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>> No. 91916 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 1:42 pm
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So...

Has there been one single actual advantage of Brexit yet?
Expand all images.
>> No. 91917 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 1:54 pm
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Why would you put the Unicorn's horn that low down? Some people are twisted.
>> No. 91918 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 1:54 pm
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>>91916
The fish are happier being British and... um...
>> No. 91919 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 1:57 pm
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>>91916
The MHRA approved the Pfizer vaccine almost three weeks faster than the EMA did?
>> No. 91920 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 2:43 pm
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We brought stilton to Japan.
>> No. 91921 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:07 pm
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>>91920
What are the Japs giving us in return?
>> No. 91922 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:08 pm
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>>91921
Nattō.
>> No. 91923 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:14 pm
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>>91922
I don't want any bukakke peanuts, but thank you.
>> No. 91924 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:16 pm
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>>91923
They're more like beans in mucous.
>> No. 91925 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:26 pm
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>>91924
In that case I'll have a double helping.
>> No. 91926 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:31 pm
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>>91922
they're fermented beans called "Natto" (pronounced Nah-doh) that you stir into your rice
>> No. 91927 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:34 pm
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>>91926
Not that anyone asked. You're also wrong. They're sometimes served on top of rice but you wouldn't stir them in.
>> No. 91928 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:45 pm
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It's pronounced Netto.
>> No. 91929 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:59 pm
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>>91928
Brexit is worth it if I can have a Montana bar again. A few years back I found a Netto still open in Sheffield but it was only me in it so I doubt it's still open.
>> No. 91930 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 4:04 pm
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>>91929
You won't find a Netto in this country. Asda bought all of the stores out about 10 years ago, which is why you have those weird Asdas that are bigger than a convenience store but smaller than a supermarket. They tried coming back about 5 years ago in a joint venture with Sainsbury's to try and rival Lidl and Aldi but Sainsbo's decided to pull the plug.
>> No. 91931 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 4:08 pm
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>>91921

If it's not 50 different flavours of Kit Kats, this will have all been a massive waste of time.
>> No. 91932 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 5:11 pm
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No, but it's hard to say there's been any considerable disadvantages either.

Give it a year and we might be able to say.
>> No. 91933 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 5:44 pm
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>>91932
>but it's hard to say there's been any considerable disadvantages either.

It really isn't, just ask the fishermen.
>> No. 91934 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 6:06 pm
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>>91933
Yeah, all their catch is rotting in transit because they can't export it. I'm sure that will do wonders for the price of the extra fish they can now get.
>> No. 91935 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 6:15 pm
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>>91934

But they were already unhappy when we were in the EU because the EU wasn't letting them catch those fish, which was the whole point. Net impact: neutral.

(See what I did there? Net? Like, what you catch fish in?)
>> No. 91936 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 6:26 pm
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>>91933
Welp.
>> No. 91937 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 7:56 pm
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Are Sovereignty
>> No. 91938 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 8:15 pm
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>>91916
The "tampon tax" is gone. But that's about it.

>>91919
They could have done this anyway, and indeed did so during the transition period.
>> No. 91939 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 8:26 pm
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>>91937

I've seen a similar point made a few times, it's kind of a dishonest conflation of the left and right arguments for Brexit. It should go without saying that what we've got is a right Brexit.
>> No. 91940 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 8:46 pm
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>>91939
Boris Johnson standing next to a bright red bus talking about giving money to the NHS.

Mordaunt would so get it.
>> No. 91941 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 8:48 pm
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>>91940

That one came true whether he wanted it to or not. Thanks covid!
>> No. 91942 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 10:30 pm
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>>91941

Except the extra money spent mostly goes to incompetent subcontractors and not the NHS.
>> No. 91943 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 11:01 pm
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It's about a decade too early to tell. And a very tedious decade it's going to be, with every closing factory mourned as a victim of Brexit and every tech unicorn championed as its vindicator.

So far the main stories have been:
- some lorries were stuck in traffic for a bit
- some fishermen in Scotland didn't get their paperwork ready
- a ham sandwich got confiscated

And look at how the media have whipped themselves into a frenzy over it. It's only going to get more and more tedious.
>> No. 91944 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 9:28 am
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>>91943
Kindly fuck off.

