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>> No. 90784 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 11:13 am
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If I was Prime Minister this is how I'd run the country:-

- Prostitution would be fully legalised, regulated and taxed.
- Recreational drugs would be fully legalised, regulated and taxed.
- The rail system would be brought fully into public ownership.
- There would be incentives to decentralise the economy away from London to the rest of the country.
- There would be a social housing drive and increases to the minimum standards for new builds.
- All new builds would have solar panels fitted.
- The feasibility of hydroelectric and geothermal energy would be investigated.
- Income tax and national insurance would be merged into one.
- All state benefits would be replaced with a universal basic income, including the state pension.
- The BBC would move to a Netflix style subscription model.
- Every child would leave school knowing how to cook a range of meals from scratch.
- Class sizes would be capped at 15 pupils at primary school and 20 at secondary school.
- The punishment for falsely accusing someone of a crime is the same as the sentence the accused would have received if found guilty.
- Convicted child molesters would be jailed for life, with no chance of being released.
- There would be a referendum on proportional representation.
- There'd be greater effort to support parents; SureStart, encouraging them to use libraries and read to their kids, that sort of thing.
- Social care would fall under the remit of the NHS and there would be much for funding, particularly for treating mental illness.
- Business rates would be scrapped, as would parking charges in council car parks.
- We'd plant shitloads more trees.
- HMRC would receive greater funding to crack down on tax evasion.
- Rent controls.

Vote for me.
Expand all images.
>> No. 90785 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 11:22 am
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>All new builds would have solar panels fitted.
I think you'd be better off using some combination of ground source heat pumps and properly green insulation. Solar panels still use rare metals that there isn't enough supply (and no ethical supply) of.

You'd also need to do some sort of coup to get all the assets from City of London and the various other associated tax havens.
>> No. 90786 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 11:31 am
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>>90785 Solar panels still use rare metals that there isn't enough supply (and no ethical supply) of.

Really?
>> No. 90788 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 11:36 am
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>>90786
So I've read.
>> No. 90789 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 11:45 am
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You're kind of shit, honestly.

>The BBC would move to a Netflix style subscription model.
Which assumes all that the BBC does is telly, which isn't remotely true. There's a reason it's called public service broadcasting. Unless you consider that hideously edited Madaline McCann documentary Netflix did to be news. And again, the BBC isn't just TV; I'd like to see how much GSCE revision material Netflix puts out, or their Kyrgyz news service.
>Class sizes would be capped at 15 pupils at primary school and 20 at secondary school.
Are you building more school and hiring more teachers too? Does this include academies, public and faith schools?
>The punishment for falsely accusing someone of a crime is the same as the sentence the accused would have received if found guilty.
This is completely insane, and makes me think you're a braindead who thinks false rape accusations are common as muck. At what point does a failure to get a conviction become a "false accusation"? Does every defendent who wins their trial get to take their accuser to court? What if the accusation never gets to trial? Does every accuser in that event need to be taken to court? I don't think you have a good grasp of the law.
>HMRC would receive greater funding to crack down on tax evasion.
Tax evasion is a problem, but it's dwarfed by the trillions held offshore in entirely legal ways. If you're not tackling that, you may as well be trying to empty Lake Windermere with a pair of chop sticks. Obviously it's not all owed to the UK, but I'm sure a quick look over the Panama Papers would prove that a reasonable sum is. And don't forget all the multinationals with HQs in Luxembourg or Ireland.

I'm sure smarter people could pull your points apart further, but I'm very stupid so I'm gonig to leave it there.
>> No. 90790 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 11:46 am
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>>90784
>All new builds would have solar panels fitted.

If solar panels are worth having in cost to benefit ratio (which they probably will be within the next in 20 years) you won't need to do this, it will happen quite naturally.

>The feasibility of hydroelectric and geothermal energy would be investigated.

They already are, the reason they aren't used more is because they aren't if it was viable you wouldn't need to look into it would already exist. The distinct lack of volcanos should give you a clue as to why geothermal isn't viable in the UK, hydroelectric needs very specific conditions to be viable and usually that is a secondary effect to some other implementation.

>The punishment for falsely accusing someone of a crime is the same as the sentence the accused would have received if found guilty.

