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>> No. 21381 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 3:04 pm
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Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted: The 20-year-old online trader who makes up to £200,000 a year

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/article/2b3f3f67-2338-4253-b7f5-a36192885492

So the BBC are promoting 'Wolves of Instagram' forex trading bullshit merchants now.
Expand all images.
>> No. 21382 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 3:15 pm
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>>21381
Everything about this is disgusting.
>> No. 21383 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 3:21 pm
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>>21381
So what watch is that? It's fucking enormous.
>> No. 21384 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 3:21 pm
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>>21383
Sorry, "timepiece".
>> No. 21385 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 4:02 pm
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>>21381
The way he's holding that key is as vulgar as it gets and also, at least in my estimation, betrays lacking self-confidence.
>> No. 21386 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 4:16 pm
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>>21385
I think he's preoccupied with obscuring the registration so people won't click he's hired the car.
>> No. 21387 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 4:25 pm
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>>21386
And he's borderline failed at that as well.
>> No. 21388 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 4:31 pm
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When was the last time BBC Three put out content worth watching? I don't think its because I'm in the wrong demographic, the last time I heard someone talk about current BBC Three content was in 2009 when a girlfriend was obsessed with Two Pints.

They had Blindboy do a documentary series on the way society is fucked a few months ago but I had to switch it off once it became obvious nobody was checking the sources.
>> No. 21390 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 5:19 pm
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>>21388
Ladhood was released last year and FWIW when I mentioned it here >>/b/432741 appreciated the recommendation. I don't think I made it all the way through the series, but it's much better than that shite How Not to Live Your Life if you ask me.
>> No. 21391 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 6:29 pm
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He's deleted his Twitter account. I'm guessing he didn't appreciate all of the negative publicity.

https://twitter.com/FHT_Ash/
>> No. 21392 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 6:33 pm
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And his website. Anyone would think he doesn't want his claims to be scrutinised.

https://www.ash-r.co.uk
>> No. 21393 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 6:59 pm
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>>21391
>>21392

So being a billy big bollocks on the BBC has ruined his livelihood? Mirth.

Now he'll have to be poor as well as have a small willy.
>> No. 21394 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 7:15 pm
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>>21393
I have the feeling he'll re-emerge once the attention dies down.

Someone I went to school with got quite deep into the Herbalife pyramid scheme. It makes me wonder what he's up to these days.
>> No. 21399 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 9:29 pm
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Nobody beats the market in the long run.

He'll be broke in a few years' time. The same trading strategies that have made him a sizeable fortune are the ones that rid people of their fortune again.

Unless you have millions in capital to start with, £200K can only be earned by taking massive risks. Which can just the same blow up in your face anytime without warning.
>> No. 21400 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 9:45 pm
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>>21399
I think you've missed the point that's he's probably not beating the market by all that much now.
>> No. 21401 Anonymous
23rd February 2020
Sunday 10:05 pm
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>>21400
It was on Twitter that his company accounts were for about a tenth of what he's saying and the MOT history for the cars he's claiming to own are also bollocks.
>> No. 21419 Anonymous
24th February 2020
Monday 3:05 pm
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>>21401

There are plenty of otherlads making a killing in the market, I am sure.
>> No. 30839 Anonymous
31st January 2021
Sunday 8:40 am
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>"I was following this guy on Instagram and he always posts with his car, a rose gold Maserati, saying that he's rich and self-made and really young, he's only 21," says Jonathan Reuben, 24, an accountant. He discovered a foreign exchange trade investment scheme through an account he followed on Instagram.

>"At first I put in £1,000 and once I saw I was getting money I deposited a bit more and more. In the end I was scammed out £17,000," he told the BBC's Money Box programme. Jonathan is one of a rising number of Instagram users who have lost money to alleged fraudsters posting on the social networking service.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55804205

Aren't accountants supposed to be smart?
>> No. 30840 Anonymous
31st January 2021
Sunday 1:28 pm
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>>30839
I'm more curious as to why he was following an unknown 21 year old man on Instagram. I can understand if he was following, say, an attractive youth or someone he used to work with because we've all had those wanks but what would cause him to start on this journey?

I don't understand Instagram at all mind you. Apparently you 'slide' into peoples DMs and there's a whole dating scene based around this.

>Losing all your money on forex

It wasn't a scam, that's just forex when you're not a whale.
>> No. 30845 Anonymous
1st February 2021
Monday 9:53 am
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>>30840

Every lie is only as good as the number of people who believe it. And the prospect of getting rich quickly never fails to attract enough certain guillible types.

That's why all those scams work. You don't have to be particularly smart or cunning to set such a trap. You just have to find enough peoole who are dumb enough to believe you.

>It wasn't a scam, that's just forex when you're not a whale.

