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>> No. 430053 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 8:53 am
430053 Literal "what are you feeling right now" thread
Shamelessly stealing the very excellent idea from >>/101/28964

Here is a place to post utterly inane observations about your current state of being.

---Start---

I like birds but starlings are a massive noisy pain in the arse.
Expand all images.
>> No. 430055 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 8:55 am
430055 spacer
The wind's got up.
>> No. 430056 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 9:01 am
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This is half the threads we have already? Isn't it? At this rate we'll just have one ".gs thread, for .gs things" and that'll be that.
>> No. 430057 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 9:05 am
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>>430056

I thought we had to do it while not interacting with each other too but I'm breaking that rule already.
>> No. 430058 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 10:29 am
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>>430056

This is really what /*/ makes the site anyway if you think about it.
>> No. 430060 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 12:18 pm
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Woke up a bit emotional so I've gotten high and trying to balance it out with a big cup of black coffee. Feeling better, considering therapy.
>> No. 430061 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 12:44 pm
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I'm usually not affected by deaths as I accept that's how the world works and I've always been a bit emotionally distant but just sometimes I'll hear about one that hits me. Strange feeling.
>> No. 430062 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 1:54 pm
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>>430061

Back at uni, a lad from one of my study groups died in a motorbike accident just minutes after we said goodbye after a class. The theory was that he got distracted while overtaking a car on a dual carriageway on his way home and failed to notice that there was a temporary maintenance barrier in the outer lane which he tried to swerve back into, where they were cutting back some trees and bushes along the carriageway. He hit the barrier head-on and was killed instantly.

I can't say we were friends, he was in my study group, but we never went and did things together. It really stayed with me for a long time though and was one of the most eerie things that I ever witnessed. How often does it happen that you talk to somebody who is only ten minutes away from death, and until that moment has as little of an idea as everybody else around him of his immediately impending doom.
>> No. 430063 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 2:03 pm
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>>430060
The coffee I bought a few days ago smells better than it tastes.
>> No. 430064 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 2:41 pm
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Hate, a desire to slash tires, anger.
>> No. 430065 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 2:47 pm
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>>430064
>a desire to slash tires
There's nothing wrong with acting constructively out of anger. Hell, at this point it's practically a good citizen's civic duty. My only advice would be to, if you can, avoid targeting someone who might dispose of the tyres through incineration, as that would be totally counterproductive.
>> No. 430067 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 3:00 pm
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We try and pretend that toast with marmite or whatever is nicer but nothing beats simple buttered toast when you're hungry.
This thread is going to turn into a low-budget Jenny Holzer exhibit.
>> No. 430068 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 3:29 pm
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>>430064

Make sure they're something like 20'' low-section tyres or some other exotic size that will be a nightmare to replace. People who drive cars with bog standard 195x55x16 wheels a) haven't got much money and therefore aren't worth your aggression, and b) those tyres can be replaced practically for a song.
>> No. 430070 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 3:57 pm
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>>430061
Feeling exactly the same way today on learning that Black is gone.
>> No. 430082 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 9:58 pm
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>>430063
I get that. The other week I was using beans and grinding them fresh, didn't seem to smell as good but tasted a lot better.
>> No. 430086 Anonymous
31st August 2019
Saturday 10:59 pm
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>>430070
It has made me very sad tonight thinking she has gone. I only met her a few times, and she stayed at my house once, I really liked her. She spoke plenty on here at different times. Others here saw her much more and will also be feeling her loss in some way.
>> No. 430107 Anonymous
1st September 2019
Sunday 8:26 am
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I really need to crack my back.
>> No. 430111 Anonymous
1st September 2019
Sunday 10:00 am
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I want to go to a massage place but I'm concerned that I'll accidentally go to one of the ones that is really just about selling you a handjob. It's not that I don't want to be wanked off on a folding table, it's more that I assume in those sorts of places you just won't get a very good massage, and that's my primary focus. If there's a place that'll do a proper sports massage and then wank me off then that'd be fine.
>> No. 430112 Anonymous
1st September 2019
Sunday 10:54 am
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>>430111
I know just the place for you.

https://www.wakefieldexpress.co.uk/news/man-s-massage-parlour-madness-1-936143/
>> No. 430113 Anonymous
1st September 2019
Sunday 1:29 pm
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>>430082
These ones don't taste too good neither in an espresso machine, nor in a moka, nor in a cezve.
Bugger.
And the seller had assured me the beans were of the strongest aroma/effect variety.
>> No. 430119 Anonymous
1st September 2019
Sunday 6:10 pm
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Bit too loud outside.
Didn't spoil my evening walk though.
>> No. 430120 Anonymous
1st September 2019
Sunday 6:18 pm
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>>430119
*n
>> No. 430122 Anonymous
1st September 2019
Sunday 7:36 pm
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>>430120
If something spoils my evening wanks, it dies. Full stop.
Also I'd like a cup of really strong black tea with milk. Not sure why, I don't usually drink tea with milk.
>> No. 430150 Anonymous
2nd September 2019
Monday 6:19 pm
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Another day has almost passed.
>> No. 430151 Anonymous
2nd September 2019
Monday 6:43 pm
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Humans spend way too much time eating and shitting. Sometimes I think that's all my life really is, a cycle of putting things in one of my holes and shitting it out the other, and occasionally putting things in that hole too, or part of my body in a lady's holes. Everything in between is just filler, the real events of life are food and big dumps.

I keep having really big dumps recently, even when I feel like I haven't eaten much. I feel like my arse has loosened over the years, and even when it only feels like a few little nuggets I'll look down afterwards and see a log bigger than my cock. I have a dildo the same size as my cock and it hurts like fuck to try get that up my arse. But a massive turd slips out effortlessly.

yes this is a literal shitpost, from the shitter
>> No. 430152 Anonymous
2nd September 2019
Monday 6:53 pm
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>>430151
>I have a dildo the same size as my cock
Lame.
>> No. 430153 Anonymous
2nd September 2019
Monday 7:07 pm
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>>430152

It's too girthy quite honestly. My favourite is the one that's a bit longer but more slender.
>> No. 430155 Anonymous
2nd September 2019
Monday 7:16 pm
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>>430122
> Also I'd like a cup of really strong black tea with milk
Those three mugs hit the spot.
>> No. 430271 Anonymous
6th September 2019
Friday 2:19 pm
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Just pondering what I'll have to look forward to in the future, given the dire outlook of any meaningful action on climate change.

I wish green allied people and political parties weren't so stubbornly anti-nuclear. It's the only weapon we have right now that can maintain our society with low carbon energy, the other option being putting the brakes on capitalism and the endless consumption cycle. But that will never happen. ffs do we really need a new TV, phone, computer, car every few years? We've become hyper efficient at producing these things with a given amount of energy, but is producing these things the most efficient thing to do with our energy given the state of our society? (Fucking no it isn't).
>> No. 430272 Anonymous
6th September 2019
Friday 2:23 pm
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>>430271

Just thinking about it the things I've bought in the past two decades haven't meaningfully improved my life. Go back 20 years to the dark and dingy times of 2001 where computers were slower and you had to phone or text people to keep up with communication trends, what a nightmare. Technilogy is great at facilitating the things that make life feel good - social interation, learning and exploration - but we reached a peak for that some time ago and have just been advancing into a weird hedonism since. The best times you can have are just old fashioned things spending time with other people and enjoying nature.
>> No. 430353 Anonymous
8th September 2019
Sunday 7:20 pm
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These petit pois I've bought from Sainsbury's aren't very petit.
>> No. 430354 Anonymous
8th September 2019
Sunday 7:24 pm
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>>430353

How pois are they?
>> No. 430355 Anonymous
8th September 2019
Sunday 9:10 pm
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>>430271

>ffs do we really need a new TV, phone, computer, car every few years?

The car really matters (~8 to 25 tonnes of CO2) but the TV (~150kg CO2) or phone (~60kg CO2) isn't really a big deal in the scheme of things. A new laptop has about the same carbon footprint as a leg of lamb.

Your carbon footprint is dominated by heating, eating and transport; everything else is basically insignificant. We need systematic changes to those things, but we also need to take personal responsibility.
>> No. 430356 Anonymous
8th September 2019
Sunday 9:11 pm
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>>430355
>A new laptop has about the same carbon footprint as a leg of lamb.
I guess a new laptop every week would be fine.
>> No. 430358 Anonymous
8th September 2019
Sunday 9:13 pm
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>>430356

No, but a leg of lamb every three years is OK. I hope you like tofu.
>> No. 430360 Anonymous
8th September 2019
Sunday 9:42 pm
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>>430358

Sadly, synthetic or cultured meat isn't the answer if you want to have steak every other day:


https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47283162

>Cultured lab meat may make climate change worse

>Growing meat in the laboratory may do more damage to the climate in the long run than meat from cattle, say scientists.

>Researchers are looking for alternatives to traditional meat because farming animals is helping to drive up global temperatures.

>However, meat grown in the lab may make matters worse in some circumstances.

>Researchers say it depends on how the energy to make the lab meat is produced.


So in other words, unless your synthetic meat was grown with solar or wind power, it solves no problems and we may as well just keep having a leg of lamb regularly.
>> No. 430361 Anonymous
8th September 2019
Sunday 9:45 pm
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>>430358
For some reason most of the emissions charts I can find lump beef and lamb together.
>> No. 430364 Anonymous
8th September 2019
Sunday 10:59 pm
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>>430358
From my cold, dead hands, m7.
>> No. 430365 Anonymous
8th September 2019
Sunday 11:06 pm
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>>430364

I know they serve chips in little metal buckets and sandwiches on slates these days, but eating tofu from a cold dead hand is really avant garde.
>> No. 430371 Anonymous
9th September 2019
Monday 3:28 pm
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Someone in London has died after they started hitting the windscreen of a car with the butt of a shotgun and accidentally ended up shooting themselves. Funniest thing I've heard in a while.
>> No. 430372 Anonymous
9th September 2019
Monday 4:11 pm
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>>430371
Someone desperately wanted to enter the Darwin Awards promotional vehicle it seems.
That person succeeded.
>> No. 430380 Anonymous
10th September 2019
Tuesday 12:11 pm
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They're remaking Face/Off. They need to fuck the fuck off.
>> No. 430383 Anonymous
10th September 2019
Tuesday 7:19 pm
430383 spacer
>>430380

Second rate action flick when it first came out. No need to revisit that kind of plot or premise.
>> No. 430384 Anonymous
10th September 2019
Tuesday 7:48 pm
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>>43038
Since I really struggle to tell who's who in films unless they reliably wear the same clothes, Face/off was doubly shit for me. Hard to see how a re/make will add much (unless they do something cunning like break down speciesist barriers, grafting a rhino's face onto a giraffe, in which case I could probably follow the plot).
>> No. 430388 Anonymous
10th September 2019
Tuesday 9:46 pm
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>>430380
Oh great, which two actors will it be a vehicle for this time?
>> No. 430392 Anonymous
11th September 2019
Wednesday 6:51 am
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>>430388
That hasn't been announced yet, but it's the writing duo behind the upcoming Sonic the Hedgehog film.
>> No. 430395 Anonymous
11th September 2019
Wednesday 5:05 pm
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>>430388

Jaoquin Phoenix and Cara Delevingne. Calling it.
>> No. 430397 Anonymous
11th September 2019
Wednesday 6:34 pm
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When I see ads asking me to become a sperm donor it makes me think about it for a few seconds. It wouldn't be too much of a weight on my mind to donate but, with the way the law works, I'd probably have some strange teenager come knocking on my door in 19 years. Imagine how many awkward conversation you could end up having to have.

I hope they give donors some information on their spunk. Something like "this is a nice healthy load you deposited" or "you just knocked up half of Kent!" That would be a nice text to receive on a Monday afternoon.

>>430388
If Cage isn't in it then what's the point?
>> No. 430405 Anonymous
11th September 2019
Wednesday 11:07 pm
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>>430397
I am the child of a sperm donor. I was born before 2000, so I believe the way it works is different now, but I cannot find out who my daddy is. All I know is his height, year of birth, eye/hair colour, and how many other children he has fathered (16).
>> No. 430406 Anonymous
11th September 2019
Wednesday 11:18 pm
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>>430405
>All I know is his height, year of birth, eye/hair colour, and how many other children he has fathered (16).
Sounds like a right wanker.

I'm sorry, mate. I couldn't resist.
>> No. 430408 Anonymous
12th September 2019
Thursday 12:00 am
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>>430405
>Amendments to The Human Fertilisation & Act (HFE Act) were introduced from 1st April 2005. These amendments removed donor anonymity; this means that children born from sperm donation can access identifying information about their donor once they reach 18.
>Knowing about their genetic heritage helps people understand who they are. This is why we ask you to give information about your family and medical history and to write something about yourself that a donor-conceived person can read when they reach 18.
https://www.londonspermbank.com/donor/faqs/

Apparently you have to "abstain" 3-5 days before every donation over 4-6 months. I imagine the clinic must get busy on a Friday afternoon.
>> No. 430414 Anonymous
12th September 2019
Thursday 12:42 am
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>>430408
Why, is Tuesday your busy day?
>> No. 430418 Anonymous
12th September 2019
Thursday 9:08 am
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>>430408

I think that's really a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it's understandable that a donor's child wants to know who they came from. But on the other hand, it can be quite disruptive, I would imagine. That child grew up with parents who couldn't conceive children of their own, but who for all intents snd purposes were that child's real parents. The sperm donor's role consisted of nothing more than letting them use his spunk. And against the child's right to know where they came from, you then have to weigh the donor's right to privacy, because the donor could reasonably expect that his active role would end the moment he'd rub one out into a receptacle.
>> No. 430440 Anonymous
12th September 2019
Thursday 6:00 pm
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>>430418
How is the kid ever going to know about the sperm bank, much less the donor, unless the bloody parents told it in the first place.
>> No. 430442 Anonymous
12th September 2019
Thursday 6:19 pm
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This adverts keep putting me off now. It's like I'm being henpecked by a woman I don't even know.
>You could be a very attractive man, Clive. You just need to change your wardrobe, earn more money and take up salsa dancing.

>>430414
Weekends are a no-go but equally you will probably want a weekday to see the Mrs to save things going stale. That leaves you with awkwardly having to do something from Tuesday night to Wednesday morning.
>> No. 430451 Anonymous
12th September 2019
Thursday 8:40 pm
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>>430440

>How is the kid ever going to know about the sperm bank, much less the donor, unless the bloody parents told it in the first place.

If you look nothing like your parents or any of your close relatives, wouldn't you become suspicious?

One of my female friends at uni didn't come from a donor, but she was the only child of her parents, and they had lived together childless for over ten years before she was conceived. She looked nothing like her dad, or anybody in her dad's family. They were all tall and dark haired, and she was a bit on the short side with reddish blond hair. To make matters worse, her mum was also somewhat taller and all of her relatives were dark haired as well. There were photos of her birth, according to which she realistically couldn't have been adopted, but her suspicion was that one of the people from her village at home, who apparently looked a lot like her, was her real dad. She told me it was a nagging thought whenever she looked at her (supposed) dad, and which prevented her from ever being very close to him.
>> No. 430452 Anonymous
12th September 2019
Thursday 9:24 pm
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>>430451
Was she a hairy baby?
>> No. 430458 Anonymous
12th September 2019
Thursday 11:44 pm
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Childofadonorlad here. I'll address the points made in more detail tomorrow, but an interesting point is that if people want you to look like your family, you will. As in, people are willing to ignore differencs and highlight similarities because they believe you are related. I had it happen to me several times as a wee'an.
>> No. 430461 Anonymous
13th September 2019
Friday 12:21 am
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>>430458

One doesn't know what you mean.
>> No. 430473 Anonymous
13th September 2019
Friday 1:04 pm
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>>430451
my red hair seemingly skips over generations
my uncle has it and so did my great uncle
all parents with dark hair i believe

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 430475 Anonymous
13th September 2019
Friday 1:13 pm
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>>430458
I always assumed that I looked more like my mum and my brother looked more like my dad, which was quite commonly agreed upon by my immediate family. That was until my estranged cousin on my mother's side got in touch and she looks like my brother in a wig. I'm fairly certain my dad hasn't fucked his sister-in-law.
>> No. 430476 Anonymous
13th September 2019
Friday 1:53 pm
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>>430475

I know that I came from my dad because although he died young, the older I get, the more I look like him. My mun keeps telling me I've even got a lot of his mannerisms, which I couldn't really have picked up from him when he was still alive. All of his old suits also fit me perfectly. Another indication is that an oil painting exists of my great-great-great-(?)granddad, and it, too, bears an undeniable resemblance to the way I look now in adulthood.

I look strikingly unlike anybody in my mum's family though. They were all pudgy looking peasants with puffy cheeks, while I inherited my dad's tall and slim frame and his oval face with the high cheekbones. So the question would actually be if I came from my mum, but there are about a dozen photographs from my birth that prove it.
>> No. 430477 Anonymous
13th September 2019
Friday 1:53 pm
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This is some CKII Zoroastrian shit ITT.
>> No. 430490 Anonymous
13th September 2019
Friday 11:53 pm
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>>430408
Fair enough. I'm not even sure if I would want to meet the guy by this point.


>>430440
>>430418
Well, this has been a whole thing. My parents never explicitly told me I was the child of a donor, but I figured it out eventually. I am a bit of a spergic cunt with no idea how to act normally, and it was somewhat exaggerated during my teen years; it really shit my dad up that I went ahead and requested the info without consulting him, but I felt like it was my right to know. Family has never been even remotely important to me, but I feel it could be catastrophic in families with a strong bond.

>>430451
As I said yesterday, you don't have to look that similar to look similar enough.



Genetics is a complex thing, though. I don't really think I look like anyone on my mum's side, but my grandfather died in 1985, and both my grandmother and grandfather's individual parents (I'm not sure how to word this without it sounding like they shared parents; they did not) died when they were young, so there are few, if any pictures of any of my direct male lineage.
>> No. 430493 Anonymous
14th September 2019
Saturday 11:37 am
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>>430490

>I am a bit of a spergic cunt with no idea how to act normally


With future designer babies, that shouldn't happen anymore.
>> No. 430494 Anonymous
14th September 2019
Saturday 1:42 pm
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>>430493
Thank fuck. The world doesn't need any more wastes of resources like me.
>> No. 430495 Anonymous
14th September 2019
Saturday 3:29 pm
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>>430494

That's the spirit.
>> No. 431712 Anonymous
24th October 2019
Thursday 11:38 am
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If I let go of my anger I'd probably dissipate into a foul smelling viscous liquid, but holding onto it I'm like a fucked washing machine, all smashed to shite by its own motive force.
>> No. 431713 Anonymous
24th October 2019
Thursday 11:50 am
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It's darker this morning than it was last night.
>> No. 432102 Anonymous
16th November 2019
Saturday 12:53 pm
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Do I see lots of Wensleydale cheese in the shops because it's popular or because I live in Yorkshire? If I went west would I instead see Cheshire cheese and I if went to Wales would it be Caerphilly cheese?
>> No. 432103 Anonymous
16th November 2019
Saturday 12:57 pm
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>>432102
Is there any cheese that comes from the South?
>> No. 432105 Anonymous
16th November 2019
Saturday 2:15 pm
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>>432103
Cheddar. If shops around here only stock three cheeses then it tends to be Cheddar, Wensleydale and Red Leicester.

Am I meant to capitalise my cheeses?
>> No. 432106 Anonymous
16th November 2019
Saturday 2:40 pm
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>>432102

Wensleydale is always available in shops here up north, though usually only one type. I see Red Leicester just as much. I don't think there is a North East cheese though so maybe that's why.
>> No. 432107 Anonymous
16th November 2019
Saturday 3:46 pm
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>>432106
CHEESE.
>> No. 432118 Anonymous
17th November 2019
Sunday 1:06 pm
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>>432107
>> No. 432129 Anonymous
17th November 2019
Sunday 8:14 pm
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>>432106

I really enjoy Red Leicester, I think of it as much better than, say, Cheddar on a sandwich.
>> No. 432130 Anonymous
17th November 2019
Sunday 8:33 pm
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>>432129
I'd say it depends on the quality of the cheese. I'd take ordinary Cheddar over ordinary Red Leicester, but I'd opt for the latter if it's aged.
>> No. 432145 Anonymous
20th November 2019
Wednesday 8:38 pm
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Just heard from an old friend that one of my exes is expecting. And she's now got her wedding planned for next spring, apparently.

