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>> No. 24177 Anonymous
25th August 2020
Tuesday 9:58 am
24177 new graphics card
I'm in the market for a new graphics card - I believe that the RTX 2060 family is the one to go for, but would appreciate any advice/experience - there seem to be millions of versions, all with pretty small variations. Pictured is the ASUS one I am thinking of.

Don't want to spend much more than 500 quid.

What would you buy in this price range?
Expand all images.
>> No. 24178 Anonymous
25th August 2020
Tuesday 11:40 am
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You might want to wait a bit, because the 3000 series is right around the corner.

The different versions of each model have the same chip but a different PCB and cooling system, which only really matters if you're overclocking. In the case of the RTX 2060, the best value option is probably the EVGA KO Gaming at a hair under £300.

If you don't care about raytracing, the Radeon RX 5700 XT is considerably better value than the RTX 2060 - it's a heck of a lot faster for only £40ish more. The Radeon drivers used to be horrendously buggy, but they're mostly OK now.

For a definitive answer, I'd really need to know what CPU and monitor you have - there's no point in buying a high-end card if you're bottlenecked by your processor or you'll only be playing at 1080p60.
>> No. 24179 Anonymous
25th August 2020
Tuesday 6:19 pm
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Why are graphic cards so expensive? I just want to play a few steam games casually when I am drunk. Some of them are worth as much as my PC.
>> No. 24180 Anonymous
25th August 2020
Tuesday 6:38 pm
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>>24179

They're basically a second computer on a single board dedicated to graphics rendering, with their own processor and RAM.

Also crypto mining pushed up the prices for a bit, not sure if you can still do the £100-£150 midrange card that'll do you for a couple of years.
>> No. 24181 Anonymous
25th August 2020
Tuesday 6:51 pm
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5700XT is probably the best value graphics card on the market right now.

It had some dodgy driver support early on but everything is sorted now, and raytracing is still firmly in that stage of "bit of a gimmick, don't bother yet". The GTX2070 should be within your budget if I remember right, and it does offer marginally better performance than the 5700XT if you're the type to care about getting the absolute most FPS your money can buy, but it's not enough more to justify the extra cost if you ask me.

I upgraded from an i5 3570k with GTX1060, to a Ryzen 5 3600XT with 5700XT last year and it's smashing games out of the park.
>> No. 24182 Anonymous
25th August 2020
Tuesday 9:48 pm
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Raytracing is incredible when properly utilised, but it presently comes at a high price for good performance.
>> No. 24183 Anonymous
26th August 2020
Wednesday 6:38 am
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>>24179

If you don't care about the latest whizz-bang graphics, you can get a GTX 1050Ti or a Radeon RX 470 for about £80 on eBay.

>>24182

The only game that looks radically better with raytracing is Minecraft RTX, but it just barely gets acceptable framerates at 1080p on an RTX 2060. DLSS is arguably a bigger deal, but Radeon Image Sharpening seems to work as well or better on most games. The NVENC encoder on Nvidia cards does make a big difference if you're a streamer, but the last thing the world needs right now is more of those twats.
>> No. 24184 Anonymous
26th August 2020
Wednesday 12:08 pm
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Why is ray tracing so important now? The new consoles are saying they can do ray tracing on certain games, but is it really that game changing? Is it the new bloom?
>> No. 24185 Anonymous
26th August 2020
Wednesday 12:26 pm
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>>24184

Raytracing is (part of) what allows for the photorealistic CGI you see in the films and that. Unfortunately it's also staggeringly computationally expensive, so current-gen raytracing technology just does a little bit of raytracing to make indirect lighting and reflections look better; even that little bit of raytracing has a huge impact on performance, roughly halving the frame rate at the same resolution most of the time.

Minecraft RTX is the best demo of what raytracing can do, although it's probably not representative of what it will do on next-gen consoles:


>> No. 24186 Anonymous
27th August 2020
Thursday 7:50 pm
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I feel like we're sort of at the point where the curve levels out for graphics improvements. Chip manufacturers/programmers are either artificially staggering new stuff, or they're struggling to find efficient new ways of actually improving rendering quality. Look at the difference in graphical quality between, say, 2005-2010, then 2010-2015, then 2015-2020. You would be hard pressed to tell a difference in most stuff over the last five years.

My missus has a 1080 in her computer and she wants to upgrade, but the trouble is it's such a good card, and it's barely aged at all in terms of performance, that she'd have to spend the Earth to get anything that's actually better. I actually wonder how long it'll last, I wouldn't be surprised if it's still going strong in three and four year's time. It has been so good that the 2080 series has been effectively pointless.