There already is a crime perjury, (or are you suggesting false call to the police should be punished) the problem atm is proving that someone is guilty of it in the circumstances you suggest is quite difficult and if you relax the rules it creates a fear to come forward in high profile cases as you risk the tables being flipped on you. Having it be the same sentence is a bit too weirdly knee jerk for my taste.
>rent controls
These are generally shown not to work as desired, they end up introducing corruption into the system and run down shit holes no one wants to improve since they can charge rent cap anyway. You can usually solve the problems they target better by "social housing drive and increases to the minimum standards for new builds" so I would advise scrapping this policy.
>> No. 90791 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 12:42 pm
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Just bring accountability and consequences back and you'll have my vote.
>> No. 90792 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 1:24 pm
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>>90790
Not to mention on the renewables front that geothermal and hydroelectric make up an absolutely tiny portion of the total UK renewable energy potential.

Realistically we need wind, wind, and more wind.
>> No. 90793 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 2:27 pm
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If I was Prime Minister I'd do something radical by listening to my civil service advisers and the experts. A proper technocratic administration that utterly fails at being decisive or winning at the ballot box but delivers nerd shit people don't want.

For about 5 minutes that is until I become corrupt and obsessed with concocting schemes within schemes. Plus I'd implement my absurd government theory in making ludicrous laws to generate culture and innovation.

>>90785
>>90788
You're wrong. Rare Earth's aren't rare, you just don't get seams of it like gold so it's a pain in the arse and you end up with onsite radioactive buildup from thorium and uranium. Nothing unusual about mining in shit countries or that eventually you can't work there.

If only we had some sort of use for radioactive material...

>>90792
Those egg-heads should work on harnessing the power of rain and overcast skies. We'd be the next Saudi Arabia.
>> No. 90794 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 2:28 pm
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>>90792
It's the tide section that has always disappointed me. We're surrounded by the fucking stuff - I know how difficult it is to make "things" that sit in seawater all day that don't rot/malfunction, but I wish there was a solution there.
>> No. 90795 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 2:32 pm
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>>90793
>If only we had some sort of use for radioactive material...

If we were serious about removing carbon from the atmosphere, we could rapidly solve the problem and build nuclear power stations, but that's unpopular and not "green".
>> No. 90796 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 2:40 pm
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That's way too much red tape and none of it will work.
>> No. 90797 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 3:06 pm
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>>90793
>You're wrong.
How is something being a pain in the arse to get hold of different to there not being a good supply of it?
>> No. 90798 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 3:43 pm
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>>90797
Because there is and will always be a good supply of Rare Earths given that, as a whole, they're common in the planets crust. The pain in the arse part is a suppliers problem where concentrated deposits are rarer but then mine viability rises with price and efficiency like any method resource extraction.

Ramp up demand and you will magically have supply - especially as significant Rare Earths deposits remain untapped. If this wasn't the case then humanity would be in serious trouble given how important Rare Earths are for the modern economy.
>> No. 90799 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 3:52 pm
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>>90797
He's an agent of BIG GOVERNMENT.
>> No. 90800 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 4:01 pm
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>>90798
Your graph / point is excellent - and correct - rare earths aren't "rare" at all, it's just that to date China has most of the processing plants, which is why it leads the way in battery and solar panel production. The underlying minerals are found in many other kinds of mine, it's just that Western miners couldn't be bothered to build the processing plants required to extract them, whilst China did.

https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/17/17246444/rare-earth-metals-discovery-japan-china-monopoly
https://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2013/07/22/big-surprise-rare-earths-arent-rare/#51e2923775bd
>> No. 90801 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 4:21 pm
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>>90798
If there is a shortage of supply from the suppliers then there is not a good supply of the supplies.
>> No. 90802 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 4:31 pm
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This is all somewhat unrelated to the fact that rare earth metals aren't used in solar panels, which is what I was originally questioning.
Yes, they're used in (magnets for) motors, and in homeopathic quantities in other things. No, they're not particularly rare, they were named so before lots of reserves were found. Mining them is a messy and unpleasant business, same as much mining.
So, Oish-P, please back up your assertion that solar panels need trick minerals.
>> No. 90803 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 4:33 pm
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>>90802
On a tangentially-related note, most phone screens are made of indium tin oxide - conductive and transparent. We're going to run out of indium and tin pretty soon.
>> No. 90804 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 4:45 pm
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>>90802

https://e360.yale.edu/features/a_scarcity_of_rare_metals_is_hindering_green_technologies
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1364032118303861
>> No. 90805 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 4:47 pm
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>>90803 tin is used in far, far larger quantities in solder, and nobody's worrying about that.
Indium's a bit more constrained, but anyone banging on about an indium shortage is probably trying to sell you something. If it really gets constrained then good old capitalism will deliver more of it, with an annoying lag and price increase.
>> No. 90806 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 4:54 pm
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>>90804 Meh, CdTe is a bit better than Silicon. It's also a pain in the arse. If we can't make CdTe, we just make a bit more silicon panels. Seriously no biggie. There are endless such tradeoffs, on availability, price, politics. It's just engineering.
>> No. 90807 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 4:55 pm
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>>90806
Alright. It's just what I'd read is all.
>> No. 90808 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 4:57 pm
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>>90786

Rare-earth minerals are totally optional in solar cells. Most solar cells are made of nothing more than sand, copper and aluminium. Some thin-film technologies do use rare earths, but those cells are actually cheaper than silicon cells because a) rare earths actually aren't all that rare and b) thin-film panels don't use much material, as the name suggests. Thin-film cells represent less than 8% of the total market, mainly because of the plunging cost and immense output of the well-proven poly-Si technology.