I feel funny about this news in a way that I shouldn't. Especially because I could never see myself marrying her and having kids with her anyway.
>> No. 432263 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 7:19 am
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My brother has asked what I want from duty free, as he's buggering off to the east for a week. On an airplane, you see. I want to ask for a nice aftershave, but I'm terribly out of touch with all that. I'm afraid whatever I ask for will make me sound like a twat, and smell like a 15 year old trying to get his end away.
>> No. 432264 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 7:31 am
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>>432263
>I'm terribly out of touch with all that. I'm afraid whatever I ask for will make me sound like a twat, and smell like a 15 year old trying to get his end away.

What often gets overlooked is that a lot of women actually like the smell of things like Lynx. If it smells nice it smells nice.

I use Joop Go, purely because you can get it cheaply.

https://www.fragrancedirect.co.uk/joop-go-eau-de-toilette-spray-100ml-0009287.html
>> No. 432265 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 8:23 am
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>>432263
Tell him to pick up a bottle of carbon sequestration to balance out the emissions of the flight.
>> No. 432267 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 10:13 am
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>>432265
He's already offset his own footprint from the flight by getting his kids to cycle up the shop for him.
>> No. 432274 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 12:48 pm
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>>432264

I'm nearly 40 and I still don't know why using Lynx is supposed to be a bad thing or what I'm actually supposed to put under my arms instead. I'm currently using some Nivea For Men gubbins even though my mum always told me that antiperspirants were bad for you because I want to avoid the "Lynx Stigma".
>> No. 432276 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 2:51 pm
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>>432265

Not sure it'll make much of a difference.
>> No. 432277 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 3:01 pm
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>>432274

Lynx is what teenage boys cover themselves in, so it's associated with immaturity, being overused, and probably also just covering up the fact you couldn't be arsed to shower. Lynx actually smells fine though, obviously. Though I'm not sure I could get a whiff of Africa without being reminded of the changing rooms at middle school.
>> No. 432278 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 4:13 pm
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I have an Olbas inhaler. Life is good again.
>> No. 432279 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 4:16 pm
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>>432274

Separate to what >>432277 says,
>my mum always told me that antiperspirants were bad for you
https://www.webmd.com/breast-cancer/features/antiperspirant-facts-safety#1
>> No. 432282 Anonymous
29th November 2019
Friday 7:47 pm
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>>432279

I think there's a reasonable compromise to be made in using roll ons or sticks instead of aerosols. There's no evidence that the aluminium compounds in antiperspirants can be absorbed through the skin, but why would you want to inhale any of it at all when a perfectly good alternative exists.
Probably a little better for the environment than aerosols too.
>> No. 432303 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 4:46 pm
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Is it just me or does girlfriend/boyfriend have stronger meaning than it used to? I feel like back in my day it merely denoted exclusively dating but I get the impression it is something much more long-term today. Maybe it's not the world that's changed but I've just gotten older.

I feel sorry for the alien archaeologists who are going to sift through our ruins one day and try to make sense of all this.
>> No. 432304 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 4:48 pm
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>>432303
There seems to be an increase in the number of people in long-term relationships who have no interest in getting married, anecdotally at least.
>> No. 432309 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 5:42 pm
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>>432304

On the other hand, I seem to notice a trend of people getting married in a quite small cermony without a wedding party. A couple I know got married in a tiny chapel by the sea, and only their close relatives and best friends were present for it. That was their whole wedding. And inspired by this, another couple I know are thinking about doing the same kind of thing for their wedding.
>> No. 432310 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 6:02 pm
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>>432309
There can be a lot of politics when it comes to weddings. I've known someone get ghosted by one of their closest friends for several years all because she didn't want children at her wedding.
>> No. 432311 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 6:25 pm
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>>432310

>I've known someone get ghosted by one of their closest friends for several years all because she didn't want children at her wedding.

To be honest, I don't think parents do themselves, or their children a favour by taking their sprogs to the wedding with them. When I think back to the weddings that I was made to go to when I was a weelad, I think it was for the most part fucking boring for the six- or eight-year-old me. Even if there were other kids to play with. And the weddings I've gone to in recent years, most kids there seemed to not really enjoy the whole affair either.

I can see how it's going to rub many people the wrong way if you tell them that they can come to the wedding but they can't bring their kids. But it's really not such a cunt move as it seems at first glance. Some thinking will have gone into it.
>> No. 432312 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 6:46 pm
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>>432311

Not sure I understand the mentality of the guests. I mean, by definition, as a guest you let the hosts have things their way. Especially if the event is their wedding day.
>> No. 432313 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 6:52 pm
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>>432311
At the last wedding I went to there were small children talking and whining during the ceremony itself and the speeches before the meal.

I'm not saying they should be banned, but most events would objectively be better off without them.
>> No. 432314 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 7:15 pm
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>>432313

Also, when parents get together with other parents, it's a pissing match on a good day. Especially with their kids in tow. Attending a function without their lifestyle accessories children and thus being less able to brag about them would do some parents some good.
>> No. 432319 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 9:19 pm
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>>432311
I'm a full grown adult and weddings bore the piss out of me. Have a party if you want to waste money celebrating your relationship, don't make me wear a suit and sit through hours of tedious rituals.

I'm not saying they should be banned, but most marriages would objectively be better off without them.
>> No. 432321 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 9:22 pm
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Is it just me or are KP peanuts soft? I've been eating spicy peanuts from the asian supermarket for a while and just bought some KP assuming they'd be the same without the spice but they're not. They have no bite to them.
>> No. 432324 Anonymous
30th November 2019
Saturday 10:30 pm
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>>432319

I've had good fun the last two or three weddings respectively, each time targeting one of the bride's perennially single friends who was feeling down that night because her friend was getting married and she was single with no hope of it changing in the near future.

Contrary to belief, they aren't always complete munters. One of them was really proper fit and we had a snog. Things went a little south when we then met a few days later and we realised we had next to nothing in common. But hey, as far as pity snogs, I could have done far worse that night.
>> No. 432350 Anonymous
1st December 2019
Sunday 10:17 am
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It will soon be a year since I've had a fizzy drink.
>> No. 432351 Anonymous
1st December 2019
Sunday 11:10 am
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>>432350
Champagne or sparkling mineral water can be very nice for the digestion. The hell with Coca-cola etc though.
>> No. 432355 Anonymous
1st December 2019
Sunday 3:57 pm
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>>432351
I dunno, nothing beats fat-coke when I have a hangover or a dodgy tummy.
>> No. 432379 Anonymous
2nd December 2019
Monday 9:41 am
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>>432350
I was about to post about this separately, but would like to join in with your celebrations if that's okay.

It will be two years in January since I've had an alcoholic one. Whilst I do feel better health-wise, and I make a prat of myself far less, I do get bored a lot more though. Particularly around these times of festivity when all friends, family and colleagues are out getting arse-faced.

I wouldn't trade (almost) two years of sobriety for one night of debauchery, but I just want it out there that the temptation arises occasionally.
>> No. 432395 Anonymous
2nd December 2019
Monday 4:34 pm
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>>432303

I'm not sure, but I've noticed it too. A while back I met a lass who I really liked, so I said (in a somewhat less cringe-worthy way) that we should be girlfriend and boyfriend. What I meant was "let's be exclusive to each other", what she thought I meant was "start making plans for our wedding, looking for houses for us to buy, and making plans for me to be a stay at home dad so you can continue your career where you earn literally one tenth of what I do".

Maybe it was because she was a fair bit younger, maybe it was because she was mental.
>> No. 432400 Anonymous
2nd December 2019
Monday 9:33 pm
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>>432395

I don't think I've ever asked a woman outright "Will you be my girlfriend". I've always hated that wording, so the times when it came to establishing just what exactly me and a lass were, my workaround would always be something like, "I guess that means we're together now", or "I wouldn't mind if we got a little deeper involved". That sort of thing. Maybe I'm just not romantic, but "Will you be my girlfriend" has always made me cringe.
>> No. 432403 Anonymous
2nd December 2019
Monday 9:57 pm
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>>432400
> Maybe I'm just not romantic, but "Will you be my girlfriend" has always made me cringe.

Quite. As I said, I didn't use those exact words but the general thrust of what I said was along the lines of we should no longer just be two people who shag but should be somewhat officially a couple, which is to say I might call her my girlfriend and vice versa.

Anyway, her interpretation of the whole thing was quite different to mine, which would have been fine in a romantic comedy but was fucking miserable in real life.

I've always maintained that the British don't really date, we just get sambuccad up to the point where it's obvious that we both want it (otherwise, why on else would we still both be there drinking however many hours later?).
>> No. 432404 Anonymous
2nd December 2019
Monday 10:53 pm
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>>432403
>why on else would we still both be there drinking however many hours later?)
Alcoholism?
>> No. 432411 Anonymous
3rd December 2019
Tuesday 1:59 am
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>>432395

If she was a millennial or younger, I think it's sort of come to mean that by neccessity. I think me and my mates were of the last generation who lived the dream of moving out in our late teens/early 20s and spending a few years getting up to sitcom drunken mates antics; and even then we were late to the party and it cost us more than it should have. I feel as though the younger generation coming up today are consciously aware from the word go that in order to comfortably fly the nest, or gain any sort of real foothold in life, you've got to have found someone to split the bill with already.

Slowly but surely I think we'll end up like Japan, with young people who can't functionally court one another at all. Online dating is the first step towards it, for those of us who still have some sense of social liberty it's fine but you do notice a lot of people treat it like a job application. Give it another ten or twenty years and they'll be marrying the first person they move in with for the sake of ease and just not taking to each other until retirement.
>> No. 432412 Anonymous
3rd December 2019
Tuesday 11:48 am
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>>432411
> If she was a millennial or younger

I've really lost track of what all these generations actually mean but she was born mid 90s so I'd say end of the millennials / first of the gen-z's border, I guess.

> I think me and my mates were of the last generation who lived the dream of moving out in our late teens/early 20s and spending a few years getting up to sitcom drunken mates antics; and even then we were late to the party and it cost us more than it should have.

Likewise. When I was 21 I could land a 4x minimum wage job and fuck off the hell far away from home, split a stupidly (relatively for the time, the same place would cost maybe three or four times that today) expensive flat with some mates and basically live a 24/7 party during my early twenties.

(Obviously none of this was particularly intelligent, if I'd taken the stupid amount of rent I was paying and even half the money I spent on alcohol and retarded clubs every week and thrown it in a savings account..... but then I wouldn't have the stories, right?).

> consciously aware from the word go that in order to comfortably fly the nest, or gain any sort of real foothold in life, you've got to have found someone to split the bill with already.

I feel you could be right about that. She was always on about how she wasn't going to leave home until she got married, and harping on about how she felt she hadn't achieved anything because everyone she went to school with had either got married or had a kid (as if being a single parent is somehow desirable). Maybe I was just the mad bint's meal ticket.

Sigh and sage. It's too early to think about this kind of thing. I need a drink.
>> No. 432424 Anonymous
3rd December 2019
Tuesday 4:20 pm
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>>432411

>but you do notice a lot of people treat it like a job application

Sadly, I think we're now seeing this as a standard. Because just like an HR person at a company, you get to choose between about two or three dozen, well, applicants, and you are only going to have a limited time to concern yourself with each one of them. And being spoiled for choice that way IMO also means that you are less willing to let something run its course and get to know the person better while not being put off by annoying quirks they may have and that are apparent from the beginning. Why invest all that time, when you can just as easily move on to the next person. But I maintain that it's merely an illusion of choice, and that it gets you no further in finding the right person for you than in the old days.

I remember a time when online dating consisted of putting an ad on some local events web site in your area, and then you would wait impatiently for three or four people to e-mail you. And the odds were against you in the first place if you were a lad writing to a lass with a very attractive photo of herself. Even that was kind of radical in the late 90s to early 2000s, because growing up, when I was a weelad, putting an ad in an actual paper looking for a partner always had kind of a connotation of desperation attached to it. You had exhausted all the ways of finding a partner within your social circles, or you were just too ugly or too messed up in the first place to find somebody among them, so that was your last straw. Kind of funny how that has changed. But like I said, it needs to be taken with a grain of salt, and finding Mr. or Ms. Right to me seems no easier than back then. Just the parameters of it have changed.
>> No. 432747 Anonymous
14th December 2019
Saturday 11:44 am
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Could I tap into the internet myself? As in, not being reliant upon an ISP and getting internet straight from the source?
>> No. 432748 Anonymous
14th December 2019
Saturday 11:53 am
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>>432747
Yes - you could rent a rack and buy bandwidth in a DC and be your own ISP.
>> No. 432749 Anonymous
14th December 2019
Saturday 12:58 pm
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>>432748
Can you explain that to me like I'm an idiot please?
>> No. 432750 Anonymous
14th December 2019
Saturday 1:00 pm
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>>432748

Do you have to do that? Why can't you just put one in your house? Where does the datacentre get their Internet from?
>> No. 432762 Anonymous
14th December 2019
Saturday 2:24 pm
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>>432749

A DC (Data Centre) is a facility designed specifically to host server and networking equipment. They typically charge a monthly co-location fee, for which they provide electrical power, a high-speed network connection and space in a rack for your equipment. The websites you visit are hosted on servers sitting in data centre racks; the network connections between these data centres and internet service providers are what makes the internet work.

>>432750

The data centre usually has a dedicated high-speed fibre connection to the nearest internet exchange point. The exchange point is a data centre full of switching and routing gear, used by ISPs and other companies with very high bandwidth needs to connect their networks together. These inter-network arrangements are negotiated between companies; larger networks tend to operate mutual peering at no charge, but this isn't universal, especially if there is a significant asymmetry in the direction of the traffic or the market power of the two operators. Internet exchanges are themselves linked together through peering agreements with other internet exchanges.
>> No. 432763 Anonymous
14th December 2019
Saturday 2:39 pm
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I just beat my best 5K time.

Sub 22 minutes by about a quarter of a minute. Very proud of myself and yes this is a humble-brag.
>> No. 432764 Anonymous
14th December 2019
Saturday 5:21 pm
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>>432763
That's not a humblebrag though.
>> No. 432765 Anonymous
14th December 2019
Saturday 5:59 pm
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>>432764
Also I think I was sped up and enthused having realised how big my cock is immediately beforehand.
>> No. 432769 Anonymous
14th December 2019
Saturday 7:24 pm
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>>432765
It's a strange realisation to come to before going on a long run; what made you believe this? I mean, I like running in Lycra as much as the next man but..
>> No. 432770 Anonymous
14th December 2019
Saturday 7:43 pm
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>>432769

I think you've identified the reason. I don't even have a massive cock, but I'm forced to confront the entire mass of my genitals every time I put my cycling shorts on.
>> No. 432873 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 10:11 pm
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Lonely. Well, actually, full because i've just stuffed a donner wrap and 4 marmite & peanut butter into my face hole. It'll fill the void for another night.
>> No. 432874 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 10:21 pm
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>>432765
>>432770

Well I do have a massive cock, and this bird I used to shag and occasionally still text made a reference to it earlier today. It happens occasionally when we're having a bit of a flirt, and it genuinely makes me feel like the king of all space and time.

I feel sorry for blokes with small cocks, I bet it would eliminate all need for antidepressants or therapy if we could just give sad blokes a seven incher.
>> No. 432875 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 10:33 pm
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>>432874
> I feel sorry for blokes with small cocks, I bet it would eliminate all need for antidepressants or therapy if we could just give sad blokes a seven incher.

I feel personally attacked and need a safe space.
>> No. 432880 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 11:41 pm
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>>432874
>I feel sorry for blokes with small cocks

I feel sorry for you, if that's the best you can say about yourself.
>> No. 432881 Anonymous
19th December 2019
Thursday 11:50 pm
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>>432880

I'll freely admit the rest of my life is incredibly mundane, and the size of my bank account certainly won't be impressing any ladies. If that makes you feel better then be my guest, honestly.

But I've got a massive cock.
>> No. 432882 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 1:47 am
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>>432881

I have the delicate and nimble hands of a watchmaker.
>> No. 432888 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 5:06 am
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>>432881

I've got a regular normal cock and I still shag women and they seem to like it, so you're not really gaining anything.
>> No. 432891 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 10:21 am
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>>432888
> and I still shag women
IYKWIM
>> No. 432904 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 4:56 pm
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>>432882
Asmongold's looking well.
>> No. 432916 Anonymous
20th December 2019
Friday 7:43 pm
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Withdrawals are a cunt.
>> No. 433094 Anonymous
27th December 2019
Friday 6:32 pm
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Do animals have periods? I know a lot of pets get spayed but I can't ever remember my mates saying their dog/cat was on the rag and I can't recall my rabbits or mice being a bit jammy down there when I was younger.
>> No. 433095 Anonymous
27th December 2019
Friday 6:38 pm
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>>433094
Our lab used to drip a watery iron-smelling blood around the house, so yeah dogs have periods. Thank god we had hard floors back then, all it took to clean up was a little mop with your sock. I assume it's the case with all mammals.
>> No. 433097 Anonymous
27th December 2019
Friday 6:47 pm
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>>433095
If took me far longer than it should have to realise you weren't on about a leaky laboratory.
>> No. 433098 Anonymous
27th December 2019
Friday 9:00 pm
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>>433095
>all it took to clean up was a little mop with your sock

Socks really are the unsung heroes of .gs.
>> No. 433482 Anonymous
7th January 2020
Tuesday 10:57 am
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I awoke this morning incredibly relieved, as I dreamt I was chucked in a cell for standing at the docks with a placard that said "LESBIANS IN!"

I wonder what Freud would've said about that, and whether he'd agree with me that this sort of inclusive behaviour should not be punished.
>> No. 433777 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 1:46 pm
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Is it possible to tell whether someone is fat just from their voice? There's someone I speak to fairly regularly on the phone and she just sounds like a fat person.
>> No. 433778 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 2:25 pm
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>>433777
Yes.
>> No. 433779 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 3:58 pm
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>>433778
I've found a picture of her online. She is indeed fat; got a right moon face.
>> No. 433780 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 4:09 pm
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>>433779

Who is this moon-faced angel of which you speak? Do you think she'd like a good arse-pissing?
>> No. 433781 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 4:20 pm
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>>433780
There's two types of women in this world; those who love a good arse pissing and those who haven't tried it yet.
>> No. 433792 Anonymous
16th January 2020
Thursday 10:23 pm
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>>433777

>Is it possible to tell whether someone is fat just from their voice?

There have been studies conducted on men:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7488442_Relationships_between_vocal_characteristics_and_body_size_and_shape_in_human_males_An_evolutionary_explanation_for_a_deep_male_voice

>The current correlational study investigated the relationship between vocal measures (fundamental and formant frequencies) and both body size and shape. Vocal samples and physical measures were obtained from 50 heterosexual male volunteers. A significant negative relationship was found between fundamental frequency and measures of body shape and weight.


So do fat poofs have a higher voice then?
>> No. 433818 Anonymous
18th January 2020
Saturday 12:42 pm
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>>433792
Yes.
>> No. 433842 Anonymous
19th January 2020
Sunday 6:23 pm
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I don't think it's said enough: Christina Ricci in Sleepy Hollow would seriously get it.
>> No. 433852 Anonymous
20th January 2020
Monday 10:23 am
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>>433842

Quite. One of my favourite wank fantasies back in the day.
>> No. 433853 Anonymous
20th January 2020
Monday 10:30 am
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>>433852
> back in the day.
Fuck off carpet-bagger.
>> No. 433855 Anonymous
20th January 2020
Monday 10:34 am
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>>433853

Christina Ricci was born in 1980, which made her 19 years old when Sleepy Hollow was made.

Fuck off yourself.
>> No. 433856 Anonymous
20th January 2020
Monday 10:47 am
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>>433855

Also though, I probably had the biggest of all stonk ons for Mena Suvari, all the way into the early 2000s. I was obsessed with her, and didn't miss a single one of her - mostly quite mediocre - movies. Everything about her was just the ideal woman to me.

Middle age has not been kind to that face though. At barely 41 years old, she looks way older than that.
>> No. 433881 Anonymous
22nd January 2020
Wednesday 12:56 pm
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>>433842
She still looks like she was grown in a vat in this photo.
>> No. 433892 Anonymous
22nd January 2020
Wednesday 6:35 pm
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>>433856
If we're playing a lovely girls competition then I submit Lizzy Caplan for consideration. Something I've always been mad about is how the classic Gen X girl was always too old for me growing up and by the time it comes around again I'll be too old.

