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>> No. 91916 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 1:42 pm
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So...

Has there been one single actual advantage of Brexit yet?
Expand all images.
>> No. 91917 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 1:54 pm
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Why would you put the Unicorn's horn that low down? Some people are twisted.
>> No. 91918 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 1:54 pm
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>>91916
The fish are happier being British and... um...
>> No. 91919 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 1:57 pm
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>>91916
The MHRA approved the Pfizer vaccine almost three weeks faster than the EMA did?
>> No. 91920 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 2:43 pm
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We brought stilton to Japan.
>> No. 91921 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:07 pm
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>>91920
What are the Japs giving us in return?
>> No. 91922 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:08 pm
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>>91921
Nattō.
>> No. 91923 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:14 pm
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>>91922
I don't want any bukakke peanuts, but thank you.
>> No. 91924 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:16 pm
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>>91923
They're more like beans in mucous.
>> No. 91925 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:26 pm
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>>91924
In that case I'll have a double helping.
>> No. 91926 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:31 pm
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>>91922
they're fermented beans called "Natto" (pronounced Nah-doh) that you stir into your rice
>> No. 91927 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:34 pm
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>>91926
Not that anyone asked. You're also wrong. They're sometimes served on top of rice but you wouldn't stir them in.
>> No. 91928 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:45 pm
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It's pronounced Netto.
>> No. 91929 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 3:59 pm
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>>91928
Brexit is worth it if I can have a Montana bar again. A few years back I found a Netto still open in Sheffield but it was only me in it so I doubt it's still open.
>> No. 91930 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 4:04 pm
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>>91929
You won't find a Netto in this country. Asda bought all of the stores out about 10 years ago, which is why you have those weird Asdas that are bigger than a convenience store but smaller than a supermarket. They tried coming back about 5 years ago in a joint venture with Sainsbury's to try and rival Lidl and Aldi but Sainsbo's decided to pull the plug.
>> No. 91931 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 4:08 pm
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>>91921

If it's not 50 different flavours of Kit Kats, this will have all been a massive waste of time.
>> No. 91932 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 5:11 pm
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No, but it's hard to say there's been any considerable disadvantages either.

Give it a year and we might be able to say.
>> No. 91933 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 5:44 pm
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>>91932
>but it's hard to say there's been any considerable disadvantages either.

It really isn't, just ask the fishermen.
>> No. 91934 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 6:06 pm
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>>91933
Yeah, all their catch is rotting in transit because they can't export it. I'm sure that will do wonders for the price of the extra fish they can now get.
>> No. 91935 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 6:15 pm
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>>91934

But they were already unhappy when we were in the EU because the EU wasn't letting them catch those fish, which was the whole point. Net impact: neutral.

(See what I did there? Net? Like, what you catch fish in?)
>> No. 91936 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 6:26 pm
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>>91933
Welp.
>> No. 91937 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 7:56 pm
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Are Sovereignty
>> No. 91938 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 8:15 pm
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>>91916
The "tampon tax" is gone. But that's about it.

>>91919
They could have done this anyway, and indeed did so during the transition period.
>> No. 91939 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 8:26 pm
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>>91937

I've seen a similar point made a few times, it's kind of a dishonest conflation of the left and right arguments for Brexit. It should go without saying that what we've got is a right Brexit.
>> No. 91940 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 8:46 pm
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>>91939
Boris Johnson standing next to a bright red bus talking about giving money to the NHS.

Mordaunt would so get it.
>> No. 91941 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 8:48 pm
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>>91940

That one came true whether he wanted it to or not. Thanks covid!
>> No. 91942 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 10:30 pm
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>>91941

Except the extra money spent mostly goes to incompetent subcontractors and not the NHS.
>> No. 91943 Anonymous
15th January 2021
Friday 11:01 pm
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It's about a decade too early to tell. And a very tedious decade it's going to be, with every closing factory mourned as a victim of Brexit and every tech unicorn championed as its vindicator.

So far the main stories have been:
- some lorries were stuck in traffic for a bit
- some fishermen in Scotland didn't get their paperwork ready
- a ham sandwich got confiscated

And look at how the media have whipped themselves into a frenzy over it. It's only going to get more and more tedious.
>> No. 91944 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 9:28 am
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>>91943
Kindly fuck off.

I work at a company that exports and imports from the EU and I can tell you that it's been utter shambles, and this is for products that don't need anything other than an invoice and declaration of origin.

With fresh fish, the fisherman getting the paperwork wrong isn't the problem. It's getting the fish and the paperwork physically checked both sides of the border with a system that was cobbled together at the very last minute and simply isn't fit for purpose.

Remember that taking back our fisheries was one of the big benefits of Brexit we were told repeatedly. Whole fat fucking lot of good it does for us if it leaves us with no one to sell it to.

Yes we voted to leave the union but the only people who voted to leave the free trade area were in parliament.
>> No. 91945 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:33 am
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>>91944

I'm genuinely worried about how many times I've heard the words "we don't have any and we don't know when we'll get more" over the past few weeks.

Honda are closing the Swindon plant in July and I don't blame them.
>> No. 91946 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 1:47 pm
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>>91916
I didn't have to pay import duty / VAT on a bit of gear I bought on ebay from Israel.
At least, I haven't had an invoice for the duty from DHL, and they didn't COD it, so I may be up £250 or so.
Not sure that compensates for import/export being a fucking shambles at the moment, but at least we haven't gone all Italy and just pile imported parcels up in a warehouse for a few months.
>> No. 91947 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 2:49 pm
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https://www.ft.com/content/55588f86-a4f8-4cf3-aecb-38723b787569

>Worker protections enshrined in EU law — including the 48-hour week — would be ripped up under plans being drawn up by the government as part of a post-Brexit overhaul of UK labour markets.

>The package of deregulatory measures is being put together by the UK’s business department with the approval of Downing Street, according to people familiar with the matter. It has not yet been agreed by ministers — or put to the cabinet — but select business leaders have been sounded out on the plan.

>The proposed shake-up of regulations from the “working time directive” will delight many Tory MPs but is likely to spark outrage among Britain’s trade union leaders.

Finally and end to those pesky EU Worker Protections. Truly we are living in a Gilded Age.
>> No. 91948 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 4:15 pm
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>>91947
It's not really a trial if you pay for it, is it? If you're going to call yourselves the "Financial Times" you should at least know that much.

Anyway, this is the most obvious and insidious outcome of Tory Brexit and I feel no one really cares. Starmer's going to spend months asking the government to "do better" before abstaining from the final vote on the "Reintroduction of Poorhouses and Child Labour Bill" and the press will call it a victory for the "freedom to work 80 hours a week!". Most of the Remain hardcore were more upset that you'd need a visa to work in Berlin than anything like this, an issue that was of interest to about 0.333% of the country. My overwhelming opinion on politics lately is "what's the point?" because everything's been dragged so far into the pit of rightist irrationality and nihilism that it all feels quite hopeless to advocate anything else. I joined the Labour party just after the election, but didn't attend the three or four local meetings that took place before COVID took hold because of personal reasons. However, I really regret not doing so because it would be nice to have some kind of idea about what the Hell I can do in opposition to immorality and ineptitude of this government. Maybe they wouldn't have any ideas either, maybe I should have kept my money that went to Labour and bought an England shirt with RASHFORD on the back instead.
>> No. 91949 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 4:24 pm
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>>91948

I mean, Labour have pretty much already announced that they're going to be calling for a return to austerity.
>> No. 91950 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 4:44 pm
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>>91948

It says "trial" not "free trial".

Trial means test, not free test.
>> No. 91951 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 5:04 pm
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>>91947
>>91948
I remember this "news" because it gave me a chuckle. For the record, it has already been confirmed multiple times that it's not government policy: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55656593

The actual story (fuck you paywall-lad and no I don't care that I can piss about to read the article) is contained in a snippet that all stories insert with no context because readers don't know how the civil service works:
>The FT said the proposals were being drawn up with the approval of Downing Street, but that they hadn't yet been approved by ministers or cabinet.

It's a draft policy paper where civil servants explore ideas of which thousands are produced every year and involve multiple stages before ever getting sign-off - including consultation with stakeholders. The ask here is no doubt connected to the upcoming Employment Bill which even the TUC are asking for and at this stage likely involves some overworked junior civil servant knocking it together as an early draft given we now kind-of have certainty. Have a good think of how long this has been in development from civil servants getting properly back from Christmas with even the Internal Market Act only passing mid-December.

You'll notice that it's not been picked up as a big news story because it's stupid to get worked up on but I figured you lads would seen start screeching. The real story is that a draft policy paper has been leaked and reported on which is a pretty dangerous thing that keeps happening for the Civil Service.
>> No. 91952 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 5:04 pm
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>>91947
Again, the Brexiteers are their own worst enemy thanks to their using the EU as a scapegoat for things that the British Government has always been free to legislate around.
Take holiday entitlement, the UK has higher mandatory holiday pay requirements than the EU law required.
On the other hand, there has been enough pressure from businesses in this country that while still in the EU our government added a clause to the working time directive that says that workers can simply opt-out of the 48 hour limit.

I reckon all this talk about changes to the working time directive are just a smokescreen to hide some far more insidious plans they have to change employment law. Perhaps they're going to strip away a lot of rights of unions, changes which would conveniently strip a lot of funding from a particular party that's in opposition to the current government.
>> No. 91953 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 5:11 pm
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>>91947

Who could have possibly seen this coming.

Boy I'm sure glad those Labour centrists made Corbyn do the right thing instead of letting him support Brexit openly and had a chance of taking control of the process.

