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>> No. 85961 Anonymous
27th May 2019
Monday 7:05 pm
85961 Rory Stewart
I think Rory is a pretty cool guy.
Expand all images.
>> No. 85962 Anonymous
27th May 2019
Monday 7:15 pm
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eh talks to Afghans and doesn't afraid of anything.
>> No. 85963 Anonymous
27th May 2019
Monday 7:17 pm
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I quite like him, but I think he stands little chance of becoming new Tory leader/PM. I feel he'll be seen as too much of a remainer in an increasingly Brexiter country.
>> No. 85964 Anonymous
27th May 2019
Monday 7:42 pm
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>>85963
Remain parties got more votes than Brexit parties.
>> No. 85965 Anonymous
27th May 2019
Monday 7:54 pm
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>>85961
Spook, freak, egomaniacal Trigger lookalike cunt.
>> No. 85966 Anonymous
27th May 2019
Monday 8:06 pm
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>>85965

He looks like Willem Dafoe, you flid.
>> No. 85969 Anonymous
27th May 2019
Monday 8:34 pm
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>>85966
He reminds me of this dude.
>> No. 85970 Anonymous
27th May 2019
Monday 10:19 pm
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Looks like an ill Fred Armisen to me but ok
>> No. 85971 Anonymous
27th May 2019
Monday 10:54 pm
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>>85961
This is his official parliamentary photograph. Why didn't the photographer say hey, by the way, your collar is poking out, you might want to fix it before I take this.
>> No. 85972 Anonymous
28th May 2019
Tuesday 12:43 am
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>>85971
Probably realised there was no point polishing a turd.

Look at the state of that fucking hair. Hole era Saddam Hussein had better grooming habits than this entitled twat.
>> No. 85973 Anonymous
28th May 2019
Tuesday 6:52 am
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>>85972
>Look at the state of that fucking hair.
Obviously he is the only one who can defeat the Boris.
>> No. 85975 Anonymous
28th May 2019
Tuesday 11:13 am
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>>85973
>> No. 85980 Anonymous
28th May 2019
Tuesday 7:03 pm
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>>85975
No chance. That's a wig. Boris's Blonde Buffoon Barnet is 100% his own hair.
>> No. 85982 Anonymous
28th May 2019
Tuesday 7:30 pm
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>Stewart pledged on Tuesday that he would deliver Brexit by convening a citizens’ assembly of 500 members of the public who would be paid to sit seven days a week to determine an outcome that parliament could support, but has said he would not countenance a no-deal exit.

???
>> No. 85983 Anonymous
28th May 2019
Tuesday 7:50 pm
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>>85982
>I want to revoke Article 50 but can't be seen to say as much, so I'll get a public convention to recommend it so there's no argument.
>> No. 85984 Anonymous
28th May 2019
Tuesday 7:50 pm
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>>85982

It's a thing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizens%27_assembly
>> No. 85985 Anonymous
28th May 2019
Tuesday 8:13 pm
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>>85982
>sit seven days a week to determine an outcome that parliament could support

Ah, this must be the pro-torture candidate.
>> No. 85986 Anonymous
28th May 2019
Tuesday 8:16 pm
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>>85985
Better still, all 500 agree from the outset that there's no point and just drag the thing out to enjoy a long stay in a London hotel at the government's expense.
>> No. 85989 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 8:43 am
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>>85985
It worked for the Good Friday Agreement

This will tell you all you need to know about are Rory.

>Stewart’s reputation as a man of unnatural achievement depends a little on the cumulative impact of his résumé—the giddy rush of soldier-diplomat-adventurer-writer-politician. Facts can become blurred. It’s easy to find articles suggesting that Stewart trekked across Afghanistan for two years (thirty-two days, in fact); or earned an O.B.E. “for his military service in Iraq” (it was for his work there as a civil servant); or that his understanding of Afghanistan outstrips that of almost all other foreigners (he lived in Kabul on and off for three years, speaks some Dari, no Pashto, and visited the south of the country for the first time two years ago).

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/11/15/paths-of-glory-ian-parker
>> No. 85990 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 9:59 am
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>>85989
Are his travel books any good?
>> No. 85996 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 4:41 pm
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Looks like Bozza might be out of the running in short order. COME ON RORY!