Where is my Jane Lane, lads? My Louise Wener?
>> No. 433893 Anonymous
22nd January 2020
Wednesday 6:55 pm
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>>433892
She kind of looks like how Alison Brie should look now, rather than morphing into Andy from Cbeebies.
>> No. 433907 Anonymous
23rd January 2020
Thursday 8:43 pm
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>>433893

I say this in the kindest possible fashion, but you're a fucking idiot. She's specifically styled to look more homely and less attractive in GLOW.
>> No. 433920 Anonymous
23rd January 2020
Thursday 10:52 pm
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>>433907

Have at look at her Instagram, she doesn't look as good as she used to. Don't get me wrong, she's still fifteen thousand times fitter than I am but I also don't fancy her in quite the same way I used to. I think she's just a bit too skinny now, her face looked better a bit more filled out back in the Community/Mad Men days.

Enthusiastic sage for a post dedicated to judging the attractiveness of a famous woman.
>> No. 434642 Anonymous
21st February 2020
Friday 11:29 am
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Is most of the pleasure of food derived from chewing it or swallowing it?

If I started giving food a chew and good suck before spitting it out instead of swallowing it would that be an effective dieting technique? Obviously I'd still eat a little of it to sate my appetite.
>> No. 434645 Anonymous
21st February 2020
Friday 12:03 pm
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>>434642

Controversial, but I'd say most of the pleasure from food is gained from the anticipation of it.
>> No. 434648 Anonymous
21st February 2020
Friday 1:31 pm
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>>434642

well is most pleasure from sex from the stimulation or the cumming? Sure you could tease, but if you never came at all it would become deeply fustrating, savour your food, but do eventually swallow.

>>434645

I can't subscribe to that idea, because I don't put much thought into what my food tastes like until I am actually eatting it unless I am very hungry. but I see the logic.
>> No. 434665 Anonymous
21st February 2020
Friday 5:53 pm
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>>434645

I see your anticipation and raise you FLAYVAAAH.
>> No. 434666 Anonymous
21st February 2020
Friday 6:00 pm
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>>434648

>well is most pleasure from sex from the stimulation or the cumming? Sure you could tease, but if you never came at all it would become deeply fustrating, savour your food, but do eventually swallow.

I've had a good few sessions where I was stoned/tripping and didn't want it to end at all, and we'd fuck for hours without cumming because that would bring it to an end. It's happened without the influence of drugs too, of course, but not to the same extent.

There's also the wonderful world or orgasm control and denial. Do you kean to say you've never tied a bird up and edged her relentlessly until she begs like a whore for crack? Some people haven't lived.

God I miss that ex sometimes. Shame she was also mental.
>> No. 434668 Anonymous
21st February 2020
Friday 7:07 pm
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>>434648
> well is most pleasure from sex from the stimulation or the cumming?

All pleasure is in release from tension.

> but do eventually swallow.

I wish more birds followed these wise words.
>> No. 434681 Anonymous
21st February 2020
Friday 8:06 pm
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>>434665

Stewart Lee used to be a bit of alright, huh?
>> No. 434696 Anonymous
21st February 2020
Friday 9:25 pm
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>>434681

Not even when he was in The Smiths.
>> No. 434701 Anonymous
21st February 2020
Friday 9:30 pm
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>>434696

Lad, Are Stew was kind of hot. He was just never funny. Or even half as intelligent as he thinks he is.

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 434884 Anonymous
24th February 2020
Monday 8:24 pm
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>>434701

Are Stew is one of the mods.
>> No. 435204 Anonymous
8th March 2020
Sunday 7:41 pm
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I like to have a bite out of a strawberry and then a bite out of a red grape. It's by far the best fruit combination out there.
>> No. 435414 Anonymous
17th March 2020
Tuesday 8:22 pm
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What's the proper etiquette for online reviews? I've received a request for a review from a seller the day after it was despatched; how long am I meant to use it for to know how satisfied I am with it?
>> No. 435415 Anonymous
17th March 2020
Tuesday 8:23 pm
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>>435414
There is no proper etiquette. If you're inclined to make that impatient fucker wait, make them wait.
>> No. 435418 Anonymous
17th March 2020
Tuesday 9:14 pm
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>>435415
If people badger me for feedback, I'm sure to mention that in any feedback I do leave. Doubly so for reviews.
>> No. 435655 Anonymous
26th March 2020
Thursday 10:19 am
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Have they changed Wotsits? They pack I had wasn't very puffy.
>> No. 435662 Anonymous
26th March 2020
Thursday 1:03 pm
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>>435655

They're running low on puff gas because of corona.
>> No. 435668 Anonymous
26th March 2020
Thursday 2:13 pm
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>>435655
Pretty sure squares have got thinner as well. Not nearly as crunchy as they used to be.
>> No. 435669 Anonymous
26th March 2020
Thursday 2:18 pm
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>>435668
If squares got thinner they'd be rectangles.
>> No. 435674 Anonymous
26th March 2020
Thursday 4:00 pm
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>>435669

They should really be called cuboids, not squares as a line has no thickness in geometry innit.
>> No. 436019 Anonymous
9th April 2020
Thursday 10:07 am
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At what point does branded cheese become superior to supermarket own brand cheese?

I quite like supermarket own brand extra mature cheddar. It's nicer than the likes of Cathedral City and Wyke Farms cheese. Is branded cheese a con? If you want to beat supermarket own brand cheese do you need artisan cheese from a proper cheesemonger?
>> No. 436020 Anonymous
9th April 2020
Thursday 10:27 am
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>>436019
Depends entirely on the brand and the supermarket.
>> No. 436022 Anonymous
9th April 2020
Thursday 10:51 am
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>>436019

Cheese is pretty much cheese, it's the processes of making it that make the flavour, rather than the base ingredients, much like beer - there's only really the same four ingredients in most common beers, but clearly some are far better than others. The same is true of cheese. Price is really a function of how much of it you make, and as of any product, the more of it you want to sell, the less interesting it gets.

As far as branded cheese goes, the whole point is consistency. The idea is that every block of Cathedral City you ever buy will taste like the last block of Cathedral City, and they spend a lot of money on the processes to ensure that happens. Supermarket cheese is usually sourced from similar if not identical dairy farms and processors. Whichever farm makes Tesco Cheddar will look almost exactly like Wyke Farms does, and involve just as many experts.

Since supermarkets make, or at least source and sell, a lot of own brand products, it's not necessary that every single product makes a profit discreetly - it's just not that common for someone to go into a supermarket and buy exactly one block of cheddar and leave, and the entire store is designed so that doesn't happen. Cathedral City doesn't have the option to also flog you a tube of smarties for a quid on the way out, so their prices have to be higher, and Tesco can undercut them with their own brand to attract people in, and never lose, even if they lose 3p per cheese (they don't, it'll still make profit, just not much).

Cheese is also subjective, my favourite cheddar is almost certainly not the same as your favourite cheddar, and that's really down to taste rather than quality. Cheddar has no protected origin, so it's hard to really define what makes a 'good' cheddar at all. When we move towards less mainstream cheeses, you'll find a distinct lack of branding as most of it will be sourced from the few creameries that make it, or in many cases, are allowed to make it under PDO rules. Wensleydale, for example, is really only made in one facility now, albeit under the yoke of a very large dairy conglomerate.

Despite there being a few very small artisan cheesemakers, the majority of cheese, even specialist or artisan style, is still made in big dairy plants or huge 2000 acre farms. As cheese is really all about a biological process, doing it on a small, craftsman scale means that though perhaps you can get very good at making one sort of cheese, it can still be done exactly as well in a factory, just more reliably. So any real 'artisan' cheese will be in some way novel or quite divisive, something like Stinking Bishop being the most prominent example - but even then they're not exactly a small outfit.

In short, it's not a con, but it's not entirely unexpected that supermarket brand cheese might still be better. I will say that Morrisons has the absolute best cheese counter of any supermarket, even better than the middle class cunt cheesemongers found in places like Booths and Waitrose.
>> No. 436037 Anonymous
9th April 2020
Thursday 4:29 pm
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>>436022
>cheese experts
This is the kind of post i come to britfa.gs for. Thanks for taking the time, mate.
>> No. 436125 Anonymous
13th April 2020
Monday 9:31 pm
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Actually I've just had Pilgrims Choice extra mature cheddar and that is nicer than supermarket own brand extra mature cheddar.
>> No. 436126 Anonymous
13th April 2020
Monday 9:34 pm
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>>436125
I can also vouch for Pilgrims Choice, but I'm not shilling for Big Cheddar.
>> No. 436136 Anonymous
13th April 2020
Monday 11:57 pm
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Duke's Barrel. The cheese for liars.
>> No. 436137 Anonymous
14th April 2020
Tuesday 12:08 am
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>>436136
Thanks, Pete.
>> No. 436138 Anonymous
14th April 2020
Tuesday 12:44 am
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I created the original "what you feeling right now?" /beat/ thread - that missing 'are' has bothered me for fucking years. Sorry, I had to say that, I think of it every time I see it.
>> No. 436139 Anonymous
14th April 2020
Tuesday 7:25 am
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>>436137

Thete.
>> No. 436140 Anonymous
14th April 2020
Tuesday 11:53 am
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>>436138
It's fine, we all just assumed you were black.
>> No. 436141 Anonymous
14th April 2020
Tuesday 3:38 pm
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Corona has made me have a good think about my life.

I always wanted to travel, try some risky moves, do stuff, but I always got so close then put it off and chose the safe route. I'm in my mid 20s now, already feeling a bit old, but I'll definitely be using this time to travel and enjoy my life afterwards. Fuck careers, they can wait (and luckily I have some decent experience now anyway).
>> No. 436142 Anonymous
14th April 2020
Tuesday 5:06 pm
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Do I want lasagne or ratatouille with gnocchi?
>> No. 436143 Anonymous
14th April 2020
Tuesday 6:24 pm
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>>436141

Assuming I still have a job in September I'm going to be renegotiating some things. So far I've been on the "mostly stay at home because you're older with kids" travel plan. Next year I want to be on the "different country every month" travel plan.
>> No. 436318 Anonymous
22nd April 2020
Wednesday 10:21 am
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I only found out yesterday that when you cum it's shot out of your prostate and through your urethra. I knew some of the fluid was created in your prostate but I always assumed it shot out your balls, through your vas deferens and then through the urethra.
>> No. 436321 Anonymous
22nd April 2020
Wednesday 3:36 pm
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>>436318

I knew this lockdown was starting to drag on, but I didn't realise that people had missed out on their entire secondary education already.
>> No. 436322 Anonymous
22nd April 2020
Wednesday 3:41 pm
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>>436321
I don't remember it being on the curriculum to cover precisely where in the body spunk is launched from. I just assumed with sayings such as getting your balls drained that this is where the spunk was stored until it's go time.
>> No. 436323 Anonymous
22nd April 2020
Wednesday 4:14 pm
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I'm looking forward to the chicken pineapple curry I will be having in a little bit. Homemade, from separate ingredients. Except for the curry powder seasoning. I was going to make the effort to buy the spices separately, but they had ready-made curry powder for under a quid at Asda, so I thought why bother.
>> No. 436324 Anonymous
22nd April 2020
Wednesday 5:11 pm
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>>436323

Well chuffed with myself, my chicken pineapple curry turned out really nice. I was out of basmati and had to use parboiled rice, and I also forgot to buy double cream and had to use a bit more coconut cream instead, but other than that, it's delicious.
>> No. 436325 Anonymous
22nd April 2020
Wednesday 6:21 pm
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>>436324
Oranges? Not too much juice/too little rice? Otherwise it looks like sick nice. Nah I'm only joking mate; I'm actually pretty chuffed today as I finally went swimming. My new dry bag works a treat - carried my clothes and towel on my back while wading through the sea. Probably walked about a mile, but only semi-submerged so only from my waist down got any excersise. I know everyone thinks it's okay to skip 'leg day' but i really don't need to focus on mine as much as today - they're my most toned muscles, everything else is flab. But yeah, I'd definitely appriciate a homecooked pineapple curry - sweet and sour/spicey are my favorite takaway flavours. Was it just a basic curry powder? Cumin, corriander, tumeric kind of thing?

I was also gonna call you a twat until I googled 'parboiled'.
>> No. 436326 Anonymous
22nd April 2020
Wednesday 8:33 pm
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>>436325

They're actually clementines. They tend to have a more delicate aroma than oranges, and they go well with the slight harshness of pineapple.

I was going to also put in some fresh mango, but the ones they had in the shop were a bit subpar and hard as bricks.

I like my curry with plenty of sauce, and parboiled rice, while somewhat bland in taste, is actually more nutritious than most other types of white rice.
>> No. 436327 Anonymous
22nd April 2020
Wednesday 9:24 pm
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>>436326
>clementines
>pineapple
Why did you add chicken to your rice pudding, you fucking savage?

SAGERU
>> No. 436328 Anonymous
22nd April 2020
Wednesday 10:10 pm
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>>436327

Feel good about yourself?

What's the most productive thing you've done all day?
>> No. 436330 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 1:14 am
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>>436328


I processed about 85 schedule diverts today, but even if I hadn't done something objectively productive, I'd still feel comfortable judging you for eating a fucking Caprisun flavoured curry.
>> No. 436334 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 8:10 am
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>>436330

>I'd still feel comfortable judging you for eating a fucking Caprisun flavoured curry.

Never change, .gs.
>> No. 436337 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 11:46 am
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How screwed is the postal service at the minute? Something was sent to me on Saturday Royal Mail first class and there's no sign of it yet.
>> No. 436338 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 12:29 pm
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>>436328
Why are you booing him? He's right!
>> No. 436339 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 1:09 pm
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>>436338

What exactly do you find wrong with putting pineapple and clementine in a curry. There are clementine curries, and there sure as fuck are pineapple curries. What is so unimaginable about putting the two in the same curry dish.
>> No. 436340 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 1:11 pm
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>>436338
>> No. 436341 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 1:50 pm
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>>436339

Fruit does not belong in a curry. Not pineapple, not oranges and especially not fucking sultanas. The Sri Lankans are a bunch of soft southern ponces.
>> No. 436342 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 1:59 pm
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>>436341
Tomatoes?
>> No. 436344 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 2:27 pm
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>>436341

Is that you, cheflad? I would have expected more of you.


>sultanas

I would indeed draw the line at sultanas. That's just savagery.

Other than that, I actually like fruit based curry more than most other kinds.
>> No. 436346 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 3:29 pm
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>>436341
Lamb and banana curry is very much a Kashmiri thing, you fanny.

It's grim but that's beside the point.
>> No. 436347 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 3:42 pm
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Also, Sri Lankans basically just seem to spice the fuck out of everything. I went there on holiday with my parents once, and the food at the three-star hotel was divided between local cuisine and European cooking. Their local dishes mainly consisted of rice with overcooked chicken or meat, and an absolute fuckload of curry and chili pepper. Their take on things like steak with mashed potato and steamed vegetables, on the other hand, was pretty dreadful, and so basically you were stuck between food that was alright but so spicy that you literally had sweat beads forming on your forehead, and international dishes that were somewhat worse than your average NHS hospital cafeteria.
>> No. 436349 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 9:16 pm
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>>436342
Shots fired!
>> No. 436352 Anonymous
23rd April 2020
Thursday 10:20 pm
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I'm starting to think the rumours about Peter Kay are true.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxYRPH19YcE
>> No. 436355 Anonymous
24th April 2020
Friday 1:44 am
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>>436352
At least he's not dead.
>> No. 436358 Anonymous
24th April 2020
Friday 3:45 am
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>>436355
You say that, but that’s a very short clip and he’s dressed exactly the way I’d dress a dead body if I was trying to make out it was still alive.
>> No. 436359 Anonymous
24th April 2020
Friday 3:56 am
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>>436358
I totally get it. If I found out tomorrow I had some terrible/terminal disease, I wouldn't want the fuss of telling everyone and dealing with their emotions. I would keep it a secret, even from my own family.
>> No. 436360 Anonymous
24th April 2020
Friday 6:02 am
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>>436358

Also how I would dress and pose someone to make a deepfake look as realistic as possible.

Note also that they have simply reused the original Amarillo footage for his parts in it. He's dead as fuck.
>> No. 436499 Anonymous
29th April 2020
Wednesday 12:37 am
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8UyndYt0oM


Robert Smith looks like a menopausal cleaningwoman on acid.
>> No. 436513 Anonymous
29th April 2020
Wednesday 7:02 pm
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I've had a sweet potato as a jacket potato. The verdict is inconclusive.
>> No. 436518 Anonymous
29th April 2020
Wednesday 9:54 pm
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Social fatigue and severe boredom. I need marijuana.
>> No. 436521 Anonymous
29th April 2020
Wednesday 11:46 pm
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My psychiatrist is worse at answering texts than an unlicensed pill dealer and it's doing my nut in. I was supposed to have an appointment this morning that was cancelled due to lockdown and now the bastard hasn't answered me to even acknowledge the fact I need my prescriptions renewed or I'm going to turn into a nut cake again.

>>436513

My favourite part of a jacket potato is the skin and most (all?) varieties of sweet potato have skins that aren't very nice no matter how you cook them. Sweet potato french fries / wedges are pretty great though. I think I might buy an air fryer off Amazon and sit in my kitchen frying things until my pills run out and I end up spending half the night having a chat with it.

Sage.
>> No. 436547 Anonymous
30th April 2020
Thursday 7:20 pm
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>>436521
>air fryer
Don't bother, they don't make nice food.

I guess if you don't have a proper oven it might make sense.
>> No. 436548 Anonymous
30th April 2020
Thursday 7:44 pm
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>>436547

I wouldn't say they don't make nice food, they are nothing more than very small convection ovens, so cook things just fine - but like you say, there's little point in getting a very small oven if you already have a big one in your kitchen already.

There are a few ways you can improve your oven's ability to crisp things up, the simplest and most effective often being to chuck a couple of paving stones in there, but I realise that has nothing to do with frying.

Sadly there's no real way to substitute the effect submerging things in hot fat has on cooking them. I would never, never recommend anyone deep fried on a stove in a pan, just don't, and I'd struggle to even recommend buying a little table top fryer - they lack thermal mass and are incredibly impractical, you could never really make something as basic as fish and chips in it as you just couldn't fit both in. And even if air fryers really fried stuff, you'd have the same issue.
>> No. 436549 Anonymous
30th April 2020
Thursday 8:56 pm
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>>436548
That's a fair correction. To clarify, I meant that air fryers (as the name suggests) are often pitched as replacements for shallow/deep frying, and they really aren't, which can lead to disappointment.
>> No. 436555 Anonymous
1st May 2020
Friday 1:00 am
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>>436549
>>436548

Thanks for the heads up, lads. Everyone I know who has one has raved about how great they are, but then again none of them are even passable cooks so maybe a minimal increase in the crunchiness of their frozen oven chips was enough to sell them on them.

Apropos of nothing much, my mum used a proper old-school chip pan to deep fry things all through my childhood and only almost burnt our council flat to the ground a handful of times. Personally I've always been scared shitless of have a pan full of hot oil on top of a naked flame (or anywhere near me, in fact) and have never used one in my life.
>> No. 436558 Anonymous
1st May 2020
Friday 4:34 am
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>>436548

>there's little point in getting a very small oven if you already have a big one in your kitchen already

Economy. My air fryer uses 70% less electricity than my oven and cooks things faster.

>Sadly there's no real way to substitute the effect submerging things in hot fat has on cooking them.

Air frying isn't really frying, but it's sort of similar and it's a lot healthier.
>> No. 436559 Anonymous
1st May 2020
Friday 9:39 am
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>>436558 My air fryer uses 70% less electricity than my oven and cooks things faster.

I've always had a hankering to build the perfect single baked potato oven.
Bit of microwave, but of convection, all in a shoebox size. Net feed, so I can set it going as I leave work. I bloody love a good baked potato.
>> No. 436560 Anonymous
1st May 2020
Friday 9:51 am
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>>436559
Try putting one in a Microchips container.
>> No. 436562 Anonymous
1st May 2020
Friday 11:03 am
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>>436555

>Personally I've always been scared shitless of have a pan full of hot oil on top of a naked flame (or anywhere near me, in fact) and have never used one in my life.