>>90784

>Prostitution would be fully legalised, regulated and taxed.

Prostitution is already fully legalised. Brothel-keeping, pimping and solicitation are illegal, but it's perfectly legal to advertise sexual services and have sex with people for money. I have no idea what you mean by "regulated", but I don't like the sound of it one bit.

>>90804

The paper you posted (full-text link below) is actually really good news for the renewables sector - the authors conclude that we can keep producing everything at sustainable levels beyond 2050 just by marginally increasing the recycling rates.

https://sci-hub.ee/10.1016/j.rser.2018.05.041
>> No. 90809 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 5:01 pm
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>>90808

Good. Though last I heard we were running out of sand too so I'm not sure how that's going to go. I realise that sounds mental but it's apparently a thing.
>> No. 90810 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 5:42 pm
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>>90809
Don't be silly. The UK might not have much sand left, but there is plenty still out there, both on land and at sea.
>> No. 90811 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 5:46 pm
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>>90809

It's building sand they're running out of due to the preferred properties of it (has to be water-eroded rather than wind eroded or something), but I assume any old silicate would work for solar panels. Which is fairly abundant in the form of rocks.
>> No. 90812 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 5:49 pm
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>>90805
It seems there was a big panic about it in 2010 or so, and that sort of makes sense since I was taught it in a uni module about optical displays and devices in 2015, using notes that were probably a few years old.
>> No. 90813 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 5:51 pm
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>We'd plant shitloads more trees
Good intentions assured, this isn't how you create healthy ecosystems. When trees are planted on blanket bog and lowland heath etc, this destroys those places as natural habitats.
>>90798
From what I understand China has a pretty tight grip on Australian and Myanmar anyway?
>> No. 90814 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 6:57 pm
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>>90808
>Prostitution is already fully legalised. Brothel-keeping, pimping and solicitation are illegal, but it's perfectly legal to advertise sexual services and have sex with people for money. I have no idea what you mean by "regulated", but I don't like the sound of it one bit.

Not him but I can see an option for well regulated brothels to address slavery and controlling STIs (by mandating regular screening). They already exist in a roundabout way so it would be a case of recognising that and ensuring that Britain has good brothels. The best.

The German's seem to manage it.

>>90813
The Australian relationship has been torpedoed and as it happens trading dependence that goes both ways. Similar situation across the world where China has managed to ruin its own foreign policy and even where it has strengthened links its been a case of breeding resentment in the population by working with corrupt officials or not delivering.

Its Saturday so I'll just post a youtube on China's failure in Central and Eastern Europe:

>> No. 90815 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 7:06 pm
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>>90808
>Prostitution is already fully legalised. Brothel-keeping, pimping and solicitation are illegal, but it's perfectly legal to advertise sexual services and have sex with people for money.
Yes and no. If you've reached a point where you have accepted payment for sex, an offence has been committed somewhere along the line.
>> No. 90816 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 7:10 pm
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I'd vote for you, OP. What's the catch?

Also if I was you I'd stop fucking about and just build a load of nuclear power stations. We can put them in Scotland where nobody lives and just pipe the leccy down here, right?

Imagine the Scottish STALKER after one of them melts down, with bucky instead of vodka.
>> No. 90817 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 7:17 pm
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>>90813
The place we need to plant all the trees is Scottish moorland mostly - all the trees were removed to benefit grouse shooting. Much of the highlands is completely un-natural as a result.

We need to rewild.
>> No. 90818 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 7:22 pm
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>>90817
Much of the parts of the UK which we think of as being national parks or the countryside could do with rewilding. We hardly realise what the place looked like "wild". We'll look at something like this and assume that's its natural state.
>> No. 90819 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 7:40 pm
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>>90815

>Yes and no. If you've reached a point where you have accepted payment for sex, an offence has been committed somewhere along the line.

