't know the meaning of the word "failure". Not in the nice way where people go on time after time until they succeed, but rather she doesn't appear to understand just how badly she's failing. She thinks she's just not trying hard enough, hence her becoming more and more dictatorial. The problem with this course of action is that it only works if you've got the charisma to back it up, and quite frankly even Herman von Rompuy has her beaten in that department.
>> No. 85372 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 2:03 am
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>>85370

The problem for Britain is that anyone who might do a better job is too sensible to volunteer. I don't know if May is oblivious to her failure or if she's just putting on a brave face, but I'm not sure that standing aside would help us. Who'd take her place? Gove? Mogg? Corbyn? At least May is trying to avoid catastrophe, even if she's doing a piss-poor job of it.
>> No. 85375 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 2:53 am
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>>85372
In my book, trying to avoid catastrophe would be putting the vote when initially scheduled in November, taking the defeat, and then spending the next four months figuring out what to do about it. Playing chicken with the entire country isn't avoiding catastrophe. Far from it, it's a very good way of hastening it.
>> No. 85376 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 4:47 am
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>>85375

Would we really be in a substantially different position if MV1 had failed a little earlier? You can think about what to do next until the cows come home, but it won't make the Withdrawal Agreement any more negotiable or the ERG and DUP any more willing to compromise.

The fundamental blunder was invoking A50 to appease the tabloids; everything else is a consequence of deciding when to leave before we knew how to leave.
>> No. 85377 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 4:50 am
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The 2017 election was a pretty spectacular cockup
>> No. 85379 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 6:02 am
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>>85376
>Would we really be in a substantially different position if MV1 had failed a little earlier?
Four months is certainly better than two weeks. Having received the best offer you're going to get but finding it not good enough, you have two options, and "just ask again" isn't one of them.

>The fundamental blunder was invoking A50 to appease the tabloids; everything else is a consequence of deciding when to leave before we knew how to leave.
Hindsight is 20/20, and all that.
>> No. 85386 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 12:58 pm
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>But she was not sorry: She accompanied her decision with a speech that called “a citizen of the world” nothing more than “a citizen of nowhere” and immediately alienated a large part of the country.

Nobody gave a fuck about this and what's more it's true. You can, by some miracle, read so why not focus your attention on something British to understand British politics? If needs must you can just follow Laura Kuenssberg and find out what's happening from the same source everyone else is using.

>>85372
>The problem for Britain is that anyone who might do a better job is too sensible to volunteer

And who might that be? Gove is growing on me.

>>85377
In fairness, her decision making in the 2017 election was entirely rational. Labour were facing extinction and it therefore seemed like an opportune moment to ask those elderly with the ability to pay to cover some of their own costs.

But the public weren't having it so now no politician will ever try again to solve the crisis of elderly care in an ageing nation and we didn't even get a competent opposition out of it.
>> No. 85387 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 1:26 pm
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>>85386
>Nobody gave a fuck about this and what's more it's true.
It's untrue and lots of people cared, it made her sound like a barmy UKIPper with a grudge and immediately sabotaged the first speech she gave as PM outside Number 10, which had been all about coming together and social justice; it was obviously bollocks but she'd still said it, it had stil set a post-referendum feeling. The conference speech was a total turn around in tone in the space of less than six months. It was a huge shift.

It was also her first gangly step down the road to becoming a latter day Muammar Gaddafi, which is how her pathetic attempts at haranguing people with far more power and influence, whether it's MPs, the EU negotiators or other national leaders, are increasingly coming across. She is a hopeless and pathetic failure of a PM who has undermined the country for the sake of her own ego, unable to effectively manage any of the problems she's faced, and the scale of those problems is not a proper excuse for that inability to cope.

Meaningful Vote 3 could have taken place months ago, but instead it's being rushed at the very, very end, because May's plan to broker a deal with Parliament amounted to: "I'll scare 'em". Except it didn't work in the least bit and now she's fouled up the entire process; she's a human bloody paper jam.
>> No. 85401 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 7:02 pm
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Really May is just hopelessly out of her depth. I'd feel sorry for her, but she's long been a horrid cunt, who I can't bring myself to pity; but the fact remains she's in an incredibly unenviable position.

You'd never have thought she, of all people, would end up prime minister five years ago. She was incompetent as that irritating home office bint who wants to ban porn, and she's ended up with the job because anyone else with an ounce of sense turned their phone off and locked themselves until the coast was clear. The Tory party effectively just panic grabbed her to use as a human shield.

She's under an enormous weight of expectation and pressure, her responsibility is enormous. But we're basically asking a shift manager from Tesco to conduct open heart surgery and then acting surprised and outraged when the patient dies on the table.
>> No. 85403 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 7:06 pm
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>>85401
>But we're basically asking a shift manager from Tesco to conduct open heart surgery and then acting surprised and outraged when the patient dies on the table.
It's more like we're asking a shift manager from Tesco to conduct open heart surgery and then acting surprised and outraged when, having had the patient die on the table, they say "that wasn't too bad, let me do another one".
>> No. 85458 Anonymous
27th March 2019
Wednesday 5:58 pm
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Apparently she's told the 1922 committee that she's willing to step down if she can pass this deal. And the key figures of the ERG have said they'd be willing to back her deal rather than risk no Brexit. So it looks like we might actually be leaving.
>> No. 85459 Anonymous
27th March 2019
Wednesday 6:30 pm
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>>85458