I'm scared of that too and have been a professional chef for almost all of my adult life. A small, shallow oil fire even in a professional kitchen is a bit sketchy, and that's somewhere with high ceilings, ventilation, fire extinguishers and blankets, and so on, it still shits people up. Being scared of it is exactly how you quickly get into trouble, when you panic and do the wrong thing. Hopefully everyone and their dog knows not to chuck water on it, but flapping and dropping the pan can be just as bad, and I've seen plenty of people instinctively chuck it in the sink, which can range from being useless to life altering on the safety scale depending on conditions.

Overall, a really bad idea. Shallow frying in a relatively high sided pan (wok probably makes the most sense) is closer to something I would recommend, but honestly I don't think it's worth it. If you like fried chips that much just call your local takeaway, they need the business.

>>436558

Honestly supposed they use that little power. I suppose in my head I was conflating them with halogen ovens.

We'll have to agree to disagree with it being sort of similar to frying, but if you're getting good results for cheap I'm not about to cunt off about it.

>>436559

They do make convection microwaves, and if there isn't a smart one yet I'm sure you could arduino it. I know it's not exactly baked potato size, but the tech exists.
>> No. 436563 Anonymous
1st May 2020
Friday 11:51 am
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>>436562

>I'm not about to cunt off about it

Captain Tom can get fucked, this is what a real hero looks like.
>> No. 436569 Anonymous
1st May 2020
Friday 11:30 pm
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>>436562

If you really want to go unhealthy and make your own oil-fried chips, a low-end deep fryer really isn't that expensive.


https://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/household-appliances/small-kitchen-appliances/small-cooking-appliances/fryers/tefal-easy-pro-fr333040-deep-fryer-stainless-steel-10175379-pdt.html
>> No. 436571 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 12:34 am
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>>436569

They're still not great, though. They have a relatively small amount of oil in them which means less thermal mass and, of course, less space. If you dunk a full basket of food into the oil, it will drop the temperature significantly, meaning all the benefits of dunking into a very hot, steady temperature oil is lost, and you end up with soggy chips. A commercial fryer has so much more oil in it that you don't lose temperature as easily.

There's also just a space issue. You don't want your food clumping together in the oil, it needs separation, particularly if you're using batter. So you have to do everything you're doing in very small batches to avoid these two problems - and that's fine unless you're trying to actually cook a meal and have it all out at the same time. It must be torturous to try and make your own fish supper in something like that.

So at that point you're left with snack size portions of fries or battered mars bars or whatever. That's not inherently a bad thing but does make it a much less useful kitchen appliance than you might assume. Plus it stinks your house out.
>> No. 436572 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 1:07 am
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>>436571

A mate at work had one and it was at the end of his kitchen counter, next to the little porch bit for the back door where they kept all their coats and what have you.

He always came to work stinking of chips when it was cold enough that he had to bring a coat.
>> No. 436573 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 9:11 am
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My experience with them has been that 3L of oil is just about enough for cooking for one person, as long as you've got the patience to cook fish and chips one after the other.
The thermostats are useless because as >>436571 said the thermal mass of the oil isn't enough to maintain a constant temperature, so you have to leave it at max all the time anyway. (But I've found the thermostat is kind of handy if you want to just leave it warm for a while between cooking different things, and makes the oil last a bit longer.)

Regarding the smell of the oil, filters can help a little bit but just don't buy one unless you've got an extractor fan that vents outside.
Choosing the right oil also helps to keep the smell down a bit. Peanute (groundnut) oil seems to be best, it also doesn't pick up the flavour of whatever you're cooking as much as other oils.
>> No. 436574 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 11:12 am
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>>436573

Peanut oil is excellent, it's what they use at Five Guys and I consider those the best chips you can get at a multinational chain.

The best chips I've ever had were deep fried in duck fat, which is not particularly practical but it's fucking amazing. Three litres of duck fat isn't cheap. Beef tallow is a close second, McDonalds used to use beef fat for their fries, and didn't even bother to tell anyone their chips weren't vegetarian. The 80s were wild.
>> No. 436575 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 11:58 am
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>>436574
I think a lot of vegetarians prefer blissful ignorance. I know plenty who will happily go into a chippy and not ask what the chips are fried in because they're feeling peckish.
>> No. 436576 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 12:27 pm
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>>436575 Is it much different having chips fried in lard, to burning petrol made from dead dinosaurs? Just a matter of scale, really.
>> No. 436577 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 12:49 pm
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>>436576

Dinosaurs, were not, to the best of our knowledge, farmed and bred for their oil.

I suppose someone who is vegetarian on purely ethical grounds should still be able to eat a wild animal that has died of natural causes, but it's probably a little easier and safer to just buy quorn.
>> No. 436580 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 3:02 pm
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>>436574

I've had duck fat roasted potatoes and parsnips and I think they might have been one of the most amazing things I've ever eaten. I'm not sure how cheap duck fat is or isn't but when I've bought shop-frozen canard a confit in France it's basically been one leg in what must have been half a cubic foot of gelatinous tissue that I assumed was fat (it certainly cooked up like it was half fat and half... something else, I mean it never quite rendered to liquid). Sage, because I think you could get quite a bit of fat out of a duck but I've never done it despite ducks being everywhere.

For very shallow stir-fry type frying I tend to use coconut oil because I'm vaguely educated enough to know a tiny bit about smoke points and MCTs and slightly too posh to use sunflower oil on a day to day basis. I've also experimented a fair bit with ghee but I do worry that it's a bit too much like "freebasing butter".

Polite sage for taking this thread from rambling to air fryers to the qualities of different oils. At some point I'll remember what oil it is I buy from Sainsbury's to do real stir fries, it's not peanut oil but it's some kind of nut. I think it might be sesame oil; stir-fries and some very heavy cabbage based salads.
>> No. 436581 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 4:00 pm
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>>436580

>because I think you could get quite a bit of fat out of a duck

You can, the confit you're talking about would traditionally all be done in the duck's own fat. Buying duck fat isn't really expensive, just that it is relative to other frying oils. It's about a tenner a kg so you'd need the best part of thirty quid to fill a home fryer, where you might be paying eight or nine to fill it with peanut oil or significantly less for veg or rapeseed.

>I think it might be sesame oil

It probably is, it's the oil a lot of chinese and other east asian places will use for their super hot wok cooking, as it has a very, very high smoke point. The only downsides are people can be allergic (same with peanut oil obviously) and that it does impart quite a bit of flavour. That's not necessarily a bad thing as sesame is used in a lot of asian dishes anyway, but I don't think I want everything I fry to taste of sesame.

I use rice bran oil for my pan frying at the moment, it's a very neutral oil and has the smoke point of groundnut oil (about 232 Celsius) and is supposed to be quite good for you, but that's not really my focus when I'm frying stuff.

Apparently avocado oil has a very high smoke point of 280c, though I've never tried or even seen it for sale.
>> No. 436582 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 4:33 pm
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>>436581
I found a bottle of avocado oil in TK maxx a few years back and I've been using it for frying ever since.
It's my favourite for shallow frying, virtually impossible to make it smoke much, and a mild flavour that can go with anything.
>> No. 436584 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 9:33 pm
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I feel a bit ashamed to admit this but I enjoy watching Family Guy before bed. There's a fair amount of bad episodes these days but it works as something you can mentally idle to where everything ends how it starts with little in the way of emotional turbulence.

Part of the enjoyment is probably just because I used to watch it late at night when I was younger and in that sense it has been a permanent presence in my life. The Simpsons doesn't work as well because the new episodes are just unwatchable whereas the older ones you can only do once a year at most.

>>436582
>I found a bottle of avocado oil in TK maxx

Wait, I thought TK Maxx was a bit of a chavy place? I was completely unprepared to read this.
>> No. 436585 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 9:50 pm
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>>436584
I used to watch it all the time when it was on BBC Three. It's quite shit but they're familiar enough that I can completely switch off before bed.
>> No. 436586 Anonymous
2nd May 2020
Saturday 11:04 pm
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>>436584

>I feel a bit ashamed to admit this but I enjoy watching Family Guy before bed.

I also find that quite enjoyable.
>> No. 436590 Anonymous
3rd May 2020
Sunday 7:11 am
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>>436584
I like Family Guy too - it's one of the few shows like that which will actually make me laugh.

Worried I fancy Lois Griffin though.
>> No. 436596 Anonymous
3rd May 2020
Sunday 1:36 pm
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>>436590

>Worried I fancy Lois Griffin though.

I have a thing for redheads either way. I've shagged and/or snogged a few of them, and ever since that, I've noticed that I can't keep my eyes off a pretty redhead walking down the street. Definitely not something I used to do as a younglad before I first became involved with a redhead.

Wouldn't want to have ginger kids though eventually, so starting a family with a redhead would be where I'd draw the line.
>> No. 436598 Anonymous
3rd May 2020
Sunday 6:22 pm
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>>436584
Used to watch it before bed on BBC three as an A-level lad and it elicited similar feelings.

Weirdly I can't stand it now though. I have no idea why, it's not like it stopped being funny to me i actively dislike it.
>> No. 436599 Anonymous
3rd May 2020
Sunday 7:45 pm
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>>436585

I think I first got into Family Guy and later American Dad when I lived in Amsterdam and the only channel that was in English was Comedy Central. It used to show a bunch of "adult" cartoons from about 8pm through to about midnight when it would switch over to Takishi's castle dubbed over in English with Dutch subtitles, which was always fun to watch blasted out of your box at 2am.

I think those cartoons being a sort of warm memory from that time lodged them into the "this is comfortable crap I can watch to zone out" part of my brain and they've never been dislodged from there. Weird how that works, really.
>> No. 436606 Anonymous
3rd May 2020
Sunday 11:03 pm
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>>436598

My evening ritual is now to pop my nightly dose of mirtazapine, and then watch the one or two hours of Family Guy and American Dad that ITV2 usually has on offer. Mirtazapine tends to take an hour or two to fully kick in so that I get really sleepy, so Family Guy and American Dad (sometimes they also have the Cleveland Show) are the perfect kind of light entertainment to help you drift off.
>> No. 436620 Anonymous
4th May 2020
Monday 1:52 pm
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Eat, Sleep, Wake (Nothing but you) by Bombay Bicycle Club is an absolute banger of a song and makes me know that when I've found the right person I'll know because I'll feel exactly how this song describes and it will invoke the same emotion the song does in me.

What's more interesting is that although the lyrics are ostensibly about a love interest the music video makes it clear it's actually about the lead singer missing the rest of the band when they went on hiatus. This song is the big hit off their album after getting back together.

Not had a song evoke such emotion since being a teenlad.
>> No. 436622 Anonymous
4th May 2020
Monday 2:28 pm
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Just put my tomato plants outside. They're now a healthy 15 inches tall or thereabouts, and they look like they should yield a decent number of tomatoes later in the season.

My chili plants, at least the ones grown from shop-bought seeds, are doing well and they have started flowering, and some of the flowers are actually now starting to develop fruit. They will produce the familiar larger chili peppers that you can buy in every supermarket.

The Etna Piccante chili plants are going to take a little longer though, as they do each year. They are Tabasco-type peppers that grow upright in bunches, and the plants look markedly different, from the foliage to their general appearance. Etna Piccante produces strikingly high yields of quite spicy peppers no larger than about two inches each, so they're perfect for spicing up your family meals or to be ground into a powder after they have been dried.

If you're a first-time grower, I would almost say go for Etna Piccante, because they are hardy plants that produce good results even if you're a novice to chili growing or haven't got the greenest of thumbs. The only important thing is that you need to germinate them about right after Christmas, because they are generally a late variety.
>> No. 436623 Anonymous
4th May 2020
Monday 3:35 pm
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>>436622
I've just finished planting all of the first batch of everything out too. Hard to say how well they'll do; most aren't the 15 inches you're talking about but some are at least.
>> No. 436624 Anonymous
4th May 2020
Monday 4:03 pm
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>>436623

I had the tomato plants in a warm and sunny place inside right next to a window for the last few weeks, and apparently they really liked it there. I also gave them just a dash of liquid fertiliser. Tomatoes, as well as other nightshades like chili pepper, generally have a high nutrient drain, so you always have to keep an eye on a good fertiliser supply in the soil.
>> No. 436625 Anonymous
4th May 2020
Monday 6:13 pm
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Bad persistent cough, sore chest, headache.
Think I've got it lads.
>> No. 436629 Anonymous
4th May 2020
Monday 9:11 pm
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>>436624
They were really thriving in the cold frame but I've moved them out to give the chillies more room to grow. I think they'll cope in the out though, that corner's a heat trap.
>> No. 436632 Anonymous
4th May 2020
Monday 9:45 pm
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>>436625
Try not to die lad.
>> No. 436634 Anonymous
4th May 2020
Monday 10:29 pm
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>>436629

From my experience, as long as chilies have plenty of water and enough fertiliser, it can't get too warm or sunny for them. Chilies originated in tropical Central America, so the closer the conditions are to their original habitat, the more they will thrive. Heat traps and the Inupiatest spot around your garden are perfect. Especially when your plants are up against a brick wall that will give off additional heat.
>> No. 436635 Anonymous
4th May 2020
Monday 10:31 pm
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>>436634

>Inupiatest

wth is inupiat, and why is it a word filter for the superlative of "sunny"?
>> No. 436636 Anonymous
4th May 2020
Monday 10:56 pm
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>>436635
Shamanistic peoples, lad.
>> No. 436637 Anonymous
5th May 2020
Tuesday 1:20 am
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>>436635

Because drunkmod can't figure out the regex to make wordfilters that only substitute whole words.
>> No. 436638 Anonymous
5th May 2020
Tuesday 1:29 am
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>>436637

Do I tick the box that says "include regular expressions" or not, genius?
>> No. 436644 Anonymous
5th May 2020
Tuesday 11:53 am
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>>436638

Regular expressions aren't generally used to filter out text substrings. They come in handy to check if an input text conforms to certain rules, e.g. does an e-mail address have the correct format, or are there any characters in your text that you don't want to allow. Implementing word filters via regular expressions would get incredibly clunky if you specify as many words to filter as we have here on .gs; a better way to do this is to just check your text against a two-dimensional array of words that you've retrieved from your flatfile or database. You then go through a loop one array pair at a time and check if the word occurs in the text, and then substitute it for the other word.

So essentially, I doubt that ticking regular expressions has any kind of noticeable impact on the text you see displayed here. It's probably just an option to filter out illegal or unwanted characters.
>> No. 436645 Anonymous
5th May 2020
Tuesday 12:04 pm
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>>436637>>436638
No matter how good, or large the technical team, only one person on it will truly understand regular expressions. It's like a rule.
>> No. 436647 Anonymous
5th May 2020
Tuesday 12:20 pm
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>>436645

You're right. I've got about 20 years of programming experience, both as a hobby and as a former side job coding web site back ends, and regular expressions still do my head in, and I usually just copy and paste code from an online source and hope that it does about 90 percent of what I need it for.
>> No. 436649 Anonymous
5th May 2020
Tuesday 2:42 pm
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>>436647
Twenty years full time here and I still find myself using regex cheat-sheets and 5-10 minutes of trial and error to get things right.

>>436644
I amiably disagree. Regular expressions are great for replacing text and especially so when you want to do things like match whitespace at the beginning/end of your matches (so you don't end up with a website that implements word-filters on fragments of words, for example). I mean, sed has only been around since about 1974.
>> No. 436651 Anonymous
5th May 2020
Tuesday 3:11 pm
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>>436649

Regexes are a) really hard to read, b) massively error-prone and c) slow as shit most of the time. They're fine for shell script lashups, they're sometimes the only reasonable option, but I avoid them if at all possible because they have a nasty habit of making me look like a complete twat.
>> No. 436652 Anonymous
5th May 2020
Tuesday 3:16 pm
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>>436649

Maybe it's because I never really got my head around regex, but when I was coding miniature web back ends (i.e. for web sites that were really too small to throw a content management system at them, or where the person commissioning a back end had ideas and requests that were just easier to do with a few lines of your own code instead of spending hours tweaking Joomla), I just threw a bunch of filter words into a table in a MySQL database, and had php make an array from a MySQL query and then cross check a text string, one array pair at a time. And developers I was talking to at the time said that that was a perfectly feasible way to do that. One project I did was a support site for a local politician's campaign, where you could enter yourself as a supporter with a small blurb of why you supported the election campaign, which would then get posted on the web site. To make life easier for the campaign workers moderating the entries, I compiled a list of around 100 of the most common spelling mistakes in the English language, anything from "their" for "they're" to "acheive" for "achieve".

Maybe it's different when you're not coding for a LAMP web server environment. I would imagine that a lot of software application development works better without retrieving stuff from a database for that purpose. If you code in C for a desktop environment, it's probably just easier to put your word filters right inside your executable code.
>> No. 436653 Anonymous
5th May 2020
Tuesday 3:34 pm
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>>436652
> anything from "their" for "they're"

If you can't figure out regex I'd love to see your grammar engine that parsed whether their, there, or they're was appropriate for any given sentence fragment.
>> No. 436654 Anonymous
5th May 2020
Tuesday 3:56 pm
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>>436653

Maybe that particular one wasn't on my spell checking list after all, I can't remember, it was over 10 years ago. I did include many classic misspellings that would be wrong regardless of grammar and sentence structure.
>> No. 436664 Anonymous
6th May 2020
Wednesday 2:48 am
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>>436652
You're literally describing how the wordfilters code works - basically the same, which is also its weakness. It's one of the easiest ways to break the site; I go through (small) periods where I think of removing/disabling the feature.
>> No. 436665 Anonymous
6th May 2020
Wednesday 3:06 am
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>>436664

I always assumed that one of the mods watched the TNG episode Darmok while on acid and decided to create a long-term sociolinguistic experiment.
>> No. 436666 Anonymous
6th May 2020
Wednesday 4:35 am
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>>436664

Well at least we learned how to break it so bad that nobody can post, that'd have been useful back when we got raided by russians more often.
>> No. 436674 Anonymous
6th May 2020
Wednesday 10:03 am
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One of my friends moved to Newcastle 6/7 years ago. She now speaks with a thick geordie accent. Is that normal?

I don't live in our hometown either; my accent has softened a bit and I use some of the local vernacular but it certainly hasn't morphed completely into a new dialect.
>> No. 436676 Anonymous
6th May 2020
Wednesday 10:17 am
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>>436674

I have a friend who has lived near Romford for a few years now. He denies it, but I think there are definitely some localisms creeping into the way he talks.
>> No. 436702 Anonymous
6th May 2020
Wednesday 4:16 pm
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>>436674

I definitely got a bit of Yorkshire in my accent when I moved to Leeds for a similar amount of time - I was already a geordie with a relatively mild accent so it was fairly noticeable, but basically means I have an unplaceable accent now rather than a straight up west yorks one.

My dad has lived in Ireland for about twenty years and his accent is fully Dublin. I feel like he did that deliberately, though.
>> No. 436807 Anonymous
10th May 2020
Sunday 12:48 am
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>>436702

>My dad has lived in Ireland for about twenty years and his accent is fully Dublin. I feel like he did that deliberately, though.
>> No. 436842 Anonymous
10th May 2020
Sunday 8:45 pm
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My arsehole brother is going to kick up a fuss about being abandoned by his family if I don't go to visit him tomorrow. Just as the fine for quarantine transgression has gone up.
Thing is, he never comes to visit me despite having access to private transport, while I dont.
Dickhead.
I do miss him though, and really want to see my nephew. Is it worth walking 13 miles? I could do with the exercise.
>> No. 436855 Anonymous
10th May 2020
Sunday 10:49 pm
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>>436842
If the cunt is so self-absorbed that he is going whinge about no-one coming to see him when it is literally illegal to do so, then he doesn't deserve it.
>> No. 436880 Anonymous
12th May 2020
Tuesday 8:07 pm
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>>436855
He actually came to me in the end after i changed my mind and explained how it's safer for him to drive and less likely to result in infection/fine.
It's really nice to see him again, just like old times walking about and listening to music over a cuppa. Felt great and 'back to usual', but now he's gone it's just more of this 'don't know what to do with myself' shit. Oh well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pS_OOvPn54I
>> No. 437031 Anonymous
16th May 2020
Saturday 10:38 pm
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I got one of those services that sends you the exact ingredients you need for a handful of meals and the instructions and you can make your own healthy meal.