I work at a company that exports and imports from the EU and I can tell you that it's been utter shambles, and this is for products that don't need anything other than an invoice and declaration of origin.

With fresh fish, the fisherman getting the paperwork wrong isn't the problem. It's getting the fish and the paperwork physically checked both sides of the border with a system that was cobbled together at the very last minute and simply isn't fit for purpose.

Remember that taking back our fisheries was one of the big benefits of Brexit we were told repeatedly. Whole fat fucking lot of good it does for us if it leaves us with no one to sell it to.

Yes we voted to leave the union but the only people who voted to leave the free trade area were in parliament.
>> No. 91945 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:33 am
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>>91944

I'm genuinely worried about how many times I've heard the words "we don't have any and we don't know when we'll get more" over the past few weeks.

Honda are closing the Swindon plant in July and I don't blame them.
>> No. 91946 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 1:47 pm
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>>91916
I didn't have to pay import duty / VAT on a bit of gear I bought on ebay from Israel.
At least, I haven't had an invoice for the duty from DHL, and they didn't COD it, so I may be up £250 or so.
Not sure that compensates for import/export being a fucking shambles at the moment, but at least we haven't gone all Italy and just pile imported parcels up in a warehouse for a few months.
>> No. 91947 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 2:49 pm
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https://www.ft.com/content/55588f86-a4f8-4cf3-aecb-38723b787569

>Worker protections enshrined in EU law — including the 48-hour week — would be ripped up under plans being drawn up by the government as part of a post-Brexit overhaul of UK labour markets.

>The package of deregulatory measures is being put together by the UK’s business department with the approval of Downing Street, according to people familiar with the matter. It has not yet been agreed by ministers — or put to the cabinet — but select business leaders have been sounded out on the plan.

>The proposed shake-up of regulations from the “working time directive” will delight many Tory MPs but is likely to spark outrage among Britain’s trade union leaders.

Finally and end to those pesky EU Worker Protections. Truly we are living in a Gilded Age.
>> No. 91948 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 4:15 pm
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>>91947
It's not really a trial if you pay for it, is it? If you're going to call yourselves the "Financial Times" you should at least know that much.

Anyway, this is the most obvious and insidious outcome of Tory Brexit and I feel no one really cares. Starmer's going to spend months asking the government to "do better" before abstaining from the final vote on the "Reintroduction of Poorhouses and Child Labour Bill" and the press will call it a victory for the "freedom to work 80 hours a week!". Most of the Remain hardcore were more upset that you'd need a visa to work in Berlin than anything like this, an issue that was of interest to about 0.333% of the country. My overwhelming opinion on politics lately is "what's the point?" because everything's been dragged so far into the pit of rightist irrationality and nihilism that it all feels quite hopeless to advocate anything else. I joined the Labour party just after the election, but didn't attend the three or four local meetings that took place before COVID took hold because of personal reasons. However, I really regret not doing so because it would be nice to have some kind of idea about what the Hell I can do in opposition to immorality and ineptitude of this government. Maybe they wouldn't have any ideas either, maybe I should have kept my money that went to Labour and bought an England shirt with RASHFORD on the back instead.
>> No. 91949 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 4:24 pm
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>>91948

I mean, Labour have pretty much already announced that they're going to be calling for a return to austerity.
>> No. 91950 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 4:44 pm
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>>91948

It says "trial" not "free trial".

Trial means test, not free test.
>> No. 91951 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 5:04 pm
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>>91947
>>91948
I remember this "news" because it gave me a chuckle. For the record, it has already been confirmed multiple times that it's not government policy: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55656593

The actual story (fuck you paywall-lad and no I don't care that I can piss about to read the article) is contained in a snippet that all stories insert with no context because readers don't know how the civil service works:
>The FT said the proposals were being drawn up with the approval of Downing Street, but that they hadn't yet been approved by ministers or cabinet.