No retail investor should ever attempt forex betting. Full stop. Or any other type of intraday trading. Profitable investments can almost without exception only be made with a long-term buy and hold strategy. That isn't to say you can't sporadically win a noteworthy sum with short-term speculation. But the odds are quite steeply against you, and that profit will with over 90 percent probability be cancelled out by failed trades that you make on other occasions.
>> No. 30907 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 4:21 pm
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>>30839

>Aren't accountants supposed to be smart?

Professional hubris, innit. Bankers, accountants and all of their sort can lose money just the same as the average person. They're probably less likely to fall for the Nigerian Prince scam, but my observation is that they take on bigger risks because they think they can handle them due to their formal training in finance.

I know a banklad who lost a third of his life savings, an amount somewhere north of £30,000, when Lehman went tits up in 2008. He knew what he was doing, because hey, it was Lehman, and they were one of the most trusted names in international banking for centuries. If they were going to go bankrupt, the whole global financial system would be fucked.

Those were more or less his actual words around the beginning of 2008 when there were already pretty serious market jitters happening. You had to hand it to him that he wasn't wrong completely in the end, just that he ended up on the wrong side of it when it did happen.
>> No. 30909 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 4:37 pm
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Not to sound like an arsehole, but looking at OPs picture, why would you spend all that money on a car and watch instead of moving to a nicer area. It's like them lads who get brand new BMWs, but live in a terrace. Rather have a nice house and a clapped out Micra, but that's just me.
>> No. 30910 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 4:57 pm
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>>30909

Because they're dickheads.


>> No. 30911 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 5:01 pm
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>>30909

On a certain level it is about what you value, I am going to say this person values vulgar displays of status. In this bumfuck suburb they are somebody, elsewhere they would be a nobody and no one would be impressed.
>> No. 30913 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 5:21 pm
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>>30909
With forex traders they get most of their money from convincing people to go on their courses. You want them to buy into the lifestyle so you rent a supercar for the weekend and take dozens of pictures of it to flaunt your pretend wealth.

I don't know about the drug dealers in Dewsbury who live in back-to-back houses whilst driving a brand new Mercedes. I assumed it's so the kids think you're cool and you can use them to be your mule. You know what they're like for grooming.
>> No. 30914 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 5:32 pm
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>>30911

Also, a flashy car on credit is probably more attainable to those types than moving to a nice neighbourhood on a £200K-plus mortgage.

The car he's got there is a 2014-onward C 220 estate. They can be had from around £15K or less depending on mileage and trim. Which may make you look like Jimmy Big Bollocks on the estate, but as >>30911 lad said, go to a middle class residential suburb, and people will almost pity you.
>> No. 30915 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 5:36 pm
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>>30913

Can't get a mortgage on unlaundered drug money, and even in Ravensthorpe nobody's taking £120k in hard cash for a house.
>> No. 30916 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 5:49 pm
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>>30915

>Can't get a mortgage on unlaundered drug money

Not if you're some git who got rich with mid-level trafficking and wants to put it in a terrace for himself.

If you're a Russian oligarch's son looking to buy a six-bedroom in Chelsea, your possibilities are on a different level.
>> No. 30917 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 5:55 pm
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>>30915
> and even in Ravensthorpe nobody's taking £120k in hard cash for a house

I wonder how true that is if it's a personal sale, like buying a car off Autotrader. Is it even legal to buy a house like that in the UK? I know of plenty of people who've bought property abroad with a simple bank transfer and having a local lawyer there to see that the paperwork gets done properly.

I've actually seen someone buy a very nice beach front flat in Brazil with an actual cash payment of ~£500k, but even in that neck of the woods it was considered a bit cheeky.
>> No. 30918 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 6:08 pm
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>>30917
You'd have to pass your solicitor's money laundering and if the seller uses an estate agent they'd do the same.

I have a friend who's an estate agent and the job's made him quite racist because of Asians always trying to pull dodgy shit.
>> No. 30922 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 6:39 pm
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>>30917

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/money-laundering-regulations-2007-supervision-of-estate-agency-businesses/estate-agency-guidance-for-money-laundering-supervision

Basically, as an estate agent, solicitor or notary, you have to screen any and all transactions that you are involved in with your clients for possible signs of money laundering, and you then have to secretly report those cases to the proper authorities without mentioning a word to your client. And it doesn't stop there. Basically in any industry where high-value goods change hands, from luxury cars to antiques, you are required as somebody working in that sector to be on your toes and report suspicious activity.

Somebody just showing up with a briefcase with £1M in cash to buy a family home is an absolute classic red flag under these regulations and almost automatically means you have to report them. Even if they say they've won the lottery and had the money paid out to them in cash, you legally have to check that story for plausibility beyond reasonable doubt. And you make yourself criminally liable in aiding and abetting money laundering if you don't.