Sage for rambling but computer hardware is weird these days. I remember having a 9800 Pro and thinking it was the absolute dog's bollocks, and it was almost completely obsolete and worthless in less than six months.
>> No. 24187 Anonymous
27th August 2020
Thursday 7:58 pm
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>>24186
What can't you run with a 1080? Games that just say "no" to stable framerates notwithstanding.
>> No. 24188 Anonymous
27th August 2020
Thursday 8:02 pm
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>>24187

Exactly, and it's likely to stay that way for the foreseeable future. You can even driver hack them to do ray-tracing now if I'm not mistaken.
>> No. 24189 Anonymous
27th August 2020
Thursday 8:18 pm
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>>24186

It's a silicon problem unfortunately. We're coming to the end of Moore's Law as we know it. We're still finding ways of making transistors smaller, but those transistors are more expensive and barely more efficient.

On the software side, we have the problem of budget bloat - making a game that takes full advantage of modern hardware requires vast amounts of high-quality art assets, which means Hollywood-level budgets and all of the creative conservatism that comes with it. Unity and the Unreal Engine team are doing great things in making low- and mid-budget game development more powerful and efficient, but we don't really know how to avoid the need for a vast army of artists without compromising on visual fidelity.
>> No. 24190 Anonymous
27th August 2020
Thursday 8:22 pm
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>>24189
Thank fuck. The game industry may well see a return to more frequent, lower fidelity, but ultimately deeper experiences yet. Sod all this overhyped and overworked bollocks the likes of Rockstar and Activision Blizzard have fallen to over the years.
>> No. 24191 Anonymous
27th August 2020
Thursday 9:35 pm
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>>24190
Nah, it's a live service world now.
>> No. 24192 Anonymous
28th August 2020
Friday 1:28 am
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>>24190
I'm really upset that a proper sequel to Jagged Alliance 2 is too much to ask.
>> No. 24193 Anonymous
28th August 2020
Friday 6:38 pm
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>>24192
I don't because they'll never top two divorcee mercenaries committing domestic violence against one another and completely fucking the mission.

That and I'd be sated with a BiA remaster.
>> No. 24210 Anonymous
2nd September 2020
Wednesday 12:14 am
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>>24178

>You might want to wait a bit, because the 3000 series is right around the corner.

The high-end models of the 3000 series have now been officially announced. The 3070 will launch in October at an RRP of £469 and will have similar performance to the 2080 Ti, which currently sells for £1100+. Mainstream 4k gaming has arrived.

Nvidia took a huge gamble by dumping TSMC for Samsung, but the technology has played out perfectly and they're getting big high-efficiency GPU dies on the cheap. I'd expect to see the second-hand price of high-end cards fall substantially over the next couple of months.
>> No. 24211 Anonymous
2nd September 2020
Wednesday 9:22 am
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Did you buy a 2060 lad? The 3070 that got announced yesterday is going to be better than a 2080ti for the same price as the 2060 super. They're obviously worried about the release of Big Navi blowing them up on the price to performance metrics.
>> No. 24215 Anonymous
2nd September 2020
Wednesday 10:09 am
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>>24211

In fairness they've been taking the piss with prices for a couple of years now.

3090 still looking like it'll cost more than a second hand car, though.
>> No. 24216 Anonymous
2nd September 2020
Wednesday 10:59 am
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>>24211
For once in my life, I held off - so thanks for all the advice chaps.
>> No. 24217 Anonymous
2nd September 2020
Wednesday 12:33 pm
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I was going to put my card up for sale and get a 5700XT but then I spent the weekend playing notorious graphics hog CKII and the 3000 series got announced so I think I can wait too.
>> No. 24221 Anonymous
4th September 2020
Friday 2:08 pm
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>24GB VRAM

Pic very much related. I was tempted to buy another 2080 Ti earlier this year but now I'm very, very glad I didn't. This is basically like getting a Titan but twice as fast and for a grand less.
>> No. 24222 Anonymous
4th September 2020
Friday 4:56 pm
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>>24221

By the sounds of it a 3090 is going to be the kind of card that lasts a whole generation, just like a nearly 5 year olf 1080 is still a decent card today, and likely will be for at least another year or two. The price sounds ridiculous but you're going to get a lot of use out of it, and can probably still sell it for a good return.

That said, midrange is always where the smart buy is. I don't have the numbers on hand, but I feel like you'd spend the same money hopping from a 1060 to 2060 and then 3060 (ow whatever equivalent) and never drop behind the curve in terms of performance, as you would have done splashing out for a 1080Ti when they were new. Beyond a certain point, the architecture just can't hold up any more and the raw muscle goes to waste.