It's a draft policy paper where civil servants explore ideas of which thousands are produced every year and involve multiple stages before ever getting sign-off - including consultation with stakeholders. The ask here is no doubt connected to the upcoming Employment Bill which even the TUC are asking for and at this stage likely involves some overworked junior civil servant knocking it together as an early draft given we now kind-of have certainty. Have a good think of how long this has been in development from civil servants getting properly back from Christmas with even the Internal Market Act only passing mid-December.

You'll notice that it's not been picked up as a big news story because it's stupid to get worked up on but I figured you lads would seen start screeching. The real story is that a draft policy paper has been leaked and reported on which is a pretty dangerous thing that keeps happening for the Civil Service.
>> No. 91952 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 5:04 pm
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>>91947
Again, the Brexiteers are their own worst enemy thanks to their using the EU as a scapegoat for things that the British Government has always been free to legislate around.
Take holiday entitlement, the UK has higher mandatory holiday pay requirements than the EU law required.
On the other hand, there has been enough pressure from businesses in this country that while still in the EU our government added a clause to the working time directive that says that workers can simply opt-out of the 48 hour limit.

I reckon all this talk about changes to the working time directive are just a smokescreen to hide some far more insidious plans they have to change employment law. Perhaps they're going to strip away a lot of rights of unions, changes which would conveniently strip a lot of funding from a particular party that's in opposition to the current government.
>> No. 91953 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 5:11 pm
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>>91947

Who could have possibly seen this coming.

Boy I'm sure glad those Labour centrists made Corbyn do the right thing instead of letting him support Brexit openly and had a chance of taking control of the process.

Fucking pricks.
>> No. 91954 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 5:16 pm
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>>91951

You have to be daft not to think it's exactly the soft of thing our current government will eventually do. Must you be reminded that this is the same party who cut the mandatory hour's lunch break entitlement down to a paltry 20 minutes in a nine hour shift? That we've been through a pandemic while statutory sick pay is so poor as to be nonexistent?

Are you just wilfully naive, or are you a business owner?
>> No. 91955 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 5:37 pm
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>>91954
Well obviously now that I've explained why it's a non-story that doesn't matter because it's real in your mind.
>> No. 91956 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 6:08 pm
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Snus will be made legal
>> No. 91957 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 6:10 pm
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>>91956

We've already got nicotine-containing pseudosnus.

https://nordicspirit.co.uk/
>> No. 91958 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 9:32 pm
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>>91957
Something about that site makes me really uncomfortable. Probably referring to it as a 'fresh nicotine experience', and 'enjoying a steady delivery of nicotine'.

I guess they have to dance around the fact they are selling hits of one of the world's shittest and most addictive drugs, but it feels like something about of a Vanderhoeven film.
>> No. 91959 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 9:34 pm
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>>91958

Nicotine actually has plenty of beneficial effects on its own, it's highly addictive sure but so is caffeine and nobody thinks twice about guzzling down coffee.

Nicotine without the act of smoking should always be perfectly legal IMO.
>> No. 91960 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:15 pm
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>>91959
I'd be just as uncomfortable referring to someone 'enjoying a steady delivery of caffiene' or a 'fresh alcohol experience'. It's the corporate talk more than anything.
>> No. 91961 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:19 pm
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>>91960

It's on the level of describing your bloated software development framework as "Rich". I hope that whoever does that feels ashamed of it in ten years time.
>> No. 91962 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:22 pm
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>>91959
Problem with nicotine is that in most terms it's much more "potent" than caffeine.
For someone who's never used it, it takes a fairly small amount to make you ill. If you use it regularly tolerance builds very quickly and it stops having any effect unless you keep upping the dose. And the tolerance is longer lasting.

Microdosing is a thing people are getting into but it's probably not realistic that you can keep taking a dose that you'll actually notice but it too low to build up a tolerance.

I do vape sometimes, just with the weakest juice you can get and only like a few puffs once or twice a week. I find it helps pull me out of the mid-afternoon lull.
>> No. 91963 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:23 pm
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>>91962
It's also carcinogenic, I think. I thought it wasn't but someone who works in medical logistics strongly disagreed.
>> No. 91964 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:33 pm
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>>91960

Standard 21st century marketing experience, do you not just mentally filter that stuff out by now?