>Brexit: Boris Johnson ordered to appear in court over £350m claim

>The Tory leadership candidate has been accused of misconduct in public office after making the claim during the 2016 EU referendum campaign.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-48445430
>> No. 85997 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 4:56 pm
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>>85996
I wonder why they didn't bring this up earlier.
>> No. 85998 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 5:00 pm
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Rory's pulled.
>> No. 85999 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 5:24 pm
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>>85997
I wonder why you don't exchange your cynicism and ignorance for some subject knowledge.
>> No. 86000 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 5:41 pm
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>>85999

If you know the answer to the question, go ahead and answer it, captain cunt?
>> No. 86001 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 5:50 pm
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>>86000
Well obviously you thick bastard it's because we have the real possibility of a full-on Brexiteer becoming PM, and the powers that be don't want that, and therefore have unleashed their first power play to eliminate him from the contest.
>> No. 86002 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 5:54 pm
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>>85996
So the case centres on a politician making a misleading statement ahead of an election. Yeah, I can't see this going anywhere but the CPS getting a royal fucking when Bojo inevitably becomes PM.

Next they'll argue that manifesto commitments are legally binding and Tony Blair must stand trial in the Hague.

>COME ON RORY!

He has neither the Parliamentary support nor the brand recognition of the Conservative membership who will continue to support Boris barring a candidate advocating WTO terms delivered on the tip of a Trident missile.
>> No. 86003 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 6:01 pm
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>>86001

The brexiteer that lied to influence the referendum? Why on earth would anyone want to stop him?
>> No. 86004 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 6:07 pm
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Roderick James Nugent "Rory" Stewart OBE MP FRSL FRSGS

He's got more name than I've got address.
>> No. 86005 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 6:17 pm
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>>86000

It's a private prosecution. Some bloke ran a crowdfunding campaign to raise the money to take Johnson to court. The campaign started in June 2016, but it has taken this long to raise enough money and bring the case to court. The application was made to the Magistrates court in February. The application has been granted, because the court believes that there is sufficient evidence to warrant a trial.

The Crown Prosecution Service still have the right to take over the prosecution of the case at the behest of the Director of Public Prosecutions, after which they would have the right to abandon the prosecution on the basis that it is not in the public interest. The DPP has thus far chosen not to pursue this course of action.

https://www.judiciary.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Ball-v-Johnson-FV-290519.pdf
>> No. 86006 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 6:49 pm
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>>86005
What're the odds of conviction?
>> No. 86007 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 6:57 pm
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>>86006
50/50
He's either guilty or he isn't.
>> No. 86008 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 7:24 pm
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>>86006

It's very hard to say, because it's completely unprecedented - no politician has ever been prosecuted for making a false claim during a campaign.
>> No. 86009 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 7:35 pm
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>>86008

I don't know if you intended it or not, but phrasing it that way made it rather blackly humorous.

I mean it is a bit fucking daft, people losing it over a politician lying. Are the younger lot these days that naive, or are we seeing some sort of push for genuine improvement in politics? Or, were the shoe on the other foot and Remain campaign had won with Are Chukka being prosecuted, would they be keeping their mouths shut?

Who knows.
>> No. 86010 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 7:50 pm
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>>86009
I don't recall any part of the remain campaign being censured by the Office for National Statistics. Funny that.
>> No. 86011 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 8:24 pm
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>>86010
Well it would be awkward for the ONS to have a go at the Treasury for producing them leaflets.
>> No. 86012 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 8:39 pm
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>>86010
I don't really want to start a massive cunt off but I've always seen it as a bit of an indictment of the remain campaign if we accept that they didn't lie. You stared into the abyss of Brexit, which you warned us about, you saw that the polls were closer than 65/35 and you didn't lie? what the fuck is wrong with you? People have lied for much, much less.

But if we're going to bring in some penalties for lying, can we round up everyone involved with No2AV and ship them to the Sahara with bottles of saltwater or something?
>> No. 86013 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 8:44 pm
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>>86012

What is there to even lie about when we're talking about trying to get people to vote for literally nothing to change? It's easy to spin the brave new world of brexit but much harder to sell literally nothing happening.