Fucking pricks.
>> No. 91954 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 5:16 pm
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>>91951

You have to be daft not to think it's exactly the soft of thing our current government will eventually do. Must you be reminded that this is the same party who cut the mandatory hour's lunch break entitlement down to a paltry 20 minutes in a nine hour shift? That we've been through a pandemic while statutory sick pay is so poor as to be nonexistent?

Are you just wilfully naive, or are you a business owner?
>> No. 91955 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 5:37 pm
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>>91954
Well obviously now that I've explained why it's a non-story that doesn't matter because it's real in your mind.
>> No. 91956 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 6:08 pm
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Snus will be made legal
>> No. 91957 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 6:10 pm
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>>91956

We've already got nicotine-containing pseudosnus.

https://nordicspirit.co.uk/
>> No. 91958 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 9:32 pm
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>>91957
Something about that site makes me really uncomfortable. Probably referring to it as a 'fresh nicotine experience', and 'enjoying a steady delivery of nicotine'.

I guess they have to dance around the fact they are selling hits of one of the world's shittest and most addictive drugs, but it feels like something about of a Vanderhoeven film.
>> No. 91959 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 9:34 pm
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>>91958

Nicotine actually has plenty of beneficial effects on its own, it's highly addictive sure but so is caffeine and nobody thinks twice about guzzling down coffee.

Nicotine without the act of smoking should always be perfectly legal IMO.
>> No. 91960 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:15 pm
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>>91959
I'd be just as uncomfortable referring to someone 'enjoying a steady delivery of caffiene' or a 'fresh alcohol experience'. It's the corporate talk more than anything.
>> No. 91961 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:19 pm
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>>91960

It's on the level of describing your bloated software development framework as "Rich". I hope that whoever does that feels ashamed of it in ten years time.
>> No. 91962 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:22 pm
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>>91959
Problem with nicotine is that in most terms it's much more "potent" than caffeine.
For someone who's never used it, it takes a fairly small amount to make you ill. If you use it regularly tolerance builds very quickly and it stops having any effect unless you keep upping the dose. And the tolerance is longer lasting.

Microdosing is a thing people are getting into but it's probably not realistic that you can keep taking a dose that you'll actually notice but it too low to build up a tolerance.

I do vape sometimes, just with the weakest juice you can get and only like a few puffs once or twice a week. I find it helps pull me out of the mid-afternoon lull.
>> No. 91963 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:23 pm
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>>91962
It's also carcinogenic, I think. I thought it wasn't but someone who works in medical logistics strongly disagreed.
>> No. 91964 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:33 pm
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>>91960

Standard 21st century marketing experience, do you not just mentally filter that stuff out by now?

What would be nice is if we can get big vape tanks back instead of the 2ml tanks the EU mandated because they're backing Big Tobacco.
>> No. 91965 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:41 pm
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>>91964
I make an effort to never see, hear, or interact with advertising/marketing if I can, so not really. It's brain rot.
>> No. 91966 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:46 pm
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>>91965

Maybe I'm just overly cynical in all areas of life, or maybe it's just some kind of incredibly shit superpower, but I find it incredibly easy to smell bullshit and ignore it honestly.
>> No. 91967 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:46 pm
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>>91963
>but someone who works in medical logistics strongly disagreed.
It must be true, then.
>> No. 91968 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 10:49 pm
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>>91967
Yes, that's why I mentioned it.
>> No. 91970 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 11:18 pm
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we are no longer ruled from abroad.

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 91971 Anonymous
16th January 2021
Saturday 11:51 pm
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>>91960
Maybe it's just a sign of getting older but a 'fresh alcohol experience' sounds like sipping some industrial solvent from a paint can followed a few hours later by softly weeping into a toilet bowl. I'll stick to the brown stuff that comes from a jerrycan tah.

>>91962
>I do vape sometimes, just with the weakest juice you can get and only like a few puffs once or twice a week. I find it helps pull me out of the mid-afternoon lull.

Think about how that would read if you were smoking a light cigarette. As someone who recently stopped smoking I realise that I sound like a tosser but just have a cup of tea and biccie.
>> No. 91972 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 12:39 am
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Oi, what happened to my tinfoil post about Yank vape bans?
>> No. 91973 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 12:40 am
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>>91966
Sure, you might not consciously acknowledge it, but advertising is designed to worm its way into your subconscious.
>> No. 91974 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 3:13 am
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>>91971

>Think about how that would read if you were smoking a light cigarette.

What's the relevancy of that? Apples to car tyres m8.

Think about how that would read if you were shooting up a small dose of heroin. As someone who recently got off the smack I know I sound like a tosser, but just take up smoking.
>> No. 91975 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 6:25 am
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>>91971

>Think about how that would read if you were smoking a light cigarette.

"Light" cigarettes just have holes in the filter to trick the smoking machines they use to measure tar and nicotine. Vaping isn't safe per se, but it's at least 95% less harmful than smoking according to Public Health England.
>> No. 91976 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 10:16 am
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>>91972
Looks as though it was deleted, maybe a miss-click trying to delete >>91970 from /sentry/.
>> No. 91977 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 10:53 am
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>>91976

There is no way banning in American states wasn't the invisible influence of big tobacco. Equally I refuse to belive the removal of this post was a coincidence. What was your price mods? 30 pieces of silver? A lifetime supply of huel? How deep does this conspiracy go?
>> No. 91978 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 1:29 pm
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>>91975
>Vaping isn't safe per se, but it's at least 95% less harmful than smoking according to Public Health England.

Also importantly it's much easier to control the dose.
You can use different strengths liquid and measure how much you're going through to know exactly how much nicotine you're getting.
How many people do you know who smoke a third of a cigarette and put the rest in the pack for later?

Unfortunately most vapers go in the complete opposite direction and get hooked on stronger and stronger liquids until they're on the equivalent of a 40 a day habit.
>> No. 91979 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 1:44 pm
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>>91978
>Unfortunately most vapers go in the complete opposite direction and get hooked on stronger and stronger liquids until they're on the equivalent of a 40 a day habit.

That's pretty shit, but still a lot safer than smoking, eh?
>> No. 91980 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 1:51 pm
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>>91978

It's a pain in the arse to get hold of weaker liquid. Most shops that sell the stuff don't have any weaker than 6ml. You can plan ahead and taper off gradually but if you ever get caught short for any reason, it's back to square one until you can get it delivered or make it to a specialist shop.
>> No. 91981 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:10 pm
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>>91980

If you're genuinely replacing smoking with it, it's like when you go from straights to rollies and realise how much you can save, so you end up scouring the Internet for big 100ml bottles that come without nicotine for a tenner each. Then you add in shots to the strength you desire.

I've never had a good experience buying e-liquids from real shops.
>> No. 91982 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:15 pm
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Vaping will cause COPD and/or lung cancer almost as certainly as tobacco does, it's just not been around long enough to obtain longitudinal clinical data to attest to this.
>> No. 91983 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:23 pm
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>>91982

How do you know then?
>> No. 91984 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:24 pm
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>>91982
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2021/jan/17/shock-brexit-charges-are-hurting-us-say-small-british-businesses
>UK fish exporters are unable to sell into European markets because of delays at borders and complain that Boris Johnson and others misled them about Brexit. Leading supermarket chains are warning ministers of food shortages in Northern Ireland because of new border rules and bureaucracy. And small UK companies such as Paul’s, which thrived as part of the EU single market, are saying they may have no future at all in exporting into continental Europe because of the crippling new costs.

I mean, it's the Grauniad so make of it what you will but I'm not seeing triumphant stories in the Telegraph about how SME is creating jobs and raising the GDP for Britain.

Can anybody provide a single positive article pertaining to the effects of Brexit? Even JRM was quoted as saying it will take 50 years to see the benefit.
>> No. 91985 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:31 pm
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>>91983
Regularly filling the lungs with volatile aromatic compounds is going to increase the frequency of mutagenic change to DNA resulting in cancers.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33320252/
>Vape users self-report similar negative respiratory symptoms to tobacco users

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33437920/
>Three patients with known peripheral arterial disease who switched from heavy cigarette smoking consumption to a high-intensity dose of nicotine e-vaping all developed further arterial complications within 6-30 months.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33429159/
> Although research remains somewhat equivocal, there is clear reason for concern regarding the potential oncogenicity of E-Cigarettes/E-Liquids with a strong basic and molecular science basis. Given lag times (extrapolating from tobacco smoke data) of perhaps 20 years, this may have significant future public health implications. Thus, the authors feel further study in this field is strongly warranted and consideration should be made for tighter control and regulation of these products.

I personally would rather smoke a cigarette than a vape, although I understand the appeal of vaping. Don't kid yourself on that it's harmless however.
>> No. 91986 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:31 pm
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>>91984

There's the fact that seasonal labour like fruit picking has been forced to offer a living wage for the first time in living memory, but of course that's secretly a bad thing because it means your strawberries cost 20p more.
>> No. 91987 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:34 pm
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>>91985
Vaping started to become popular around 2011, so we'll start to see all the never 'smoked, only vaped' zoomers getting lung cancer in another 10 years or so. Screenshot this.
>> No. 91988 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:40 pm
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>>91985

Oh well. I'm willing to roll the dice on my own purely anecdotal experience that ever since switching from a 15-20 a day smoking habit, the shortness of breath, and hacking cough have completely cleared up. I'm not going to pretend it's completely healthy but it's definitely a lesser evil, and in my case that's good enough because I'd be a lifetime smoker otherwise.

At any rate I'll be surprised if when I'm on my deathbed, they tell me it was my 5ml a day vaping habit what done it. The pollution of living in a city is probably much more damaging.
>> No. 91989 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:41 pm
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>>91986
Source?

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/covid-uk-immigrants-job-loss-b1787785.html
>Up to 1.3 million immigrants have left the UK – the largest population fall since the Second World War – with coronavirus the likely cause, a study says.