What would be nice is if we can get big vape tanks back instead of the 2ml tanks the EU mandated because they're backing Big Tobacco.
>> No. 91965 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:41 pm
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>>91964
I make an effort to never see, hear, or interact with advertising/marketing if I can, so not really. It's brain rot.
>> No. 91966 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:46 pm
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>>91965

Maybe I'm just overly cynical in all areas of life, or maybe it's just some kind of incredibly shit superpower, but I find it incredibly easy to smell bullshit and ignore it honestly.
>> No. 91967 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:46 pm
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>>91963
>but someone who works in medical logistics strongly disagreed.
It must be true, then.
>> No. 91968 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:49 pm
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>>91967
Yes, that's why I mentioned it.
>> No. 91970 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 11:18 pm
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we are no longer ruled from abroad.

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 91971 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 11:51 pm
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>>91960
Maybe it's just a sign of getting older but a 'fresh alcohol experience' sounds like sipping some industrial solvent from a paint can followed a few hours later by softly weeping into a toilet bowl. I'll stick to the brown stuff that comes from a jerrycan tah.

>>91962
>I do vape sometimes, just with the weakest juice you can get and only like a few puffs once or twice a week. I find it helps pull me out of the mid-afternoon lull.

Think about how that would read if you were smoking a light cigarette. As someone who recently stopped smoking I realise that I sound like a tosser but just have a cup of tea and biccie.
>> No. 91972 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 12:39 am
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Oi, what happened to my tinfoil post about Yank vape bans?
>> No. 91973 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 12:40 am
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>>91966
Sure, you might not consciously acknowledge it, but advertising is designed to worm its way into your subconscious.
>> No. 91974 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 3:13 am
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>>91971

>Think about how that would read if you were smoking a light cigarette.

What's the relevancy of that? Apples to car tyres m8.

Think about how that would read if you were shooting up a small dose of heroin. As someone who recently got off the smack I know I sound like a tosser, but just take up smoking.
>> No. 91975 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 6:25 am
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>>91971

>Think about how that would read if you were smoking a light cigarette.

"Light" cigarettes just have holes in the filter to trick the smoking machines they use to measure tar and nicotine. Vaping isn't safe per se, but it's at least 95% less harmful than smoking according to Public Health England.
>> No. 91976 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 10:16 am
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>>91972
Looks as though it was deleted, maybe a miss-click trying to delete >>91970 from /sentry/.
>> No. 91977 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 10:53 am
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>>91976

There is no way banning in American states wasn't the invisible influence of big tobacco. Equally I refuse to belive the removal of this post was a coincidence. What was your price mods? 30 pieces of silver? A lifetime supply of huel? How deep does this conspiracy go?
>> No. 91978 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 1:29 pm
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>>91975
>Vaping isn't safe per se, but it's at least 95% less harmful than smoking according to Public Health England.

Also importantly it's much easier to control the dose.
You can use different strengths liquid and measure how much you're going through to know exactly how much nicotine you're getting.
How many people do you know who smoke a third of a cigarette and put the rest in the pack for later?

Unfortunately most vapers go in the complete opposite direction and get hooked on stronger and stronger liquids until they're on the equivalent of a 40 a day habit.
>> No. 91979 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 1:44 pm
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>>91978
>Unfortunately most vapers go in the complete opposite direction and get hooked on stronger and stronger liquids until they're on the equivalent of a 40 a day habit.

That's pretty shit, but still a lot safer than smoking, eh?
>> No. 91980 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 1:51 pm
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>>91978

It's a pain in the arse to get hold of weaker liquid. Most shops that sell the stuff don't have any weaker than 6ml. You can plan ahead and taper off gradually but if you ever get caught short for any reason, it's back to square one until you can get it delivered or make it to a specialist shop.
>> No. 91981 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:10 pm
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>>91980

If you're genuinely replacing smoking with it, it's like when you go from straights to rollies and realise how much you can save, so you end up scouring the Internet for big 100ml bottles that come without nicotine for a tenner each. Then you add in shots to the strength you desire.

