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>> No. 425247 Anonymous
18th March 2019
Monday 1:45 pm
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New mid-week thread.

I've got the feeling I was meant to look something up but I can't remember what and it's bugging me.
171 posts omitted. Last 50 posts shown. Expand all images.
>> No. 425806 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 6:09 pm
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>>425797
>What on earth are you doing, lad?
He's choosing the best version of Windows released to date.
>> No. 425812 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 9:09 pm
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>>425805

Windows ME was the most shit system that Microsoft ever annoyed its users with. Stability was fucking awful, driver issues were abundant, and it just looked and felt like Windows 98's retarded cousin.

I got a pirated CD with a system builders version of ME on it from a friend back in the day when it had just come out, and for some time, I thought that I had all those problems because it was an illegal rip. But one of my friends then bought a new computer at the time with an all legit copy of ME, and he had the exact same problems on his computer.

It's just the natural course of events with Microsoft. For every really quite usable, stable, well designed operating system that they come out with now and then, they seem to feel the need to get one or two shit follow ups out of their system again before the OS after that will then amount to something good again. Just look at how poorly received Vista and Windows 8 were. With Windows 10, they seem to have rolled back a few of the unfavourable quirks of Windows 8 again, but having seen both systems side by side, 7 and 10, I would always advise somebody to stick with 7 as long as possible.
>> No. 425813 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 9:21 pm
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Am I paranoid for believing Windows is moving towards a subscription based payment system? Basically everything else is doing so and the auto updates you have no say over seem like the thin end of the wedge for just that kind of thing.
>> No. 425816 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 10:10 pm
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>>425813
Windows 10 has heralded the move from a paid product towards a free one.
>> No. 425818 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 10:27 pm
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Just use Linux. For fucks sake lads it's 2019.
>> No. 425819 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 10:33 pm
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Windows gave me a free update to 10 from my cracked copy of 7 Ultimate. It was a pretty good deal if you ask me.
>> No. 425821 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 11:11 pm
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>>425818

>Just use Linux. For fucks sake lads it's 2019.


Take a minute to think about what you just said before we move on, lad.
>> No. 425822 Anonymous
11th April 2019
Thursday 11:18 pm
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>>425818
Keep your own farm animals. It's 2019 after all.
>> No. 425827 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 10:34 am
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>>425822
I do. Need to move the sheep off the hayfield onto their summer grazing, but they've gone feral over the winter. Took a week of trying to coax the wooly bastards into the barn so I could load them into the trailer - when I realised that the keys to the trailer are in the towcar, which is 100 miles away. Fuck's sake. Sheep released.
>> No. 425835 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 5:42 pm
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Still busy updating my Windows 7 reinstall. A good three GB of data so far. And counting.

Fuckssake. Seems like my Windows 7 version is proper ancient. It's a disk image on a bootable USB thumb drive that I originally downloaded directly from Microsoft. My computer originally only came with a recovery version of Windows 7 Home which was stored on a system reserved hard drive partition. And then when the cheaply made hard drive went kaput and needed replacing just after the warranty ran out, I happened upon the downloadable disk image on Microsoft's web site. It lets you install anything from Windows 7 Starter 32-bit to Win 7 Professional if you type in the correct serial number. But apparently it's a very early Win7 build, which doesn't even contain Service Pack 1. Might have to check if they offer a more up to date disk image now, but obviously too late for this reinstall now.
>> No. 425837 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 5:45 pm
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>>425821
>>425822

He's right. Stop being goddamn plebs who depend on Windows-brand spyware/bloatware.
>> No. 425838 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 5:47 pm
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>>425837

>Stop being goddamn plebs

>I'm Linux edgelad, behold mah edges.
>> No. 425841 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 6:07 pm
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>>425837

I love Linux and have ran it in many forms since I was about 12, but there's still too many specialist programs that will likely never run properly, so I'm stuck with Windows or OSX for at least half of my computing time.

