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>> No. 91916 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 1:42 pm
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So...

Has there been one single actual advantage of Brexit yet?
390 posts omitted. Last 50 posts shown. Expand all images.
>> No. 94890 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:34 pm
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>>94889
He spent his whole life forgoing European freedom of movement not to mention practically universal access to higher education. He's as lazy as he is bitter.
>> No. 94891 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:39 pm
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>>94888

Does it include biomed scientists or technicians? You see the thing is I was told this was a good job because it's science and all that, but the reality is I'm just a factory robot in a white coat most of the time, and the pay is shit. I don't mind that but I want to live somewhere nicer than Rotherham or Scunthorpe.
>> No. 94892 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:41 pm
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>>94890

Oh but I have a degree, dickhead. It just wasn't the right degree even though it is the right degree, because it doesn't have the box ticked that nobody ever told me needed to be ticked to get the good jobs.

It's a load of shit and frankly, fuck you, I hope your mum gets raped.
>> No. 94893 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:44 pm
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>>94892
Why do you expect to be spoonfed and have everything handed to you on a plate? Are you incapable of doing things for yourself? You should try channelling your impotent rage into something more productive.
>> No. 94894 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:48 pm
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>>94893

No, I'm on strike.
>> No. 94895 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 2:19 pm
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>>94891

Medical laboratory scientists are on the New Zealand national shortage list. Medical laboratory scientists and technicians are on the Australian list.

https://skillshortages.immigration.govt.nz/

https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/working-in-australia/skill-occupation-list
>> No. 94896 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 2:21 pm
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>>94895

Bonza. Call me Sheila and light me barbie mates.
>> No. 94897 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 2:26 pm
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>>94896
That’s a good start, they love a bit of racism down under.
>> No. 94898 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 2:43 pm
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>>94897

It's hardly racism to make fun of Aussies, it's just like calling your own kid ugly.
>> No. 94899 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 2:56 pm
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Skills shortage lists always add to my "lower middle class" victim complex.
Did a trade? Did hairdressing? Great. Come on over. You can start immediately.
Got a degree in generic widget engineering or advanced theoretical microbiology? Maybe even Art if we're feeling kind? Great. Come on over. You can start immediately.
Got a degree in history or sociology or politics or any vague certification of literacy like that? Sorry, you don't seem to have enough points to qualify for any work-to-residence visas. Have you considered: Tourist visa 3156B? 15 minute working holiday visa 6814A? Assisted suicide zoom call 7431E?
>> No. 94900 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 3:00 pm
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>>94899
>Skills shortage lists always add to my "poor life choices" victim complex.

FTFY.
>> No. 94901 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 3:00 pm
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>>94892

I remember being in the third year of my undergraduate degree -- the wrong one, of course, because working class lads are only ever meant to become engineers or computer scientists if they go into higher education -- and looking for a way out of my little Welsh hometown. I wanted to see something new and find out what working life might be like in other countries.

I had tried essentially every structured or semi-structured channel you could think of. Every ERASMUS+ scheme, every bit of EU-funded nonsense, every placement via institutional partnership, even the Godawful volunteer tourism organisations. I had researched them and dutifully filled out application forms and sent off earnest e-mails. Absolutely nothing came of it.

I now work in the EU, but I do remember making a post on the .gs uni board back in the day asking for advice. The same cretins popped out of the woodwork accusing me of wanting spoonfeeding. I was a bit dumbfounded, and came away with an even stronger impression that working in other countries was some sort of secret club with an initiation or rite of passage.

The truth is that you will need some grit and resourcefulness to make it work, and there are going to be moments when no one can help you and you just have to make a call. What everyone ignores is how much more difficult this becomes if you don't have the kind of connections and mentorship that are taken for granted in the middle class crowd. Others just seem to "run into" opportunities while you don't even know where to start. You waste your time jumping through hoops that are designed to weed people out, and you didn't have that key person around to tell you that, actually, doing this is a waste of time, and you should really be looking over here.

Unfortunately, since it sounds like you're in a similar starting position to me, you're really going to have to be far more diligent than the uni mates that arsed about on gap years or had mysterious postgraduate funding.