I've never had a good experience buying e-liquids from real shops.
>> No. 91982 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:15 pm
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Vaping will cause COPD and/or lung cancer almost as certainly as tobacco does, it's just not been around long enough to obtain longitudinal clinical data to attest to this.
>> No. 91983 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:23 pm
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>>91982

How do you know then?
>> No. 91984 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:24 pm
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>>91982
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2021/jan/17/shock-brexit-charges-are-hurting-us-say-small-british-businesses
>UK fish exporters are unable to sell into European markets because of delays at borders and complain that Boris Johnson and others misled them about Brexit. Leading supermarket chains are warning ministers of food shortages in Northern Ireland because of new border rules and bureaucracy. And small UK companies such as Paul’s, which thrived as part of the EU single market, are saying they may have no future at all in exporting into continental Europe because of the crippling new costs.

I mean, it's the Grauniad so make of it what you will but I'm not seeing triumphant stories in the Telegraph about how SME is creating jobs and raising the GDP for Britain.

Can anybody provide a single positive article pertaining to the effects of Brexit? Even JRM was quoted as saying it will take 50 years to see the benefit.
>> No. 91985 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:31 pm
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>>91983
Regularly filling the lungs with volatile aromatic compounds is going to increase the frequency of mutagenic change to DNA resulting in cancers.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33320252/
>Vape users self-report similar negative respiratory symptoms to tobacco users

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33437920/
>Three patients with known peripheral arterial disease who switched from heavy cigarette smoking consumption to a high-intensity dose of nicotine e-vaping all developed further arterial complications within 6-30 months.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33429159/
> Although research remains somewhat equivocal, there is clear reason for concern regarding the potential oncogenicity of E-Cigarettes/E-Liquids with a strong basic and molecular science basis. Given lag times (extrapolating from tobacco smoke data) of perhaps 20 years, this may have significant future public health implications. Thus, the authors feel further study in this field is strongly warranted and consideration should be made for tighter control and regulation of these products.

I personally would rather smoke a cigarette than a vape, although I understand the appeal of vaping. Don't kid yourself on that it's harmless however.
>> No. 91986 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:31 pm
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>>91984

There's the fact that seasonal labour like fruit picking has been forced to offer a living wage for the first time in living memory, but of course that's secretly a bad thing because it means your strawberries cost 20p more.
>> No. 91987 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:34 pm
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>>91985
Vaping started to become popular around 2011, so we'll start to see all the never 'smoked, only vaped' zoomers getting lung cancer in another 10 years or so. Screenshot this.
>> No. 91988 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:40 pm
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>>91985

Oh well. I'm willing to roll the dice on my own purely anecdotal experience that ever since switching from a 15-20 a day smoking habit, the shortness of breath, and hacking cough have completely cleared up. I'm not going to pretend it's completely healthy but it's definitely a lesser evil, and in my case that's good enough because I'd be a lifetime smoker otherwise.

At any rate I'll be surprised if when I'm on my deathbed, they tell me it was my 5ml a day vaping habit what done it. The pollution of living in a city is probably much more damaging.
>> No. 91989 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:41 pm
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>>91986
Source?

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/covid-uk-immigrants-job-loss-b1787785.html
>Up to 1.3 million immigrants have left the UK – the largest population fall since the Second World War – with coronavirus the likely cause, a study says.

I guess this could be spun as a benefit of brexit to appeal to gammon that voted for it, but when they're made unemployed due to factory closures and/or have zero workers rights in the gig economy they might twig that somebody is not quite playing fair.
>> No. 91990 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:42 pm
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>>91988
>a lesser evil
yep.

>>The pollution of living in a city is probably much more damaging.
Also yep.
>> No. 91991 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 11:07 pm
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>>91957
Garbage compared to the real thing

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 91992 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 11:52 pm
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>>91989

It's funny because when they say "coronavirus is the likely cause" it really means "the fact there's no jobs because of coronavirus", which is why the migrants were here.

When the economy does open back up and we're outside the EU, in theory they'll have to offer better wages to attract employees, so the British working class will be better off. Supply and demand that innit.

Of course, the capitalists don't like that when it doesn't work in their favour.
>> No. 91993 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 3:41 am
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>>91985

That's really piss-poor data. The first study is a survey of 49 e-cigarette users who reported experiencing negative respiratory symptoms, which is hardly representative. The second is a case report of three people with fucked arteries; it tells us basically nothing that their arteries kept getting worse after they packed in the fags.

