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>> No. 85279 Anonymous
20th March 2019
Wednesday 8:45 pm
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I think the UK has become like one of those girlfriends that's always threatening to dump you, but never does.
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>> No. 85357 Anonymous
22nd March 2019
Friday 9:36 pm
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>>85355
That are commit medium-level traffic offences. Or threaten to, anyway. I presume they'll see a pub on the way and get pissed up on a proper British beer like Stella and then forget.
>> No. 85358 Anonymous
22nd March 2019
Friday 10:35 pm
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>>85328
>Are you that muppet that keeps whining about Blairites and "managerial centrism" and just wants the whole thing to burn?
No, that's me and I'm rather bothered you'd insinuate I'd say that. Mostly because I know the implication: That you haven't spent sufficient time dwelling on the causal chain that gave us Brexit, which goes back way before Cameron's promise of a referendum.

>>85343
You know while I'm all for a second referendum, I've never liked the whole corrupt influence angle. It's definitely an interesting sub-plot, but it takes a lot of the blame off the dire remain campaign that seemingly learned nothing but the wrong lessons from the Scottish referendum. There's no point getting a second referendum just to cock it up and get an even bigger majority for leaving than the first time.
>> No. 85359 Anonymous
22nd March 2019
Friday 10:43 pm
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>>85358
>I've never liked the whole corrupt influence angle
I'm sorry if the truth isn't quite to your tastes.
>> No. 85360 Anonymous
22nd March 2019
Friday 11:17 pm
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>>85359
I didn't say it wasn't true, I said it was stupid to focus on when it lets the remain campaign off the hook.
Remain didn't lose because it stuck to the law, it lost because it was utterly incompetent. It took the tactics that lost "no" a 15% lead in the Scottish referendum and applied them to an issue where "Leave" had already regularly polled ahead in the pre-referendum period and "Remain" never had such a massive lead to throw away.
(Though let's be funny, since we're probably all going to starve anyway it would be pretty funny to watch us get a final chance to save ourselves and have the would-be heroes screw it all up.)
>> No. 85361 Anonymous
22nd March 2019
Friday 11:30 pm
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>>85360
Evaluation of the relative merits of the campaigns is subjective, and implicitly depends on the legitimacy of the referendum. The corrupt influence is objective, and undermines that legitimacy.
>> No. 85362 Anonymous
23rd March 2019
Saturday 12:10 pm
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The stakes have never been higher in British politics.
>> No. 85363 Anonymous
23rd March 2019
Saturday 1:27 pm
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>>85362
It made a difference to me - doing the shopping earlier was a fucking nightmare.

Why can't we have a protest tradition where the big ones happen in dying coastal communities to give them an up-tick in revenue? I don't think anyone wins in this aside from the press who avoid going far. What would happen if one day we actually do move the capital to Morecambe, would people still protest in London?
>> No. 85364 Anonymous
23rd March 2019
Saturday 3:10 pm
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>>85362

I don't like Limmy. He's funny, but I don't like him. If he was one of the lads at work he'd be that one everyone goes quiet around because you never really know what kind of awkward and uncomfortable shit he's going to inflict on everyone.
>> No. 85365 Anonymous
23rd March 2019
Saturday 4:09 pm
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>>85364
I think he just understands that Twitter is performative, so he doesn't take it seriously. I don't think he'd be the same IRL.
>> No. 85366 Anonymous
23rd March 2019
Saturday 4:18 pm
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>>85365

That's the vibe I've always got from him, to be fair. His show and his livestreams often have much the same vibe. Let's not even get started on his vines.

He's a genuinely odd lad, I reckon, not just a surreal comic.
>> No. 85367 Anonymous
23rd March 2019
Saturday 9:07 pm
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>>85366

Is he odd, or does he just express thoughts that most of us might have at some point but few of us would willingly express? I think a lot of Limmy's work is very relatable.


>> No. 85374 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 2:44 am
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>>85367
You think but don't express that song sung in a stupid voice?
>> No. 85384 Anonymous
24th March 2019
Sunday 11:05 am
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>>85374
That's pretty shallow surface interpretation of what that scene is about and makes me think it went over your head.
>> No. 85483 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 2:52 pm
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No deal Brexit it is, then?
>> No. 85489 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 4:15 pm
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=https://youtu.be/aYBmDZ_grKY[/yt]

Happy Brexit Day, Lads!
>> No. 85490 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 4:18 pm
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>>85489
For fuck sake...

So how do we embed YT videos? I tried the old embeds and a .com and a youtu.be link.
>> No. 85491 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 4:26 pm
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>>85490


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYBmDZ_grKY

Was this it? I found it in the page's source code.
>> No. 85492 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 4:26 pm
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>>85490
>>85491

Looks like the old way worked for me.
>> No. 85494 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 4:29 pm
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>>85491
It was this, yeah.
>> No. 85499 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 7:28 pm
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She's gone Brental.
>> No. 85500 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 8:14 pm
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>>85499

I'm assuming that'd fail, then we'd get election (aka referendum v2), Conservatives in the hard/no brexit corner and labour in the soft/revoke corner. No idea who'd win that, would like to see labour win as Jezza has always been very anti-EU.