I suppose the TL;DR is that yes, it is shite and unfair, and that you may have to put in twice the effort to get half the results of others, but that it is indeed worth it, and not everyone is as obtuse as to say you're thick because you had the audacity to ask the question.
>> No. 94902 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 3:06 pm
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>>94899
Most of us got vague certifications of literacy at 16.
>> No. 94903 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 3:14 pm
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>>94900
Poor life choices naturally follow on from poor availability of advice my smug friend.

>>94902
I can't speak for your school, but I wouldn't count my GCSEs as a certificate of anything, not even that I didn't skive.
>> No. 94904 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 3:41 pm
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>>94901
Finding a job, and even just navigating the adult world, is a skill in itself. It's not about social class, I don't think, because I'm posh as balls but my family are all autists and so am I so I just can't hack it. People said to me in 2008, "Why don't you just get a job in X industry?" when Burger King never even called me back. Because jobs in X industry aren't listed on Totaljobs, you thick bellend. And yet other people got jobs there. At some point, someone must have told them the secret and not told me. And it's not even my family; I have friends from school with similarly spergy backgrounds and they've have the same problems, if not worse.

tl;dr ur parents r retards lmao
>> No. 94905 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:00 pm
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>>94904
Not him, but how did you personally overcome being raised by the principal cast of The Peep Show?
>> No. 94906 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:01 pm
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>>94887
There are effectively no significantly hurdles for immigration in the western world unless you're a criminal or useless. Especially to America. You can do it, it might take a decade to become a proper citizen but if that's what you want from life then there's not much to it.

Pomms are the third biggest immigrant group in Australia we're their version of immigrant scabs.

>>94899
Literally just retrain even if you have to do it out of pocket.

>>94901
I've known some complete morons who navigated ERASMUS to go to Spain. One's who had a working class background and no masonic connections. I don't know how you managed to fuck this up other than trying to do it in your third year. Even without ERASMUS you could have studied in courses taught in English in many EU countries.

I'm working class for the record but I'm not thick as a laplanderstanis moustache so YMMV.
>> No. 94907 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:06 pm
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>>94906
>we're their version of immigrant scabs.

Someone I went to school with emigrated to Australia almost 15 years ago. He spends a lot of time complaining about gangs of Africans, mainly Sudanese off the top of my head.
>> No. 94908 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:10 pm
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>>94904

On a population level, I'd argue that the kind of job you end up in is very strongly associated with class. It's been shown, for example, the earnings of people who go to the same universities and attain the same grade in the same subjects can vary considerably over their lifetime depending on their parent's background. Generally, if your parents were in customer service or manual work, then you'll earn less on average than a contemporary whose parents were professionals, even when controlling for what you study and how well you do at uni. I accept this doesn't describe everyone's life perfectly, but it's broadly true.

As for "industry X", I agree there's often an obscure job board and an opaque system of HR criteria that you have to be told about. Many industries are a labyrinth of unpaid internships, unspoken social norms, and internal stealth-hiring. People with parents and friends who have already navigated these shitshows have a huge advantage, and I would broadly term those people to be "middle class".

For the record, I'm now on a very healthy salary and don't consider myself to be "spergy", but I've also been rejected from fairly menial jobs.
>> No. 94909 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:26 pm
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>>94897

In my experience they do, try discussing Aboriginals and you will hear a bunch of terms and descriptions which would result in a court appearance over here
>> No. 94910 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:31 pm
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>>94908
See, this is why your one job in life as a working class lad is to find yourself a posh bird. Not just for your own security and the joy of ruining her but for the good of the family.
>> No. 94911 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:32 pm
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>>94906
>Especially to America. You can do it, it might take a decade to become a proper citizen but if that's what you want from life then there's not much to it.

This is pure ignorance. If you're from the UK, you can stay in the U.S. for three months, but beyond that you need a visa of some kind. There are temporary and permanent work visas, the former being, well, temporary, and the latter being extremely competitive (unless you belong to a niche profession).

>I've known some complete morons who navigated ERASMUS to go to Spain. One's who had a working class background and no masonic connections. I don't know how you managed to fuck this up other than trying to do it in your third year. Even without ERASMUS you could have studied in courses taught in English in many EU countries.