You can viably use Linux for gaming now, which is great, but until it runs Ableton, certain CAD programs, and Adobe suite, I'm going to have to remain a pleb.
>> No. 425842 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 6:12 pm
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>>425837
Ganoo Slash Lunicks has its uses, but it's still simply not there for serious productivity. Unsupported by Adobe CS, Altium, SolidWORKS, AutoCAD, etc, and LibreOffice is fucking useless compared to MS Office. I suppose with Google Docs, that's not as much of an issue unless you're going full FOSS. Hell, even Netflix was a bit of a pain until very recently.
>> No. 425843 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 6:24 pm
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>>425841

LibreOffice and GIMP both have their merits, which is what I use often on my Windows computer. Exporting to PDF tends to be somewhat more convenient in LibreOffice, and GIMP in its current 2.10 version, although still not a de facto alternative to Photoshop, has really come a long way.
>> No. 425844 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 6:54 pm
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Eating an apple.
>> No. 425846 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 7:02 pm
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>>425844
If it's going to take you all weekend get some lemon juice on it or it'll go all manky.
>> No. 425848 Anonymous
12th April 2019
Friday 7:17 pm
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Someone called me eccentric today, purely based on the fact that "you drive a much worse car than you can afford"

I asked them if they could understand the value in having a car you don't care about getting scratched etc but still runs perfectly well, but he genuinely seemed to struggle with that idea.

I just need to get a Defender again, people assume that's a rich person car.
>> No. 425862 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 11:17 am
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Formula E is fucking boring.
>> No. 425863 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 11:20 am
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>>425862
Do they still sound like drills and have the pit stop where they have to jump out of one car and get into another?
>> No. 425875 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 1:50 pm
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>>425848

>Someone called me eccentric today, purely based on the fact that "you drive a much worse car than you can afford"


As opposed to most people, who drive much more expensive cars than they can realistically afford without having to eat fish fingers and spaghetti all week.
>> No. 425876 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 1:54 pm
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>>425863

Couldn't be arsed watching long enough to see if they still switch cars, but they definitely still sound like drills or Jetsons cars.

I found out recently that sound is just what straight cut racing gears sound like at high speed, you'd just never know in a combustion car because of the engine noise drowning it out.

I went to a Formula E event at Silverstone last year, or the year before, I forget, and talked to some bloke from the Virgin team. Despite being a giant nerd and very much into cars myself, he did not succeed in impressing or even entertaining me with his waffle about electric motors.

I did get a Virgin Racing branded bluetooth speaker with a robot face on it from them though.
>> No. 425883 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 2:44 pm
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>>425848
I've had a similar run-in recently, replace cars with phones.
Would do the same if it came to cars too. Unless, of course, I had a sudden windfall of a fortune to afford a W221 and its maintenance.
I suspect I'd still prefer a W124/W140 though.
>> No. 425884 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 3:14 pm
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>>425848

>I just need to get a Defender again, people assume that's a rich person car.

Or a murderer's car.

https://sniffpetrol.com/2014/10/01/one-life-live-it-sticker-defines-land-rover-owner/
>> No. 425887 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 6:53 pm
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>>425884

>Or a murderer's car.

Still better than a white van. One of my mates had one for a while, mainly to transport his surfboards, and people kept asking him jokingly if he was a child snatcher or a paedo.
>> No. 425888 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 7:29 pm
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>>425887

My missus has a white van to transport her bikes around in and nobody ever asks her if she's a paedo. Typical double standards.
>> No. 425889 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 7:31 pm
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>>425887

Does he look like a paedo though?
>> No. 425890 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 9:09 pm
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>>425889

Long shaggy hair and beard stubble.

Your guess is as good as mine.
>> No. 425891 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 10:47 pm
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>>425890

If the hair is a bit greasy too, that's very paedo.
>> No. 425892 Anonymous
13th April 2019
Saturday 11:57 pm
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>>425891

How do you know this?
>> No. 425893 Anonymous
14th April 2019
Sunday 8:15 am
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>>425892

Paedos excrete a chemical that attracts children. It smells like hammers, and makes the hair look greasy.
>> No. 425927 Anonymous
15th April 2019
Monday 4:47 pm
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Watching two pigeons outside my window in a tree competing over a female pigeon. But if I am not entirely mistaken, both males have mated with the female in the last ten minutes.

Proper dirty slag, that female pigeon.
>> No. 425929 Anonymous
15th April 2019
Monday 4:59 pm
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How do I become less of a judgemental cunt? When it was in the news about that lad being mauled to death by a dog in a caravan one of my first thoughts was "I bet they've got a chav name like Lexi, Hayden or Jaxon and I bet their parents are proper pondscum too." When that was confirmed right on both counts it made me think less of them, like the death doesn't count as much because it's one more waste of space elimated from the gene pool. I know it's terrible to think like people such as these don't really matter, they're not real people, but it's the first thing that automatically and instinctively pops into my noggin.