I wanted to learn how to cook different things so this was a great start. What I was not expecting was the great quality of the ingredients and how fucking tasty my food come out. It literally tasted better than takeaway and your average restaurant quality. I am astounded there are people out there cooking food this tasty every night compared to what I've been eating for years.

Worth every penny.
>> No. 437037 Anonymous
16th May 2020
Saturday 11:50 pm
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>>437031
Is dividing the weights mentioned in recipes really so hard that you have to pay a company to do it for you?
>> No. 437040 Anonymous
17th May 2020
Sunday 3:24 am
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>>437037

It probably sounds daft to you, but for people who never cook, who don't have an established pantry and the knowledge of what to do with store cupboard ingredients, it makes a certain amount of sense to pay £6 for two chicken breasts, 8g of paprika, 100ml of cream, etc etc than paying £10 for the more economically sized packages of the same thing, and ending up with half a litre of cream you have no fucking idea how to use up, because you just started cooking.

These services are also aimed at people who eat out or get takeaway almost every night - I have friends, particularly in London, whose cupboards are almost entirely empty and whose fridges have beer and maybe a jar of pesto and some fruit in them, because it's simply not part of their routine to eat at home. Once such friend was just as surprised as >>437031 that when you cook food at home, it can turn out really nice.

These services are certainly not particularly economical, but if it gets more people to cook for themselves, I'm all for it. It's easy for home cooks* to sneer at it, as we can just wander through a supermarket and get what we need or throw something together from our established core ingredients, but if you've made it to adult life without really doing that, even just following a recipe can seem out of reach, so having everything laid out for you as mise on place from the start is the leg up most people in that situation need. I would just hope that most people who use these services will figure out within a month or two that they can just go to the shop and get this shit themselves.

*the very fact the phrase 'home cook' is in the lexicon, as if feeding yourself is something that only certain people do, is ridiculous to me anyway.
>> No. 437041 Anonymous
17th May 2020
Sunday 6:30 am
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>>437037
No need to snipe anon. It's not that it's hard and >>437040 gave a great explanation but it's also helpful when you're trying new things to have little aspects taken care of without having to worry about measuring everything as well.

I can cook lots of basic meals, spag bol, fajitas, shepherd's pie and similar but cooking some delicious Chinese food and having the ketjip manis measured out perfectly for me was helpful, considering I'd never think to add it in.

Next time I can buy my own ingredients and just make it myself, but now I have a new meal under my belt and it tasted great.

It's been pretty cheap too, £2.50 per serving with the introductory offer which by any stretch is cheaper than than just one takeaway and I'm learning how to cook and picking up different tips. Pretty happy with it all in all, a nice way to go from 'here's some basic meals' cooking to 'here's some food you will actually really really like.'
>> No. 437057 Anonymous
17th May 2020
Sunday 12:53 pm
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Beautiful song, this.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9694K85Xc8
>> No. 437096 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 12:30 pm
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Is this what otherlad was on about, the £3 trial box?

https://www.simplycook.com/
>> No. 437097 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 1:05 pm
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>>437096
It was Hello Fresh but I tried to avoid name dropping after that lad got really upset when somebody mentioned fruit and veg that time.
>> No. 437109 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 2:33 pm
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>>437097

Simplycook has much more favourable reviews on trustpilot at the moment. Long turn around for delivery (ten days from starting the trial) but Hellofresh are apparently missing items and delivering things that are not so fresh.
May try the free trial later when it picks up again.
>> No. 437110 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 2:34 pm
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Not free, just the trial. I can cook but it's nice to have someone else deal with planning what to make and what ingredients to buy.
>> No. 437114 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 3:42 pm
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>>437110
That's one of the things I enjoyed about recently picking up loads of produce via the Real Junk Food project. It's more fun to be given a bunch of ingredients and decide what you're going to make with them than having to think what you're going to cook and then buying in the ingredients for it. A bit like a shitty version of Ready, Steady, Cook.

That said, I don't think I'll attempt making sweet potato gnocchi again.
>> No. 437118 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 5:38 pm
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>>437109
I too saw this, but the ingredients have been fine for me and the quality of the meat is surprisingly good. Maybe I've just been lucky.

>>437110
Exactly,the other lad hit the nail on the head. Me having Chinese 5 spice lingering in my cupboard for years at 4 pound a pop for one container is much less sensible than getting the exact portion and jsut chucking it in.
>> No. 437120 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 5:52 pm
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I started this thread about SimplyCook years ago. I still think they are a rip off and I never restarted my subscription. I did enjoy the curries linked to in the final post though. Beany feast indeed.

I've since tried Gousto and HelloFresh - Gousto was alright, HelloFresh had some disasterous recipes.

>>/nom/10343
>> No. 437121 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 6:43 pm
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I KEEP GETTING ADVERTS FOR HELLO FRESH NOW. PACK IT IN, LADS.
>> No. 437122 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 6:49 pm
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That reminds me.

I've been meaning to tell the resident Cheflads/Italianlads: I made a carbonara the other night. Bit of salt, pepper and garlic, thick cut bacon, loads of mushrooms, a single egg yolk and a fuckload of grated mature cheddar. And then to finish off, half a pot of double cream.

I had it with pasta shells. How do you like that you cunts.
>> No. 437125 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 7:05 pm
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>>437122


>> No. 437126 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 7:22 pm
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>>437122
God tier: Rigatoni > farfalle > cavatappi.
Good tier: Fusilli > macaroni.
Acceptable tier: Conchiglie
What the fuck are you even doing tier: Penne > orzo.
>> No. 437128 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 7:27 pm
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>>437122

It was going so well until the cream. You basically wasted an egg by putting both in.

Ironically the shells will have been a better choice for your dairy based soup than spag or tag would have been.
>> No. 437130 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 7:39 pm
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>>437126
The fuck is wrong with Penne? It's a perfect design for absorbing flavours which is what you want from a starch.
Farfalle is for children. You basically have the Turkey Dinosaurs of pasta (but not absolutely delicious).
>> No. 437131 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 7:40 pm
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>>437128
>the shells will have been a better choice for your dairy based soup

Shells is the best pasta to have with cream of tomato soup.
>> No. 437132 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 7:54 pm
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>>437128

The egg yolk cooks and thickens the cream, fuck, do they even teach you daftie bumders how to cook at chef school these days or is it all just crack and waitresses?
>> No. 437133 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 8:00 pm
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>>437130
The best pasta dish is farfalle with chicken and pine nuts in a sauce made of cream, pesto and parmesan.

Penne is for school kids and the type of mouth breather who uses ketchup as a pasta sauce.
>> No. 437134 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 8:17 pm
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>>437133

Well you better be uing your own herbs to make that pesto lad, because jarred stuff is shite. And don't think you can get away with ready-made parmesan either lad, I'll be able to taste the difference. If it's not been aged in your own cellar for two years what's even the point, you might as well just have fucking Heinz Ravioli.
>> No. 437135 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 8:54 pm
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>>437125
We really are just Reddit reposts at this point.

https://www.reddit.com/r/videos/comments/gm1m12/its_been_ten_years_since_the_if_my_grandmother/
>> No. 437136 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 9:02 pm
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>>437132

It's mostly speed, we can't afford crack.

>The egg yolk cooks and thickens the cream

Cream cooks and thickens just fine on its own, all your yolk is doing is adding richness that almost certainly isn't needed if you're using double cream.

I also just realised you put cheddar in it, fucks sake. I'm sure what you made was quite nice, but it was more like a bacon and cheddar alfredo than a carbonara.

Maybe we do need Hello Fresh as a sponsor.
>> No. 437138 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 9:47 pm
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>>437136

It's alright mate, I was only posting about it because I enjoy how triggered your lot get about the minor differences between dishes that are basically the same thing to your average pleb.

I can actually cook pretty competently, it's just guided more by the principles of stoned shopping trips than classical technique.
>> No. 437139 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 9:49 pm
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>>437138

It just seems weird that so many people are intent on making worse versions of stuff and then claiming they're better or the same.
>> No. 437140 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 11:23 pm
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>>437139

Have you heard of cryptocurrency?
>> No. 437141 Anonymous
18th May 2020
Monday 11:48 pm
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>>437140

At least I can buy drugs with that.
>> No. 437143 Anonymous
19th May 2020
Tuesday 1:19 am
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>>437141

And pay off the makers of ransomware.
>> No. 437144 Anonymous
19th May 2020
Tuesday 6:54 am
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>>437143

That reminds me, I must pay off that chap that's filmed me wanking (and filmed what I'm wanking over) before he sends it to all my personal contacts.
>> No. 437311 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 1:17 pm
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If I was stood at the North Pole could I even point east and west or would every direction be south?
>> No. 437312 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 1:30 pm
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>>437311
Every direction would be South.
>> No. 437323 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 4:53 pm
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Except up.
>> No. 437326 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 5:30 pm
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As I get older I just find in your face, overly politicised people so, so tiring.
>> No. 437327 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 6:18 pm
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>>437326
I've thought that from a young age. I mean, I care about others wellbeing and society at large, but being in charge politically? Why are they so arrogant that they have all the right ideas?
>> No. 437330 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 6:43 pm
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>>437327
I really don't know. I have a lot of respect for people that acknowledge they don't have all the answers and that their side, their argument, their front line politicians/people have flaws and get things wrong.

Everybody seems so divided. It gets really boring for example when people pile in on Trump for an out of context quote. He's got lots to criticise, but when they take something out of context to attack him it puts me off and then in my mind they're no better than him, do you get what I mean?
>> No. 437332 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 6:59 pm
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>>437330

I get what you mean. It often seems to me that people need to step back and take a good devil's advocate look at their views, and then things would be a bit more rational and reasonable. But I also feel like that's partly because I'm an emotionally distant sperg and fail to appreciate how much stock other people put in feelings.

I feel that often these people are also slightly blind to the most glaring weaknesses in their own rhetoric, and that becomes tiresome. The current flavour of the week is dolphin rape, for example, so obviously there's been lots of "omg you guys dolphin rape is so bad! why can't you see how bad the dolphin rape is?" going about. Which, obviously, it is, I would never deny that. Of course it is.

But the blindingly obvious thing these people are missing is that their opponents are racists. Of course they don't understand why you think dolphin rape is bad. They literally don't care one bit about that. You might as well be talking about potato wedges. You need to change your tact because you're absolutely, 100% wasting your time with that approach; and I really don't understand why that comes as a surprise.

I don't think I've articulated that very well but it's been banging about in my head for a while. I feel like there's a lot of trying to hammer square pegs through round holes in today's politics. That or it's just because so much of it is entirely performative.
>> No. 437334 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 7:18 pm
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>>437332
>But the blindingly obvious thing these people are missing is that their opponents are racists. Of course they don't understand why you think dolphin rape is bad.

So you're saying that people constantly questioning dolphin rape and holding racists to account are ineffective because they won't change anyone's viewpoint?

I don't mean to insult your intelligence, but do you think there is less dolphin rape, or fewer racists, today than there were seventy or a hundred and fifty years ago? If so, what reason do you give for that being the case?
>> No. 437335 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 7:23 pm
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>>437334

The integration of immigrant communities, face to face interaction that enabled people to see that brown folk aren't so different after all, that sort of thing.

I'm not saying you've deliberately understood me, but I did make the disclaimer I probably haven't articulated the argument all too well. I just don't think telling people (especially on the internet) that their subjective viewpoint is wrong has ever really got anyone anywhere.
>> No. 437340 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 8:15 pm
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>>437332
A lot of people in America like watching Fox News, not because they think it's accurate but because the sentiment agrees with their prejudices and they prefer to have that reinforced. People care more about feeling right than accuracy and Fox better than anyone else know their audience and how to pander to them.

On the racist front I'd say the issue is that these people don't think they're being racist. It's the "legitimate concerns." If people call them racist then it's easy to rationalise this as not being a credible claim because it's come from some easily triggered Rotherham enabling hand-wringing do-gooder lefty snowflake who hates our country and cries dolphin rape at everyone and everything, to the point the word racist has been watered down and almost lost all meaning.
>> No. 437343 Anonymous
1st June 2020
Monday 10:11 pm
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>>437332>>437334>>437335
Third chap here.

My own viewpoint on this is that as a society we've put a great deal of time and energy into teaching people how to be politically correct "you can't use that word it's racist", but far too little effort into solving the underlying issues such as segregation and inequality. We've essentially taught entire generations of people how to hide their prejudices from other people, rather than proving that some of their prejudices are incorrect and working to lessen any truths underlying other negative prejudices.


I was going to make an anecdote about how you could find plenty of posh white hipster students wearing #BLM tshirts, who would still cross over to the other side of the road if they saw a group of black guys walking towards them, but then I remembered that they would anyway because of social distancing
>> No. 437351 Anonymous
2nd June 2020
Tuesday 12:32 pm
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>> No. 437354 Anonymous
2nd June 2020
Tuesday 2:35 pm
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>>437343
Aye, society's better at teaching people what to think than how to think.
>> No. 438588 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 5:34 pm
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I've been feeling self concious of late;

Out with my brother today we walked past a public tent hosted by a community group I've been interested in joining, but I felt too embarassed to approach them because I'm getting pretty fat and wearing my 'hippy' gear of sandals, rolled up loose corduroy trousers and a grey slightly stained tshirt. I feel scruffy and slobbish wearing this - like the vulnerable feeling of wearing no underwear inside your trousers - but I've no other clothes for this weather plus I like the simplicity of my attire. I've been refered to as a slob before while wearing similar clothing and walking barefoot so I guess I'm still holding the shame of that in my mind. It doesn't help that the trousers are held together by a string because they're too narrow for my 'lockdown belly' (as people have been calling it).

Later on our walk my brother bumped into a friend whom I recognised; this aquaintence looked over me once and said 'hello, how are you' then proceeded to talk primarily to my brother. This isn't unusual because I lack social skills and the aquaintence realises this on some level, but later one of his friends joined the chat and was introduced to my brother and not me - again it makes sense because we've little in common but it left me feeling poor.

I just feel embarrassed, ashamed, and all those times i'd refered to myself as retarded are starting to come back up again.

I feel as though a change of attire, haircut and maybe a beard trim would improve my self esteem but (yes, there's always a but) the change feels sudden and I feel embarrassed about being seen trying. You might say no one will recognise me but this is a small town and I recognise a number of people from the highstreet alone.
I'd like to begin checking the local charity shops for clothes again but the current mask bullshit and shop capacity problems feel inhibitive (anything but 'fruit of the loom heavy grey tshirt multipack' is similarly confusing to buy online).

I don't know, I'm just feeling self concious and ashamed at the moment. Everything is so loose and hanging out.
>> No. 438589 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 5:58 pm
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>>438588
>I feel as though a change of attire, haircut and maybe a beard trim would improve my self esteem but (yes, there's always a but) the change feels sudden
So don't do it all at once?
>> No. 438590 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 6:21 pm
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>>438588>>438589

The haircut and beard trim thing is a piece of piss. I got a set of hair clippers from Tesco for £30. It was an absolute impulse buy, but I'm glad I did it; I made my head 3 stone lighter in just as many minutes. I even carried on and did my pits 'n' balls.
>> No. 438591 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 7:09 pm
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Today I've been bramble picking. It's quite early in the season so most of them weren't ripe yet, but there was more than enough to come away with a sizeable haul. I'll be making jam with them later, possibly bramble scones too.

What boiled my piss was the amount of litter that I saw. If you go to the woods and litter you're a prize cunt.

>>438588
>the change feels sudden and I feel embarrassed about being seen trying

I've known a fair few people paralysed by fear of what other people will think about them. The reality is that most people won't give a shit. If they do say something then if you're improving your image then it's likely to be a positive comment. If not then so what?
>> No. 438592 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 7:15 pm
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>>438588>>438591
>If they do say something then if you're improving your image then it's likely to be a positive comment.

BrambleLad is correct in my case; people said I looked younger / better (but then, my head looked like a bird's nest before). Unless your skull is a strange shape, you should absolutely do it.
>> No. 438595 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 8:53 pm
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>>438591
I've a bumper crop in my garden too - jam is the obvious thing, but I was trying to think of what else I could do with them. I've tried putting them in an apple crumble, but it just makes it all go pink/taste a bit tart.
>> No. 438596 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 9:11 pm
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>>438595
Turnovers.
>> No. 438597 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 9:58 pm
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>>438595

I made them into wine. Fermented on the pulp for five days, separated, then "aged" (still fermenting) for three more days with a small amount of chipotle, some raw and some roasted French oak chips.

Can't taste the oak but it's a nice tipple.
>> No. 438598 Anonymous
15th August 2020
Saturday 10:24 pm
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>>438596
Fucking hell, can't we get spoilers for that kind of post. It's indecent. Some of us are trying not to rock up at the 24 hour supermarket at a quarter to midnight and buy 3000 calouries of slightly past it pastries for 25 pence.
>> No. 438608 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 12:44 am
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>>438597

That's a very short time for a wine. Fermentation normally takes weeks, as does self clearing.

Also, oak cips don't age your wine, they just make it taste of oak chips. The aging process of keeping wine in oak barrels isn't from the wood as such, it's from the fact that wooden barrels aren't completely airtight. The admittedly tiny amounts of oxygen that then constantly get through to a wine are what age it and make it taste smooth and rounded over time. You cannot speed up that aging process in a meaningful way, it needs to happen slowly. Exposing wine to too much oxygen too quickly will almost invariably make it go bad in a short amount of time.
>> No. 438609 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 12:56 am
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Watching a re-run of World War Z on Channel 4 and chuckling about this scene - I watched it being filmed against a mahoosive greenscreen on a disused army parade ground in Aldershot.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecattell/6093126044
>> No. 438610 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 1:03 am
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>>438609

I was quite disappointed by the movie as such. Just not a very good sci fi movie, nor a good zombie film. Even the humble 28 Days Later was ten times better, and probably only had one tenth of the budget.
>> No. 438611 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 1:05 am
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>>438610
Agreed - Twelve Monkeys is the only similar kind of film I like Brad Pitt in.
>> No. 438623 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 12:31 pm
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>>438597
Oak and blackberries sound wonderful.
>> No. 438625 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 12:47 pm
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>>438608
Large scale fermentation might but I'm just doing this in a bucket and it is definitely capable of producing up to 20% in a few days if you want it to.

>ageing process
Using oak chips is a fairly common thing to do. I don't have oak barrels, just these buckets. It's fine. Other than there being a bit too much chipotle and not as much oak flavour as I'd like, that batch was just as good as off-the-shelf wines.
>> No. 438627 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 5:08 pm
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>>438625

>Large scale fermentation might but I'm just doing this in a bucket and it is definitely capable of producing up to 20% in a few days if you want it to.

Yes, some yeasts can produce that much alcohol in a week. But that's all you get, a lot of alcohol in your wine. But actual flavour takes months to develop. Also, many kinds of fruit contain tannins, which make it a good idea to let your wine mature for quite a while before drinking, because that way it becomes soft and loses its harshness. And there are a lot of other complex chemical reactions that go on in wine over months which impact taste and flavour. There is no way you can get all that from a wine that was still fermenting just a week ago. It's really not a question of large-scale fermentation or not. I've made batches of fruit wine of ten litres or less but let it go through a months-long process just the same. And you will find that most people who blog or post about their winemaking online do the same.


>Using oak chips is a fairly common thing to do

Yes, I know it's common, but again, oak chips don't age your wine, they make it taste of oak chips. Which is also true for wine that was aged in an actual barrel, but the oak flavour is just a byproduct. The real reason, once again, why barrel-aged wine is desirable is that the constant exposure to tiny amounts of oxygen breaks down tannins and gives the wine a smoother, more profound taste. And if it's kept in an oak barrel long enough, you will have a few percent of water evaporation, which can also concentrate flavour.

If you ever get the chance to visit a vineyard, ask for a glass of their best barrel aged wine. Not the supermarket stuff you can often buy in Britain that was treated with oak chips. The difference will be massively noticeable.
>> No. 438632 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 7:12 pm
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>>438627
I'm not going to go through a many-months long process to create a wine that there's a good chance will end up being undrinkably sour when I can do just under two weeks and get something I enjoy.
>> No. 438635 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 7:58 pm
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>>438632

If it's undrinkably sour after many months, then it was undrinkably sour when it first fermented. Unless your wine suffers an acetobacter infection, your acid content will more or less remain constant. With the exception of grape wine, which tends to precipitate tartaric acid as solid salt crystals at the bottom of the vessel and thus actually loses acidity.