I will kind of miss SLI though. It was always shit but it was the computer equivalent of a big V8. Custom builds with fancy watercooling loops and such feel a bit empty and less impressive now.
>> No. 24223 Anonymous
4th September 2020
Friday 5:45 pm
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>>24222
I mostly use my GPUs for Machine Learning bollocks so the gaming aspect is secondary to me. My typical bottleneck is VRAM since I largely do image processing, so this is particularly exciting news. I suppose gamers will get a lot out of it too.
>> No. 24224 Anonymous
4th September 2020
Friday 7:29 pm
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At the risk of sounding like a troll. I've had my graphics card for 5-6 years now. It seems fine I can't work out what the value would be in top of the range gear in normal use. What exactly is it I am missing out on?
>> No. 24225 Anonymous
4th September 2020
Friday 7:44 pm
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>>24224

Depends what you play, and if you're not playing games (or doing something like AI-lad) you're not going to get any real benefit. Higher end cards just mean you can run the latest games with everything maxed out, 4k, 144Hz refresh rate, VR... That sort of thing.

If you're just playing CS:GO every now and again at 1080p you could have got away without an upgrade for the last ten years. Bear in mind as well that because all games are cross-platform now, so the bar is set by console hardware. If you have a graphics card that was current and capable as of the latest console generation, you'll probably be able to run near enough anything released that generation, give or take a bit of eye candy here and there and depending how well optimised the ports are.

The long and short of this is that your 5-6 year old graphics card which seems okay now will probably start to feel out of date pretty quickly when the new consoles come out and things make a surge forward- But then the pace of change will slow right down again, and the cycle repeats in another 7-8 years.
>> No. 24226 Anonymous
4th September 2020
Friday 8:19 pm
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>>24222

The value proposition in the current line-up is clearly the 3070 - it's overkill for 1440p/144Hz and very capable for 4K/60Hz, especially with the improvements in DLSS. Unless you've got a 4K monitor, it's probably worth waiting for the 3060.

SLI via NVLink is still available on the 3090 and I think it was wise to remove it from the lower-end cards. It just doesn't make sense to buy two 3080s instead of one 3090, but you've still got the insane overkill option if you've got more money than sense.

>>24223

I'm just hoping that Nvidia don't gimp the tensor cores. A £1400 card with that much vRAM, that level of performance and NVlink would make the Quadro cards irrelevant for ML workstations.
>> No. 24228 Anonymous
6th September 2020
Sunday 9:59 pm
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Be able to pick up a mad cheap 2080ti soon I reckon. People are already trying to shift them for about £600 on eBay, presumably while crying into a stiff drink- Imagine how much more the resale will plummet after 3000 is out.
>> No. 24229 Anonymous
6th September 2020
Sunday 11:28 pm
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>>24223

More exciting news: leakers who accurately predicted the existing announcements are saying that there'll be a 20Gb version of the 3080 and a 16Gb version of the 3070.
>> No. 24230 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 12:44 am
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>>24228
I'm not really that bothered since you expect depreciation in computer parts anyway, though if I'd bought it a couple of months back for gaming purposes I'd likely feel different.

Mine's a bit trickier to sell since I watercool, so it's wrapped up in a big metal Heatkiller block I can't really be bothered to take off. If anyone here has an offer I'd certainly be open to it (sorry if that breaks any rules, modlads).
>> No. 24231 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 1:26 am
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>>24230
I'll give you £50 for it. You water cooled it so it's basically ruined now.
>> No. 24232 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 1:41 am
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>>24231
>basically ruined now

I'm not him, but I'm interested in why you said that.

I'm about to build a watercooled PC, not because I care about the performance per se, but because I am fed up with hearing fans whirring all the time. I'm not an overclocker, I just want a silent PC. Also, there is absolutely zero value in most second hand PC parts, so I probably agree with your valuation.
>> No. 24233 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 1:52 am
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>>24232
He's covered it in water, unless it was turned off it's knackered.

Sorry, I was taking the piss all along. I really didn't mean to mislead anyone. My offer still stands, mind you.

I'm just upset because I bought the worst PC case ever. 80mm exhaust fan? What was I thinking?
>> No. 24234 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 7:45 am
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>>24232

Water cooling is a very expensive way of achieving silence. A water-cooled PC still needs fans for the radiators and you've got the additional issue of pump noise. It makes sense if money is no object and you want to run massive overclocks, but the value proposition is lousy if you just want a fast and quiet machine.

The main mistake people make with air cooling is using a case with very restrictive air intakes. The case fans have to work harder and the GPU and CPU fans work less efficiently with the turbulent air. A good mesh-fronted case fully loaded with 120mm or 140mm fans can move a massive amount of air at less than 30dBA, which is effectively silent outside of an anechoic chamber.