I do seem to recall remain campaigners pointing out how fucking disastrous leaving would be, so I'm not sure lying would have helped. What could they have said? That brexit was a secret Jewish conspiracy? Actually that would have worked. Fuck.
>> No. 86014 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 9:31 pm
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>>86013

I don't know about you, but I'm willing to believe that it was. Maybe not the jews in particular, but somebody out there wanted to destroy the pound and open us up to new and exploitative trade agreements.
>> No. 86016 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 10:12 pm
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>>86014

You don't have to look far.
>> No. 86018 Anonymous
29th May 2019
Wednesday 10:41 pm
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>>86013
Lie and make it seem like a vote for change. I'd take the route of promising reduced public spending cuts (framed as an increase, not as 'we'll have to cut more if we leave'), but obviously that's not appealing to a government committed to a program of public spending cuts. Supposing they were selling the promise of people living on Mars by 2018, it would be better than trying to sell no change.

Failing that, yeah, conspiracies. Getting in the conspiracies before the vote would've been handy.
>> No. 86026 Anonymous
30th May 2019
Thursday 9:21 am
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>>86012
I agree with your sentiment but it is whataboutism.
>> No. 86202 Anonymous
15th June 2019
Saturday 11:47 pm
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He's doing really well; but they aren't going to vote for him.
>> No. 86204 Anonymous
16th June 2019
Sunday 10:33 pm
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>>86202
And he definitely just "won" that pointless debate on C4 this evening. Raab seems like a monster, Gove was just spouting well-meaning but unconvincing nonsense (again), Hunt was boring. I quite like Javid but I don't think he has enough to be PM.
>> No. 86205 Anonymous
16th June 2019
Sunday 11:08 pm
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I really should pay more attention to the leadership race, but knowing that it will continue for another five weeks, despite the fact that the only people voting will be Conservative MPs and then a hundred-thousand party members, really makes me too irritated to care. I waste more time than any bastard living, but I'm not responsible for much more than washing my scrotum and staying hydrated. I've frequently lapsed in my responsibilities to both and to my knowledge not one factory has shut down nor shipping company had to cease business in the English Channel.
>> No. 86206 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 1:17 am
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Lads.

I hate Channel Four's take on politics, they always poison debate with acidic interjections and refuse to allow people to finish a sentence. I get that 20 years ago they were teenagers with attitude but now it is just a middle class cunt of a channel doing the equivalent of mobile phone policing.
>> No. 86207 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 1:50 am
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>>86206
UK debates will always be like that now. It's the long, long shadow of Paxo.
>> No. 86208 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 8:11 am
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>>86206
I dont know why you're conflating the quality of debate moderation with politics.
>> No. 86209 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 12:30 pm
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Y'know what, I hope Raab wins. I've never seen a genuinely mental PM before. Of course they've all had a bit of a screw loose, but Raab might actually lamp a cabinet minister for no reason if he gets wound up enough.
>> No. 86210 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 4:27 pm
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>>86208

The media is an important part of the political system; as we see in so many countries, democracy simply doesn't function without a free press.

The problem in the British media is a combination of sycophancy, shallowness and mindless aggression. Lobby reporters are too wrapped up in the Westminster bubble, too eager to jump on the latest bit of gossip or report on whatever press release is being shoved out today. They play the part of a fearless reporter holding power to account, but there's no teeth because there's no depth - it's all trivialities like whether you did coke 20 years ago or whether you said something daft in a radio interview. Politicians aren't being held to account for their actions, they're just being bullied.