Not in England and Wales. Street walking and kerb crawling are illegal, massage parlours are a widely-tolerated grey area, but escorting is 100% legal. If you message a girl on Adultwork and book an outcall to a hotel room or an incall to her flat, no offence has been committed by anyone.

Sex workers have mixed opinions on the legalisation of brothel-keeping. Most are in favour of relaxing the law to allow two or three girls to work out of the same flat, but there's a general opposition to German-style mega-brothels.
>> No. 90820 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 10:23 pm
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>>90819

>Sex workers have mixed opinions on the legalisation of brothel-keeping.

I'm not surprised, If I'm letting someone spunk in my hole I'm definitely keeping 100% of my fee for it.

It's one thing to sell your labour to Tesco and complain about the injustice of the boss making more than you to sit on his arse in the office all day; it's quite a-fucking-nother to have some parasite putting their feet up while skimming off the fat from all the dicks you've had to suck.
>> No. 90821 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 10:28 pm
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>>90818
No thanks. I don't want bears and wolves on these isles.
>> No. 90822 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 10:34 pm
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>>90821
Bears bad idea obviously - but wolves are actually very close to happening.

In Scotland, one of the reasons they struggle to plant trees is all the deer (over-bred to support shooting) eat the young saplings, so having some wolves around would keep them in check. Some of the wildlife trusts are very close to actually doing this.

We already have numerous big cats all over the country, the wolves would also keep them in check.
>> No. 90823 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 12:41 am
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>>90818
I remember when Lancashire suffered some bad flooding a few years back, almost entirely because moorland along drainage basins is almost exclusively owned and managed by Hoorah Henries who want to encourage a few game birds they can shoot once a yah. Any tree that could help retain water and land from erosion that pops up is felled at its sapling stage.
>> No. 90824 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 11:46 am
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>>90820

A pimp isn't just an internet persona, lad.
>> No. 90825 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 1:08 pm
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>>90824

Your mum's an internet persona. On adultwork.
>> No. 90826 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 1:58 pm
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>>90817
I might be wrong but I think it's mostly been deforested since the bronze age, however sheep grazing and then shooting have made it a relative wasteland. The shooting lobby is absolutely implacable, unwilling to concede to anything, no exaggeration, it would be a big battle for sure.
>> No. 90827 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 2:32 pm
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>>90822
The documentary I watched about the Yellowstone trophic cascade was amazing honestly, I wouldn't mind at all of they reintroduced Wolves. They'd cull fox populations naturally too, removing another "need" for hunts.
>> No. 90828 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 2:33 pm
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>>90825

And I'm your Dad's Pimp.
>> No. 90829 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 2:54 pm
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>>90820
I'm remembering this from Freakonomics but brothels and pimps can provide beneficial services. For example 18th century brothels managed to create a taboo around blowjobs (as its less arduous work than anal) and there's data that if a prostitute has a pimp she can make more money safely even with someone taking a fee. Although for the latter it obviously depends on how much control the pimp is exercising.

Maybe the comparison would be in how OnlyFans is popular simply because it handles all the internet pimping which, as we all know, ain't easy.
>> No. 90830 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 3:18 pm
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>>90829

It's more or less equivalent to something like Uber. Your view on whether or not this is exploitation of the workers or beneficial to them obviously depends, but is hard to deny there's something more viscerally obvious about the economic mechanics of what's going on, if you are profiting from the use of other people's holes.

If you had brothels owned by a co-operative of the hookers who work there, and the fee is used in a non-profit way to provide security and cleaning etc and any left-over equally shared back around the staff, then everyone's happy I suppose.

In practice, though, the German brothels are most often the former, and that's why they are controversial. There's a decent documentary on Netflix about how they work. Without any legal restriction, it's not hard to imagine the Jeff Benzos of brothels buying out a hotel chain like Travelodge and filling them all with "self employed" minimum wage prozzies.
>> No. 90831 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 3:23 pm
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>>90826
>shooting lobby is absolutely implacable, unwilling to concede to anything, no exaggeration

It's because the shooting estates cover so much land in Scotland - the statistics are quite staggering. There is misuse of the land due to the plants they grow, to benefit the grouse, and then the killing of other animals (hares, foxes, others), that they believe get in the way of grouse breeding. It's very difficult to make inroads into the problem when almost half of Scotland is given over to grouse moor.
>> No. 90832 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 3:30 pm
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>>90830
>Without any legal restriction, it's not hard to imagine the Jeff Benzos of brothels buying out a hotel chain like Travelodge and filling them all with "self employed" minimum wage prozzies.