A decent mesh-fronted case (Phanteks P400A, Be Quiet! 500DX, Cooler Master NR500), a big tower cooler, some decent low-noise PWM case fans (Arctic P-series, Be Quiet Silent Wings) and a GPU with a reasonably beefy cooler will achieve similar noise levels to a water-cooled rig at vastly lower cost.

GPUs have traditionally been a sticking point, but it's now quite straightforward. All the decent cards will stop their fans completely under light loads. A 2.5 or 3 slot card should be quiet under full load if you resist the temptation to overclock and basically silent with a little undervolting. A GPU cooler that's designed for big overclocks will run very quietly indeed at stock clocks.
>> No. 24235 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 10:19 am
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My rig keeps freezing during games. I'm posting it in this thread because I imagine something is overheating (even though I just replaced my bloody heatsink) but I don't know how to find out what. Googling the problem just results in people whinging about stuff freezing on startup or BSODs or other problems which don't regularly occur after a certain amount of gameplay. What course of diagnostic software would you prescribe, doctor?
>> No. 24236 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 11:14 am
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>>24235
>What course of diagnostic software would you prescribe, doctor?

You need to find something that runs for a looong time. But you're probably oin the right track with overheating, particularly as you've just mentioned replacing a heatsink. Are your fans working? Is there proper airflow in the case?
>> No. 24237 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 11:54 am
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>>24236
>particularly as you've just mentioned replacing a heatsink
I said even though. I've had this problem for yonks, I just replaced the Hyper 212 EVO I had with another because the fan was clicking from detaching off it's bearings, and hoped that that and a fresh coat of thermal would do the trick - obviously it didn't.

I don't think the airflow is particularly poor, I've got a Cooler Master case so two fans and mesh/grilles on every side. I have an i5-6600k and GTX 970 and it's freezing after half an hour of Fall Guys. I don't understand it. That's why I asked for diagnostic software suggestions.
>> No. 24238 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 12:04 pm
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>>24234
Well, watercooling is indeed quiet but to me at least it's an overrated aspect since I quite like the humming of a computer in the background. I use it for part longevity, I'll typically run ML experiments overnight that utilise >90% of the GPU and most of its memory. When I aircooled, its temperature would stabilise at around 83 degrees. With watercooling, my GPU temp doesn't rise above 37 degrees under full load. For long-term intensive usage it's just better for the parts, plus building a watercooling rig is a lot of fun in of itself. I don't expect to get much for the GPU and its block but every little helps.

>>24235
First thing I'd do is stress test your components to identify the point of failure. For GPUs try Furmark, for the CPU try prime95 and for the RAM flash memtest86 onto a USB drive and give it a run. If you want to skip this and go straight to temp monitoring then I'd recommend downloading CPUID HWMonitor to get temperature readouts of every internal sensor available. Bear in mind that Ryzen chips report overestimated temperatures and you'll want to read Package (Node 0) or Package (Node 1) to get the actual value. Everything I've mentioned here is freeware, incidentally.
>> No. 24239 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 12:11 pm
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>>24238
>for the CPU try prime95
I've read stuff like Prime95
a) runs operations that are non-standard so not a decent comparison to day-to-day usage
b) is more like a 'torture test' and will shorten the life of the component
Anything available that is not like that?

>go straight to temp monitoring
Can I set these up to log temperatures while I'm performing tests, so that if the machine freezes I can still read the log on reboot to see which component was overheating at the time?
>> No. 24240 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 12:26 pm
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>>24239
You can try Open Hardware Monitor, it's like the one I mentioned but a bit more extensive and has a simple logging option.

Stress testing does do odd things that a component wouldn't usually go through, that's sort of the point, but it won't decrease their lifespan unless you're running them 24 hours a day. If anything rises to a high temperature you'll get throttling, and at a dangerous temperature the computer will just switch off - these failsafes are built in. If you want something a little less intensive then you can try Cinebench for the CPU and Heaven Benchmark for the GPU. Memtest86 is really the best tool you can get for identifying dodgy memory.
>> No. 24241 Anonymous
7th September 2020
Monday 12:30 pm
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>>24240
OK thanks, I'll try these and report back.
>> No. 24258 Anonymous
10th September 2020
Thursday 7:23 pm
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Interesting leaks about AMD's new hardware regarding pricing. By the looks of it they're focussing squarely on the midrange and not even bothering to take on the performance of the 3080 and 3090, which people have suspected for a while but it's all but confirmed now.