That's a large part of the reason why we're in this mess. Very few journalists are willing or able to actually cut to the heart of a political problem and challenge the narrative being presented; it's far easier to nit-pick and score cheap points. saville has exploited this structure very well, as has Johnson; their politics are fundamentally vapid, but the surface is hardened against the very limited critical arsenal of the modern journalist.
>> No. 86211 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 6:56 pm
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https://www.joe.co.uk/news/personality-quiz-conservative-leadership-candidate-235250

oh god I got Jeremy Cunt Hunt
>> No. 86212 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 7:05 pm
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>>86211

Yaaaaaaas!
>> No. 86213 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 7:40 pm
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>>86211
I'm apparently Javid, which I can only assume is down to the class question.
>> No. 86214 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 7:44 pm
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>>86213

I'm Gove and I'm pretty sure it was entirely down to my prolific cocaine use.
>> No. 86215 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 9:28 pm
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>>86211

I got Bojo despite turning up for the debate. Either their quiz algorithm is badly designed or their abortion of a website didn't register my choices properly. Could be worse though, I can live with being compared to Boris over any other politician, even though I don't think he'll be a good PM.
>> No. 86216 Anonymous
17th June 2019
Monday 10:46 pm
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>>86211
This doesn't even make sense fuck off I'm not doing that
>> No. 86217 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 6:07 pm
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Raab has been eliminated.
>> No. 86218 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 6:33 pm
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Since all except Are Rory are hard leavers, why won't it be Rory Vs Boris in the final vote. The party members are rabid leavers, so Boris wins (and we're all fucked as he fails to deliver because it's a fuckwit idea and people will finally convince him that he'll get lynched...)
Years more of this shit. Joy.
>> No. 86220 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 6:50 pm
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>>86218

Rory probably won't make it through to the final two, which is basically fine; he wouldn't stand a chance in a against Boris anyway, because the Tory membership are senile lunatics.

Boris's failure to deliver Brexit will be months of tedium, but hopefully they should finally kill off the idea that May negotiated a crap deal because she's really a remainer and didn't Believe in Brexit. The aftermath of that failure will probably be quite polarising, but I think it'll probably wake up a decent number of Tory MPs to the fact that a) there will be no renegotiation, b) there is no deal without the backstop and c) we will not be leaving the EU without a deal.

The Withdrawal Agreement only needs another 45 votes to get through parliament. Rory is the only leadership candidate who has anything nice to say about the WA. That presents the Tories with a very compelling option - push Rory for leader, get the WA through parliament and finally get this godawful mess over with.
>> No. 86221 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 6:58 pm
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GET IN POSHLAD
>> No. 86222 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 7:12 pm
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I bet he goes and punches an elderly woman in the face out of frustration.
>> No. 86223 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 7:15 pm
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>>86222

I'd have a go on that.
>> No. 86224 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 8:07 pm
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>>86222
An angry wank for sure.
>> No. 86225 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 8:12 pm
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Why is he sitting like a weirdo?
>> No. 86226 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 8:38 pm
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>>86225
He's "the only one with his feet on the ground" - no accident.
>> No. 86227 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 9:02 pm
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And there I was thinking the Channel 4 debate was poorly moderated...
>> No. 86228 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 9:04 pm
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>>86227

The real winner tonight is Jeremy Corbyn. I'm not sure whether the format made them all look like cunts or whether it just revealed their underlying cuntishness, but nobody has come out of this looking good.
>> No. 86229 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 9:15 pm
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>>86228

Addendum: I'm normally quite stoical when it comes to politics, but this debate has really depressed me. It's a hollow cliche at this point, but the lunatics have taken over the asylum.
>> No. 86230 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 9:15 pm
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>>86228
He'll no doubt find a way to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.
>> No. 86231 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 10:05 pm
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>>86229
On Brexit, Rory wins hands down. He gets at least 2/10 for effort. Otherwise the whole thing has descended into farce. Not one of them has the decency to be honest and admit that we've fucked it and it's turned into a fucking death march.

I'm amazed they have the balls to talk about negotiating when there's nobody to negotiate with.
>> No. 86232 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 10:49 pm
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>>86231

I don't know how we can recover when so much of the electorate demands to be lied to. Westminster and the media have (intentionally or otherwise) conspired to create a complete fantasy which now utterly dominates the debate. One part of the electorate denounce anyone who point to Corbyn's dismal poll ratings and election results as a wrecker; another part denounces anyone who states basic facts about the Article 50 process as a hardline remoaner. Both parties have spent years pandering to the most deluded part of their own membership, to the point that they've driven away all of the people who retain even the loosest connection with reality. They're trapped in a vicious cycle of extremism, choosing increasingly bonkers candidates to pander to an increasingly bonkers membership.