I guess this could be spun as a benefit of brexit to appeal to gammon that voted for it, but when they're made unemployed due to factory closures and/or have zero workers rights in the gig economy they might twig that somebody is not quite playing fair.
>> No. 91990 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 2:42 pm
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>>91988
>a lesser evil
yep.

>>The pollution of living in a city is probably much more damaging.
Also yep.
>> No. 91991 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 11:07 pm
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>>91957
Garbage compared to the real thing

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 91992 Anonymous
17th January 2021
Sunday 11:52 pm
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>>91989

It's funny because when they say "coronavirus is the likely cause" it really means "the fact there's no jobs because of coronavirus", which is why the migrants were here.

When the economy does open back up and we're outside the EU, in theory they'll have to offer better wages to attract employees, so the British working class will be better off. Supply and demand that innit.

Of course, the capitalists don't like that when it doesn't work in their favour.
>> No. 91993 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 3:41 am
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>>91985

That's really piss-poor data. The first study is a survey of 49 e-cigarette users who reported experiencing negative respiratory symptoms, which is hardly representative. The second is a case report of three people with fucked arteries; it tells us basically nothing that their arteries kept getting worse after they packed in the fags.

The third paper is more subtly crap - it's a review of other crap papers. Several researchers made the mistake (or "mistake") of buying a high-power box mod, fitting it with a crap atomiser and cranking it up to full power. They get vapour samples with shitloads of VOCs, aldehydes and PAHs, but no actual vaper would do this because the liquid is being burned rather than atomised and tastes absolutely horrendous.

More broadly, there's the mistake of testing e-cigarettes in isolation rather than comparing them to conventional cigarettes. Nobody is arguing that e-cigarettes are harmless, but we have hundreds of studies demonstrating that they're vastly safer than conventional cigarettes. Giving up nicotine completely is the best option, but giving up cigarettes is much more important and e-cigarettes are a fantastic harm reduction option for people who can't or won't quit nicotine use.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/733022/Ecigarettes_an_evidence_update_A_report_commissioned_by_Public_Health_England_FINAL.pdf

>While vaping may not be 100% safe, most of the chemicals causing smoking-related disease are absent and the chemicals that are present pose limited danger.

>Encouraging smokers who cannot or do not want to stop smoking to switch to EC could be adopted as one of the key strategies to reduce smoking related disease and death.
>> No. 91994 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 9:01 am
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>>91993
They should never have banned vaping indoors IMO.

Maybe in rooms the size of lifts but that's about it.
>> No. 91995 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 10:21 am
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>>91985

Parachuts are dangerous, but they are significantly safer than jumping out of a plane without one. Let's not pretend vape is even in the same ball park as
inhaling smoke (which regardless of the source is inherently dangerous) and buttering your lungs with tar which has obvious high health impacts.

I am sure at some point tobacco companies will find a single case of pneumonia where water vapour in the lungs from vape contributed and parade it out as a false equivalence, but don't buy into their shit prematurely.
>> No. 91996 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 12:10 pm
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>James Owen, owner of Outdoor Toys, says high transport costs and port congestion may mean larger toys such as swings, trampolines and climbing frames will be more expensive.

>Trampoline prices could soar by 40-50%, he told BBC 5 Live's Wake Up to Money. "The port congestion just keeps snowballing," he said. "More and more issues keep arising," Mr Owen added. "We can't get space out of China, there's a container shortage. Hauliers are really stretched, rates keep climbing."

>His firm makes some products in the UK already and rising shipping costs will mean it will become economical to make more.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55702243

Get ready for the post-Brexit bounce.

>>91994
Asthma innit. Although I suspect the stronger drive was twats would smugly puffing away when they were asked not to.
>> No. 91997 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 1:24 pm
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>>91994

That and group of vape enthusiasts with vapour set to max could quickly have a pub looking like a disco with a malfunctioning smoke machine.
>> No. 91998 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 1:26 pm
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>>91996

If Brexit revives manufacturing in the UK, that would actually be great. But I can't see the Neoliberals that run shit ever allowing it.
>> No. 91999 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 2:01 pm
91999 spacer
>>91998

The neoliberals would be perfectly happy to bring back manufacturing in the UK, but that would only be viable if British people would be willing to a) work in factories for £2 an hour or b) pay loads more for stuff just because it's made in Britain.

Even if Chinese wages reached parity with British wages, we'd still struggle to compete because of our higher land prices. If the government confiscated land to build factories on, we'd need to spend a couple of trillion to develop the necessary skills and infrastructure to have a viable manufacturing base.

Pretty much the only reason anyone had for manufacturing in the UK was efficient ports and full access to the EU market, both of which have just gone up in smoke.
>> No. 92000 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 2:16 pm
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>>91999
>pay loads more for stuff just because it's made in Britain

If we can ensure that the stuff being made won't have planned obsolescence built in, and still be fit for purpose for more than two years, it'd be a rare selling point that would possibly even make British Stuff™ attractive for exports again.

...A man can dream.
>> No. 92001 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 4:13 pm
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920019200192001

>> No. 92002 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:09 pm
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>>91999
>that would only be viable if British people would be willing to a) work in factories for £2 an hour or b) pay loads more for stuff just because it's made in Britain.

Just build on automation with emerging tech like IIOT and move production outside of the SE. I also think that we're probably passed the point of cheap low-quality goods. The west has become more environmentally focused while the developing world has itself started to measure the costs - China has especially changed.

>Pretty much the only reason anyone had for manufacturing in the UK was efficient ports and full access to the EU market

That's stupid and you know it. 25% of the UK economy is manufacturing where our advantages are technical-scientific such as Rolls-Royce engines or JCB otherwise it's food/drink manufacturing where we shovel out Vimto to the Middle East for Ramadan.

The decline of British manufacturing has been multifaceted but connected to the strength of the pound and wider government priorities.
>> No. 92003 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:31 pm
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>>92000

The British Stuff will undoubtedly be worse than the decent Chinese Stuff, because we're feckless bastards.
>> No. 92004 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:42 pm
92004 spacer
Somewhere out there is a timeline where Britain made like Japan and started manipulating the value of its currency downwards to promote exports and domestic consumption rather than fetishising a high pound.
>> No. 92005 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:42 pm
92005 spacer
>>92002

>our advantages are technical-scientific such as Rolls-Royce engines or JCB

I neglected to mention the other advantage Britain offers to manufacturers - a blind eye to corruption.

Rolls-Royce wouldn't be in business were it not for massive amounts of bribery and their willingness to flog jet engines to despotic regimes. JCB have donated millions to the Tory party and received hundreds of millions in government support, despite the fact that they're technically a Dutch company and pay no UK tax.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-38644114
>> No. 92006 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:43 pm
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>>92004

Yeah, but in this timeline we got to go on package holidays to places with cheap beer.
>> No. 92007 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 5:55 pm
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>>92006
how about more expensive package holidays to the Channel Islands, recently rebuilt to look like Okinawa?
>> No. 92008 Anonymous
18th January 2021
Monday 10:13 pm
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>>92004

In this timeline I would have been a VTuber and I wish I could go there.
>> No. 92009 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 1:50 am
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>>92008

One of my biggest regrets in life is not spotting the niche earlier and becoming a streamer with a furry avatar (they'll spunk money on anything) or one of those people who just plays all the mods for a certain game (niche appeal).

I can do a great Russian accent, I could have just played STALKER Misery for a living.
>> No. 92010 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 10:43 am
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>>92009

What's stopping you now? Twitch hasn't hit its peak yet.
>> No. 92011 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 2:07 pm
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>>91945

Swindon closing is more about import tariffs being scrapped on cars built in Asia than Brexit
>> No. 92012 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 2:13 pm
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>>91947

The opt out clause of the “working time directive” made it meaningless to the lower end of the job market, during the initial interview you would be asked 'would you be prepared to sign the opt out ' with the implication quite clear, say no and kablam your 'not suitable' for reasons
>> No. 92013 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 4:07 pm
92013 spacer
>>92012
In most companies I've worked at, I was able to simply not sign the opt-out, but one particularly scummy place wrote the opt-out into the contract and stated that you could opt-in on three months' written notice.

tl;dr capitalists are cunts.
>> No. 92014 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 6:50 pm
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>>92012
>>92013
For me it's paradoxical that back when I was given the opt-out I worked 9-5 and then fucked off. Now that I'm in an established job where it's never in the contract I probably do work in excess of 48 hours some weeks just because the place would fall apart if I didn't.

Managers and specialists of the world, unite! The workers will be lost without their chains!
>> No. 92015 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 9:39 pm
92015 spacer
>>92014
It's averaged over 17 weeks, so as long as it's not constant it's fine. I've had people say "we need it otherwise you can't work out of hours", only for me to say (1) I don't particularly want to work out of hours, and (2) even if I did I'd need to basically work 7-day weeks for 4 months straight to break through.
>> No. 92017 Anonymous
19th January 2021
Tuesday 10:32 pm
92017 spacer
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/uk-northern-ireland-55711531

Stock up on Jelly lads.
>> No. 92018 Anonymous
20th January 2021
Wednesday 5:40 am
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>>91948
The trial is the most expensive option in the long run ("Trial" is £53.00/month, "Digital" is £33.00, "Print" is £31.20). I think they know exactly what they're doing.
>> No. 92027 Anonymous
23rd January 2021
Saturday 1:30 pm
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>sadtrumpet.wav
>> No. 92029 Anonymous
23rd January 2021
Saturday 2:43 pm
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>>92027

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ag1o3koTLWM
>> No. 92049 Anonymous
24th January 2021
Sunday 1:10 pm
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https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2021/jan/23/brexit-hit-firms-advised-government-officials-set-up-shop-in-eu?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_gu&utm_medium&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1611428749

>In an extraordinary twist to the Brexit saga, UK small businesses are being told by advisers working for the Department for International Trade (DIT) that the best way to circumvent border issues and VAT problems that have been piling up since 1 January is to register new firms within the EU single market, from where they can distribute their goods far more freely.