It's not something you want to get yourself into lightly. At least here in Britain. Not only will you probably never sell houses again or practice law, but you will also have a criminal record that can prevent you from working in similar professions in the future. Next to murder and kiddie fiddling, anything to do with dodgy finances isn't something you ever want as a criminal record. It can even affect your credit score in your personal life.
>> No. 30923 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 6:40 pm
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>>30918

So say I go to Mrs Miggins next door and say "I'll give you £200,000 to transfer your house into my name, and then we do that, is that fine? I'm sure if the money was dodgy someone would still want to ask me where I got it from, but from the perspective of a property sale, is there anything stopping us?
>> No. 30924 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 6:46 pm
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>>30923

That is pretty much how I've seen such "cash in hand" deals go down abroad (inside and outside the EU).

If you're tax resident in the country you're buying the property in then local version of HMRC might start asking some very annoying questions but other than that there didn't seem to be anyone taking any notice. "Money talks".

I've never purchased property in the UK but I've had a few six figure sums dropped into my savings account and never got any grief. I just assumed that the rogue thieving bastards at HSBC knew which side their bread was buttered. Oh the other hand it's plausible that everything got investigated and declared kosher without me ever finding out.
>> No. 30926 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 6:57 pm
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>>30924
In my experience HSBC are only awkward when it comes to money coming out of your account with them.
>> No. 30927 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 7:05 pm
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>>30924

>Oh the other hand it's plausible that everything got investigated and declared kosher without me ever finding out.

This is what I would assume. I have a friend in government, high up there in something or other, he's never told me what, obviously, and apparently I caused a bit of drama a few years ago when I got paid profit share from my job at the time, down to the way it was transferred to me directly from the owner's accounts. It didn't take long to work out everything was legitimate, but people certainly noticed. Also he didn't tell me that either, probably, and I'm lying. I have no doubt this transaction would have been flagged even if I wasn't apparently being fucking scraped by GCHQlad even more than the rest of us.

Never assume you're too small to be overlooked in this country, you are not.
>> No. 30928 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 7:20 pm
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>>30927

>Never assume you're too small to be overlooked in this country, you are not.

This would have been a much more impactful statement if I had managed to make it make sense.
>> No. 30929 Anonymous
2nd February 2021
Tuesday 7:20 pm
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>>30924

>If you're tax resident in the country you're buying the property in then local version of HMRC might start asking some very annoying questions but other than that there didn't seem to be anyone taking any notice. "Money talks".


You accidently just dug this song out of where it had been buried in my memory for 30 years.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9o0rAvZtM7w
>> No. 30932 Anonymous
3rd February 2021
Wednesday 12:24 pm
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>>30927

With bank transfers, it's pretty clear where that money comes from. It doesn't just miraculously appear in your account one day, but somebody transferred it there, and that person or entity in turn got that money from somewhere else that transferred it to them. It's traceable throughout. So my guess is whoever was bothered in your case didn't suspect money laundering, but was more concerned about possible tax evasion, as profit shares count as personal income and are as such subject to your income tax. If your boss paid you out through his personal account, there was a danger of obfuscating the true purpose of that payment to you, and thus evading income tax. Not to mention that it probably went against a handful of accounting laws and principles.

Money laundering works differently. You have assets that are generated, usually in cash, through illegal activity like drug or human trafficking, extortion, bribery or gambling, and many other things. That money is then not tradeable because it cannot be traced back to legal financial activity, and should technically not exist at all. The main vector for injecting those assets into the legal economy and thus laundering your ill-gotten gains into ostensibly legit capital is then often a cash payment for high-value goods like a house or a collectible luxury car or an expensive painting. What also happens frequently is that they deposit the cash into some offshore account in a country with lax money laundering laws, and then wire it to your bank account in Britain.
>> No. 30937 Anonymous
3rd February 2021
Wednesday 6:49 pm
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>>30932
>What also happens frequently is that they deposit the cash into some offshore account in a country with lax money laundering laws, and then wire it to your bank account in Britain.

A few years back the government decided to overhaul companies, making it cheap and easy to set up your own company, in the name of Mrs Stalin Knobhole of Turkmenistan and keep all your money laundering in the good old British Isles.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jul/05/how-britain-can-help-you-get-away-with-stealing-millions-a-five-step-guide
>> No. 30938 Anonymous
3rd February 2021
Wednesday 9:39 pm
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>>30937

Why do you think so many Russian oligarchs or their family members have moved to Britain.

https://inews.co.uk/news/politics/russia-report-multi-millionaire-russian-oligarchs-welcomed-london-558887
>> No. 30939 Anonymous
3rd February 2021
Wednesday 10:04 pm
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>>30938
It says lots have but doesn't give any examples.
>> No. 30940 Anonymous
4th February 2021
Thursday 12:43 pm
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>>30938

They haven't but London property is the best investment tool around. Gives out much better rates than any other and is considered quite secure thanks to the aiding and abetting of the fucked housing situation by central government and the boomers.
>> No. 30943 Anonymous
4th February 2021
Thursday 11:02 pm
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>>30940

The London property market is absolutely bonkers these days. Your only way to profit from it as an average person who isn't minted is if you or your parents bought a house in Croydon in the 90s and you now sell it to move out to the country. Depending on your expectations, you could have over £250K left over in cash after you've bought your new place.

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