If acidity is a problem with your wines, then get an acid titration kit:

https://www.homebrewcentre.co.uk/acid-test-kit

A rule of thumb for winemaking is that fruit wine should have around 7 g/l acid content. A bit less perhaps in wine from tannin rich fruit like pear, quince, or grapes used for red wine.


Within reason, the more time that you leave your wine to mature, the better the taste will be. Almost without exception. I've got cherry wine in the basement from 2018 that still tasted just a bit "rough" from the tannins when I botttled it about six months after the initial fermentation, and I had a bit of it the other weekend, it now tastes very smooth and balmy.

What you get after two weeks is fruit flavoured ethanol, nothing more. You may not know any different, but just to attempt to prove me wrong, why not leave your next batch of wine to mature in the basment for six months. And then see if there's really no difference.
>> No. 438640 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 8:36 pm
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>>438635
I haven't got a basement, not storing things for six months is also a space issue.
>> No. 438644 Anonymous
16th August 2020
Sunday 10:23 pm
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Yesterday I had a good laugh at a bouncer's expense after I overheard his boss call him Armani. I'd never met someone named after a clothing brand before and it was nice to see some of the smugness disappear from his face.
>> No. 438678 Anonymous
19th August 2020
Wednesday 4:45 pm
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I've decided that I'm going to get my dad a Chuckle Brothers DVD as a bit of a joke present. Which one do I go for:

- Spooky Goings On.
- Pirates of the River Rother.
- Indiana Chuckles and the Kingdom of the Mythical Sulk.
- A Christmas Chuckle.

They're all recordings of their stage shows.
>> No. 438679 Anonymous
19th August 2020
Wednesday 4:57 pm
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>>438678
Spooky Goings On. All Saints' Eve is coming up anyway.
>> No. 438686 Anonymous
20th August 2020
Thursday 12:18 am
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>>438678
Spooky Goings on is funny as fuck even at 35.
>> No. 438687 Anonymous
20th August 2020
Thursday 1:18 am
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>>438686
Seems like a bunch of childish nonsense to me
to you!
>> No. 438700 Anonymous
22nd August 2020
Saturday 3:51 pm
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One sachet of yeast doesn't make enough pizza, but two sachets of yeast would make too much pizza.
>> No. 438701 Anonymous
22nd August 2020
Saturday 4:07 pm
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>>438700
Buy a little tub. I picked up a little tub of Allison's bread yeast for £1 iirc. Then you can spoon it out as you need.
>> No. 438769 Anonymous
2nd September 2020
Wednesday 6:19 pm
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I'd like to make accounts with the websites I enjoy but they all require associated email addresses - utilities such as 10 minute mail don't seem to work, they must be blacklisted by modern account software.
My main concern is privacy and that.

Can you offer solutions?
General searching tips like "browse beyond the second page" are good too.

Would it be worth making a /g/ general comments and questions thread? I'd feel like a sausage making a thread for this.
>> No. 438770 Anonymous
2nd September 2020
Wednesday 6:51 pm
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>>438769
There are plenty of sites providing disposable or anonymous email addresses. You just need to cycle through them until you find one that the particular site you're using hasn't blacklisted. Lots of sites just have manual lists that they update from time to time.

This isn't a recommendation, and other options are available, but I've used Sneakemail for around a decade and there are only a few places I've had to use something else.
>> No. 438771 Anonymous
2nd September 2020
Wednesday 8:59 pm
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September rolls around and I find myself thinking things like "I must remember to see if they have any Prestone Extreme Performance Screen Wash next time I'm down the shop, it was Auto-Express' best buy last year and melts ice at up to -18°C." I've come a long way from thinking "I must remember to phone up Greeny and see if he's got weight to shift".

I think the isolation of this past year is starting to crack me. I've still got plenty of social interaction going on technically, but I'm starting to feel incredibly sheltered. Too much solitary reading and absorbing things. Not enough expressing and feedback. I am starting to understand how weird trainspotting anorak types end up the way they do, it's happening to me.

We watched The Lighthouse last night. Can't say I'd recommend it, but it's definitely worth a watch, if you know what I mean.
>> No. 438772 Anonymous
2nd September 2020
Wednesday 9:37 pm
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>>438771
>Prestone Extreme Performance Screen Wash

I literally noticed this evening that Tesco have it on special - in the doorway by the entrance/exit, where they have all the other weird/big outdoor stuff.
>> No. 438773 Anonymous
2nd September 2020
Wednesday 9:56 pm
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I've got into a new routine and the weeks are flying past.
While it's nice, I fear it will go on too long and before I know it it'll be next year and I'll feel like I've wasted a shitload of time.

I want this virus shite to be over already, I want normality.
>> No. 438780 Anonymous
4th September 2020
Friday 12:22 pm
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I was excited to sow all my seeds in the propagator and now I've done it I feel at a bit of a loose end. Got a nice baby agave in the post too. Just think; if I keep it alive for only thirty years I'll be able to harvest it and make my own mezcal!
>> No. 438781 Anonymous
4th September 2020
Friday 12:40 pm
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>>438772

I was going to thank you for the tip, but they didn't have any in mine, so now I'm going to spend an entire winter running on sub par Tesco own brand screen wash. Not even Halfrauds has it. I think people must have been panic buying it like the great bog roll panic back in February.
>> No. 438782 Anonymous
4th September 2020
Friday 3:47 pm
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>>438781
Starting to think I ought to buy it all up and eBay the lot - had no idea that screen wash was A Thing.
>> No. 438783 Anonymous
4th September 2020
Friday 4:31 pm
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Gave in and ordered a bunch of mixed cold-hardy agave seeds.
I put my spare aloe pups on Freecycle and all the people who responded to the listing are attractive young women. It makes sense, who else commonly wants house plants but doesn't have many of their own yet? Fuck the Ostrich Method, get with the Aloe Program.
>> No. 438914 Anonymous
11th September 2020
Friday 9:32 pm
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Two of the eleven cacti I re-potted last weekend are looking a bit yellow. I can't understand why as the process for them was the same as all the others which are doing fine. I've sown another 85 seeds and have another 146 that should arrive fairly soon; I think I've learned some lessons and should have much higher germination and survival rates this time.
>> No. 438935 Anonymous
12th September 2020
Saturday 2:12 pm
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I can't stop coughing. I tried to get tested earlier this week and the site wasn't working. Now I can't get tested because it's been over 5 days since my symptoms started.

I've been hiding in my room to try and protect my flatmates, who have kindly responded by letting the place turn into a total fucking pigsty and not even keeping soft drinks in so I can take cough drugs- obviously trying to avoid going to the shops myself so I don't coof all over everyone.

So my current feeling is that I'm going to bomb the houses of parliament. That or travel back in time to shoot Bojo in the back of the head.
>> No. 438936 Anonymous
12th September 2020
Saturday 2:23 pm
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>>438935
I believe there are some breathing exercises you can do that gets you through the coughing bit a little easier; also sleeping facing down is supposed to help.

Get well soon ladm8 and try not to die.
>> No. 438938 Anonymous
12th September 2020
Saturday 4:27 pm
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>>438935

Testing capacity is overwhelmed because they thought it was a great idea to set a pie in the sky target while doing absolutely fuck all to increase our ability to do it. Whole thing is a shambles.

If the Tories stay in power beyond the next election, I'm emigrating. To Mars.
>> No. 438939 Anonymous
12th September 2020
Saturday 4:52 pm
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>>438938
>If the Tories stay in power beyond the next election

Simply not going to happen given the 'rona and exitting from the European Union. People have already had enough; give it another twelve months and there will be demands for an election.
>> No. 438940 Anonymous
12th September 2020
Saturday 5:02 pm
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Whenever I see a magpie, it's always alone. Perhaps that's I'm severely depressed.
>> No. 438941 Anonymous
12th September 2020
Saturday 5:46 pm
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>>438940
Get two pet magpies and you'll be sorted.
>> No. 438942 Anonymous
12th September 2020
Saturday 6:30 pm
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>>438940
You have to say good morning to them, it's a rule. Maybe that would help?
>> No. 438946 Anonymous
12th September 2020
Saturday 8:45 pm
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>>438940
I noticed this recently too, but then after noticing it I've seen two everytime I've gone out since, except for the other day when I saw 5. Is there a rhyme for 5?
>> No. 438948 Anonymous
12th September 2020
Saturday 9:18 pm
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>>438946
One for sorrow
Two for joy
Three for a girl
Four for a boy
Five for silver
Six for gold
Seven for a secret never to be told.
>> No. 438949 Anonymous
12th September 2020
Saturday 9:19 pm
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>>438941

Fuck that

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-49711147#:~:text=Swooping%20magpies%20are%20a%20common,in%20Wollongong%2C%20New%20South%20Wales.
>> No. 439009 Anonymous
14th September 2020
Monday 4:52 pm
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I just found my Dymo LabelPoint and it works!! I thought I had lost it and would have to buy a new one (and they don't seem to make them anymore - what do OCD labelling types use now?)

Slightly sad that I'm going to have to buy new tape for it, and Dymo don't make that so its knock-off copy stuff, which is at least loads cheaper than the "real" thing, but otherwise thrilled!
>> No. 439061 Anonymous
16th September 2020
Wednesday 3:39 pm
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The woman with the big arse who wore yoga pants every day doesn't turn up during the school run anymore. Gutted.
>> No. 439149 Anonymous
19th September 2020
Saturday 11:42 am
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Only 17 of the 60 seeds sown on >>438780 have germinated, that's a bit rubbish. The conditions should have been optimal.
I know nobody else is interested but I forgot to make a note of when they all went in so I'm using these posts as one. I can move them to the windowsill on the 3rd of October.
If any of the agave have fallen over or grown sideways they'll need propping up too.
>> No. 439151 Anonymous
19th September 2020
Saturday 3:00 pm
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>>439149
I really like your propagator - is that light re-purposed or part of it? I'm guessing the latter as it seems to have those slats in the plastic roof - where did you get that from?
>> No. 439152 Anonymous
19th September 2020
Saturday 3:27 pm
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>>439151
It's an "X-stream heat propagator" with "Sunblaster" lights and "Nanotech T5" reflectors. They're made by different companies but it seems to be designed to fit. The propagator came with a probe thermostat but I had to get a timer for the lights separately.
>> No. 439153 Anonymous
19th September 2020
Saturday 3:34 pm
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Trying not to laugh at this.
>> No. 439154 Anonymous
19th September 2020
Saturday 3:53 pm
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>>439153

That's pretty fucking funny.

I assume he's making loads of secret dodgy money, though? No man has the right to be as cocky as him while making less money than many britfa.gs users.
>> No. 439155 Anonymous
19th September 2020
Saturday 4:29 pm
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>>439153
Now the Russians will offer him more money.
>> No. 439156 Anonymous
19th September 2020
Saturday 7:51 pm
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>>439153
The poor thing. He must be struggling to make his last couple of thousand last each month.
>> No. 439158 Anonymous
19th September 2020
Saturday 8:47 pm
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>>439156

This why he needs to do all those odd jobs at dairies, building sites, and laboratories.
>> No. 439159 Anonymous
19th September 2020
Saturday 9:10 pm
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>>439156
His take home is £7.5k - I imagine most of that goes into paying the maintenance of his kids/divorce, which is entirely his own fault to be honest.

I do think it's slightly unfair around the HMRC "benefit in kind" of using the flat attached to Number 10 - he would be criticised if he didn't lived there, and it seems entirely reasonable to me that it should simply be a perk of the job.
>> No. 439163 Anonymous
19th September 2020
Saturday 11:02 pm
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>>439159
I'd always figured it was, the way they make such a big deal of the sitting PM moving into Number 10. And Bodger does do a lot of sitting.
>> No. 439177 Anonymous
20th September 2020
Sunday 9:33 am
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There's a real scarcity of Xbox One controllers at the moment. No shops in town had them in stock, and even online retailers like Argos, Amazon, Smyths etc had none in for delivery. I ended up paying slightly more than I would like to get one from the Microsoft store. I assume it's because the Series X controller will replace the One ones when they launch in a couple of months, but the newer models are smaller with a worse d-pad so they're no good for me.
>> No. 439263 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 9:22 am
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What is the point of leaf blowers? Isn't it just shifting a problem somewhere else rather than dealing with it?
>> No. 439264 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 9:32 am
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>>439263 You make a big pile that's easy to pick up into a trailer or whatever. to take away.
If your're just shunting them along, you're a cunt. Doubly so on a windy day.
>> No. 439265 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 10:18 am
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>>439263

You get to make a massive amount of noise early on a Sunday morning and fill your neighbour's garden with leaves, crisp packets and empty cans. Absolute arseholes. I hope they do a Brian Harvey with a ride-on lawnmower.
>> No. 439268 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 12:10 pm
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>>439263>>439264>>439265
I know a lot of people get upset about leaf blowers, but mine has a SUCK mode, too, and a bag that hoovers up all the leaves; if you have a big garden(s) with many trees, then it is a godsend. I have never used it in BLOW mode, but I've no doubt all my neighbours think I'm a cunt for using it.
>> No. 439272 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 4:14 pm
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>>439268
Nah, big gardens have a billygoat. 4 gears and 16bhp. Loud in a way that a mere leaf blower can only dream of.
However, I barely use it any more, just use the mower with the brush & collector on the back, much quicker.
Still, been doing autumn gardening this weekend, so plenty of 2-stroke action. Chainsaws, hedge trimmers, brushcutter. Shoulders are pure pain.
>> No. 439282 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 8:16 pm
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>>439268
Have you ever had the slight urge to use it on yourself?
>> No. 439288 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 10:46 pm
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>>439282
No. I have long-term access to sexual congress with an actual female, almost whenever I like, so the idea of sticking my dick in a power tool, or any kind of electronic device really, seems extremely stupid and a very bad approach to life. Your mileage may vary.
>> No. 439289 Anonymous
27th September 2020
Sunday 11:52 pm
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>>439282


>> No. 439302 Anonymous
29th September 2020
Tuesday 11:52 am
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My car insurance is up for renewal and it looks like it'll be going up from about £330 to around £440. Here was me thinking that coronavirus would see premiums going down.
>> No. 439303 Anonymous
29th September 2020
Tuesday 12:09 pm
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>>439288
>I have long-term access to sexual congress with an actual female
An actual female what?
>> No. 439388 Anonymous
3rd October 2020
Saturday 3:09 pm
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I've not done too well with this agave; only 9 out of 40 seeds successfully germinated. It's not totally awful for a first try but still disappointing. The Parryi did best at 5, Utahensis worst with just 1 and the other 4 I have no idea what they are.
>> No. 439389 Anonymous
3rd October 2020
Saturday 3:14 pm
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The cacti on the other hand came in strong with about 50% germination for all varieties from all the different vendors. These were spread across about six different boxes but I've consolidated them here as I'd like to try again with more agave so this frees up space and soil. I'll probably lose a few from the stress of being moved but as I have sixty that's... fine.
>> No. 439390 Anonymous
3rd October 2020
Saturday 4:09 pm
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>>439389
They look great, every time I have attemped cacti from seed they fail miserably.
>> No. 439391 Anonymous
3rd October 2020
Saturday 4:24 pm
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>>439390
The humidity and consistent temperature seem to be key.
>> No. 439400 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 12:23 am
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>>439389

I was in Greece in September three years ago, at peak season for prickly pears. I took some fruit back home with me and germinated the seeds. They have grown into half a dozen cacti, the biggest of which is now almost 2 ft tall.

People have told me that opuntia are notoriously difficult to germinate, and advice online ranges from eating the seeds and shitting them out again to grinding them on one side with sandpaper to help break the seed's hard shell. I simply put them in a shallow pot with moist compost above a radiator and placed a turned over glass bowl over it to trap the heat. And after about two weeks, little baby cacti started popping up.
>> No. 439401 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 12:27 am
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>>439400
That's impressive. I've not tried any of those but what I'm doing is just a slightly more measured version. Maybe it's a freshness thing? Buying seeds you have no idea how fresh they really are, older ones being harder to germinate, but yours were obviously as fresh as it's possible to be.
>> No. 439403 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 1:01 am
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>>439401

Yes, the age of your seeds is definitely a factor. But also, the fruit that your seeds come from must be fully ripe. The best donor fruit are usually those that are almost too far gone to be eaten, not just with prickly pears. When you buy seeds, you never know how and under what circumstances they were sourced.
>> No. 439404 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 1:07 am
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>>439403
That's valid, comes under the whole not-knowing of what you're buying but yes.
>> No. 439405 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 1:12 am
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>>439403
Prickly pears grow like fucking weeds once they get established, so well done for that. I'm very familiar with them from many visits to Malta, where they grow all over the place, like Greece. The eating/shitting them out to germninate story sounds slightly apocryphal, they have a well known laxative effect if you eat too many, but the fruit is DELICIOUS; knowing how plants evolve though I wouldn't be surprised.

My hands are tingly/stinging now just at the thought of picking them and how many spikes you get in your hands. As I'm sure you saw, the leaves have huge spikey bits, but the fruit have millions of tiny hairline spikes.

Jealous / impressed that you've managed to grow one though.
>> No. 439406 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 1:32 am
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>>439405
What do prickly pears taste like? Like pears or apples..?
>> No. 439407 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 1:59 am
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>>439406

I would describe it as a mix between watermelon and strawberry.

The texture is a bit like cantaloupe, but with plenty of seeds that are about 3-4 mm in diameter.
>> No. 439408 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 3:46 am
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>>439407
That... actually sounds pretty good. I would love to try it.
>> No. 439409 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 11:50 am
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>>439408
You can get cuttings for a few quid on ebay and etsy, you just need* to know if you're getting one that's rooted or not and if so what needs doing with it.

*Given how well they seem to grow this may not matter that much.
>> No. 439410 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 2:59 pm
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One day I could come back from IKEA with only the things I intended to buy.

Swear they put something in the air conditioning.

DAMN YOU CAPITALIST SWEDES AND YOUR FLATPACK
>> No. 439411 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 7:49 pm
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>>439410

Just order online. They charge for delivery, but it works out cheaper because you don't end up spunking £30 on house plants, candles and a shitload of meatballs.
>> No. 439412 Anonymous
4th October 2020
Sunday 10:43 pm
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>>439410

>DAMN YOU CAPITALIST SWEDES AND YOUR FLATPACK

And to think that Swedes are usually the furtest from.
>> No. 439414 Anonymous
5th October 2020
Monday 10:44 am
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50 parryi, 50 utahensis and 20 ovatifolia in the bigger tray.
Just marking the date so I remember it later. Ready to go on the 19th.
>> No. 439415 Anonymous
5th October 2020
Monday 10:50 am
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>>439414

You'll be a fanny magnet with all those succulents.
>> No. 439416 Anonymous
5th October 2020
Monday 10:53 am
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>>439415

Okay.
>> No. 439417 Anonymous
5th October 2020
Monday 11:16 am
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>>439415
Aloe? Is it me you're looking for?
>> No. 439419 Anonymous
5th October 2020
Monday 3:03 pm
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>>439417

Growing your own aloe plants will make you a hit with 30something women and up.
>> No. 439420 Anonymous
5th October 2020
Monday 3:46 pm
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>>439419
That's more women than anyone needs in one go.
>> No. 439421 Anonymous
5th October 2020
Monday 8:07 pm
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Happy Gilmore is probably the only Adam Sandler film I like. I've watched it more times than I'd care to admit.
>> No. 439422 Anonymous
6th October 2020
Tuesday 4:30 pm
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>>439421
I have a soft spot for Anger Management and Big Daddy. His newer movies are shit but I appreciate that he still looks after his friends.
>> No. 439423 Anonymous
6th October 2020
Tuesday 7:09 pm
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>>439421

I Like the Waterboy, just because Fairuza Balk is in it and she makes my balls ache.
>> No. 439424 Anonymous
6th October 2020
Tuesday 7:18 pm
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>>439423
Here you go lad, post this in the "still would" thread.
>> No. 439425 Anonymous
6th October 2020
Tuesday 7:34 pm
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Sometimes when I'm having a wee I play a game where I try and put my fingers as close to the stream of piss as possible without getting them wet.
>> No. 439426 Anonymous
6th October 2020
Tuesday 7:38 pm
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>>439424
I thought that was Noel Fielding for a second.
>> No. 439427 Anonymous
6th October 2020
Tuesday 8:17 pm
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>>439426

Could be.