>Andrew Moss, who runs Horizon Retail Marketing Solutions, based in Ely, Cambridgeshire, which sells packaging and point-of-sale marketing displays in the UK and to EU customers, is registering a European company Horizon Europe in the Netherlands in the next few weeks, on the advice of a senior government adviser.

>This will mean laying off a small number of staff here and taking on people in the Netherlands.

ARE JOBS
>> No. 92050 Anonymous
24th January 2021
Sunday 1:26 pm
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>>92049

That's hardly an extraordinary twist, is it? That's just exactly what we knew would happen.
>> No. 92051 Anonymous
24th January 2021
Sunday 1:39 pm
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>>92050

It's an extraordinary twist that a Government department is basically telling businesses "fuck off to Europe if you love them so much".
>> No. 92052 Anonymous
24th January 2021
Sunday 2:19 pm
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>>92051

I suppose more realistically it's an extraordinary twist that a government department is giving good, truthful advice?
>> No. 92053 Anonymous
24th January 2021
Sunday 2:28 pm
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>>92049
What kind of keyboard is that?
>> No. 92054 Anonymous
24th January 2021
Sunday 2:41 pm
92054 spacer
>>92053

She's using her right hand to jiggle the mouse, but it's on the left side of the keyboard.
>> No. 92055 Anonymous
24th January 2021
Sunday 3:09 pm
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>>92053

I don't know what it is specifically, but it looks like one of those multi-workstation controller keyboards often seen in control rooms and trading floors. Weytec made a relatively recent example:



I'd actually really find one useful, I have to run five different systems at the same time at work.
>> No. 92056 Anonymous
24th January 2021
Sunday 3:40 pm
92056 spacer
>>92055
If you have the technical aptitude, would be a nice project to build one, or at least the top half of one with a normal keyboard as the bottom half.

Mechanical keyswitches are pretty cheap and readily available now, and its quite easy to design a PCB and get it custom printed in China to mount the switches.
It's possible to use an Arduino to create an input device which will send macros to the PC. You could even recreate those diplays using Arduino but it would be harder to program.
>> No. 92060 Anonymous
25th January 2021
Monday 11:07 am
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>>92056

I have been thinking about it, it would be genuinely useful and I have some arduino and pi experience, and have built mech boards.

For a long time I wanted to do a "cyberdeck" build for no real practical reason, this is just the adult, justified version of that.
>> No. 92061 Anonymous
25th January 2021
Monday 2:58 pm
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>>92055
Reminds me of the Talking Whizz Kid I had as a lad. INSERT CARD, INSERT CARD
>> No. 92062 Anonymous
26th January 2021
Tuesday 8:33 am
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>>92049

Nevermind, we don't need them anyway.

All the recent hassle has prompted the decision by true workhorse of the British economy, Games Workshop, to bring all their manufacturing and printing back home from China to the UK. That'll be an instant ten percent boost to the GDP.
>> No. 92063 Anonymous
26th January 2021
Tuesday 7:55 pm
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https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2021/jan/26/eu-citizens-offered-financial-incentives-to-leave-uk

Can any of you lads find me a fake Danish passport?
>> No. 92064 Anonymous
26th January 2021
Tuesday 7:57 pm
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>>92063
I didn't even know we paid anyone to leave the country, let alone EU citizens. Wasn't this basically BNP policy?
>> No. 92065 Anonymous
26th January 2021
Tuesday 8:52 pm
92065 spacer
>>92063
Can we open this to UK citizens as well?
>> No. 92066 Anonymous
26th January 2021
Tuesday 9:09 pm
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>>92065
No, but don't let the door hit you on the way out.
>> No. 92067 Anonymous
26th January 2021
Tuesday 9:14 pm
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>>92066
I don't think he meant it in a racist way, just in a "I want to get off this fucking island way".
>> No. 92068 Anonymous
26th January 2021
Tuesday 9:27 pm
92068 spacer
>>92067

I think >>92066 knew exactly what >>92063 meant.

I am a naturalized Australian citizen and living there if you complain about Ozzy things people are legit like 'Well fuck off if you don't like it then' and I actually think it's pretty fair dinkum.
Happy Australia Day!
>> No. 92069 Anonymous
26th January 2021
Tuesday 9:29 pm
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>>92067
Exactly this, get me the fuck out of here please.
>> No. 92070 Anonymous
26th January 2021
Tuesday 9:36 pm
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>>92063
I actually feel for the Home Office given that it has been nearly 5 years of absolute kid's gloves and Brexit dominating the news. Anyone who still doesn't have this sorted is royally taking the piss and shouldn't get special treatment compared to any other immigrant.
>> No. 92071 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 12:20 am
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>>92066
Not the lad you're replying to but I don't plan on sticking around long enough for the door to hit me. Soon as this pandemic shit is over and my visa application is back, I'm gone. Fuck this place.
>> No. 92072 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 12:41 am
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I only just got back to being in the UK in Sep '19 after leaving in 2015.

Looking at these most recent messages.

If rats are first to leave a sinking ship, what organism is quickest to return to one?
>> No. 92073 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 12:50 am
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>>92072

Barnacles.
>> No. 92074 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 8:47 am
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>>92071

I don't understand how someone gets this bitter about a whole country. It's not as if anywhere out there is exactly perfect, and I've heard the same attitude from people all over the world. I even knew a New Zealander who lived in Manchester, and I asked him why the fuck he possibly thought that was an upgrade- He hated NZ because it's so big, empty, and full of nothing but old people and sheep.

Is it more likely that you've just alienated all your mates, burnt every bridge, and fucked your life up so badly you need a fresh start in another country? Or is it really true that this country and its circumstances specifically are shite enough that you think any other country is substantially better, and doesn't simply have problems of its own?

I'm not saying you are that kind of guy, by the way, so don't take it personally. That's just how I've always felt this attitude comes across.
>> No. 92075 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 10:08 am
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I'm a big fan of Nordic social democracy. If they spoke English and it wasn't so fucking cold I'd move up there like a shot.
>> No. 92076 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 10:22 am
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>>92075
Move to Estonia. The women are fitter and it's pseudo-Scandinavian.
>> No. 92077 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 11:29 am
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>>92074
As someone who had left the UK years ago but popped back every so often, it's a lot easier to see the country going to shit when you're on the outside. When you're here it's all small, slow incremental changes where you can say "Ah it won't be that bad" "I'm sure it'll be fine" and then you come to terms with it because what else can you do. If you're on the outside and come back in, you really notice what's changed and what's become worse.
>> No. 92078 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 11:31 am
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>>92076
I have a mate who moved to Estonia for a woman only to end up horrified with the society. It's not that anything is wrong per se. but everyone looks the same, dresses the same and acts or same. Or else.

It all went tits up but he managed to fuck her mum which is impressive in its own right
>> No. 92079 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 11:39 am
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>>92077
More brown-eyed people and foreign shops?
>> No. 92080 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 11:40 am
92080 spacer
>>92079

It's grey and wet and all the young people are terribly disrespectful.
>> No. 92081 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 12:24 pm
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>>92079
No.
>> No. 92082 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 12:54 pm
92082 spacer
>>92081
Well what then? 20mph speed limits? No Woolworths? Piers Morgan on daytime TV? What is it?
>> No. 92083 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 1:06 pm
92083 spacer
>>92082
Curly Wurlys and Freddos cost more and are smaller.
>> No. 92084 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 1:18 pm
92084 spacer
>>92082

Salaries generally have not increased in the past 10 years which is a cut in real terms when you consider inflation. Taken alongside the considerable increase in cost of living (Mostly due to Rent and Freddo Frogs) the quality of life for most Brits has been in slow decline.

https://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea036.pdf

Also I don't like the aesthetics of the beauty standards that Instagram has young women aspiring towards.

And the music today is too loud.
>> No. 92085 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 3:13 pm
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>>92084
Where has the quality of life been improving?
>> No. 92086 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 3:41 pm
92086 spacer
>>92085
Elon Musk's house.
>> No. 92087 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 3:58 pm
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I think my main thing is that everyone and everything here is so ultimately entrenched that it's all but impossible to change anything from the bottom up. If you're not fucking minted or born into six-toed ponyfucker aristocracy (one and the same) literally nothing you can do will change anything.

I've been involved in silly socialist groups at university, and sure some of these groups may be well-intentioned but ultimately useless, but it really woke me up to the fact that these people are just as entrenched in their views and in a way, the status quo suits them because they can forever whinge. I unsuccessfully tried even just chipping away at the fact that The Yoot simply don't respond to the talking points and imagery and handing out pamphlets on a street corner isn't the way that information spreads among people my age. I never really liked Momentum but at least they understood that.

All the unions I've been involved with as I've been a worker (GMB, Unite, and a more specific one I won't reveal the name of) have at most been able to act as a brake on shit getting worse -- they have rarely been able to tangibly make anything better, just resist the worst of contract changes and working conditions, but in the end, things are still getting worse.

I've grown up with the rug being continually pulled out from under me -- told that I and my peers must go to university if we want a good job, but EMA being cut the year before I could have got it, same with tuition fees going up from £3k to £9k and later £9250. Wages falling in real terms whilst the triple lock on pensions continues; the pension age going up.

The media here is so insidious, performing absolute character assassinations on anyone who dare try and change the fucked-up status quo.

130,000 dead for 'purely ideological reasons'. Another 100,000 dead from complete mismanagement. UNICEF feeding kids. 4+ million kids in poverty.