A majority are stuck in the middle, wondering why everyone on the news spends all of their time arguing whether 2+2 equals three or five.

I'm reminded of the bewildered exasperation of this 1997 Lib Dem broadcast:


>> No. 86233 Anonymous
18th June 2019
Tuesday 11:21 pm
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Is this that Trump effect thing where he ends up winning by making everyone talk about him?

>>86231
In fairness, when it comes to Northern Ireland the lie might be the better option until power sharing somehow returns.
https://www.politico.eu/article/brexit-uk-northern-ireland-backstop-irish-border-ulster-problem-good-friday-agreement/
>> No. 86234 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 2:33 am
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>>86232
>One part of the electorate denounce anyone who point to Corbyn's dismal poll ratings and election results as a wrecker; another part denounces anyone who states basic facts about the Article 50 process as a hardline remoaner
I don't like the false equivalence here. I mean what is Clease doing there except moaning about the Liberal Democrats dismal election results? Corbyn's leadership is dismal, but you could point out his relative ineffectiveness in parliament or the membership's comparative tolerance of his pro-Brexit leanings rather than poll ratings, which he neutralised pretty well in 2017. (And all it did was leave us with dismal parliamentary mathematics. Oh dear. Well, it was fun at the time.)
>A majority are stuck in the middle
I'm not sure that's true. I'm willing to bet that most people's first choice option for Brexit is either No Deal or Remain/Second Referendum then remain. i.e. the two most extreme options.
People are picking bonkers candidates because they're the only ones offering a hope of doing anything different. If compromise is inevitable, why start with a compromise position? At least the no-compromise candidate might get you what you want.

The progressive pruning of the ability of government to actually directly help people through the 80s and 90s have gotten us to the stage where the only hope of hope (or at least catharsis) is to have the government do crazy things. The government can't stop your town centre being a dead shithole full of bookies and payday loans, that's not been part of their remit since before you were born - but technically there's no rule against leaving the EU. (And hey, our politicians lost all their power - it must've gone somewhere, right? 'Europe' sounds more plausible than the reality...) Backs against the wall, the post-1980s consensus would prefer economic crisis to going back to the days of arbitrarily slapping down steel mills, subsidized train routes and nationalised factories to tide the electorate over. I'm not saying 1:1 we should go back to the postwar consensus or that a REAL labour government would've avoided Brexit. The postwar consensus died for a reason and such a government wouldn't have been elected for a reason, but there's a long overdue rebalancing that should've brought us to an alternative consensus either after 1992 or 2008. I don't think we'll ever get it though. We're used to living on a cliff-edge now so high-ho, high-ho, it's off the cliff we go.
>> No. 86235 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 4:19 am
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>>86234

>I mean what is Clease doing there except moaning about the Liberal Democrats dismal election results?

Moaning about being shafted by FPTP. At the time, they were stuck in the unenviable position of being hugely popular but unelectable, because most voters prioritised blocking their least favourite option over choosing their favourite option. The Lib Dems would have stood a good chance of winning a majority if we didn't have such a crap electoral system.

My comment about polls and election results isn't particularly a criticism of Corbyn, but his supporters; despite all evidence to the contrary, many of them ardently believe that he is wildly popular and is posed to take a landslide. That misapprehension has profoundly disconnected Corbynism from reality and crippled the ability of Labour to campaign effectively, because so many people in the Labour movement simply don't believe that they need to campaign.

>I'm not sure that's true. I'm willing to bet that most people's first choice option for Brexit is either No Deal or Remain/Second Referendum then remain.

The polling is really tricky, because people have intransitive preferences - you get very different answers depending on how you ask the question. I'm not sure that it's entirely fair to present the status quo as an extreme option. No deal has never polled better than about 25% and the withdrawal agreement becomes vastly more popular if you pit it head-to-head against no deal or remain. At the least, about 40% of the electorate want neither no-deal nor remain; it's not clear from the data what proportion of remainers are fanatically devoted to the EU and what proportion just don't want the upheaval of Brexit.

>The progressive pruning of the ability of government to actually directly help people through the 80s and 90s have gotten us to the stage where the only hope of hope (or at least catharsis) is to have the government do crazy things.