I'm very happy for your mate that managed to go to Spain, but you're lacking in imagination if you think that there weren't plenty of other candidates that applied that didn't get it, or even some that would have loved it but had no idea what was available. There's different circumstances, application processes, and availability of information across universities. You rightly point to the fact I only began trying in my third year, but why do you think this was?

>Literally just retrain even if you have to do it out of pocket.

Right, but the point is that many people don't have to do this and therefore have a massive leg-up. It's all well and good to tell people to pull themselves up by their bootstraps, but it's an insanely unfair demand to expect someone self-training while already working full-time to compete with someone who was guided through the right steps from the outset.

Historylad certainly could retrain, but you may be totally underselling the effort necessary and impact it would have on them to do so.

I'm not trying to put anyone off trying, here, I'm just saying I have both changed industry and effectively moved countries, and both are really quite fucking tricky without outside help.
>> No. 94912 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 5:41 pm
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>>94911
I know more than one person who got a short-term work visa in the US and then just... stayed. They give you a social security number even if you're on a student visa, which is all most employers really need. Obviously, you can never leave, but who would even want to? I'm fucking stuck here until they start re-issuing H-1B visas and trying to keep my chin up about it.

"Extremely competitive" isn't really an appropriate descriptor of a long-term work visa, but I realise I'm being nitpicky. You won't be able to even apply for a visa unless an employer has filed a petition on your behalf with USCIS to grant you permission to work in the country, so strictly it's a case of getting a job first and then the visa after.

If you really wanted to come over to the US, it's not impossible, but it is a case of being employed somewhere that cares to go to the extra effort of hiring a foreigner. A mate of mine does kitchen work and I encouraged him to apply for a job at a ranch in Montana, who very nearly employed him despite the mountain of paperwork they'd need to do, so it's worth keeping an eye on openings that are interesting or relevant to you and reaching out to see if places would sponsor a temporary work visa. Not now, mind, they're not giving them out unless it's covid or diplomatic work.
>> No. 94913 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 8:18 pm
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>>94912

If your implying staying on as an illegal this does have some major downsides...like if they the authorities do catch you an unsavory experience of the borderline medieval American prison service

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 94914 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 8:36 pm
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>>94913
How's that vague certification of literacy treating you?
>> No. 94915 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 4:28 am
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>>94914

probably better than an illegals experience of the American prison service
>> No. 94916 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 8:11 am
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>>94901

Thanks for this lad. It's nice to be reminded not everybody is a sneering arsehole from time tie time. I know it's often just trolling, but still, you encounter it enough in real life that it becomes a real chip on the shoulder.

>I now work in the EU, but I do remember making a post on the .gs uni board back in the day asking for advice. The same cretins popped out of the woodwork accusing me of wanting spoonfeeding. I was a bit dumbfounded, and came away with an even stronger impression that working in other countries was some sort of secret club with an initiation or rite of passage.

It seems to just go hand in hand with the subject matter, and it's weird. I can only assume it's the bitterness of others who have tried and failed (that crustacean bowl effect one lad here always liked to go on about perhaps), or it's just that the posho wankers who know how to do all this because their uncle's best mate works at the home office earnestly showing the way they think of the lower classes when trying to better themselves.

Either way it's rotten and it's the main reason I want to leave this place, I don't want to forever be defined by a Northern accent. Abroad I'll always be "the British guy", but people in other countries won't understand all the subtle class and cultural baggage and prejudice that goes along with it.
>> No. 94917 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 8:52 am
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>>94916
>Thanks for this lad. It's nice to be reminded not everybody is a sneering arsehole from time tie time.

I've always found it queer when people post something online and only want to read responses that reaffirm their choices in life or reinforce their opinion rather than being open to challenge in any way.
>> No. 94918 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 9:46 am
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>>94917

I don't think the issue is being challenged, but rather being challenged with what? "Do your own research" could be the answer to almost any question that's ever asked, but there's loads of contexts where asking for advice is far more beneficial. I'd say jobhunting and emigrating are firmly in that category. It was a combination of guidance, one or two acts of kindness, and a load of hard work that paid off for me.