You never know with him.
>> No. 439431 Anonymous
7th October 2020
Wednesday 12:03 pm
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You ever sit in a meeting with people your age and think "holy hell, we're the grown-ups now". I've zoned out entirely from a meeting watching two people younger than me discuss quite serious stuff and high-level management.

They're involved and talking like professionals about stuff that has no immediate impact but look like people I went to school with. This is nuts.
>> No. 439433 Anonymous
7th October 2020
Wednesday 1:25 pm
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>>439431
>You ever sit in a meeting with people your age and think "holy hell, we're the grown-ups now".

Yeah. I don't like it one bit.
>> No. 439434 Anonymous
7th October 2020
Wednesday 1:50 pm
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>>439431

I don't know how old you are, but at thirty, I feel like this quite often about myself, when I hear myself talking about planning equipment rotations five years into the future or explaining to people who have been doing something a certain way for longer than I've been alive that I've worked out a more efficient way to do it within the last couple of weeks, I get serious fucking impostor syndrome. But people seem to smile and nod and go "oh okay" and then implement it, so I must be fine.

On the other hand, I'm new to this career so there are certainly other people around me that look like they're about seven, but know much more than me. It's hard to decide which is worse.
>> No. 439492 Anonymous
9th October 2020
Friday 11:13 am
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Started stratifying some acorns. Should be good to plant in late January.
>> No. 439494 Anonymous
9th October 2020
Friday 12:44 pm
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>>439492
What do you do to stratify them?
>> No. 439500 Anonymous
10th October 2020
Saturday 9:00 am
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>>439494
Not him, but in the past I've had success growing sweet chestnuts using this method.

Get a sturdy plastic bag, fill it with a mix of sphagnum moss and the seeds, make sure it's fairly damp but not soaking wet, tie it up tight and poke some holes through the bag for aeration, and then leave it in your fridge for a few months.
Keep checking them and they should eventually sprout on their own. Note you don't want them too cold, it's safer in the door of the fridge than at the back where they can freeze.
>> No. 439502 Anonymous
10th October 2020
Saturday 9:01 am
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Is it sweet chestnut picking time of year?
>> No. 439503 Anonymous
10th October 2020
Saturday 9:12 am
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>>439494
I just put them in some tupperware and the fridge, all that stuff about moss may help but I'm not sure it needs to be that complicated. The fridge door bit is definitely a good tip though.
>> No. 439509 Anonymous
10th October 2020
Saturday 11:02 pm
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>>439500

The only problem is that sweet chestnut trees take about 20 years before they first bear chestnuts. So this is definitely one of the longest long-term projects you'll ever take on.

That said, I've grown two mango trees from shop bought mangoes, they're each about 25 inches tall now, but they will never bear fruit. Because they need constant temperatures above 25°C and loads of humidity to even flower.

They make very decorative livingroom plants though that grow quite quickly under the right conditions, so if you're in the mood to try something off the beaten track, now is a good time of year to start. Get a fully ripe mango, the squishier the better, then carefully pry open the husk, and then wrap the emerging seed in toilet paper, put it in a small Tupperware box with the lid open on one side, add a bit of water so that the toilet paper is just about wet, and put the box in the warmest spot in your home. Check every two days to ensure that the seed is still moist. After about a week or two, the plant should get going and you'll quickly have a stem that's about five inches tall. It's then ready to plant into a pot with compost.
>> No. 439510 Anonymous
10th October 2020
Saturday 11:10 pm
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>>439509
If you're going to just grow something indoors for decoration, why not get something that has some other practical purpose? At the very least, something that's good at filtering chemicals out of the air.
I do see the allure of doing something with the massive seed you get out of a mango or avocado or whatever but they'll never fruit, never contribute to your local ecosystem, never survive without your care; all they do is take up space.
>> No. 439512 Anonymous
10th October 2020
Saturday 11:36 pm
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>>439510

Are you off your tits again, drunklad?

I's really good fun to grow your own indoor plants from seeds. You'll always get to look at it and think you grew that plant. You didn't just get a ficus from Ikea for 15 quid.

Also, just to be a nitpicking cunt, any plant you grow binds carbon from the atmosphere, and any plant in a pot that you don't water regularly will not survive.
>> No. 439515 Anonymous
10th October 2020
Saturday 11:51 pm
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>>439510
But growing plants is fun.
>> No. 439516 Anonymous
10th October 2020
Saturday 11:55 pm
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>>439512
>>439515
You both realise that you can grow plants with practical purpose from seed, too? Not just your food waste.
>> No. 439523 Anonymous
11th October 2020
Sunday 9:10 pm
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>>439516

Not everything needs to have a practical purpose, you know. And I prefer a homegrown mango tree in my livingroom to a ficus from Ikea.

Bit like complaining that your dog doesn't give milk.
>> No. 439524 Anonymous
11th October 2020
Sunday 9:41 pm
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>>439523
A ficus from IKEA? What the fuck are you talking about?
>> No. 439525 Anonymous
11th October 2020
Sunday 9:55 pm
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>>439524

https://www.ikea.com/gb/en/cat/plants-10779/


Ikea has good quality indoor plants, but they often tend to be more expensive than at your B&Q or Homebase.
>> No. 439526 Anonymous
11th October 2020
Sunday 9:58 pm
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While we're talking about plants can any of you recommend good indoor plants for the winter? Ideally for a chilly windowsill, the room itself is usually chilly too. I've only got two kalenchoes at the moment. Sorry if this derails or makes no sense I'm on the tail end of some shrooms, I just want a nice room full of plants/flowers for the winter.
>> No. 439527 Anonymous
11th October 2020
Sunday 10:37 pm
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>>439526

Most indoor plants come from subtropical regions where it doesn't get chilly a lot, so they often don't tolerate it well.

Succulents are a good bet, because they are often from polar climates, and are used to temperatures dropping every night.
>> No. 439528 Anonymous
11th October 2020
Sunday 10:38 pm
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>>439527

>because they are often from polar climates

Ok, arid then.
>> No. 439530 Anonymous
11th October 2020
Sunday 11:41 pm
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>>439527
Bugger I probably should've said I'm aware of succulents but not a huge fan of them.
>> No. 439531 Anonymous
12th October 2020
Monday 12:05 pm
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>>439530
>I'm aware of succulents but not a huge fan
When you say you're "aware" of them, are you just picturing some fairly boring, artichoke-looking things, or are you really aware of all the shapes these things come in?
>> No. 439532 Anonymous
12th October 2020
Monday 12:26 pm
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>>439531
The latter, they just don't do much for me. Did stay in a house with a lot of them once so maybe I've just had my fill.
>> No. 439533 Anonymous
12th October 2020
Monday 12:28 pm
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>>439532
You're not meant to put them up your bum.
>> No. 439534 Anonymous
12th October 2020
Monday 2:45 pm
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rnraC-1jUeY
>> No. 439535 Anonymous
12th October 2020
Monday 6:25 pm
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>>439532

Succulents are always a good place to start for people who don't have much experience with plants, because they usually tolerate poorly kept soil and they will survive a week or two, perhaps longer, without proper water supply.

Plants like ficus are more temperamental, they will shed leaves profusely if they are kept in the wrong conditions. They especially don't like cold and drafty places around the house.
>> No. 439536 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 11:17 am
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>Pokemon: Rapper Logic spends £173,000 on rare Charizard card
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-54507760

I used to have this card along with a load of others but I gave them to the brother of a girl I was trying to impress when I was a teenager. Didn't even get anywhere and I remember my dad called me an idiot for doing it.

I just want a large amount of money with a minimum of effort on my part to acquire it, is that really so much to ask?
>> No. 439537 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 11:29 am
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>>439536
Do you play the lottery?
>> No. 439538 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 11:38 am
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>>439537
I want money so of course not.
>> No. 439539 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 11:46 am
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>>439538
You do realise the lottery pays out in money? Did you think they paid out jelly beans?
>> No. 439540 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 12:10 pm
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>>439536

Pokemon cards are actually worth something? I have a folder full of them in my parents attic. Pretty sure I had most of the shinies including that Charizard.
>> No. 439541 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 12:22 pm
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>>439540
Sod's law says you will now find them to have been eaten by mice/damaged by water/thrown away by your dad.
>> No. 439542 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 12:28 pm
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I found this pokemon website
https://www.pokemonpets.com/Shiny-Litwick-Pokemon-Pokedex-2607
which is secretly Shamanismic propaganda. I think it's mostly a rip of bulbapedia with this suggestion to visit whyShamanism.org slipped into the middle of each page.
>> No. 439543 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 12:29 pm
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I meant to attach this.
>> No. 439544 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 12:30 pm
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>>439539
>You do realise the lottery pays out in money?
You do realise the expected return on a lottery ticket is less than half its price?
>> No. 439545 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 1:18 pm
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Weird thought but how much was the outlook of stoicism a reflection of the Ancient to Medieval mindset toward destiny and the societal conditions of the time?

To go into detail, if you look at the original stories from bygone eras you spot that the characters have a proclivity to either accept their fate (e.g. the Odyssey) or when they do rebel it happens anyway. Ultimately a very deterministic universe is presented whether that be the machinations of a curse or the wheel of fortuna in Dark Age Christianity. In this context, stoicism seems more akin to a way to cope with the reality without it becoming tragedy. Boethius perhaps gave the Christian expansion on this concept where he wrote in a fictional conversation with Fortuna that wicked men suffer from their own power where their nature only binds them to do evil whereas the pious who suffer only profit - but essentially up and down come like the tide and bitching of how the bad guys come out on top misses the point.

Today it would be slightly different under the influence of existentialism, absurdism etc. I'm certain this isn't some new observation but something that bubbled to the surface in mind. Not to discredit stoicism, just a thought.

>>439542
Is anyone else seeing an ongoing religious war in their youtube recommendations? I keep getting shown channels for Shamanismic, Christian and sometimes even Taoist videos.
>> No. 439546 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 1:37 pm
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>>439544
Oh now suddenly you're talking about 'expected return'? If you're such a fucking economist why are you whinging on here about your inability to make any money?
>> No. 439548 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 4:27 pm
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>>439545
I keep getting ads for Mi'kmaq merchandise. Something to do with a "tradition of knightly chivalry".
>> No. 439549 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 7:15 pm
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>>439545

>how much was the outlook of stoicism a reflection of the Ancient to Medieval mindset toward destiny and the societal conditions of the time?

A lot. To elaborate on that: They weren't wrong, you typically have a lot less control over your "fate" than you think you do.

There was a scientific study demonstrating as much, but I can't be arsed to find it so I'll just ask you to trust me. It's not a pessimist statement saying we're all just dragged along by the currents of time, but it is a realist statement that we all massively overestimate our ability to influence the world around us. The conflict between expectation and reality then leads to unhappiness.

Also consider asking yourself why it's still so relevant and prevalent today. In many regards, we haven't come as far as we'd like to think either.
>> No. 439550 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 7:59 pm
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>>439549

A scientific study on free will vs predeterminism? Sounds reasonable.
>> No. 439551 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 8:36 pm
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>>439550

No, you spacker, a much smaller scale study into whether people overestimate their ability to influence a situation. It's pretty easily done. You get a group of people, interview them about their attitudes on things, then put them through a set-up situation to see if their ability matches what they expressed.

If you think you sounded like a billy big bollock smart arse there, you might be quite shocked if you ever decide to actually look into the fields of sociology or experimental psychology.
>> No. 439552 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 9:32 pm
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>>439551

What does any of what you just described have to do with "fate"? How people respond in the moment to a set-up situation you've just sprung on them has no relation to how well they can impact the overall course of their lives.
>> No. 439553 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 9:59 pm
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>>439549
That's not what I was talking about. Functionally it doesn't even matter.

My thought was on the history of philosophy and in particular storytelling where there's a noticeable divide in man's relative position to the universe and where even in absurdist writing characters by definition still fight against a predetermined destiny. From a societal perspective I wouldn't call it a bad outcome to encourage resistance to the way things are or to imagine a better world that by default comes about owing to the current pace of innovation.

>>439551
I'm not convinced on the studies validity owing to how we're hardwired to participate in things like democratic voting without knowing the real reasons why (tribalism). We have blind-spots, big deal it doesn't remove choice on that level.
>> No. 439554 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 10:28 pm
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It's not even the full two weeks and these things have a near 90% germ rate. Incredible.
>> No. 439555 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 10:46 pm
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>>439552

What else is fate but the collision of chaotic, random and unpredictable events we find our lives affected by? Philosophers have been asking this question since before the time of Christ mate.

>>439553

The key seems to be that you think societal conditions were significantly different then, in terms of how much a single person (or protagonist) could alter the larger narrative of their life. I really don't think they are much different now, we just have lots of shiny gadgets in the mix.

None of that is to say trying to resist is a bad thing, but if you wanted to ask how much stoicism is a reflection of that, I feel it's obvious. Modern day CBT therapy is just stoicism with fancy medical lingo attached. We are still cogs in a machine much greater than us.

You might want to read up on some Taoism. Affecting change while accepting the inevitability of "fate" are not necessarily mutually exclusive concepts.
>> No. 439556 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 11:07 pm
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>>439555
One-off eventa and the accumulated long term events of a life are not comparable. You can't assume something like that scales. You'll find out if you ever actually look into the fields of sociology or experimental psychology.
>> No. 439557 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 11:18 pm
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>>439556

>One-off events and the accumulated long term events of a life are not comparable. You can't assume something like that scales.

You can't assume it doesn't either. One off events can be life changing. Long term experience can amount to nothing in the face of mere circumstance.
>> No. 439558 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 11:35 pm
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>>439557
I don't need to, the onus is on you to show that the thing you're talking about is relevant and supports your initial statement; you haven't, because it's not.
>> No. 439559 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 11:47 pm
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>>439558

I too remember that great bit in Plato's Republic, where the young upstart Aristotle charges in and yells "BURDEN OF PROOF YOU OLD BEARDY TWAT". Plato was rekt and nobody ever listened to him ever again.

Fuck off with your student debate club gotchas, if you don't want to actually talk about a subject don't start a conversation.
>> No. 439560 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 11:50 pm
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>>439559

It's not a "gotcha" you angry little man, you're just talking shite.
>> No. 439561 Anonymous
13th October 2020
Tuesday 11:59 pm
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>>439560

Well, I'm better at it than you in any case.
>> No. 439562 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 12:01 am
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>>439561
Agreed.
>> No. 439563 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 12:11 am
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That was a nice read, and then the gotchalad ruined it.
>> No. 439564 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 1:03 am
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I do trend to feel that there's something insecure and immature about people who reject the notion of external events/circumstances playing a substantial role in a person's life and outcomes. I've come to think of it as one of the things you have to really get to grips with as an adult, when you have to start taking responsibility and making decisions based on your own wellbeing, because things won't just work out automatically like they do when you're a kid. The thing is you're only ever choosing the path which is the most beneficial, the route of least resistance, or whatever matters in your particular circumstances. You never really seize the day to make of it what you will, because if you did, you would probably be in prison or homeless.

I think this is the bit those people don't want to admit to themselves because it makes them feel the kind of existential angst they can only suppress by telling themselves they really DID want to be the audit manager for an office stationery distributor. That was the best they could do, so they had to rationalise it as their own free will, rather than the cruelty of fate.
>> No. 439566 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 1:53 am
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>>439564
Yes, it's definitely the people who take responsibility for their actions who are being childish, it's very mature of you to blame circumstances for you not being a doctor or any other thing that takes long term planning and commitment in a way that's not really possible to just fall into yet millions of people still somehow manage.
>> No. 439567 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 2:19 am
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>>439566
Unnecessarily rude post.
>> No. 439569 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 7:34 am
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>>439564
>I do trend to feel that there's something insecure and immature about people who reject the notion of external events/circumstances playing a substantial role in a person's life and outcomes

In my experience you see a lot of the mindset of "If anything good happens to me it's because of my hard work and smarts, if anything bad happens to me it's because of poor luck and circumstances beyond my control. If anything good happens to someone else it's because of fortunate luck, if anything bad happens to them it's because they deserve it due to being lazy, not working hard enough and making poor life choices."
>> No. 439570 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 9:11 am
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>>439567
Yes, because the blanket statement about how everyone who isn't like you are all insecure, immature and in denial was such a supremely polite post to make.
>> No. 439572 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 10:02 am
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>>439566

You don't know what that poster does for a living. You're really proving their point quite capably.
>> No. 439575 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 10:39 am
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>>439572

So long as he didn't become a doctor by accident one day, I'm really not.
>> No. 439576 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 10:50 am
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>>439575

A tenner says I can make you do the bit about crabs in a bucket again if I carry on.

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 439577 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 11:21 am
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>>439576

Go on then.
>> No. 439578 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 11:32 am
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I can't believe we're actually arguing over whether or not class plays a role in your success in life. I can't believe someone is on britfa.gs arguing that all you need to do is pull up your bootstraps, it's easy.

Fuck off back to America and/or Knightsbridge.
>> No. 439579 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 11:40 am
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>>439578
Nobody is arguing that.
>> No. 439580 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 12:07 pm
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>>439575

I don't know many of people who have ended up as airline pilots or business owners by accident either, but I do know a couple who would love to tell you how full of shit you are right now.
>> No. 439581 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 12:21 pm
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>>439580

You don't need to add an insult to your sentence after backing down like that.
>> No. 439582 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 7:33 pm
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>>439578

We started out talking about the concept of stoicism and how it relates to "societal conditions".

It's obviously not much of a leap to go from the idea that circumstances outside of your control can have a big impact on your life, to midwit tories posting about how much control they have over their lives, completely without irony, in the middle of a global pandemic that came out of nowhere and devastated entire industries.

>>439581

Let's ask Big Man what they should retrain as then shall we?

Oh dear oh dear.
>> No. 439586 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 9:13 pm
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>>439555
>The key seems to be that you think societal conditions were significantly different then, in terms of how much a single person (or protagonist) could alter the larger narrative of their life. I really don't think they are much different now, we just have lots of shiny gadgets in the mix.

I wouldn't go so far, social organisation differed drastically in the past in a way quite unlike now and with it a feedback loop of social engineering. If you live in a society of rigid distribution of power along patrilineal lines or entrenched religious order (remember magic was real back then) then that is going to be reflected in the common narratives people tell. It's not a revelatory thought in that aspect, people and especially children learn from the stories we tell like knights and princesses.

Today you can talk of how things haven't changed and I don't even need to argue on that because I'm merely able to imagine a world of social mobility. Similarly to us doubt and faith are interlinked but ask someone a thousand years ago and they will tell you that they know God is real as sure as 1+1=2. So long as they don't just put you in the wicker man for such blasphemy.

The symptom of this is a great deal of interest in modern society of 'retelling' of myth/legend to reflect the different way we now see characters. Medusa and Lilith have fisherperson retelling, Sisyphus smiles, Don Quixote was elevated from a comical figure to one of the greatest heroes of literature. Things change.

Don't even get me started on how 'animal does people things' was once the height of comedy to the degree that Chrysippus allegedly died of laughter.
>> No. 439588 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 9:15 pm
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>>439580

Training as an airline pilot costs about £90k. It's not a massively difficult job - it's a heck of a lot easier than many engineering and ground support roles - but there's a huge financial barrier to entry. Nobody accidentally becomes an airline pilot, but it's only something you can realistically choose if your dad is loaded.
>> No. 439589 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 9:26 pm
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>>439588

Similarly, many business owners need a decent amount of money to become a business owner too.
>> No. 439590 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 10:22 pm
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>>439582
>Let's ask Big Man what they should retrain as then shall we?
What? You've lost the plot.
>> No. 439591 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 10:24 pm
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>>439588
>>439589

While those are valid points, I have no doubt that Conservativelad would reject the premise that those things are truly obstacles. You could take control of your life and put away fifty quid a month to save up for your pilot's license, he would say.

