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>> No. 13623 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 10:13 pm
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Just watching this;

Do any of you know if the same "rules" apply in the UK? I.e. you can eat salmon and trout raw as sushi, just make sure it was farm raised?
Expand all images.
>> No. 13624 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 10:15 pm
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It should have attached this.
>> No. 13625 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 10:31 pm
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Yes. They used to recommend only using farmed fish that had also been frozen, as this will kill parasites, but relatively recently that rule has been relaxed, as it was found there is a negligible risk of parasites from farm raised UK fish. It's absolutely fine.

It's correct that it's not particularly a good idea to eat wild fish raw unless you know what you're doing or buy it from someone that does, but good luck finding non-frozen wild salmon for sale anyway.
>> No. 13626 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 10:34 pm
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>>13625
Thanks!
>> No. 13627 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 10:36 pm
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>>13625
There was a program by Ed Balls a little while ago about what Britain exports in a day - one of them was about fish, and it also talked about this.

I didn't know that tuna (even the really good stuff) has to be blast frozen down to about -40 to kill any/all the parasites on it, and it highlighted this too - even the really expensive ones that go for hundreds of thousands of pounds in the posh Japanese markets.

Fascinating really that the farmed fish is "better" for you than the wild, kind of goes against the grain of what we're led to believe about organic/wild food.
>> No. 13628 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 11:37 pm
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>>13627
> kind of goes against the grain of what we're led to believe about organic/wild food.

Organic food is all marketing. It's a bit old now, but watch the Penn & Teller: Bullshit! episode on it.
>> No. 13629 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 11:39 pm
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>>13627

>Fascinating really that the farmed fish is "better" for you than the wild, kind of goes against the grain of what we're led to believe about organic/wild food.

We are only as pervasive a species as we are because of agriculture. The ability to grow bigger, better food and keep it all in once place is the direct factor that caused brain growth, settlements, infrastructure, and so on. I understand why people find appeal in paelo diets and wild food and all that, but the reality is that ever since the first caveman dropped some meat in a fire, we have been on a path to prepared and farmed foods.

Farmed seafood specifically is ridiculously sustainable and, like you say, inherently better as a food than the wild equivalent. I was the executive chef of a seafood restaurant chain, so I feel qualified to say that no, you absolutely cannot tell the difference between farmed and line caught sea bass, for example. Salmon gets a bad rap because of the relatively common knowledge that farmed salmon isn't really pink and they have to feed them stuff to dye their flesh, but so fucking what - it still tastes the same, actually better, as farmed salmon has a higher fat content. If I was still Fish King I would decree we start marketing "white salmon" as the new trendy product, and just stop feeding them the dye. Lean into it. There's no point sitting on our phones/laptops on our sofas in our houses and saying that fish should be caught by hand by one old man in a river.
>> No. 13630 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 11:43 pm
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>>13629
>that farmed salmon isn't really pink

Interesting, I didn't know that bit - I had read that we have completely cracked the problem of farming cod (which we have overfished to the point of technical extinction in our own territorial waters) but it comes out a grey colour, whereas consumers are expecting it to be pure white. Totally agree that we should embrace it.
>> No. 13631 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 11:45 pm
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Interestingly, the Japanese didn't tend to eat salmon for the reason that it was notorious for parasites. Part of the turnaround was a sustained campaign by Norway to try and popularise salmon over there since they had so much of the stuff. Older Japanese people will sometimes refuse to eat salmon.
>> No. 13632 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 11:45 pm
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>>13629
If I was still Fish King?
>> No. 13633 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 8:49 am
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>>13629
There are issues with farmed fish which put me off it.

Their diet is processed food which is a mix of grains and fishmeal. This diet results in lower omega-3 and much higher omega-6 than in wild salmon which takes away part of the benefit of eating fish.
The fishmeal part of their diet comes from waste from trawler-caught fish, which partly undermines the sustainability argument for farmed fish.
Many types of fish caught in the Baltic sea are deemed unfit for human consumption due to heavy pollution, but the industry has found a loophole in that these fish can be processed into animal feed and hence to humans indirectly. This is the main route by which farmed fish become contaminated with toxic and carcinogenic chemicals such as PCBs. It's also a necessity for the high-fat fish feeds to be treated with an artificial anti-oxidant called ethoxyquin. This chemical is probably mostly-harmless, but the European food safety authority has for many years deferred making any recommendations on its safety because there is just not enough good research into it, which leads into the next point,
The fish farming industry has been incredibly active in lobbying over the years, as well as there being many allegations of corruption with members of the Norwegian government having financial ties to the industry, likely resulting in governments and the EU to avoid any attempts at imposing stricter standards on the industry. Also there are stories of researchers in universities who have attempted to run studies into the safety of farmed fish and chemicals in them, who have had all their funding stripped and even lost their careers.

Personally I prefer the taste and texture of wild salmon, but one thing that farmed fish does have in its favour is lower levels of mercury.
I don't entirely avoid farmed fish, I just treat it as occasional treats, mostly I try to eat more of small oily fish such as mackerel.
>> No. 13643 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 11:08 pm
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I was watching an Australian cookery show the other day and the audience applauded when the chef made a meringue, which surprised me as usually Australians boo meringue.
>> No. 13644 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 11:41 pm
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>>13643
>usually Australians boo meringue
Citation needed.
>> No. 13645 Anonymous
17th August 2020
Monday 12:18 am
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>>13643
I'm genuinely bewildered by this post.
>> No. 13646 Anonymous
17th August 2020
Monday 12:49 am
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>>13645
Say "boo meringue" out loud. Gave me a chuckle at least.
>> No. 13647 Anonymous
17th August 2020
Monday 1:05 am
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>>13646
Okay but I still want to see footage or studies of Australians booing meringues.
>> No. 13648 Anonymous
17th August 2020
Monday 1:09 am
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I was watching an Australian documentary the other day about telecommunications. They interviewed a few people about how they would speak to friends. The millenial texted, but the boomer rang.
>> No. 13649 Anonymous
17th August 2020
Monday 2:14 am
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>>13648
>> No. 13650 Anonymous
17th August 2020
Monday 3:11 am
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Fucks sake.

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