Makes sense really- The high end cards are a tiny segment of the market relatively speaking and they could easily keep themselves in good business simply by offering a better value prospect. The 5700XT wasn't a competitor for the top end 2000 series cards, but it was consistently better bang for buck than anything Nvidia offered.

Normally I wouldn't pick a horse in this kind of race but as a lifelong GeForce user and recent Radeon defector, I'm sort of rooting for them.
>> No. 24259 Anonymous
10th September 2020
Thursday 8:28 pm
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>>24258

The "4K gaming for all" line certainly suggests that their target is the mainstream *060/*070 level. They've clearly got something half-decent, otherwise we would have seen another generation of piss-take prices from Nvidia.

Personally, I just hope that AMD develop an equivalent to the Tensor Core - Nvidia arbitrarily disable loads of useful machine learning features on the consumer RTX cards, because they've got no real competition and want to keep flogging £5,000 Quadros.
>> No. 24269 Anonymous
13th September 2020
Sunday 4:17 pm
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2000 series owners have gone absolutely ape in recent days and all but throwing them away.
>> No. 24271 Anonymous
13th September 2020
Sunday 7:12 pm
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>>24269

Great news for anyone who wants a cheap upgrade though. If the 3070 is as good as they say we'll see £400 2080Tis by Christmas, and let's be real about it- That's an absurdly powerful card that'll last you several years.
>> No. 24273 Anonymous
13th September 2020
Sunday 8:39 pm
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I bought a 2060 late last year, but may be able to upgrade to a 2080 or something sooner than I hoped.
>> No. 24274 Anonymous
13th September 2020
Sunday 9:20 pm
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>>24271
Yeah, I'm more interested in that than I am the new cards now. Here's hoping AMD pull off something similar and I can start picking year old 5700 XTs out of skips.

>>24273
Every 2000 series card has dropped a tier in terms of pricing on the used market. Barely used 2080 Supers for £450, it's like people think the games they're playing right now are going to get harder to run overnight.
>> No. 24275 Anonymous
13th September 2020
Sunday 9:40 pm
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>>24274

>Barely used 2080 Supers for £450

That only looks cheap because of the ridiculous pricing of the 20-series cards. It's a bit daft to dump a nearly-new 2080 on eBay, but it was even dafter to buy it in the first place. The 3070 should beat the 2080 Ti for £469, so second-hand 20-series cards will have to drop a lot further before they become an attractive proposition.
>> No. 24276 Anonymous
13th September 2020
Sunday 10:07 pm
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>>24275

That's exactly the point really though isn't it- Remember when £500 was a top of the line flagship graphics card, and even then people basically only bought them for dick-waving, and you were rightly considered to be daft spending that on something that would be outdated in a couple of years for any other reason?

As the pace of acceleration slows down, going high-end is not quite as daft nowadays, because they last you longer. Look at the 1080 still going strong. But asking over a grand for a high end model which was the exact same actual card as the one below it at £600, with features arbitrarily locked off, was just evidence that the prices were a pisstake.
>> No. 24280 Anonymous
13th September 2020
Sunday 11:12 pm
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>>24276
And this is why (save for exotic enterprise-class, usually rack-mounted kit), it just isn't worth buying anything second-hand in the PC market - people are all BUT I PAID THIS MUCH FOR IT - it's not even worth 10% of what you paid for it ladm8 and that's before we consider how you've run or treated it.
>> No. 24284 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 7:56 am
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>>24280

>it just isn't worth buying anything second-hand in the PC market

I have to disagree with that. Ex-corporate laptops and desktops can be a fantastic bargain, because corporate IT departments tend to operate on a three-year upgrade cycle and need to get rid of containerloads of old kit. A new Lenovo T490 will set you back the thick end of a grand, but you can get a tidy T470 with a warranty for less than £350.

The PC market has got a bit weird because of the 'rona, but generally speaking it makes a great deal of sense to let someone else bear the brunt of the depreciation.
>> No. 24285 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 3:30 pm
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How big a difference is there between the 1060 and 2060?
>> No. 24286 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 3:30 pm
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Just stuck my system into an ITX case and cards are only getting fatter and longer. I may have erred.
>> No. 24287 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 3:48 pm
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>>24285

not as big as you'd hope. 1060 is a difficult card to upgrade from because when it came out it was such good price to performance. 2060 is about on par with a 1070, so while it's and upgrade it's not a massive step up for the money.
>> No. 24288 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 4:04 pm
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>>24285

The 2060 is more than 50% faster. The performance difference will grow wider as more games support DLSS.

https://www.tomshardware.com/uk/reviews/gpu-hierarchy,4388.html

https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/news/nvidia-dlss-2-0-a-big-leap-in-ai-rendering/

>>24286

Water-cooling is an option, albeit a pricey one. Failing that, return/flog whichever dinky case you've mistakenly bought and get something with decent GPU clearance like a Masterbox NR200
>> No. 24289 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 4:38 pm
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>>24288
>dinky case

Yeah this - case is usually the cheapest part to replace.
>> No. 24290 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 5:20 pm
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>>24288
That case looks, and I do just mean looks because I don't know anything else about it, awful unless you're water-cooling, which is something I really couldn't be arsed with.