Failing that we could always, I don't know, make our democracy actually representational
>> No. 85502 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 11:02 pm
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>>85500

Party lines don't divide neatly enough on the subject for that to happen. Expect the 'independent group' to balloon with remainers under those circumstances and spit the vote nationally in a way where no ones seat is safe. If that sounds like an unrealistic idea then you haven't been paying attention to how unrealistic modern politics is.
>> No. 85503 Anonymous
29th March 2019
Friday 11:25 pm
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>>85499
My money is on it eventually it passing. It's not ideal but she is clawing up votes and I feel that Parliament is mostly playing until the last possible minute on the 11th April. For evidence just look at how blasé Parliament's debates seemed over the SI.

>>85500
I don't see a general election being in anyone's interest. Labour is just as divided as the Tories and will face the same problems once they're asking for something more than voting everything down.

Plus the next GE will likely see Sinn Féin emerge as the largest party in Northern Ireland and Labour inevitably having to seek a coalition with the SNP if they win. We really have enough on our plate right now.
>> No. 85510 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 7:56 am
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>>85500
>No idea who'd win that

Hung parliament.
>> No. 85511 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 8:44 am
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>>85502
The difference is that modern politics breaks for the unrealistic against the former 'sensible' status quo. That makes the independent group less likely.
In the same sort of way, President Clinton is less likely than America electing a dog as president. We're living in the age of the stupid, not the age of the unexpected.
>> No. 85516 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 11:13 am
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>>85503
>Plus the next GE will likely see Sinn Féin emerge as the largest party in Northern Ireland
That would only help whoever ends up winning. The erosion of the middle has meant that NI is currently represented in Westminster almost entirely by the DUP. All that swing would achieve is reduce the number of sitting MPs, and therefore the number required to achieve a working majority.
>> No. 85517 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 11:21 am
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>>85503
>My money is on it eventually it passing. It's not ideal but she is clawing up votes
She offered up her own head on a plate and still came up short. The DUP have made it clear that their minds are made up, and all that's left in her own party are two groups of hardliners. She needs Labour votes to carry it, and only a couple of desperate souls have jumped on board so far. The main problem she has now is that she has nothing left to give, so she has to resort to playing chicken.
>> No. 85518 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 11:26 am
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>>85517
Apparently she's said if it loses a fourth time she'll call a general election, so there's no way Labour would vote for it.
>> No. 85519 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 12:03 pm
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>>85518
The key question there will be whether that's before or after getting a long extension. Or maybe whether she'll sneakily try and ratify it while Parliament is dissolved. Remember that if there is to be an extension, there will be EP elections in May, and to arrange a general election for the same day the formalities need to be done by April 12. It's already too late to make it happen by the confidence process alone, because that requires a 14-day timeout.
>> No. 85522 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 12:26 pm
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Why are people so outraged about the possibility of new European Parliament elections? Is it just the symbolism of it or is there a real issue with it?
>> No. 85523 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 12:31 pm
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>>85522
I think the EU countries don't want it as the MEPs we elect are likely going to be eurosceptic Brexiteers, who will disrupt the European Parliament.
>> No. 85525 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 12:41 pm
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>>85511
So we're living in exactly the same age that saw Kennedy beat Nixon?

>>85516
Pull your head out of the arithmetic for 5 minutes and consider the big picture. Nationalists want a border poll and they want it while Brexit is ongoing despite the knowledge Belfast will catch fire. The last election saw a Sinn Féin and DUP get equal seats in Northern Ireland Assembly while moderate movements have been brushed aside.

Ultimately it is a single issue that the most strong and stable of governments would struggle with but now we sit with the legislature dictating policy.

>>85517
>so she has to resort to playing chicken

Which has been the only card worth anything. Labour's customs union has all the appeal of a wet fart and a GE means we're staying in until 2020 with many MPs looking nervously at their leave constituencies.
>> No. 85527 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 12:47 pm
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>>85522
Well, it costs money and we're totally unprepared to run it but mostly it comes down to the symbolism.
>> No. 85528 Anonymous
30th March 2019
Saturday 12:51 pm
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>>85523
It's PR, so even if there's vote splitting between UKIP and the Brexit Party, they'll both end up there. The fun part will be figuring out which group to join when they're there. They probably won't want to be in the same group, but at the same time neither of them will want to share a group with Marine Le Pen.