Not that much of this is unique to the UK (though the fully entrenched class system absolutely is in the form we have it), but if I'm going to watch the planet burn whilst being utterly powerless to do anything about it, I might as well go somewhere where it's a bit sunnier and wages are higher.
>> No. 92088 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 4:41 pm
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I popped my head into the live feed of PMQs via my local Trinity Mirror newspaper's Facebook page today. The comments were the same four or five people spamming that Starmer was a lefty wanker and he had no plans and wouldn't do a better job over and over again. There were even a few uses of the Captain Hindsight nickname. Utter bootlickers.
>> No. 92089 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 4:53 pm
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>>92088
Politics is like supporting a football team these days.
>> No. 92090 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 5:11 pm
92090 spacer
>>92089
Yeah, and the team in question is Bolton fucking Wanderers.
>> No. 92091 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 5:15 pm
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>>92089
It's not the fact that these people are so nasty as to comment 'Nicola Sturgeon needs to be sectioned' that winds me up, it's the fact they don't shut up. They've said their bit, now let other people contribute. But it was constant repetition of the same few talking points. Almost as if it was designed to give people the impression there was huge public support for the government.
>> No. 92092 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 5:19 pm
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>>92091

A lot of those kinds of posts are made by bots, and the ones that aren't may as well have been.
>> No. 92093 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 5:54 pm
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>>92092
"I SUPPORT BORIS 100%" was a bot I remember before the last election. Hundreds if not thousands of comments on so many political posts.
>> No. 92094 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 6:02 pm
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>>92093

https://skwawkbox.org/2019/08/24/expose-of-johnson-promo-bots-leads-to-sinister-wave-of-hacking-attacks-on-labour-supporter-account/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-50218615

pretty funny tbh.

https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/05/20/859814085/researchers-nearly-half-of-accounts-tweeting-about-coronavirus-are-likely-bots?t=1611770264069

I hope they cover this in the Adam Curtis doc, and I wonder what Marshall MacLuhan would make of it all.

He famously wrote about how people who listened to JFK debate Nixon reckoned Nixon won, but people who watched it on TV gave it to JFK.

How is a person's consumption of new media reflected in their perceptions of how the world works?

I was going to write an essay a couple years back comparing Barack Obama's use of Twitter to Donald Trump's and what this says about contemporary culture but I figured somebody smarter than me would beat me to the punch.
>> No. 92095 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 7:34 pm
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>>92094
And that is one of the myriad reasons that the tories will continue to win in perpetuity. For a bunch of tech-illiterate boomers, they aren't afraid to do the shadiest internet shit imaginable. Labour always seem to take the high ground, but this isn't a fair game.
>> No. 92096 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 7:39 pm
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>>92095
>boomers

Fuck off back to Kansas, Yosemite Sam.
>> No. 92097 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 7:42 pm
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>>92096

ok boomer.
>> No. 92098 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 7:43 pm
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>>92095
Batman: You don't understand. I don't think you've ever understood.

Jason Todd: What? That your moral code just won't allow for that? It's too hard to cross that line?

Batman: No! God Almighty, no. It'd be too damned easy. But if I do that, if I allow myself to go down into that place... I'll never come back.

>> No. 92099 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 8:09 pm
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>>92096
The average age of a Conservative Party member was 57 in 2017. I can't imagine the yoot flooding them since then, so let's assume that's not changed. Assuming '45-'64 is the Boomer Years, it'd make your average tory a boomer. Only just, I'll grant you that.
>> No. 92100 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 8:13 pm
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>>92099
Everybody over the age of 30 is a boomer.
>> No. 92101 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 8:22 pm
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>>92099
At the last general election the crossover age for voting Tory was 39.
>> No. 92102 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 8:26 pm
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>>92099
Boomer stereotypes don't work in Britain because our economic experience diverges from America's considerably. It's not only dumb generational slang from the otherplace but one that attempts to apply American politics to Britain.
>> No. 92103 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 9:28 pm
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>>92102
Agreed.

In the UK anybody who was old enough to be able to buy a house in the 90s or earlier is a boomer.
>> No. 92104 Anonymous
27th January 2021
Wednesday 10:03 pm
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>>92101
But the tory voter is not the one waging a dark online propaganda war.
>> No. 92105 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 8:16 am
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>>92104
I know plenty of people who post pro-Labour, anti-Tory things online and none of them are actual Labour party members.
>> No. 92106 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 8:43 am
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>>92088

>the same four or five people spamming that Starmer was a lefty wanker

It's funny that, because amidst the political circles I dip my toes in it's all "Starmer is a Tory bastard" and "Starmer is a racist fashy".

I'm starting to form a new political opinion, and it's probably the first genuinely novel one I've had in the last five or six years: If there's one thing more insufferable than a Tory, it's an ex-Labour member.
>> No. 92107 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 8:53 am
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>>92106
They are correct though. Of course Starmer is right-wing. I don't see him reforming the economy into democratic workers' councils any time soon, do you? But that's irrelevant to the perception of the kind of Tory supporter who spams newspaper comment sections who think him a red under the bed.
>> No. 92108 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 8:59 am
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>>92107

Arguably yes, but they're not saying it out of any understanding of his political position. They're just parroting shite like "saying "Labour will be the party of the family" is a right wing heteronormative dogwhistle".

Both sides and all that, but it's basically the same kind of frothy mouthed fanaticism. He's no Jay Cee and appointing Israeli special service operatives to his security team is a bit... Well, what do you even say about something like that, considering everything?

But even so I'd still find it hard to call him anything but centrist.
>> No. 92109 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 9:06 am
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>>92107
Go woke, go broke.
>> No. 92110 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 9:15 am
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>>92108
Again, I find myself agreeing with your friends whom you hate - 'family values' is a socially conservative dogwhistle. If you're going to call saying that frothy mouthed fanaticism, then you must be able to explain what appealing to 'family values' actually means in practice for policy and how those policies are responsible and reasonable?

>>92109
Oh fuck me I was wrong he took a photo while kneeling. That's basically the same as actually ending racism.
>> No. 92111 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 9:42 am
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>>92110

I'd call it more like what it actually is- An empty centrist politician saying whatever he thinks sounds the most electable. The focus groups say people like family? He'll say it. A dogwhistle is a coded reference to something only an insider-group would pick up on- "family values" might indeed be a socially conservative talking point, but he's not even attempting to mask it, he's just outright stating a vague gesture of approval for it.

There's nothing fashy about it, it's just a broad attempt to appeal to the former Red Wall voters who have jumped ship because Labour has become too socially progressive for them. Calling anything that isn't your side of the socially progressive/conservative fence fascism is just a deeply wearisome British equivalent of Trump Derangement.

Anyway in practice it'll just mean boosting child tax credits or some shit. I understand the point being made when people say it's heteronormative, but I'm straight and don't have or want kids, and it would discriminate against me for the exact same reasons. So that's bollocks too.

I just want people to be accurate when criticising somebody. Call him a morally bankrupt and politically empty centrist, but don't call him a fascist, because he's clearly fucking not.
>> No. 92112 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 10:28 am
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Cruel as it is I wish there were more people who just made fun of Starmer for being charmless and Labour for being rudderless. When people on the Labour left go after him for conceding on this policy or this or that mealy mouthed focus grouped sop to nobody they miss the much wider open goal that he's just a bit shit. His lack of charisma and weird voice will keep him out of number 10 no matter what, and just in case that isn't enough it's going to be bolstered by Labour's traditional complete lack of focus: Today he's talking about hardworkingbritishfamilies, tomorrow he'll be on about "controls on immigration", the next day he'll waste valuable time and money on a trip to Scotland, and then he'll cap it off by saying something on poverty which will have enough workfare-y dogwhistles to piss off the left while leaving everyone else convinced he's out to give doleys another Mazda.

But it doesn't suit anyone to focus on the detached, technical side of things: The left can't help but fall into the role Starmer wants them to play by whining about policy and when they try mocking him they can't really stick the landing because it clearly comes from a place of bitterness rather than a sort of detached amusement that he's no good. You'd think the right might do a better job of it, but they've got much greater to just lie and pretend that he's actually a raving Marxist Europhile who'll take us back to the 1970s. There's nobody really capable of putting aside their personal politics and going: Objectively, the kindest rating you can give Starmer is that he's the best of a bad lot for a party perpetually caught in zugzwang. Love or hate Blair and new Labour, he had charisma and they had message discipline. Starmer doesn't, and at the end of the day in the absence of those two things it doesn't matter how many old buzzwords you use, how many policies you jettison or how many lefties you fight with, in the absence of charisma and a clear message you will not become prime minister at a general election. Labour is going to poll ahead in the middle when people are half ignoring politics and then crash again in 2024 when it falls into the trap of putting up a weirdo with a badly planned campaign against the government, which has the advantage of being the government. The only really interesting question is whether the crash will be Labour's 1992 or its MH370.

And when you're trapped in a situation such as this, what can you do but try to see the humour in it? Even if it's your party and your leader. Especially if it's your party and your leader.
>> No. 92113 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 11:26 am
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>>92112

At this rate covid will still be on by 2024, and BoJo will fucking wish that wierdo with a funny accent was the actual Marxist he was up against last time.

See it's funny because Starmer started off so well, hot off the leadership race knowing he had to say all the right things and shut very tightly the fuck up about certain others. If he'd kept all that stuff up it'd be fine, and sure all the Momentum lot would be off having a tantrum in their playpen, but everyone else would be on board. And I say that as someone most people would identify as one of the Momentum lot.

Instead he's immediately reverted to the aimless careerist default setting of going for the worst of both worlds.
>> No. 92114 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 11:53 am
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>>92111
I didn't mention fascism and neither did your friends in the context of this one phrase so I don't know what you're on about.
>> No. 92115 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 12:03 pm
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>>92111
Oh, and also:

>A dogwhistle is a coded reference to something only an insider-group would pick up on- "family values" might indeed be a socially conservative talking point, but he's not even attempting to mask it, he's just outright stating a vague gesture of approval for it.