The third paper is more subtly crap - it's a review of other crap papers. Several researchers made the mistake (or "mistake") of buying a high-power box mod, fitting it with a crap atomiser and cranking it up to full power. They get vapour samples with shitloads of VOCs, aldehydes and PAHs, but no actual vaper would do this because the liquid is being burned rather than atomised and tastes absolutely horrendous.

More broadly, there's the mistake of testing e-cigarettes in isolation rather than comparing them to conventional cigarettes. Nobody is arguing that e-cigarettes are harmless, but we have hundreds of studies demonstrating that they're vastly safer than conventional cigarettes. Giving up nicotine completely is the best option, but giving up cigarettes is much more important and e-cigarettes are a fantastic harm reduction option for people who can't or won't quit nicotine use.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733022/Ecigarettes_an_evidence_update_A_report_commissioned_by_Public_Health_England_FINAL.pdf

>While vaping may not be 100% safe, most of the chemicals causing smoking-related disease are absent and the chemicals that are present pose limited danger.

>Encouraging smokers who cannot or do not want to stop smoking to switch to EC could be adopted as one of the key strategies to reduce smoking related disease and death.
>> No. 91994 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 9:01 am
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>>91993
They should never have banned vaping indoors IMO.

Maybe in rooms the size of lifts but that's about it.
>> No. 91995 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 10:21 am
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>>91985

Parachuts are dangerous, but they are significantly safer than jumping out of a plane without one. Let's not pretend vape is even in the same ball park as
inhaling smoke (which regardless of the source is inherently dangerous) and buttering your lungs with tar which has obvious high health impacts.

I am sure at some point tobacco companies will find a single case of pneumonia where water vapour in the lungs from vape contributed and parade it out as a false equivalence, but don't buy into their shit prematurely.
>> No. 91996 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 12:10 pm
91996 spacer
>James Owen, owner of Outdoor Toys, says high transport costs and port congestion may mean larger toys such as swings, trampolines and climbing frames will be more expensive.

>Trampoline prices could soar by 40-50%, he told BBC 5 Live's Wake Up to Money. "The port congestion just keeps snowballing," he said. "More and more issues keep arising," Mr Owen added. "We can't get space out of China, there's a container shortage. Hauliers are really stretched, rates keep climbing."

>His firm makes some products in the UK already and rising shipping costs will mean it will become economical to make more.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55702243

Get ready for the post-Brexit bounce.

>>91994
Asthma innit. Although I suspect the stronger drive was twats would smugly puffing away when they were asked not to.
>> No. 91997 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 1:24 pm
91997 spacer
>>91994

That and group of vape enthusiasts with vapour set to max could quickly have a pub looking like a disco with a malfunctioning smoke machine.
>> No. 91998 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 1:26 pm
91998 spacer
>>91996

If Brexit revives manufacturing in the UK, that would actually be great. But I can't see the Neoliberals that run shit ever allowing it.
>> No. 91999 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 2:01 pm
91999 spacer
>>91998

The neoliberals would be perfectly happy to bring back manufacturing in the UK, but that would only be viable if British people would be willing to a) work in factories for £2 an hour or b) pay loads more for stuff just because it's made in Britain.

Even if Chinese wages reached parity with British wages, we'd still struggle to compete because of our higher land prices. If the government confiscated land to build factories on, we'd need to spend a couple of trillion to develop the necessary skills and infrastructure to have a viable manufacturing base.

Pretty much the only reason anyone had for manufacturing in the UK was efficient ports and full access to the EU market, both of which have just gone up in smoke.
>> No. 92000 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 2:16 pm
92000 spacer
>>91999
>pay loads more for stuff just because it's made in Britain

If we can ensure that the stuff being made won't have planned obsolescence built in, and still be fit for purpose for more than two years, it'd be a rare selling point that would possibly even make British Stuff™ attractive for exports again.