Fair play if you're trying to say that it'll take a lot of effort and personal research -- but then so does, say, earning a degree, and we still have professors/lecturers on hand to curate and structure the information to guide students on things like where to start, how to approach a problem, and where find the best information, right?
>> No. 94919 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 1:31 pm
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>>94917
I've always found it queer when people buy flatpack furniture and only want to read instructions that tell them how to make a bed or an armchair, rather than opening a boxing glove on a spring and a sad-trombone noise.
>> No. 94920 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 2:02 pm
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>>94919
Top analogizing m8
>> No. 94921 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 2:13 pm
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>>94917

Yeah but you do sound like a right prick, in all honesty.
>> No. 94922 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 3:18 pm
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>>94921
Look where you are. That goes without saying.
>> No. 94923 Anonymous
24th October 2021
Sunday 6:35 am
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Music gear was my primary concern with Brexit, and there was briefly a rough patch last year when everything went official. There was a dodgy transition for a few months where European retailers were just offloading VAT and customs payments to the customer, payable to the courier at the door.

But a year later, Thomann and DV still manage to undercut UK retailers by 10-20% in a lot of cases. Even on gear made in the UK, they are somehow selling it cheaper than UK shops, and their prices include VAT and customs. A Marshall head, which is made in the UK, costs £1299 at G4M or GAK, but is going for just a shade over £1000 from Ze Germans.

How are they doing this, even with all the supply chain nonsense going on right now? Are they just eating the VAT and customs charges while undercutting the competition just to keep the UK customers? Are the UK retailers relying on people not knowing about the tax/customs exemption in order to charge more? Or did it turn out the Brexit deal wasn't actually all that terrible now we've figured it all out? It seems they have a similar arrangement for Swiss customers too.

(And let's not even think about all the costs and energy wasted transporting these goods from Milton Keynes to Treppendorf then all the way back to Leicester or wherever.)

So yeah, I'm still waiting for Brexit to actually impact my life.
>> No. 94924 Anonymous
24th October 2021
Sunday 7:11 am
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>>94923

Thomann's prices are low because they buy a shitload of the product and pass that wholesale saving onto the customer. It's just something you can't compete with unless you also have a comically large warehouse like they do. The supply chain is irrelevant if you ordered 50,000 amps six years ago and are halfway through selling them. They ARE the supply.

Speaking of Thomann, anytime anyone brings them up I feel compelled to mention how surprised I was that their own brand bass and guitar bags were/are so good. I bought a bass one nearly 20 years ago now and it's still going strong.
>> No. 94946 Anonymous
2nd November 2021
Tuesday 11:37 am
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>Morrisons has backed down after customers complained about its labelling of a chicken meat product as containing "non-EU salt and pepper".

>The supermarket chain's salt-and-pepper chicken crown features the Union Flag on its label, which says that it is "made from British chicken". The label provoked an angry reaction on Twitter, including one accusation of stoking "anti-EU hatred".

>In response, the firm said the wording was "an error for which we apologise. We are changing the packaging immediately," A spokesman for Morrisons said: "It is adhering to packaging regulations rather than making any political point." The supermarket said it would change the packaging and de-emphasise the mention of non-EU salt and pepper, but said it would still have to be included somewhere on the wrapping because of packaging laws. Among the reactions from customers, some pointed out the irony of a soon-to-be US-owned supermarket displaying its British credentials.

>Last month, Morrisons shareholders approved a multi-billion pound takeover offer from US private equity group Clayton, Dubilier & Rice (CD&R). The move comes in the midst of a debate in the food retailing industry about firms' increasing tendency to use patriotic imagery on packaging, with trade publication The Grocer identifying it as part of a post-Brexit "culture war".