>>425927
Pervert.
>> No. 425930 Anonymous
15th April 2019
Monday 6:37 pm
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>>425929
Consciously choose to have a more open minded approach to other human beings, and especially become more open to making friends or at least connecting socially with other humans regardless of background or class. Talk to people. Try to understand their lives. Deeply question what, if anything, makes you much better or that fundamentally different to them, and be honest with yourself about your own shortcomings and strengths with the attitude that no one is perfect, and that we're all just learning to get by.

Except Bike Thief though, he's just a cunt.
>> No. 425931 Anonymous
15th April 2019
Monday 7:14 pm
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>>425929

>How do I become less of a judgemental cunt?

>Pervert.


I can't say I have doubt that you need help.
>> No. 425933 Anonymous
15th April 2019
Monday 7:21 pm
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>>425770
Lads could someone please explain why I've just lost 45 minutes of my life to watching a man get very excited about a freeze dried slice of pepperoni pizza

Why is he so genuinely enthuasistic about the flavour of coffee powder

Why is this such compelling viewing what is going on
>> No. 425934 Anonymous
15th April 2019
Monday 7:31 pm
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>>425930
I'm probably tainted by the fact that I've spent too much time growing up around these kind of people to know they're the absolute dregs of society. It doesn't help that the more I read about this case, such as the fact that it was members of the public who tried to help the boy rather than friends and family in adjoining caravans because they were too busy getting hammered at 5am to even notice anything was wrong, the worse it gets and it just ends up confirming my prejudices were correct (even if that's just at a superficial level).

However, when I hear in the news about a stabbing, shooting or acid attack in London my first thoughts are generally along the lines of "I bet the perpetrators are black." When I'm proven correct I don't think less of them, I think that they're a byproduct of the culture they've been raised in where joining a gang and engaging in criminal acts helps make up for a lack of male role models in their lives, gives them a sense of camaraderie and they see it as an easy way to get rich rather than joining the daily grind; a bit like the local Asian kids who don't try hard at school because they want to emulate people they know who deal drugs and drive flash cars. I think what I'm getting at is that I find it very hard to emphasise with chavs.

>>425931
If you're watching multiple pigeon intercourse then chances are you're a wrong 'un. The mere fact that you're posting here in the first place means you're almost certainly a pervert.
>> No. 425935 Anonymous
15th April 2019
Monday 7:56 pm
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>>425934

>The mere fact that you're posting here in the first place means you're almost certainly a pervert.

I would say that it takes one to know one, but there is probably no hope that that would alter your view on the matter.
>> No. 425936 Anonymous
15th April 2019
Monday 8:42 pm
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>>425935

That poster is also posting here so that's really a moot point.
>> No. 425940 Anonymous
16th April 2019
Tuesday 8:45 pm
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>>425929
Oh, I was under the impression that was perfectly normal, and wouldn't worry about changing.
>> No. 425942 Anonymous
17th April 2019
Wednesday 2:09 am
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>>425934

When Madeleine McCann's disappearance was in the news, I wondered how the coverage would be different if her parents were called Wayne and Tracey and she had gone missing in Magaluf.
>> No. 425943 Anonymous
17th April 2019
Wednesday 2:15 am
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>>425942

You only have to compare Madeline McCann's case to that one where that bird in Dewsbury faked the kidnapping of her own kid for a bit of money for a stark picture of how classism works in modern Britain.

Both of them blatantly, obviously did it,and everyone knew they did it. The McCanns got away with it and became media personalities, whereas the chavvy Northern lass was just another hate figure of the week.
>> No. 425949 Anonymous
17th April 2019
Wednesday 7:13 pm
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>>425943

>The McCanns got away with it and became media personalities

Class privilege at work, without a doubt.
>> No. 425950 Anonymous
17th April 2019
Wednesday 7:33 pm
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>>425949
It's because the McCann's are friends with Gordon Brown. Nothing like the establishment to close ranks and cover up a missing child.