I'm not sure you understand the concept.
>> No. 92116 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 12:26 pm
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>>92115

>accusations of dog whistling are, by their nature, hard to prove, and may be false.

Bit of an own goal there m8lad
>> No. 92117 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 1:01 pm
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>>92116
Or you're just stupefyingly naive.
>> No. 92118 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 1:20 pm
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>>92117
That doesn't sound like a refutation.
>> No. 92119 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 1:28 pm
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>>92115
Hang on, shepherding whistles aren't ultrasonic. They're variable pitch, and bloody hard to get to work, so you need to be able to hear them.
(Therefore the rest of it must also be tainted).
>> No. 92120 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 1:35 pm
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>>92118
What's there to refute lad? Someone said 'family values' can't be a dogswhistle; I show that its usage has been written into the definition of the term in an encyclopaedia citing two academic writers; that's been ignored in favour of 'oh well you might still be wrong somehow!'
>> No. 92121 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 2:58 pm
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>>92120
So only you're allowed to ignore elements of the wikipedia article which you yourself linked to defend your position?
>> No. 92122 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 6:57 pm
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>>92120

Original lad you were replying to here. You didn't engage with any of the substance of my arguments, of which I made about three or four distinct points, so I can only assume you've no real counter to them.

I'm not really interested in continuing the debate so okay, it's a dogwhistle and Starmer is a literal member of the Conservative party. Good day.
>> No. 92123 Anonymous
28th January 2021
Thursday 7:18 pm
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>>92120

I think you are misunderstanding the premise of the objection. It's not that is doesn't signal conservative values, it's that it isn't a dogwhistle because everyone already knows exactly what it means.

It's an ordinary whistle.
>> No. 92124 Anonymous
29th January 2021
Friday 9:11 am
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>>92113
I don't expect Boris to stay on if he's not polling well in late 2023. In situations where both parties stick to their playbooks the Conservatives always win. They're more ruthless than Labour and tend to have incumbency advantage.
>> No. 92125 Anonymous
29th January 2021
Friday 12:18 pm
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>>92122
If you mean this >>92111, then this >>92114. Seemed to me all your points were predicated on Starmer being labelled a fascist. I agree with you that he's not a fascist and to my recollection he hasn't said anything I would characterise as fascist.
>> No. 92126 Anonymous
29th January 2021
Friday 12:38 pm
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>>92125
He's called himself a Social Democrat before, that's enough for some people.
well read idiots of the worst sort.
>> No. 92127 Anonymous
30th January 2021
Saturday 1:32 pm
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>>92126
Right, as said by Stalin, who famously never came up with paranoid bullshit excuses to murder anyone who got in his way.
>> No. 92128 Anonymous
30th January 2021
Saturday 3:40 pm
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>>92127

I don't think the lad you're replying to is endorsing Stalin, m8.
>> No. 92129 Anonymous
30th January 2021
Saturday 5:20 pm
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>>92128
You quote somebody because you consider them to be reliably illustrating a point you're trying to make, I don't think quoting the world's most paranoid mass murderer does much for your argument.
>> No. 92133 Anonymous
30th January 2021
Saturday 5:21 pm
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Alright, I don't know why that posted four times, I hope it got.my point across though.
>> No. 92134 Anonymous
30th January 2021
Saturday 5:38 pm
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>>92126
>> No. 92135 Anonymous
30th January 2021
Saturday 6:10 pm
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>>92129
You are displaying remarkable intellectual inflexibility.
>> No. 92136 Anonymous
30th January 2021
Saturday 10:55 pm
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>>92129

It very reliably illustrates a point lad, you're just a bit too thick to realise what it was apparently. You're only strengthening the point.

I'll spell it out for you: If you're comparing a milquetoast socdem to a fascist, you're in the company of dullards and tankies. Famous humanitarian progressive Josef Stalin is among the people who agree with you.
>> No. 92137 Anonymous
31st January 2021
Sunday 1:54 am
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>>92136
>milquetoast

We need a new Road of Bones.
>> No. 92138 Anonymous
31st January 2021
Sunday 2:11 pm
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>>92135

Maybe we should make them a mod.


BOOM BOOM.
>> No. 92139 Anonymous
31st January 2021
Sunday 3:38 pm
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>>92129
Have never read anything this stupid here before.
>> No. 92140 Anonymous
31st January 2021
Sunday 10:31 pm
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55871373

RIP UK-US Special Relationship

Better start learning Mandarin Lads 因为我们将来会买所有东西
>> No. 92141 Anonymous
31st January 2021
Sunday 10:37 pm
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>>92140

I'm a moron, I thought this was the one China signed with Australia and all the ASEAN coutnries.

Nvm

DELETE POST
>> No. 92142 Anonymous
31st January 2021
Sunday 10:38 pm
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>>92141

I thought this was RCEP
>> No. 92143 Anonymous
31st January 2021
Sunday 11:52 pm
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>>92140
I think you mean better start sucking up to the 60-odd people living in the Pitcairn Islands (with nearly a third of the men being convicted pedos*). Pitxit would be hilariously poor timing.

*Start checking those IPs you ban, modlads.
>> No. 92144 Anonymous
1st February 2021
Monday 9:33 am
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>>92141
No, that's the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.
>> No. 92145 Anonymous
1st February 2021
Monday 11:56 am
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https://www.politico.eu/article/mastercard-fees-to-increase-fivefold-for-uk-eu-trade/

>Mastercard will increase its transaction fees for British shoppers purchasing from an EU-based company on October 15.

>Credit card fees will increase from 0.3 to 1.5 percent of the value of the purchase, and debit card fees will increase from 0.2 to 1.15 percent, the Financial Times reports. Since Brexit, cross-Channel card fees no longer fall under an EU cap on transaction levies.

>MP Kevin Hollinrake, who chairs the all-party parliamentary group on Fair Business Banking, called the move “alarming,” adding that it “smacks of opportunism” and has called on regulators to make sure similar companies do not use Brexit for economic gain.
>> No. 92146 Anonymous
1st February 2021
Monday 12:55 pm
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>>92145

FINALLY, THE BRITISH PEOPLE HAVE SECURED THEIR GOD-GIVEN RIGHT TO BE RIPPED OFF BY MASTERCARD!
>> No. 92147 Anonymous
1st February 2021
Monday 5:54 pm
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>>92145
VISA have apparently not yet got any plans to increase their fees yet, but wouldnt be surprising if they did the same next financial year.
>> No. 92166 Anonymous
3rd February 2021
Wednesday 1:41 pm
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https://twitter.com/cstross/status/1356960430699257856

Boris Making the case for being in the EU today.
>> No. 92338 Anonymous
18th February 2021
Thursday 12:03 pm
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Oh goodie, it looks like Brexiters are pushing to bring back brexit.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-restart-boris-johnson-conservative-b1803583.html
>Talks to rebuild security cooperation with the EU must restart now after the Brexit deal left the UK “less safe and less secure”, a Conservative group says.
>> No. 92339 Anonymous
18th February 2021
Thursday 12:36 pm
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>>92338
By 'the Brexiters', are you referring to the parliamentary group of Europhilic Conservatives?
>> No. 93026 Anonymous
15th April 2021
Thursday 10:04 am
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>>91916

https://www.thegrocer.co.uk/new-product-development/bernard-matthews-launches-turkey-twizzlers-into-the-chilled-aisle/652544.article

Finally, the edict of EU puppet Jamie Oliver has been overruled and Turkey Twizzlers have made a triumphant return to our shelves. LAAAAND OF HO-OPE AND GLOOOOORY.
>> No. 93033 Anonymous
15th April 2021
Thursday 10:39 am
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>>93026
Traditional British values I can get behind.

We need to get Starmer pictured eating Greggs and Wimpy next.
>> No. 93035 Anonymous
15th April 2021
Thursday 11:23 am
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>>93033

Hoping that they start putting the toys back into the center of lucky tatties next.
>> No. 93036 Anonymous
15th April 2021
Thursday 11:25 am
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https://petition.parliament.uk/archived/petitions/24054
>Bring Back Old Money - Restore Pounds, Shillings and Pence (£,S,d)

Somebody should remake this 2012 petition to see how it fares now.
>> No. 93037 Anonymous
15th April 2021
Thursday 11:26 am
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>>93035

WE'VE LEFT THE EU, SO WHY HAVEN'T THEY BROUGHT BACK OPAL FRUITS? BREXIT MEANS BREXIT.
>> No. 93049 Anonymous
15th April 2021
Thursday 11:42 pm
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56756731

>Marks & Spencer has begun legal action against Aldi, arguing the supermarket's Cuthbert the Caterpillar cake infringes its Colin the Caterpillar trademark.

Merkel and her minions stealing wholesome British confection intellectual property. We shall not stand for it! Take back control!
>> No. 93050 Anonymous
15th April 2021
Thursday 11:55 pm
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>>93049

Doesn't Asda do a Curly the Caterpillar? I'd love to know what makes that legally distinct.

Also, I had no idea Colin was an M&S thing - has it always been? I struggle to accept that my mum went in to marks and sparks for any reason, not least to buy me a cake.
>> No. 93051 Anonymous
15th April 2021
Thursday 11:55 pm
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>>93026
>We’re opening it up to a broader range of people who don’t necessarily buy frozen but would buy fresh and would buy into sausages. The product flavour profiles match sausages [and] the product has a lot of connotations with sausage. We thought sausages exist in fresh and frozen, so why can’t the Twizzler?