>However, those who support the trend see the "made in the UK" tag as a sign of quality rather than a political statement.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-59134190

We must now live in a true halcyon age if this is what people have to complain about.
>> No. 95432 Anonymous
23rd February 2022
Wednesday 4:14 pm
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>The government is to launch a study of the economic benefits of reintroducing imperial units of measurement, to quantify a supposed advantage of Brexit.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-imperial-measurements-economic-benefit-study-b2021304.html
>> No. 95433 Anonymous
23rd February 2022
Wednesday 4:22 pm
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>>95432
Nice, that will make things miles better.
>> No. 95459 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 6:50 pm
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>>91916
Yes, if you want to make up your own mind on political matters without government interference.
https://arkmania.in/russia-controlled-rt-sputnik-banned-by-eu-over-ukraine-disinformation/
>> No. 95462 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 6:56 pm
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>>95459
>> No. 95463 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 8:10 pm
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I had a hardcore sissify friend ask me for my views on the removal of Russia Today from the airwaves. I'm happy to support it as part of the sanctions, same as the Winter Paralympians not being allowed to compete and Russian football teams being expelled from tournaments, but they had better bring it back if Russia withdraws. There are very strict regulations about how TV news reporting can be done; just look at how GB News was billed as being our very own Fox News when it's really more like the Antiques Roadshow. I have watched Russia Today slightly less than I have watched GB News, which is also very little, but they really are pretty harmless-seeming and I do support alternative viewpoints being put forward.

It's possible you were being sarcastic with your post, since "government interference" could either be Russia's government interfering with RT's coverage or our own government interfering with RT being shown, but I stand by my point either way.
>> No. 95464 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 8:46 pm
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>>95463
>I have watched Russia Today slightly less than I have watched GB News, which is also very little, but they really are pretty harmless-seeming

My parents had GB news on today while I was there, and it was godawful. It's clearly written around the formula of having personalities framing topics in a way to make you angry and tribal. Obviously any news network can have bias by picking and choosing what to tell you, but its very different when your "newsreaders" are acting out roles.
>> No. 95465 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 9:00 pm
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I tuned into RT for the first time in forever at the start of the war to see how they were covering it. At the time the answer was "not at all", instead they had an overly made up American woman interviewing a bloke in Caliafornia who was claiming wearing masks was making teenagers depressed. I can only assume he spent his teenage years in cryostasis if he thinks that's even going to make a dent on a teenager's psyche.

I would rather chew through one of my own arteries than watch GB News.
>> No. 95466 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 9:02 pm
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>>95463
Sounds like similar to what Jeremy Vine does for a living.
>> No. 95467 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 11:08 pm
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>>95464
There's a reason people have taken to calling it "GBeebies".

Though, in fairness, I recently saw they had a poll on "should prison be harsher" and the results were 67-33 to No, so they've got at least three viewers.
>> No. 95786 Anonymous
6th May 2022
Friday 8:34 am
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Boris Johnson munches ‘Fukushima popcorn’ as radioactive food rules scrapped

Fish and vegetables grown near the old Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan can be freely sold in Britain after the Food Standards Agency (FSA) scrapped a rule on radioactivity levels in produce.

Controls on a wider range of products, including baby food and breakfast cereals, were lifted several years ago but the FSA maintained tight restrictions on 23 farm products, including bamboo shoot and bracken. After consulting on the issue, the agency decided to remove a threshold that limits Japanese imports that contain more than 100 becquerels, a measure of radioactivity, per kilogram.

The FSA said: “Our risk assessment shows that removing the 100 becquerels per kilogram (Bq/kg) maximum level of radiocaesium for food imported from Japan to the UK would result in a negligible increase in dose and any associated risk to UK consumers. Without specific import controls, the emphasis would fall on food businesses to ensure food is safe under General Food Law. However, we would not recommend businesses need to take any precautions beyond their normal due diligence.”


https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2022/05/05/boris-johnson-fumio-kishida-share-fukushima-popcorn-radioactive/
>> No. 95790 Anonymous
6th May 2022
Friday 11:37 am
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>>95786
So long as it's not so toxic as that shirt tie combination.
>> No. 95827 Anonymous
11th May 2022
Wednesday 6:52 am
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Sounds like we're replacing the Human Rights Act. Take that, wokies!
>> No. 95844 Anonymous
11th May 2022
Wednesday 9:01 pm
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>>95827
Just think of the percentage increase in profits for businesses once we are finally free of the burden of all those bloody rights!
>> No. 95845 Anonymous
11th May 2022
Wednesday 9:42 pm
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>>95827

Yeah well, what has the human rights act ever done for us, really, though?

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