That is exactly what would happen - as you say, it would just become another gig-economy job mostly in the hands of one or two very large companies, rather than the cute idea of workers co-operatives that we see in Holland or Germany. I think the same would happen if we legalised drugs, or Dutch-style coffee shops.
>> No. 90833 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 4:09 pm
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Sex workers don't want sex work to be "legalised". They want it to be decriminalised. There is a difference.
>> No. 90834 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 4:29 pm
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>>90831
I'm not defending the land management in Scotland but those figures are a little misleading when not taken in the context of how desolate the Highlands are. It's mostly poor quality land used for grazing hardy cattle and sheep so I don't see much of an alternative.

Grouse hunting seems to be the usual drum to beat on this which makes me cynical that it might just be smoke and mirrors. Grouse can fuck off but fluffy cows is another matter entirely.

The 'Islands' part always feels a bit weird for me, Orkney and Shetland are their own thing and that's the hill I'll die on.
>> No. 90835 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 6:52 pm
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>>90834
> in the context of how desolate the Highlands ar

Oh I totally agree with that point - one can easily argue that grouse/deer shooting is a pretty good way of exploiting that land, given the money it will bring in, compared to other kinds of farming. The weather is terrible in the Highlands, the land is extremely rugged and difficult to access etc. On the face of it, the alternatives aren't that great, right now.

But the landscape isn't "natural", that's the point, and shooting estates intentionally keep them that way, ruining the biodiversity. Climate change, rewilding, there are other conversations to be had about what could/should happen with that land in the future.
>> No. 90836 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 7:21 pm
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>>90827
What was the documentary? Been looking for some good ones to watch.
>> No. 90837 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 7:31 pm
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>>90835
>one can easily argue that grouse/deer shooting is a pretty good way of exploiting that land, given the money it will bring in, compared to other kinds of farming

That's the tail wagging the dog. Shooting and hunting is a consequence of the land being adapted to the needs of the wool and beef industries not the other way and not something that requires the enormous footprint of human activity.

Best of luck having your rewilding conversations with wool farmers at the minute.
>> No. 90838 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 7:39 pm
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>>90836
Not him so I might not be right, but I saw this on BBC4 the other day and it was simply excellent (and featured wolves).

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episodes/b00jcdml/yellowstone
>> No. 90839 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 8:28 pm
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- Put the AOC back down to 12.

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 90840 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 9:21 pm
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We don't need nuclear, we just need to flood a small part of Scotland - https://scottishscientist.wordpress.com/2015/04/15/worlds-biggest-ever-pumped-storage-hydro-scheme-for-scotland/
>> No. 90841 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 9:54 pm
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>>90827

As if fox hunting was ever about keeping fox populations down.

Why does everyone hate foxes? It's not as if they're endemic like non-native hares or whatever it is in Australia.
>> No. 90842 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 9:58 pm
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>>90841
>Why does everyone hate foxes? It's not as if they're endemic like non-native hares or whatever it is in Australia.

I think its people who keep other livestock, like chickens, who actually hate them.
>> No. 90843 Anonymous
18th October 2020
Sunday 11:54 pm
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>>90841
I don't hate them, but their numbers adversely affect small animal populations when their numbers aren't controlled by a large, dominant natural predator. The same thing happened with coyotes in Yellowstone. Their numbers went down massively, and as a result smaller mammals flourished.
>> No. 90844 Anonymous
19th October 2020
Monday 12:33 am
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>>90841
They keep shitting in my garden.
>> No. 90845 Anonymous
19th October 2020
Monday 12:49 am
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>>90843

So wolves actually eat foxes, or just compete for food etc? I wouldn't have thought they're very tasty.

I can see us just having a lot more urban foxes if they had more competition in the countryside. The thing they share with other animals considered vermin is that they're just as happy to adapt and live by scrounging out of our bins as they are hunting in the wild.

The last thing we want is them teaming up with rats and pigeons to plot our downfall. Crafty bastards, so I've heard.
>> No. 90846 Anonymous
19th October 2020
Monday 12:58 am
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>>90841

>Why does everyone hate foxes? It's not as if they're endemic like non-native hares or whatever it is in Australia.

If they get into a chicken shed, they tend to go into a frenzy and keep killing birds until they're exhausted or there's nothing left to kill. It would be one thing if they nicked the odd bird, but the sight of dozens of decapitated chickens is utterly enraging.

I don't understand why someone would dress up like a twat and chase after a fox with a pack of dogs, but I do understand why a farmer would go out lamping or support his local hunt.
>> No. 90847 Anonymous
19th October 2020
Monday 1:13 am
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>>90846

Weasels do the same thing, and they're only the size of a squirrel. If you want to imagine terror, imagine a weasel upscaled to the size of a dog.

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