So it's Turkey sausages with a sprinkling of MSG for flavour? That sounds lovely but still.
>> No. 93062 Anonymous
16th April 2021
Friday 6:52 pm
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>>93050
Pretty much every major supermarket has their own caterpillar cake. They just don't usually look almost identical to each other.
>> No. 93074 Anonymous
17th April 2021
Saturday 6:19 pm
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>>93062
Well, Charlie and Clyde have the same face...
>> No. 93077 Anonymous
17th April 2021
Saturday 7:25 pm
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>>93074
Wiggles and Cecil have the same face, they just use different eyes.
>> No. 93078 Anonymous
17th April 2021
Saturday 7:40 pm
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>>93062
I reckon Sainsbury's looks the best but I'll have to get back to you on taste. All-in-all I can't help but feel this is a cynical ploy to get the names out with kids parties on the horizon.

Aldi seems to certainly be playing it that way on twitter.
>> No. 93080 Anonymous
17th April 2021
Saturday 10:29 pm
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>>93078

>Aldi seems to certainly be playing it that way on twitter.

I think they've played a blinder here by tweeting stupid stuff about it. No matter how the case goes, they've won, I reckon. If they lose all they have to do is disfigure colin a bit and people will still buy him.
>> No. 93104 Anonymous
20th April 2021
Tuesday 12:45 pm
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>>93080
>Hey @marksandspencer can Colin and Cuthbert be besties? We’re bringing back a limited edition Cuthbert and want to donate profits to cancer charities including your partners @macmillancancer & ours @teenagecancer. Let’s raise money for charity, not lawyers #caterpillarsforcancer.
>Morning @Tesco @sainsburys @asda @Morrisons @waitrose @coopuk. Cuthbert needs the help of Curly, Clyde, Cecil, Charlie, Morris and Wiggles. Caterpillars clubbing together to raise money for charity, not lawyers. #caterpillarsforcancer. Up for it?

https://twitter.com/AldiUK

Remind me to never get on the bad side of Aldi. I was surprised to learn that they actually stopped selling Cuthbert months ago but have now brought him back in direct response to the IP challenge (and fundraising).
>> No. 93105 Anonymous
20th April 2021
Tuesday 1:00 pm
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>>93104
They're definitely enjoying themselves as they thumb their noses at the repercussions our legal system might bring to bear on them.
Some of the tweets made me chuckle and this isn't Aldi's fault per se but it is a little bit concerning how fast and loose a corporation can play with IP law where a non-corporate entity would be buried for it.
>> No. 93757 Anonymous
23rd May 2021
Sunday 7:03 am
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The hundred billion Pounds profit the Boeings made on short gbp and rebound, so far, and the resultant increased competitiveness of manufacturing from the (temporarily) devalued pound.
>> No. 93758 Anonymous
23rd May 2021
Sunday 7:20 am
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Exposing the root of corruption in European politics which is sabotage style negotiating in favor of soul sucking bureaucracy - as wesaw with the french threats and insults which were mostly a phony attempt to try to stop brexit from happening uncompromised. Now parliament can stop falling into corrupt bureaucrat traps and create policies wildly advantageous to UK citizens and businesses. In 20 years Britain will be a much better place for it and the example will lead to comparative improval of our allies in Europe as well. National Socialism has to be curbed before it binds the UK to the destiny of the EU.
>> No. 93759 Anonymous
23rd May 2021
Sunday 8:00 am
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>>93758
Go home Nige, you're drunk.
>> No. 93773 Anonymous
23rd May 2021
Sunday 1:48 pm
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>>93758
>Now parliament can stop falling into corrupt bureaucrat traps and create policies wildly advantageous to UK citizens
Ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.
>> No. 93774 Anonymous
23rd May 2021
Sunday 2:12 pm
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>>93758
Darren's been on the shandy bass again.
>> No. 93796 Anonymous
26th May 2021
Wednesday 2:25 pm
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Not half as drunk as I should be to suffer half the stupidity I see on this board. But I like more than half the posts more than half as much as they deserve.
>> No. 93811 Anonymous
1st June 2021
Tuesday 7:36 pm
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IN LIZ WE TRUSS!
>> No. 93812 Anonymous
1st June 2021
Tuesday 7:41 pm
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>>93811
>Up to 50 new jobs
RULE BRITANNIA, BRITANNIA RULES THE WAVES... !
>> No. 93813 Anonymous
1st June 2021
Tuesday 10:43 pm
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>The Brexit-backing boss of JD Wetherspoon has urged Boris Johnson to introduce a visa scheme for EU workers as British pubs and restaurants struggle to recruit staff in the post-pandemic labour market squeeze.

>Tim Martin, an ardent Brexiteer, said the Government should introduce a visa system to alleviate some of the pressures on companies, suggesting that countries geographically closer to the UK could be given preferential treatment. The intervention came as pub and restaurant bosses warned they were being forced to shut sites during the crucial lunchtime trade due to a shortage of workers.

>Mr Martin said: “The UK has a low birth rate. A reasonably liberal immigration system controlled by those we have elected, as distinct from the EU system, would be a plus for the economy and the country. America, Australia and Singapore have benefitted for many decades from this approach. Immigration combined with democracy works."

>Experts have said hospitality companies could hike wages to attract more staff amid shortages. Tony Wilson, of the Institute of Employment Studies, said businesses "might find themselves having to pay more, they might find they’ve got skill shortages. All of that ultimately could end up holding back the strength of the recovery.”

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/06/01/wetherspoons-boss-calls-eu-migration-tackle-bar-staff-shortage/
>> No. 93814 Anonymous
1st June 2021
Tuesday 10:51 pm
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>>93813

Well well well, Johnny Capitalist, you can get to fuck can't you. Brexit means Brexit, so tough tits. No cheap immigrant slave labour for you.
>> No. 93815 Anonymous
1st June 2021
Tuesday 11:04 pm
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>>93814
I think Brexit Tim is one of those people who actually dislikes the EU itself rather than being driven by reducing immigration, particularly as he is so reliant on cheap labour.
>> No. 93816 Anonymous
1st June 2021
Tuesday 11:30 pm
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>>93812
I hate to be the one to point this out but 50 jobs is actually more than 50 jobs in reality. A ketchup factory isn't going to turn Wigan into the next Silicon Valley but it does support other local jobs in services and as a rule business attract other businesses into a local hub (a proverbial issue the north knows).

The better way to imagine it is perhaps the opposite process we're more familiar with of a local business shutting down and its effects being magnified across the town.
Hopefully they'll start making HP sauce in this fucking country again.

>>93813
>businesses "might find themselves having to pay more, they might find they’ve got skill shortages

I'm all for fit young Eastern European immigrants, maybe even tapping the Caucasus, but you've got to be fucking joking. "Reasonably liberal" my arse.
>> No. 93817 Anonymous
2nd June 2021
Wednesday 1:09 am
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>>93813
Has he tried paying English workers more? I know it didn't work for that fruit-picking company or whoever it was, but he should at least give it a go. I'd pull pints for £40 an hour.
>> No. 93818 Anonymous
2nd June 2021
Wednesday 9:51 am
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>>93817
I could be wrong, but as it is I believe Spoons already tend to pay amongst the highest wages in the pub trade and have more staff on duty at the same time.
>> No. 93908 Anonymous
7th June 2021
Monday 8:39 am
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A shortage of workers is driving up wages: are we entering a new economic era?

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/jun/06/fall-in-workers-rise-in-wages-new-economic-era-pandemic-work

SuPpLy AnD dEmAnD dOeSn'T aFfEcT wAgEs!
>> No. 93909 Anonymous
7th June 2021
Monday 8:44 am
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>>93908
Don't do that again or I'll take one more worker out of the labour market.
>> No. 93910 Anonymous
7th June 2021
Monday 11:43 am
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>>93908

I should hope not. If we start paying them more, what next?

They'll start buying houses in places like Methley and Rothwell instead of South Elmsall and Kirkby where they belong, if we're not careful.
>> No. 93911 Anonymous
7th June 2021
Monday 4:01 pm
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>>93908
I can tell you two aren't management material. When things are short-staffed you don't raise wages, you raise demands on the existing workforce and do some bullshit stress management exercises to escape liability. Maybe give them vouchers if they start to break.

Remember, it's the workers responsibility to look after their health. You only have to give them the tools.
>> No. 93912 Anonymous
7th June 2021
Monday 7:46 pm
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Im getting a lot of targetted ads like this at the moment, so it seems like there is a bit of a staffing crisis on hospitality.

The irony is that in industries (I'm thinking of care work soecifically here) where owners don't want to pay more is that they end up understaffed and ultimately have to pay more to hire agency workers. This in turn results in organizational issues of its own and workers with a car and a brain end up working the same job but on the agency's roster.

I dont know that that's what's going to happen with hospitality, but it seems like it might.

I look forward to apps like the one in pic related evolve into weird post-industrial unions.
>> No. 93919 Anonymous
8th June 2021
Tuesday 12:51 am
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>>93912

I'm so happy this is finally happening, I have been telling anyone who would listen in the industry that underpaying their staff is fucking stupid, and I have the receipts to prove it from when I ran a kitchen where everyone was on at least a tenner an hour plus time and half after 40 hours a week and we still made 85% labour inclusive GP. Because people pay more when the food is always good.

As you say, understaffing has been the 'solution' to wage reduction for thicko managers for years, and they truly don't seem to understand why their staff can't just 'be better'. They really kid themselves that the staff are shit, which only helps to encourage people to leave, often dramatically, mid shift.

Of course, when you're only paying your managers 19 grand a year, it's not surprising they also don't know how to run a rota.
>> No. 93920 Anonymous
8th June 2021
Tuesday 1:06 am
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>>93912
Is the agency life really all it's cracked up to be though. From what I remember of my youth during the great recession it's a terrible, transient existence for workers and equally not all it's cracked up to be for recruiters.