I don't really buy this argument. Blair delivered some fairly substantial improvements in the living standards of ordinary people - the National Minimum Wage, massive increases in health and education spending, major urban regeneration etc. By pretty much any measure, the fag-end of the Blair years were the best years in British history. The electorate rejected that vision in favour of austerity in 2010 and has largely stuck with that position. If the electorate wanted moderate democratic socialism, they could have given Miliband a majority in 2015; if they wanted a radical alternative, they could have given Corbyn a majority in 2017. Instead, they have voted fairly indifferently for the purse-tightening vision of some very mediocre Tories.

A lot of Brexit voters clearly want some sort of radical change, but it's entirely unclear what that change is and how we can deliver it; immigration has become a key issue largely because of a lack of clarity about anything else. There's a vague nostalgia and a sense that things are in a state of decay, but very little that can be translated into policy and a surprising unwillingness by leavers to blame that decay on austerity. Most of the stuff that people complain about on a day-to-day basis - NHS waiting times, bin collections, potholes, skint schools - could be fixed simply by reverting public spending to 2009 levels as a share of GDP.

It's arguably reasonable to conceptualise Brexit as a backlash against the complexity of the modern world and Britain's status as a mid-sized economy rather than a global superpower, but I'm not sure how that can be translated into policy. Unplug the internet? Try and take back India? Give everyone 1960s jobs with 1960s wages and 1960s spending power? I feel like I'm being unfair, but I just can't seem to get any Brexiters to explain in concrete terms what they actually want, aside from lower immigration.
>> No. 86236 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 8:04 am
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>>86235
>By pretty much any measure, the fag-end of the Blair years were the best years in British history.
So here's a thought. I won't dispute that's what most measurements will show, but (cutting out a lot of context for brevity) I'm made to think of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peak%E2%80%93end_rule and other cognitive biases
If you could somehow stick them into measurable political data, I've a suspicion Blair and especially Brown would come off much worse than standard measurements would suggest. I'm not entirely sure why, though. Iraq and a general sense of dodginess, perhaps. Or perhaps people include the start of the financial crisis in their memories of Blair, or group Blair and Brown into one 2000s blur. Perhaps inequality grated, or there was a lack of perceived improvement regardless of reality. Perhaps people credit government with big things they can remember (like nationalising the trains) more than personal things they can overlook (like greater education spending).
Somewhere in there is a philosophical question about whether government should make people feel good, or make them well-off even if they don't realise it.

I'll give your post a proper reply later, I appreciate it. I just wanted to fire off an idle thought before I clear off to work.
>> No. 86237 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 8:08 am
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Rory's a pretty cool guy. Eh takes his tie off and doesnt afraid of anything.
>> No. 86238 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 12:17 pm
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I'm still unsure if this is just a Rory fanclub thread or the Tory leadership one, but I'm calling it as the latter from now on.

Here's a snapshot of how nutty the Tory members are.
>> No. 86239 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 12:49 pm
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>>86238

I'd really like YouGov to push the limits on this one. What else would Tory members prefer to remain? Plague of locusts? Death of all first-born sons? Full Brexit but we all have to speak French?
>> No. 86240 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 2:32 pm
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>>86238
Since when did this party over country bollocks get more prevalent here?
>> No. 86241 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 3:04 pm
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>>86240
No idea, but it's all the rage up and down the Tory party right now.
>> No. 86242 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 3:56 pm
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>>86240>>86241
PEOPLE WANT TO KEEP LUCRATIVE JOB SHOCKER
>> No. 86243 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 4:09 pm
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>>86242
Oh, aye, a suprising number of MPs really struggle after leaving public office. You often see ex-squaddies, addicts and former MPs huddled under bridged in Manchester. It's a shocking.
>> No. 86244 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 4:13 pm
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>>86242

Making policy and voting leaders in just to make yourself money is exactly the opposite of what we should want politicians to do, in case you haven't worked that out.
>> No. 86245 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 5:01 pm
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>>86240

54% of Tory members would willingly see the death of the Tory party if it meant delivering Brexit. That's a really extraordinary finding that confounds a lot of our previous beliefs about tribal loyalties in British politics; there's clearly a tribe who are more loyal to Brexit than the oldest political party in the world.