It's mostly just a height issue on my end. Any card taller than a double slot is a bridge too far.
>> No. 24291 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 6:12 pm
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>>24290

It's a vertical-airflow case with full mesh on the roof and floor. The thermals aren't brilliant in stock configuration, but become class-leading with a couple of 120s in the roof.
>> No. 24292 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 7:13 pm
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>>24290

Watercooling really isn't the hassle it used to be. A decent 120mm AIO will cool any CPU you throw at it and get you a good overclock, and you can get graphics cards with AIOs installed off the shelf too these days.

That said in an ITX case it's not going to make a big difference, the airflow is restricted in either case unless it's one of those that's little more than a fancy mesh cage to hold everything together, but there is the advantage that you're transferring heat away to the same place you're dumping it out at the back/top rather than having it warm up inside the case and around the board.
>> No. 24293 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 7:49 pm
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>>24292

Watercooling autist here. There is absolutely no point in watercooling a CPU unless you're doing it for aesthetics. A Noctua fan will cool it just as well, if not better. The component that really benefits is the GPU - you will see temperatures 30 degrees lower even with a suboptimal setup.
>> No. 24294 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 8:11 pm
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>>24292

Case design is vastly more important than case size. There are huge full-tower cases that run 30 degrees above ambient because they're totally choked-off and tiny SFF cases that only run a couple of degrees hotter than an open bench. Annoyingly, it's hard to tell just by looking whether a case is any good or not - the Lian Li O11 has fantastic thermals despite being plastered in glass, while the Coolermaster Q500L is a terrible hotbox despite being covered in holes. A lot of cases are totally mediocre with the stock fans but run cool and quiet with a couple of extra 120s. My policy is to just buy whatever Steve from Gamers Nexus tells me to buy.

>>24293

>There is absolutely no point in watercooling a CPU unless you're doing it for aesthetics.

99% agree with you, but there are some SFF setups that'll accommodate a 240mm rad but not a tower cooler. You can find decent AIOs for under £80 these days, so there's not a huge price premium over a high-end air cooler. 120mm AIOs are totally pointless though - they're less reliable and less efficient than even a mid-range tower cooler.
>> No. 24295 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 8:52 pm
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>>24293

Well like you say, depends on case design more than anything. An air-cooled CPU really suffers if it's not getting enough air at that part of the case, or it's sucking warm air in from the GPU, or whatever. For a watercooler rad you can set it up as a pull at the front so it's getting fresh air 100% of the time. All depends what your priorities are.

Personally I'm all about cooling for silence, not cooling for high performance. I undervolt my graphics card and run the CPU stock so I can have all my fan curves set at a barely audible whisper. I definitely get better results since putting an AIO on my CPU than I did with a big air cooler, because my case has HDD bays that limit airflow through the front.
>> No. 24296 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 9:28 pm
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>>24291
I'd need to send back my PSU, get a SFX one, become good at cable management. I suppose it serves me right for buying a sixish year old Thermaltake V1. Whatever, serves me right for being an idiot.

I guess I could buy a shorter card and stick some Noctuas on it. Whatever.
>> No. 24297 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 9:55 pm
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>>24296

The Founder's Edition 3070 will fit no problem and you can just about wedge in a 3080 if you swap out the 200mm front fan for a 140mm. Airflow isn't ideal, but you should be able to get acceptable temps if you experiment with the interchangeable panels.
>> No. 24310 Anonymous
16th September 2020
Wednesday 4:20 pm
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So I have a GTX 1060 6GB, which so far has been fine for playing most games on medium-high at a decent FPS at 1080p. I'm not bothered about higher resolutions or playing on ultra settings, but I feel I may need to upgrade to get a good experience for the upcoming AAA releases like Cyberpunk 2077. I was thinking of maybe going for the RTX 3070, but don't know if that is a worthy upgrade. For around that price I could buy an Xbox Series X or maybe a PS5. I was told to wait until the new year before buying a new card, which is fine, but thought I'd get youse lads input.
>> No. 24311 Anonymous
16th September 2020
Wednesday 4:44 pm
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>>24310

If you're in no hurry to upgrade, I'd wait until AMD announce their new cards next month. A 3070 is major overkill for 1080p/60Hz and only really makes sense for higher resolutions or refresh rates. You'll probably be able to pick up a high-end 10- or 20-series card quite cheaply once the new cards hit the market, which would be my recommendation if you don't also plan on upgrading your monitor.