Karen Matthew's mistake was not inviting ol' Cyclops around to share a few tinnies after Shannon had disappeared.
>> No. 425951 Anonymous
17th April 2019
Wednesday 7:56 pm
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_TmphKMXXY
>> No. 425952 Anonymous
17th April 2019
Wednesday 8:12 pm
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>>425951
I've got this album on CD. It's fucking amazing. I want a live show of it.

Get another Kickstarter going, Kunt.
>> No. 425961 Anonymous
17th April 2019
Wednesday 10:12 pm
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I made the mistake of buying Smarties mini eggs because they were 90g for £1 whereas Cadbury's are 80g for the same price. I should have gone with quality over quantity.
>> No. 425969 Anonymous
18th April 2019
Thursday 2:37 am
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>>425961
I cannot believe it is Easter already.
>> No. 425997 Anonymous
18th April 2019
Thursday 3:45 pm
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>>425436
>I've always liked Michael Young's framing of meritocracy: a term he coined in the negative, describing a class unto itself.

Does the rise in the so-called meritocracy coincide with the decline of industry in this country? If you back 50/60 years then it didn't matter if you didn't try hard at school because it was almost guaranteed that there'd be a job for you for life at the local factory, down the pit or whatever. There may have been lower social mobility but those at the bottom were still able to build a nice, if somewhat modest, life for themselves where they could afford to buy a house from a relatively early age.

My Dad left school at the age of 14 and spent almost 35 years working in the same factory, a job he got because his brother worked there. I don't think he ever earned much more than £20,000 before he retired in his late fifties due to being a member of a final salary pension scheme. That was enough for him to buy a house, raise two kids, own a nearly new Rover 400 and go abroad on holiday almost every year.

Once those industries were decimated then if you didn't try hard at school or have much in the way of aspiration then you were pretty much fucked and apparently it's all your fault for not having the benefit of hindsight. Throw in some people becoming docile because of the welfare state and others believing their brilliant entrepreneurs solely because their wealth has grown due to house price rises and you can see why we are where we are now.
>> No. 426007 Anonymous
18th April 2019
Thursday 9:50 pm
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>>425997

It's all about wealth generation and the distribution thereof. Back when your dad was in the workforce, work productivity was a tiny fraction of what it is today in terms of output per man hour. With today's technology, a single worker can output ten times as much in a given time period as in the mid-20th century. This stark rise in productivity was anticipated by sociologists and futurists alike in the 50s and 60s.

The fallacy that they then committed, however, was that they assumed that all that increase in productivity and fewer man hours needed to maintain a certain level of output would mean that workers would get to spend more time off with no loss of pay. I've got stacks of old issues of Popular Mechanics in my basement still from my dad from the late 1950s to early 60s, and in them, you can read loopy visions of the future, of people barely working three days a week as early as the 1980s, and spending their income and all their free time on holidays to space stations orbiting Earth.

What went wrong was that all these increases in productivity ended up not being paid out to workers and employees, but they led to competitors undercutting each other on prices per unit on goods markets. And it kind of makes sense from an economist's view point. In industries were you have oligopolic competiton, enterprises will tend to see increases in productivity as a cost advantage against other competitors. So the price for a good goes down nearly the same way as productivity has increased. This in turn means that not only do workers not see wage increases, but as time goes by and technology evolves yet more, workers will be made redundant because machines tend to outperform human workers many times over and at much lower cost. And therefore, increases in productivity have not generated more wealth for the common worker.

Also, you have to consider the role of capital. Capital wants to see interest, and as that interest is generated through investment returns, for example from investments in factories and companies, that money then needs to appreciate as well. So what you have is an enormous feedback loop of compounded interest over decades that has made certain segments of the population obscenely wealthy in the last 150 years and especially in the globalised world of the last 20 to 30 years, but today, there is just so much capital that all of it will not appreciate unless you take chunks out of the paychecks of the people who actually generate that wealth through their own hands' work. From that perspective, every quid that is paid to workers won't go into somebody's return on investment.

And then you notice very quickly where it has been going from there. Nearly all industrialised countries in the last 25 years have seen countless "job market reforms", ostensibly to make the job markets more flexible, but what they really did was take away most of the workers' share of the wealth that they generate. And it isn't just your actual monthly pay, but also things like job security and other marks of a person's standard of living that have eroded.

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