It's also extraordinary that so many members of the Conservative and Unionist Party would willingly give up Northern Ireland. If you'd said ten or twenty years ago that the right wing of the Tory party would deliver a united Ireland, you would have been sectioned.

What the hell does Brexit actually mean? What is the vision of the future that so many are willing to sacrifice so much for? What would those people consider a satisfactory outcome? I think that could prove to be an existential question for the United Kingdom in the near future.
>> No. 86246 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 5:30 pm
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>>86245
I said this all a month or two ago on here. I don't mean that to sound like I'm trying to take credit for something, just that I've been trying to figure out "what Brexit means" for a while now and I have no idea either. They just seem to like Brexit in the same way a lot of people who are technically monarchists just like the Queen, the difference being, as much as I dislike the monarchy, the Queen isn't going to explode in the middle of London like Peter nearly did in Heroes series 1, or shit all over the economy like No-Deal on October 31st. If only someone could fly No-Deal into the sky and save us all.
>> No. 86247 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 5:49 pm
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>>86245
They're all at it - this is discussing Labours potential shift in policy to supporting a referendum. Nothing about principles, or what's best for the country, it is nakedly self-serving and about the best interests of the party.
>> No. 86248 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 5:50 pm
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>>86246
The truth is that at this point Brexit is undeliverable. If they'd been honest from the beginning about the advisory nature of the referendum, there would be a viable narrative along the lines of the government seeing an appetite for it set about trying to find a feasible way to make it happen and couldn't find one, but at least they tried. Instead we've got this "we must Brexit at all costs" nonsense going on even though it's no longer what people want.

If the party were sensible, and wanted a leader that could get them the votes from outside their core support that they need to form a stable government, they'd back Rory Stewart. Out of the remaining candidates, he's the only one who has even the faintest idea of what he's doing, and is easily the most popular candidate outside the party.

It seems that the tribal narrative is very much "my ball" - we're going to do this and if it destroys the party we're going to take the whole country with it.
>> No. 86249 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 6:07 pm
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And he's out.

Prepare for Mr Corbyn.
>> No. 86250 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 6:13 pm
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If it wasn't for his hair Stewart would look on death's door.
>> No. 86251 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 9:53 pm
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>>86245
>What the hell does Brexit actually mean? What is the vision of the future that so many are willing to sacrifice so much for? What would those people consider a satisfactory outcome? I think that could prove to be an existential question for the United Kingdom in the near future.

I voted Brexit and I've forgotten why. I'm not actually that fussed about whether we leave or not, I just want out of the limbo one way or the other.

It's a bit like when you're arguing with the missus and you're objectively right; she knows you're right but she won't want to admit to being wrong and lose face so she continually doubles down out of sheer stubbornness.
>> No. 86252 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 10:32 pm
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>>86251
>I voted Brexit and I've forgotten why. I'm not actually that fussed about whether we leave or not

Well done.
>> No. 86253 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 10:52 pm
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>>86252
I'm not overly bothered. I'm more concerned about which party is in power here rather than whether we're in the European Union or not. If leaving the EU means parliament becomes more accountable and the European Project can go ahead without us hindering it then great.

My reasons for voting Leave have become rather hazy. At least they weren't something daft like believing it would mean more money in the NHS because it was written on a bus.
>> No. 86254 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 10:56 pm
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>>86253
>If leaving the EU means parliament becomes more accountable
The delusion is strong in this one.
>> No. 86255 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 11:01 pm
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>>86254
It means the government have lost a major scapegoat and the past three years have shown that our political system is so broken that we may end up with PR sooner than I'd otherwise hoped.
>> No. 86256 Anonymous
19th June 2019
Wednesday 11:19 pm
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>>86255
>It means the government have lost a major scapegoat
If only it were that simple.
>> No. 86257 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 1:09 am
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>>86255

I don't share your optimism. If we can no longer blame the EU for all our failings, things could get really ugly for whichever ethnic minority takes their place.
>> No. 86258 Anonymous
20th June 2019
Thursday 1:49 am
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>>86257
The Scots give as good as they get, it'll be fine.

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