The Xbox Series X is likewise pretty pointless if you don't have a 4K telly - the Series S is miles cheaper and will run all the same games at 1440p.
>> No. 24312 Anonymous
16th September 2020
Wednesday 7:02 pm
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>>24310

What CPU? It's worth considering that you sometimes won't really get your money's worth out of a new graphics cards if your CPU is getting on a bit too.
>> No. 24313 Anonymous
16th September 2020
Wednesday 7:05 pm
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>>24312
Intel i5-8600K. I've been told it's not the best but can probably last me a little while longer.
>> No. 24314 Anonymous
16th September 2020
Wednesday 7:15 pm
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>>24313

It's a perfectly decent modern processor with plenty of overclocking headroom. It'll keep up with a 1080 Ti or a 2080 quite comfortably, especially if you whack it up to 4.9GHz.
>> No. 24315 Anonymous
16th September 2020
Wednesday 9:28 pm
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>>24313

Yeah nah that's fine to be fair, it's a reasonably new-ish architecture. Thread count might start to become a limiting factor before long, but that doesn't tend to manifest itself as low frame rates, just more insidiously irritating stuff like micro-stutter and inconsistent frame times.

I was still squeezing blood out of the stone of my 3570K until earlier this year, and I only begrudgingly upgraded it because I needed a spare computer for the living room. I still have my 1060 paired up with it and it can handle any of the console-ish games I'm likely to play on the sofa with ease.
>> No. 24325 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 6:27 pm
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In case you missed it, the RTX 3080 went on sale today. Every component retailer's website went down from the demand as though they'd been DDoS'd, and the cards sold out in minutes.

Now the scalpers are on the loose...
>> No. 24326 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 7:04 pm
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>>24325
Why do they think anyone will pay those prices?
>> No. 24327 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 7:27 pm
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>>24326

Some of the ridiculous bids are obviously just people trolling the touts, but I've no doubt that some daft buggers will pay double the retail price just for bragging rights or because they got swept up in the hype.

Oculus Quest and Valve Index headsets had been selling at above retail price for many months; prices are just starting to return to normal after the announcement of the Quest 2 and the Reverb G2. The PSU market has gone completely bonkers and there are shortages of decent PC cases.

I think a lot of people have got (back) into gaming during lockdown and many of them feel quite flush with cash because they haven't been spending money on nights out and holidays. Combine that with very limited stock of the first decent GPU in four years and it's a recipe for hype and madness. Things should start to calm down in late October after the second batch of 3080s, the release of the 3070 and the announcement of Big Navi.
>> No. 24331 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 8:00 pm
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reccomended online retailers for computer hardware? I'm sorry if it's already been mentioned - I'd search but I don't know what terms to use.
>> No. 24334 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 8:17 pm
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>>24331

OcUK, Scan or CCL. The latter are usually cheapest. Everyone's website is a bit broken at the moment due to the 3080 madness, but it should be back to normal tomorrow.

PCPartPicker is the price comparison tool everyone uses, but it's not always fully up-to-date so it's worth checking the prices on CCL before ordering. It is very useful if you just want to find, say, the cheapest available 16GB kit of DDR4 or the hard drive with the lowest price per gigabyte.

If you're not sure what you need, don't be afraid to pick up the phone - these retailers have staff who actually know what they're doing.

https://www.overclockers.co.uk/

https://www.scan.co.uk/

https://www.cclonline.com/

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/
>> No. 24335 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 8:18 pm
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>>24331
I have never had anything but great customer service from Scan, I'll happily recommend them. Overclockers have apparently screwed a few people over the years.
>> No. 24336 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 8:26 pm
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>>24334
Do OcUK still have Gay Racist sympathies or are they properly respectable now?