As mentioned above, there is also the awkwardness, in reality as well as optics, of having these elections three years after voting to leave. Someone really needs to get across to Leave voters that this shitshow is ultimately their fault. They were warned about it, and now they're getting indignant about getting exactly what they voted for. This isn't some deep state conspiracy to thwart The Will Of The People™.
>> No. 85559 Anonymous
4th April 2019
Thursday 6:57 pm
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Seumas is now involved in the Brexit talks, I can only see things somehow getting even worse.
>> No. 85560 Anonymous
4th April 2019
Thursday 7:10 pm
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>>85559
Yeah, we're fucked now.

It's been nice knowing you, lads.
>> No. 85561 Anonymous
7th April 2019
Sunday 2:02 am
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>British Prime Minister Theresa May’s government has a plan to enshrine in law a customs arrangement with the European Union in a bid to win over the opposition Labour Party to back a Brexit deal, The Sunday Times newspaper reported.
>“Under the new plan, the prime minister would offer to rewrite the government’s withdrawal bill to enshrine a customs arrangement in law,” the newspaper said.
https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-eu-customs-idUKKCN1RI0NF

Wouldn't it be a laugh if the vote 4 still fails.

>>85522
Is the world ready for Tommy Robinson MEP?
>> No. 85562 Anonymous
8th April 2019
Monday 11:36 am
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>>85561

I think the world is far more ready for ARE Tommy then it ever was for ARE Simon's Nick or ARE Nige.
>> No. 85577 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 9:28 am
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MEP elections in May, huh? Simultaneous referendum?
>> No. 85578 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 9:30 am
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The new Brexit deadline is Halloween, 29 weeks away. The legal minimum amount of time needed for a referendum in this country is 26 weeks.

The odds on a second referendum must have narrowed considerably.
>> No. 85579 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 9:33 am
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>>85577
What're the odds I can get a serious party to put me up as a candidate because all the serious contenders don't want to take up such a dead end?
>> No. 85580 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 9:40 am
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So another 6 months of having to plan for all possible outcomes. Fucking great.
BRB, heading over to apolloduck to buy ferries.
>> No. 85581 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 9:46 am
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>>85578
>The legal minimum amount of time needed for a referendum in this country is 26 weeks.
Where do you get that number from? The only number that's enshrined in law is 10 weeks from announcement of the poll.
>> No. 85582 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 9:54 am
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>>85581
The ever reliable source; it's what someone who follows these things told me. LSE suggest that the entire process could be shortened to 24 weeks which is why, until now, most commentators have suggested that a General Election was far more likely than a second referendum.

>Allowing one week between passage of legislation and the start of the regulated campaign, and a 10-week regulated campaign period, would take the total period from start to finish to 24 weeks.

https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/brexit/2018/09/05/how-long-would-it-take-to-hold-a-second-referendum-on-brexit/
>> No. 85583 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 10:11 am
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>>85582
While I understand the point about the Electoral Commission, bear in mind that we just had a bill rushed through all stages in the Commons with a lot of debate and a number of contentious votes in a little under five hours.

Plus I think that if the decision were taken to stage a referendum on the deal, the EU would happily grant a further extension, since it would be abundantly clear what we were going to do with it.
>> No. 85584 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 7:34 pm
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>>85577
>>85578
The referendum seems like a catch 22, sure it would give Parliament an answer (?) but on the other it requires Parliament to actually pass a bill on having a referendum.

>>85583
>Plus I think that if the decision were taken to stage a referendum on the deal, the EU would happily grant a further extension, since it would be abundantly clear what we were going to do with it.

That depends on how much we mess about. The Multiannual Financial Framework happens in 2020 and decides the EU budget commitments for the next 7 years - obviously we'd want to have fucked off by then.
>> No. 85585 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 1:28 am
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>>85584
The EU has shown they've been more than reasonable. If a referendum bill is put forward and held up at the last stage for the EC to do their thing, but the statutory periods run past the Halloween deadline, they'd certainly react a lot better than they have done. Remember, the main objection from the European side was that we were asking for an extension without any hint as to what we were seeking the extension for. Indeed, I believe both Juncker and Tusk have explicitly said as much.
>> No. 86481 Anonymous
10th August 2019
Saturday 1:06 pm
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>>85580
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-49302778
Looks like fake ferries are last month's game. Time to get our proposal in for the .gs fisheries protection fleet. I'll bung Boris a few quid. No need to even pretend we've got any boats, crew or experience, naturally.
(although there are a few tempting options over on apolloduck.com )
>> No. 86482 Anonymous
10th August 2019
Saturday 1:13 pm
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>>86481

We lost three cod wars against Iceland, a country with a population of 360,000 and no actual navy. If Boris decides to deploy his "fisheries protection fleet", I can only imagine that London will end up being destroyed in a nuclear attack.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cod_Wars
>> No. 86483 Anonymous
10th August 2019
Saturday 1:35 pm
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>>86482
We should definitely build more boats though.

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