What he can't argue with is the fact that a completely unpredictable twist of fate has put fifteen thousand of those people out of a job. Nothing they could do about it, it just happened. Totally out of their control.

https://www.eurocockpit.be/news/redundancy-tracker-european-pilots-losing-their-jobs
>> No. 439592 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 10:26 pm
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>>439586
Most of this is still true for a good chunk of the third world. The world hasn't moved past all of that yet really. It's just our western bubble that has.
>> No. 439593 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 10:30 pm
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>>439589

Absolutely, I'd say that's more a question of playing the hands you're dealt rather than having zero control over your fate. May as well say people have no control over their fate on the grounds they can't change the laws of physics.
The point I was making from the start though, which seems to have been wildly misunderstood, is just that the study, which we never saw but, apparently showed that people were shit in some situation that was sprung on them, does not apply to life in general. It just doesn't. Even if there are some situations where a microcosm of something doesn't have any emergent properties in a macro view, the study isn't even that. I've been saying that and only that, but people seem to have interpreted that as me saying all sorts of nonsense about bootstraps or whatever. I'm not trying to prove a negative or making any specific claims about it, just pointing out that the [alleged] study doesn't prove the positive even if it is everything it's claimed to be.
>> No. 439596 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 10:57 pm
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Not exactly loving my new bedtime ritual of getting under the douvet and having my brain immediately go "you're going to die one day" at 150 thought decibels. It's happened three nights in a row now.
>> No. 439597 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 11:00 pm
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>>439593

Nah, it's more that you're misinterpreting what this alleged study was alleged to show, which was that people overestimate their level of control over situations. This was used to support an argument that people overestimate their level of control over their life, which isn't that much of a stretch.

Broadly the point was that stoicism is still relevant today for much the same reasons, just under different guises- i.e that people often don't have as much control over their lives as they'd like, thanks to a wide array of circumstances and possible influences, and that the mindfulness and resilience stoicism teaches is a valuable coping mechanism to maintain mental well being in the face of such an existential dilemma now as it was then.

I do remember seeing something along those lines on some Panorama show or something, in support of said alleged study. It probably had this guy, or the one that looks like Groucho Marx.

(This next bit is just a tangent about religion based on the things some lads have said, you can skip it if you want.)

Religion may have been a more all-encompassing part of life in earlier times, but that arguably has more to do with the fact that the Church fulfilled all the social roles we today expect either private companies or the state to fulfil. It was school, hospital, and homeless shelter, as well as supra-national government, all in one. Worship was arguably a means to an end in times before widespread literacy. My own personal feeling is that your average person was religious, yes, but only in as much as being a heathen was socially undesirable in a way akin to being dolescum on the Jeremy Kyle show today- Except with more stake burning rather than shame suicide.

In that regard I don't think it means much in terms of an average person's relationship with philosophy or spiritualism- The structures were all in place in a similar way, the names and faces were just different.
>> No. 439600 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 11:06 pm
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Alright fine.

https://www.jstor.org/stable/20182602?seq=1
>> No. 439602 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 11:12 pm
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>>439597
>which isn't that much of a stretch.
It's a fucking huge stretch.
>> No. 439603 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 11:29 pm
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>>439593
You've got me going now.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCARADb9asE
>> No. 439604 Anonymous
14th October 2020
Wednesday 11:58 pm
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>>439597
>>439602

The point of society ought to be to make our up and coming generations simply better than we could ever be in terms of educational attainment with granted experience taken as a matter of course, physical wellbeing, sense of worldliness and assured mental health, in such a way that makes Communism a reality.

No need getting kids to read Marx, all Communism proper needs is that culture of taking in elder advice when younger and the Hegelian dialectic, mixed in with one's own youthful ideas, to take hold and we'd have a generation of young adults that are capable. Spoiler because I'm a raving Commie when I've had a drink, and I've sniffed a shandy tonight.
>> No. 439611 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 12:26 pm
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>>439604

>The point of society ought to be to make our up and coming generations simply better than we could ever be

Socialism was kind of a dead end in that respect though. Standards of living, and in many countries also standards of education were considerably lower than in Western countries. You had your university educated intelligentsia, but which you were only allowed to be a part of if you were an ardent supporter of socialist ideology. You were then allowed to be part of society's upper crust, but dissenters on the other hand had almost no career prospects whatsoever, and the common person was confined to humdrum blue collar jobs with little chance for advancement.

Capitalism isn't the better system, but it allows infinitely more scope in terms of what you are able to do with your life. While it's also true that not everybody in capitalism has the wherewithal and family background to utilise those potential opportunities to their own advantage, most developed capitalist countries today have institutions in place to help those who can't help themselves.

On the other hand, capitalism also evidently means you have to put in your own initiative and there can be no pissing about. There are anecdotes from socialist combines in the days of the Communist Bloc where factory workers spent half the day twiddling their thumbs because some of their ancient machinery had broken down again, and sometimes half their production output was junk and had to be scrapped. I remember seeing something on TV about a candle factory in Eastern Europe where they spent a third of the workday melting down wax candles again because they didn't pass quality control. Except even the flawed candles that then went back were counted as production output, and it helped mask the fact that a lot of the time, they didn't produce anything at all due to broken down machinery or other holdups. And that, on a larger scale, is also the way much of the Communist Bloc succeeded in overstating its economic might, by massively doctoring economic output figures.

Self sage for pointless rambling.
>> No. 439616 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 1:16 pm
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>>439611
Not him but should we take this post to mark you as pro-capitalist? I'm a democratic market socialist and I wouldn't recognise any of the wasteful, highly centralised bullshit you describe in my vision for society, but I do recognise a lot of equally wasteful, highly centralised bullshit goes on currently under capitalism.
>> No. 439621 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 4:37 pm
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>>439616

I think that capitalism has been around long enough to have shown plenty of its ugly side. Most schools of thought in economic science today argue that capitalism, if left alone completely, is inherently unstable. In its most extreme form, there is the - figurative - prediction that if you distributed all the world's wealth evenly among all its inhabitants at noon one day and left capitalism completely to its own devices, with no institutions or other governing bodies, then by six o'clock in the evening it would be concentrated in the hands of a ruthless few again.

I think capitalism can be a good way to use resources efficiently and give individuals the opportunity to make something of their lives in a way that socialism almost by design can't deliver. But in order for capitalism to keep that promise, institutions must exist that ensure that growth and wealth aren't distributed too unevenly, and that those who haven't got the means, or at least start out without them, can still prosper as long as they put in an honest effort.

These institutions must also help ensure that capitalism doesn't end up doing another thing that it's prone to, and that is the creation of bubbles. Which brings us back to your point of wastefulness. It's also the counterargument to people claiming that healthy markets are markets that are left alone, and the belief that the market always knows best. We've seen it throughout history with anything from the Tulip Bubble, Black Tuesday, and the housing bubble. Capitalist markets aren't inherently efficient, at least not under real-world conditions. Market theory generally states in its simplest form that capital always flows to where it earns the most interest, but in the end, markets are still made by people, and people miss the signs of markets overheating and as a consequence your return on investment being far lower than anticipated.

To sum up, I would consider myself moderate pro-capitalist. Capitalism can do good, but you should never turn your back on it and leave it unattended.
>> No. 439623 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 5:55 pm
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>>439621
I see. So you could be described as a centrist/social democrat?

>I think capitalism can be a good way to use resources efficiently and give individuals the opportunity to make something of their lives in a way that socialism almost by design can't deliver.
Well let's break this down. Socialism, by definition, is a system whereby "the workers own the means of production". Can you explain why democratic control of production precludes "individuals the opportunity to make something of their lives"?

What opportunities are being denied at, say, Boots, if it is in shared ownership by the people who work for it, rather than a fragmented collection of capital management funds and foreign-born billionaires such as Stefano Pessina? Between the billionaires who currently own the company, and the workers employed by it, whom do you think is more interested in 'expanding opportunities for individuals', and whom do you think is more interested in profiting from the labour of those individuals?
>> No. 439625 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 6:41 pm
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>>439623

> Can you explain why democratic control of production precludes "individuals the opportunity to make something of their lives"?

There's an old saying. If everybody owns everything, then the individual owns nothing.

Workers "owning the means of production" was always an empty turn of phrase in socialist economies. They owned diddly squat of the combine where they went to work every day. And they didn't democratically control anything, as most socialist political systems in existence were factually dictatorships with pretend democratic institutions. Everything was owned by the government, whose inner circles decided everything.

I think a much more honest approach, under capitalism, is employee shares. If part of your wage or salary is in shares of the company you work for, then you very directly by definition own a piece of the company. Even if you can't just go down to the production floor and say "Excuse me, I believe that wrench is mine". And you have a very direct incentive to put your back into your work, because it immediately contributes to your shares gaining value over time.


>whom do you think is more interested in 'expanding opportunities for individuals',

Any good corporate leadership recognises that people who show promise need to be given opportunities to rise up through the ranks in that company. Hence employee training schemes and career advancement programmes. Even somebody pushing pills in Boots has the chance to get a higher paying job if they put in the effort. I don't buy the image of the downtrodden lowly wage slave in a dead end job working for next to nothing. If you are stuck in that kind of job, then you're doing something wrong. There are ways to get ahead in nearly every line of work.
>> No. 439626 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 7:33 pm
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>>439625

>Even somebody pushing pills in Boots has the chance to get a higher paying job if they put in the effort.

I don't mean to sound confrontational or dismissive here but how long has it been since you had a real job, mate?
>> No. 439627 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 7:58 pm
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>>439625

>Even somebody pushing pills in Boots has the chance to get a higher paying job if they put in the effort.

Pharmacists are medical professionals with postgraduate training. They save thousands of lives a year by catching the fuck-ups of doctors and nurse prescribers. Despite that, most community pharmacies are running at a loss due to years of cuts and COVID/Brexit-related drug shortages. Pharmacists generally don't like working for the big chains and particularly don't like working for Boots, but a job's a job.
>> No. 439628 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 7:59 pm
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>>439625
<Hence employee training schemes and career advancement programmes. Even somebody pushing pills in Boots has the chance to get a higher paying job if they put in the effort. I don't buy the image of the downtrodden lowly wage slave in a dead end job working for next to nothing. If you are stuck in that kind of job, then you're doing something wrong. There are ways to get ahead in nearly every line of work.
Jesus Christ mate...

I guess... I would advise you to stick with your current employer and never change jobs, since you found a rare one.
>> No. 439629 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 8:00 pm
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I'm struggling to believe this is real.
>> No. 439630 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 8:00 pm
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>>439626

>how long has it been since you had a real job, mate?


I have a real job.

Maybe your job is just shit. You will know better than me.

Not to sound confrontational, mind.
>> No. 439634 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 11:04 pm
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>>439627

I probably shouldn't have used the words "pushing pills" to describe job positions below an actual pharmacist.

What I meant was, I had a girlfriend once who was actually a pharmacy technician. She was unhappy working for mediocre pay, in a job and a profession that had no actual long-term career opportunities "out of the box". Yes, you can become the senior technician at your pharmacy and earn upwards of £25-28K a year, but you cannot get to the position of a pharmacist, or even start your own pharmacy. Not without additional qualifications, i.e. becoming an actual pharmacist.

So she decided she was going to try to get a degree somewhere in the medical field. We split up before she put her plans into action, but if I remember correctly, she was beginning to look at studying medical engineering. Which was going to be a bit of a do without A levels and without support from her parents who were essentially council estate paupers, but she was determined to attempt a career in drugs that wouldn't stop at being senior pharmacy technician.

And that's what I really meant. Even if you're from a working class upbringing and stuck in a job that doesn't satisfy you, there are always ways you can make something more of yourself. And to get back to capitalism vs. socialism, I doubt that socialist societies and economies actually gave you the freedom to just change up your career based on personal preference and ambition. The reality was that in most Communist Bloc countries, governments dictated a quite narrow band of career paths that you as a particular individual were allowed to follow. If there was a shortage of plumbers and machinists one year, then you were told to either become a plumber or a machinist, and that would have been the end of it.
>> No. 439635 Anonymous
16th October 2020
Friday 11:24 pm
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>>439634
>Even if you're from a working class upbringing and stuck in a job that doesn't satisfy you, there are always ways you can make something more of yourself.

I couldn't agree more with what you're saying. In this regard, working for a large company is often better than working for a small company, as it's somewhat easier to progress and find other jobs in the organisation. There is a lot to be said for "working you way up from the shop floor" and there are plenty of examples of CEOs who actually did this. I think people give up on initially mundane jobs too easily.
>> No. 439636 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 12:10 am
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>>439635

You're absolutely right.

I know somebody who was a geologist for an oil company (not Tony Hayward). He was an intern during uni there, but even within an oil company, job prospects are limited for geologists. He then got a full-time job after uni at the same company for some time as a research data manager, which was a fancy way of saying he spent every workday entering numbers into Excel and supervising interns who were doing the same. The pay was quite disappointing, and they never really knew what to do with him besides that. Oil companies really need engineers more than they need geologists. He didn't know enough about engineering to do the work of an engineer, while a drilling engineer knows enough about geology to make an actual geologist obsolete.

In a stroke of luck, he was then given funding from his employer for an MBA programme in corporate management. I think somebody else suddenly left the company who was going to do that MBA, and so it went to him. And with that MBA under his belt, things went swimmingly, and he became an important figure for their Southeast Asia operations.
>> No. 439640 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 12:50 am
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I was just starting to get somewhere with a woman but lockdown kicks in again. Well, lockdown is more the excuse because even before I was having to fight the fact that I've just become comfortable with myself now and in winter I prefer to just hibernate.

This has come up before even in prior relationships because I'm a lazybones and I suppose the solution is just to be aware of it. If not for myself then because a partner needs more than nights in with a cup of tea no matter how charming I am. Can't think of anything that you can do at the moment that doesn't involve freezing on some park bench - anything (legal) working for you lot?

>>439625
>Any good corporate leadership recognises that people who show promise need to be given opportunities to rise up through the ranks in that company. Hence employee training schemes and career advancement programmes. Even somebody pushing pills in Boots has the chance to get a higher paying job if they put in the effort. I don't buy the image of the downtrodden lowly wage slave in a dead end job working for next to nothing. If you are stuck in that kind of job, then you're doing something wrong. There are ways to get ahead in nearly every line of work.

I'm going to echo broad agreement but I'm sceptical about in office training for a multitude of reasons. Mostly because even if you work somewhere with enough demand there's a hesitance attached to making you specialist because of risk and cost on one end but also the workplace will have to pay you a specialist wage out the other (or could even lose you). In organisation promotion also exists and new colleagues will help you out but unless you're willing to work somewhere bollocks to climb the ranks these opportunities will only come so-often and competition will be fierce. It's a long road to travel at best.

But you're right that you can pull yourself up by your bootstraps and it annoys me that whenever this is suggested some people will spit absolute bile. It is possible to do your own training part-time and go from zero and I know this because I did it having gone from someone working shitty call centre and data entry jobs. The problem I see is a host of interrelated issues to do with a lack of commitment and a whole societal perspective around mobility. Impostor syndrome is probably the worst part but there's also toxic attitudes from peers and a general feeling that these opportunities are locked out unless your parents went to a good school (I'd probably have been fucked without the internet to encourage me). It's probably something we're especially bad at as a country but I found that after about a year it does snowball as your confidence alone grows and some short courses at least single you out as someone with commitment.
>> No. 439641 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 1:00 am
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>>439640

>But you're right that you can pull yourself up by your bootstraps and it annoys me that whenever this is suggested some people will spit absolute bile. 

It may not be coincidence that this is happening just as some people here are declaring themselves socialists.
>> No. 439642 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 2:54 am
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Jesus when did this website become neoliberalfa.gs?

You all sound utterly disconnected from reality, and I say that as someone with a decent job in biomedical science.

The thing is, everything has too much gatekeeping nowadays. You are all talking about how you can "work your way up" but that simply hasn't been the case in any of the jobs I had before this one. It was a pain in the fucking arse to get a degree and get where I am as an adult; but I know from some of the older scientists where I work that in the old days, you COULD just be trained up from the bottom, without even having any qualifications.

Your attitude just sounds like the typical "blah blah blah spoilt millenials" baby boomer shite, where you don't appreciate at all the intensity of competition and pressure our younger generation faces. In principle, capitalism is a fine idea, but it needs a FUCKING LOT more intervention than we are currently giving it in our present system. It's barely fit for purpose right now.
>> No. 439643 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 3:23 am
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>>439642
You just need to work a bit harder ladm9.
>> No. 439644 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 7:00 am
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>>439642
>It was a pain in the fucking arse to get a degree and get where I am as an adult; but I know from some of the older scientists where I work that in the old days, you COULD just be trained up from the bottom, without even having any qualifications.

That was the unintended consequence of Labour aiming to get just around half of all students to go to university. In many ways it has been extremely bad for social mobility; degrees are so ubiquitous and the value of them has been watered down so much that many companies have created a barrier to entry by listing a degree as a minimum requirement to apply when it wasn't necessary for the role whatsoever.

Many graduates, particularly those from working class backgrounds, were sold the lie that a degree, any degree, would set them up for life so if they didn't go to university they'd be a failure. The reality is I know a fair few people ~10 years after graduating who are still stuck working in a call centre or a dead-end admin job because they felt compelled into going to university but their 2:2 from a former Poly in a non-subject is just about worthless. They had it drummed into them to get a degree, but nobody drummed into them the importance of what you study and where. They won't retrain because another hangover from the Labour days is that they see vocational work as beneath them, even though some of the most minted people I know from school learned a trade.
>> No. 439645 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 12:16 pm
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>>439644

>Many graduates, particularly those from working class backgrounds, were sold the lie that a degree, any degree, would set them up for life so if they didn't go to university they'd be a failure.

Which made about as much sense as saying if more people get a driving licence, there will magically be more roads to drive on. New Labour's job market reforms as a whole were probably the biggest scam ever on the people that Blair ostensibly promised to put into work.

The only real difference is that the kind of people who didn't get a high paying job in the old days now have a degree that they still don't get a high paying job with. So it's almost a zero sum game. It sounds cynical, but you have to ask yourself what your career hopes actually were with a two-year degree in international politics.

It also has a lot to do with many degrees in recent years being shrunk down to two-year programmes. You simply cannot learn a university-level subject worth its salt in two years, it's impossible. Unless you're taking a complete Mickey Mouse degree, it will give you a passing grasp on the subject matter, but you are not going to become an expert in your field as such. Your degree will essentially be half baked. I think this devaluation is another big reason why people end up in call centres after uni. And of course sheer numbers. The fact that there are thousands of other candidates like you with a half baked Mickey Mouse degree doesn't improve your career chances.


>The reality is I know a fair few people ~10 years after graduating who are still stuck working in a call centre or a dead-end admin job because they felt compelled into going to university but their 2:2 from a former Poly in a non-subject is just about worthless.

I think this happens when you are from a working class background where nobody has any experience with higher education. If your dad is a doctor, a business owner/executive or a lawyer, then you will usually get plenty of encouragement from that direction to study the right thing, and at the right university. But if your parents are factory workers, then you will often have nobody to ask if becoming an archaeologist is really such a good idea. One of my friends is from a family where both parents spent much of their working lives as factory workers at Dagenham. She sort of got the idea of studying archaeology from watching films like Indiana Jones and The Mummy as a teenager. Her parents were out of their depth advising her in any way, and nobody in their extended family or even her friends had any way of knowing if that was a good choice or not. In all fairness, she studied her arse off to get into uni and finish the degree, but 15 years later, she works as a glorified tour guide at a museum and makes a whopping £35K a year.

I do have another friend who grew up on a council estate with a single parent, who went on to first become an insurance salesman and then got a law degree. Has a very solid career now working for a major insurance company, and makes absolute shedloads of money. But he seems to be the rarest of exceptions.
>> No. 439646 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 2:38 pm
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>>439645

I would've considered 35k a fairly comfortable salary, considering how low salaries generally are in the UK. It's decently above the median.

I'm also not sure where you're finding 2 year degrees and coming to the conclusion they're very common.
>> No. 439647 Anonymous
17th October 2020
Saturday 2:48 pm
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>>439646

>I would've considered 35k a fairly comfortable salary, considering how low salaries generally are in the UK

You're not going to make people turn white with envy though when you tell them that you make 35k with a university degree and 15 years of job experience. And to get there was a real struggle, she spent years temping in all kinds of jobs for much less than that.

I'm not saying you're a failure if you have a steady job for 35k. That's good money and allows you a living. But you could have had that after 15 years in a good number of professions without ever going through the trouble of getting a uni degree, let alone one in archaeology, and then spending years going from one temp job to another.