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>> No. 23383 Anonymous
17th November 2020
Tuesday 1:06 am
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I've been watching loads of foreign films recently, and I was struck by something I find quite interesting. When I watch a foreign film in a Germanic language like Dutch or German, it feels impactful to me because the intonation, tone, sentence pacing and structure of the actors feels quite similar to English, which makes their performances feel about as compelling as they would be if they were in English.

When I watch something in French, Spanish, or Italian, it often feels like a word salad of peculiar sounds that are either lacking in distinct emotions, or are over emphasising one particular emotion. Spanish and Italian are a slurry of fast paced words and French is a blur of people making "bleugh" sounds.

Is it just me or have any of you noticed the same thing? I used to think that English kind of sat "in between" Romance and Germanic languages, but I now realise it's firmly a Germanic language with a bunch of loanwords thanks to our Norman enslavement.
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>> No. 23384 Anonymous
17th November 2020
Tuesday 2:00 am
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I think what you've noticed are differences in stress and isochrony. The rhythms of French or Spanish are closer to Mandarin or Japanese than English.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress_(linguistics)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isochrony
>> No. 23385 Anonymous
17th November 2020
Tuesday 8:41 am
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All three sound fine to me, it's not until Italian that I start to notice that.

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