Obligatory shoutouts to Amazon and Ebuyer, though be aware that the latter regularly "deliver" via Yodel.
>> No. 24337 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 8:26 pm
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>>24334
For just hard-drives and storage, I can also recommend Span. Have used them many times.

https://www.span.com/

Crucial own most of the memory market, but in the UK we have Mr Memory, and I've used them plenty too.

https://www.mrmemory.co.uk
>> No. 24338 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 8:32 pm
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>>24337
They seem to specialise in server-grade ECC RAM which probably isn't what otherlad was looking for. Still bookmarked though, I'd literally never heard of them.
>> No. 24339 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 9:01 pm
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>>24336

Mark Proudfoot (the gay racist boss) ceased his involvement with the company under murky circumstances in 2011. He became a tax exile in Switzerland and the business was subsequently sold to some Germans. The new owners had a clear-out of the incompetent staff with colourful opinions and OcUK is now effectively the UK retail brand of the Caseking group. Proudfoot later moved to Jersey where he had a number of run-ins with the local constabulary about his outspoken views. He died on a yacht in 2018 at the age of 54 and was definitely not murdered by his much younger wife.
>> No. 24340 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 9:11 pm
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>>24339
The new owners have, however, kept up the OCUK tradition of piss-take prices and godawful customer service though.
>> No. 24342 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 9:13 pm
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>>24339
I never knew about this angle to it all - what an awful man.
>> No. 24351 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 11:03 pm
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>>24339
Found this charming article about him from the Jersey Evening Post:

https://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2015/04/20/we-are-not-getting-away-with-it-multi-millionaire-defends-perks-for-islands-rich-residents/

Turns out he was in the arms trade too. Though this bit is ... something:
>'We were quite happy in Switzerland and eventually sold the business in 2011. While we were there in 2013 we had a conversation one day about where we would like to live.
>'Somebody suggested Jersey, which I first thought would be a bit like Guernsey – quaint, but you wouldn't want to live there,' says Mr Proudfoot.
>> No. 24353 Anonymous
17th September 2020
Thursday 11:29 pm
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>>24351

Ringing up the American embassy to ask "how do I become an international arms dealer?" and getting a really helpful answer is pretty much the definition of white privilege.
>> No. 24356 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 3:11 am
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>>24342
Why are you booing him? He's right!
>> No. 24357 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 7:19 am
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>>24342>>24356
When I first moved to West Yorkshire I was shopping and struck by the overpowering smell of curry. It took me a little while to realise it was the Asian family at the other end of the aisle; they must have bathed in cumin.

I also had a mate who lived in a council house where the former tenant was Asian. All of the walls were stained yellow from how much he must have cooked curry and it took weeks of having all of the windows open to get rid of the smell.
>> No. 24358 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 8:23 am
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>>24357
Aye, yeah, that's mad that.

>I... had a mate
Liar.
>> No. 24360 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 8:30 am
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Black Americans report that hwite people smell like wet dog, especially when wet.
>> No. 24361 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 10:30 am
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>>24360
What did they put in school uniforms that made them smell like wet dog when it rained? Never had any other clothes that do that.
>> No. 24362 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 10:46 am
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>>24361
Woolen clothes often do that.
>> No. 24363 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 11:39 am
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>>24360
According to Chinese people we smell like butter. I think they're jealous of our lactose tolerance.
>> No. 24364 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 11:45 am
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>>24363
Japanese people say we smell like cheese.

I think the message is that everyone smells.
>> No. 24365 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 12:34 pm
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>>24364
Based on my experiences from university, Chinese people smell like sneezes.
>> No. 24366 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 12:46 pm
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>>24364

Arabs think we smell of milk. I'm starting to see a pattern.
>> No. 24367 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 1:14 pm
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X group smells to Y group of most pungent food X eats a lot of that Y doesn't, shocker.
Not sure where the 'wet dog' smell fits in there.
>> No. 24368 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 1:25 pm
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>>24367
Black people smell like cocoa butter (which they don't eat) and not fried chicken grease though.
>> No. 24369 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 1:31 pm
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>>24357

Are you the same lad who always posts things like "nuke the West Riding" in response to things that had nothing to do with West Yorkshire?
>> No. 24370 Anonymous
18th September 2020
Friday 1:33 pm
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>>24368
s/eat/consume
>> No. 24427 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 4:30 pm
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Welp, otherlad called it.
>> No. 24428 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 5:22 pm
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>>24427

Otherlad who called it reporting in. Unsurprising, but there is some good news.

The 16GB 3070 and 20GB 3080 have been confirmed, which should be tremendous value for dev workstations that are limited by VRAM more than training time.

Puget have done some preliminary benchmarks on the 3080 in TensorFlow and it goes toe-to-toe with the Titan RTX, which was a £2500 card. The tensor cores may be gimped, but they're still damned fast.

Now if I can only get my hands on one...

https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/hpc/RTX3080-TensorFlow-and-NAMD-Performance-on-Linux-Preliminary-1885/
>> No. 24429 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 5:40 pm
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>>24428
Thanks for the link. Dettmers also ran some FP16 tests, albeit against a range of different GPUs. His results weren't quite as dramatic but are still impressive:

https://timdettmers.com/2020/09/07/which-gpu-for-deep-learning/#Additional_Considerations_for_Ampere_RTX_30_Series

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