...A man can dream.
>> No. 92001 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 4:13 pm
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920019200192001

>> No. 92002 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:09 pm
92002 spacer

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920029200292002
>>91999
>that would only be viable if British people would be willing to a) work in factories for £2 an hour or b) pay loads more for stuff just because it's made in Britain.

Just build on automation with emerging tech like IIOT and move production outside of the SE. I also think that we're probably passed the point of cheap low-quality goods. The west has become more environmentally focused while the developing world has itself started to measure the costs - China has especially changed.

>Pretty much the only reason anyone had for manufacturing in the UK was efficient ports and full access to the EU market

That's stupid and you know it. 25% of the UK economy is manufacturing where our advantages are technical-scientific such as Rolls-Royce engines or JCB otherwise it's food/drink manufacturing where we shovel out Vimto to the Middle East for Ramadan.

The decline of British manufacturing has been multifaceted but connected to the strength of the pound and wider government priorities.
>> No. 92003 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:31 pm
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>>92000

The British Stuff will undoubtedly be worse than the decent Chinese Stuff, because we're feckless bastards.
>> No. 92004 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:42 pm
92004 spacer
Somewhere out there is a timeline where Britain made like Japan and started manipulating the value of its currency downwards to promote exports and domestic consumption rather than fetishising a high pound.
>> No. 92005 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:42 pm
92005 spacer
>>92002

>our advantages are technical-scientific such as Rolls-Royce engines or JCB

I neglected to mention the other advantage Britain offers to manufacturers - a blind eye to corruption.

Rolls-Royce wouldn't be in business were it not for massive amounts of bribery and their willingness to flog jet engines to despotic regimes. JCB have donated millions to the Tory party and received hundreds of millions in government support, despite the fact that they're technically a Dutch company and pay no UK tax.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-38644114
>> No. 92006 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:43 pm
92006 spacer
>>92004

Yeah, but in this timeline we got to go on package holidays to places with cheap beer.
>> No. 92007 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:55 pm
92007 spacer

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>>92006
how about more expensive package holidays to the Channel Islands, recently rebuilt to look like Okinawa?
>> No. 92008 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 10:13 pm
92008 spacer
>>92004

In this timeline I would have been a VTuber and I wish I could go there.
>> No. 92009 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 1:50 am
92009 spacer
>>92008

One of my biggest regrets in life is not spotting the niche earlier and becoming a streamer with a furry avatar (they'll spunk money on anything) or one of those people who just plays all the mods for a certain game (niche appeal).

I can do a great Russian accent, I could have just played STALKER Misery for a living.
>> No. 92010 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 10:43 am
92010 spacer
>>92009

What's stopping you now? Twitch hasn't hit its peak yet.
>> No. 92011 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 2:07 pm
92011 spacer
>>91945

Swindon closing is more about import tariffs being scrapped on cars built in Asia than Brexit
>> No. 92012 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 2:13 pm
92012 spacer
>>91947

The opt out clause of the “working time directive” made it meaningless to the lower end of the job market, during the initial interview you would be asked 'would you be prepared to sign the opt out ' with the implication quite clear, say no and kablam your 'not suitable' for reasons
>> No. 92013 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 4:07 pm
92013 spacer
>>92012
In most companies I've worked at, I was able to simply not sign the opt-out, but one particularly scummy place wrote the opt-out into the contract and stated that you could opt-in on three months' written notice.

tl;dr capitalists are cunts.
>> No. 92014 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 6:50 pm
92014 spacer
>>92012
>>92013
For me it's paradoxical that back when I was given the opt-out I worked 9-5 and then fucked off. Now that I'm in an established job where it's never in the contract I probably do work in excess of 48 hours some weeks just because the place would fall apart if I didn't.

Managers and specialists of the world, unite! The workers will be lost without their chains!
>> No. 92015 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 9:39 pm
92015 spacer
>>92014
It's averaged over 17 weeks, so as long as it's not constant it's fine. I've had people say "we need it otherwise you can't work out of hours", only for me to say (1) I don't particularly want to work out of hours, and (2) even if I did I'd need to basically work 7-day weeks for 4 months straight to break through.
>> No. 92017 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 10:32 pm
92017 spacer
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/uk-northern-ireland-55711531

Stock up on Jelly lads.
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