The numbers are still very tight. The DUP still aren't willing to budge because of the backstop and there's a core of at least 10 ERG MPs who are still rooting for a hard Brexit. Bercow has also declined to table MV3, so May would need to rustle up a meaningful change from somewhere. It's still possible, but the odds are slim.
>> No. 85460 Anonymous
27th March 2019
Wednesday 6:40 pm
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I for one am going to enjoy the coming riots and looting. I'm running really low on rice recently
>> No. 85461 Anonymous
27th March 2019
Wednesday 7:36 pm
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Side question: Has anyone see the adverts on tv recently about how Brexit will effect us, and gone to the gov webpage for travel after Brexit? Spoiler, there's no benefits on the pages. All of it hurts us. Cannot fathom who on Earth would still be for this.
>> No. 85462 Anonymous
27th March 2019
Wednesday 8:17 pm
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>>85461

They have adverts on tv about it? What nonsense.
>> No. 85463 Anonymous
27th March 2019
Wednesday 8:17 pm
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>>85461

They have adverts on tv about it? What nonsense.
>> No. 85464 Anonymous
27th March 2019
Wednesday 8:17 pm
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>>85461

They have adverts on tv about it? What nonsense.
>> No. 85465 Anonymous
27th March 2019
Wednesday 9:16 pm
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854658546585465
>>85458
>So it looks like we might actually be leaving

Either that or we're about to fall into the most absurd dictatorship in history.
>> No. 85466 Anonymous
27th March 2019
Wednesday 9:23 pm
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>>85461
>Spoiler, there's no benefits on the pages

Most of the information on the .gov pages is vague or missing because civil servants can't see into the future.
>> No. 85467 Anonymous
27th March 2019
Wednesday 11:16 pm
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>>85458
>Apparently she's told the 1922 committee that she's willing to step down if she can pass this deal.
If what we've heard from the DUP tonight and what we found out about the size of the ERG (up to 93) is anything to go by, she's not going to get the deal through. Too many rebels and not enough members on her own bench, and not enough rebels on the other.

By the looks of thing, she'll be sacked and cracked but not backed.
>> No. 85468 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 5:07 pm
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Found this in a book from 2003.
>> No. 85469 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 5:30 pm
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>>85458

Is she daft or something? You can't persuade people by offering to do something you were obviously already going to do.
>> No. 85470 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 5:45 pm
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>>85469

>Is she daft or something?

She's coming apart at the seams. Promising to resign arguably makes it less likely that she'll get her deal through. A lot of Tory moderates will be terrified that the deal will pass, Johnson or Mogg will win a leadership contest, immediately rescind the WA and plunge us into an unplanned no-deal.
>> No. 85471 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 6:43 pm
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>>85470
>>plunge us into an unplanned no-deal.

Better pop to B&Q now if I want my Killdozer up and running before then.
>> No. 85472 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 7:08 pm
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>>85471
I'm curious if any of you lot have actually stocked up on anything.
>> No. 85473 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 7:13 pm
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>>85472
I bought three packets of biscuits yesterday but I'm already down to one so I'm not sure it counts.
>> No. 85474 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 7:59 pm
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>>85472

I have my usual stock of batteries, flashlights, pocket knives, water purification tablets, cigarette lighters and half sovereigns. Come the apocalypse, market traders will be the new elite.
>> No. 85475 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 8:28 pm
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>>85472

I do have rice (no, really), tins, bottled water, dried food, that sort of thing, probably enough to last a couple of months. We also have two freezers and the outside one is full of meat mostly. This isn't really to do with brexit though, I'm just a deranged, paranoid mentalist person who goes camping often, and likes the idea of having a backup plan, you really never know. One of my grandparents saw the worst of the Soviet era and was quick to teach me just how quickly things can go badly in terms of food and supplies. As such I've always sort of kept a stock of decent food without ever really thinking about it.

Strongly considering making some pemmican now, mind.
>> No. 85476 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 8:37 pm
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>>85475

You realise you'll be the first cunt anybody burgles and caves your head in with a cricket bat, right?

At least in America, prepper cunts go the whole nine yards, turning their house into a castle with more guns than you can shake a stick at. Over here, you're at the mercy of roving packs of yobs, and the best plan is probably to be one of them.

Personally, I'm just going straight to cannibalism. I'm not even going to wait for the riots to stop, I'll just start eating people and putting their skulls on sticks in my front garden. That should keep would-be looters away, and if it doesn't, I simply get a free meal.
>> No. 85477 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 8:50 pm
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>>85476

They'd have to know, for a start. I don't plan on telling anyone (non anonymously) I've got a shed full of rice. It's feasible some of my neighbours could have seen something, but A) all of my neighbours are pensioners and B) I'm in the most defensible position in the cul-de-sac. I won't be running the generator until long after the riots have weakened the population.

I also do have a firearms license, as it happens. Even without that, I just need to have a longer cricket bat than they do. I'm willing to kill to protect my tins of beans and Huel powders. My missus is quite good at archery too, I was thinking about learning that myself, for once the food runs out and I'm having to hunt deer, the bow seems a better option.

Any roving mob will be quickly mowed down by my Land Rover as they bottleneck at the entrance to the street.
>> No. 85478 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 10:32 pm
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>>85477

>Huel powders

I think you'll find yourself opting for long pig pretty quickly. That stuff is like drinking someone else's puke.
>> No. 85479 Anonymous
28th March 2019
Thursday 10:37 pm
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>>85478

It doesn't really taste like anything to me, even with the flavouring powders. I'd get bored of it, not disgusted.
>> No. 85480 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 12:48 pm
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>>85477

Hope your hiding behind a VPN, if the rozzers see your comment you rapidly won't have a firearms license
>> No. 85481 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 12:48 pm
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>>85477

Hope your hiding behind a VPN, if the rozzers see your comment you rapidly won't have a firearms license
>> No. 85482 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 12:51 pm
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>>85480

I don't have one anyway. This is the internet, mate.

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