Although I suppose working for a cunt and working for an agency isn't any different. Maybe it will reverse the past two decades of stagnant wages.

Also:
>motivated students
>> No. 93921 Anonymous
8th June 2021
Tuesday 1:12 am
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>>93920

Hospitality agency work is hugely consistent, or at least it was pre-pandemic. There was always, always work. Largely because of the aforementioned wage issues of permanent staff.
>> No. 93922 Anonymous
8th June 2021
Tuesday 1:23 am
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>>93919
There's a story going around about an American place that around doubled their wages from $7.25 to $15. They filled all their outstanding vacancies in a matter of days, the staff are much happier and more engaged, and when word got out customers flocked to them to support a business doing right by their workers.
>> No. 93923 Anonymous
8th June 2021
Tuesday 1:40 am
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>>93922
It reminds me of the story from last year of the American businessman who decided to take a substantial pay cut and so every employee could earn a minimum of 70k a year.

>Since then, Gravity has transformed.

>The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn.

>But there are other metrics that Price is more proud of. "Before the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team," he says. "And since the announcement - and it's been only about four-and-a-half years - we've had more than 40 babies." More than 10% of the company have been able to buy their own home, in one of the US's most expensive cities for renters. Before the figure was less than 1%.

>"There was a little bit of concern amongst pontificators out there that people would squander any gains that they would have. And we've really seen the opposite," Price says. The amount of money that employees are voluntarily putting into their own pension funds has more than doubled and 70% of employees say they've paid off debt.

>Rosita Barlow, director of sales at Gravity, says that since salaries were raised junior colleagues have been pulling more weight. "When money is not at the forefront of your mind when you're doing your job, it allows you to be more passionate about what motivates you," she says. Senior staff have found their workload reduced. They're under less pressure and can do things like take all of the holiday leave to which they are entitled.

>Price tells the story about one staff member who works in Gravity's call centre. "He was commuting over an hour and a half a day," he says. "He was worried that during his commute he was going to blow out a tyre and not have enough money to fix that tyre. He was stressing about it every day." When his salary was raised to $70,000 this man moved closer to the office, now he spends more money on his health, he exercises every day and eats more healthily.

"We had another gentleman on a similar team and he literally lost more than 50lb (22kg)," he says. Others report spending more time with their families or helping their parents pay off debt. "We saw, every day, the effects of giving somebody freedom," Price says.

>He thinks it is why Gravity is making more money than ever. Raising salaries didn't change people's motivation - he says staff were already motivated to work hard - but it increased what he calls their capability. "You're not thinking I have to go to work because I have to make money," Rosita Barlow agrees. "Now it's become focused on 'How do I do good work?'"

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/stories-51332811

Just imagine that; everyone can afford a home, the baby crisis disappeared, people got healthier and a better work was done. I suppose not every industry has the profit margins to afford that kind of payroll but still.
>> No. 93925 Anonymous
8th June 2021
Tuesday 2:35 am
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>>93923
On the upside, there were a lot of positive effects from that.

On the downside, it turned out that he was still a massive cunt.
https://twitter.com/ek1jp33hrtw4rf/status/1369718228524662785
>> No. 93926 Anonymous
8th June 2021
Tuesday 2:44 am
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>>93925

I don't know enough about him to know whether he's a cunt or not, but it's usually safe to assume that anyone who is getting a lot of publicity is a narcissist. There's a competitive marketplace for our attention and narcissists work much harder than everyone else to get it, so they usually win out.
>> No. 93928 Anonymous
8th June 2021
Tuesday 6:48 am
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>>93925
>> No. 93949 Anonymous
15th June 2021
Tuesday 6:55 pm
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>Young Britons will be able to travel and work in Australia more easily after Boris Johnson announced the UK’s first bespoke post-Brexit trade deal. Johnson and Scott Morrison, his Australian counterpart, hailed a “new dawn” after thrashing out the final parts of a deal at a dinner in Downing Street last night.

>When it comes into effect in the months after that — should Covid travel restrictions have eased — it will be easier for Britons to travel to Australia. At present Britons under 30 who spend a year travelling in Australia must do 88 days of farm work if they wish to extend their stay for another year. The trade deal gets rid of this requirement and allows them to stay for three years. The maximum age for the visas will also be raised to 35.

>In addition, Australian companies will no longer have to prioritise Australian workers if they want to hire a Briton, a move which politicians in both governments hope will lead to more highly skilled workers such as lawyers, doctors and architects moving between the two countries.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/australia-opens-arms-to-young-britons-in-new-dawn-trade-deal-k68z9bz38

It turns out the sunlit uplands of Brexit was being able to spend three years in Australia without having to do farm labour. Take that, Europe.
>> No. 93950 Anonymous
15th June 2021
Tuesday 8:15 pm
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>>93925
This chain would be much more credible if it wasn't done through the prism of 'abolish work' nutterism. As far as I can surmise there was some sort of disagreement with his brother and someone felt he was a bit of a bully to work for.

Not saying that's what happens but I've seen too many twitter burns.

>>93949
I feel like we're getting a bad deal out of this, who would trade Mr Kipling for rip-off Penguin bars?
>> No. 93951 Anonymous
15th June 2021
Tuesday 8:35 pm
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>>93950
Mr Kipling is very overrated.
>> No. 93952 Anonymous
15th June 2021
Tuesday 9:03 pm
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>>93951
Name a better mass produced cake company.
>> No. 93953 Anonymous
15th June 2021
Tuesday 9:17 pm
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>>93952
I'd rather have a tub of own-brand brownie bites or something like that.
>> No. 93954 Anonymous
15th June 2021
Tuesday 9:51 pm
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>>93953
Problem I always found with 'mini' anything is that I'll soon eat the whole tub just by grazing. Or someone else will.
>> No. 93955 Anonymous
16th June 2021
Wednesday 12:27 am
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>>93953
But I'm told it all comes from the same factory?
>> No. 93956 Anonymous
16th June 2021
Wednesday 1:55 am
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>>93955

Doesn't mean it's made to the same recipe or quality control levels.
>> No. 93957 Anonymous
16th June 2021
Wednesday 4:33 am
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>>93956
That's true. Just look at Charles and Andrew.
>> No. 94141 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 1:08 pm
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>A Michelin-star restaurant has said it will no longer open at lunchtimes due to a shortage of staff. David Moore, the founder of Pied à Terre in London, said he decided to halt the restaurant's lunchtime menu to "preserve" his depleted workforce.

>"If I slog them to death, in two weeks' time, I won't have a restaurant," he told the BBC. Mr Moore is the latest of several hospitality business owners to raise concerns over staff shortages.

>As the UK economy emerges from the effects of the pandemic, several industries have reported shortages of staff, with UK job vacancies hitting their highest level since March 2020. The hospitality sector has been hit harder than most, having to cease trading during lockdowns and operating under tight restrictions. It has led to many staff being placed on furlough, which has prompted some to leave the profession. Industry body UK Hospitality has said waiting staff and chefs are in particular demand.

>Restaurateur Mr Moore said 800 people applied for a receptionist role in November 2020, but he received just seven responses when he re-advertised for the role three weeks ago, and no-one showed up to an interview. He said higher wages were "still not getting the eyeballs" on advertisements. "I don't know anybody who is not looking for a kitchen porter," he added.

>Mr Moore said Brexit was "definitely the biggest" factor behind staff shortages, and he said the "heartbeat" of the hospitality industry was "young kids" coming from abroad to work in restaurants and bars to gain life experience and new skills. "[The government] don't realise the huge commodity we have that they have excluded us from, that keeps this industry moving more than anything else," he said. He said before the pandemic, just three out of his 30-strong workforce were British. His restaurant currently has 12 staff. He said some workers who were furloughed during lockdown had moved back to their home nations and decided not to come back to the UK.

>"Anecdotally, I have a lot of pals saying they are opening up restaurants and they are expecting their 18 employees to come back and only 12 turn up," The Pied à Terre founder said. "They don't say anything because they don't want to lose their furlough, so they don't mention anything until the last minute."

>Mark Agnew, manager of Gylly Beach Cafe in Falmouth, Cornwall, said he will close every Monday and Tuesday due to staffing shortages. "The main reason is a severe lack of trained professional chefs, [and] trained front of house," he said. "There seems to be a national crisis that we are now feeling the effects of. Brexit I'm sure is a factor within this. Undoubtedly Covid and the continual lockdown, too."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-57555608
>> No. 94146 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 2:18 pm
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>>94141
Finally, a world without chefs.
>> No. 94147 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 2:25 pm
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>>94141

None of us saw it coming, from our kitchens packed with euro lads.
>> No. 94148 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 2:39 pm
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>>94141

As a fastfoodlad I can't imagine going and working in a proper kitchen. The same absolute madness and hectic pace, but with significantly more stress and finesse at the same time? I'll keep burger flipping thanks.
>> No. 94149 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 2:49 pm
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>>94141
Now I'm curious, I'd very much like a gig bartending once a week as I miss it and I don't *have* to do it so I can enjoy it more. Do you guys reckon this is prime time for trying to get some shifts at places?
>> No. 94157 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 5:30 pm
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>>94149
I was thinking the same thing after watching that Clarkson's Farm. I've still got over a month's worth of leave I can use and wouldn't mind helping out on a farm to build my muscles and get my hands on some scrumpy. Not sure how much use I'd really be as a labourer but I can crack a whip and talk down to rural folk.

Belarus isn't a place anyone wants to imitate but I like their policy of everyone taking a couple weeks in the years to pick crops, paint fences and that sort of thing.
>> No. 94159 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 5:38 pm
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>>94148

And you make a better hourly wage at maccas than you do at a great many restaurants too.
>> No. 94160 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 5:39 pm
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>>94149

Almost certainly. Maybe get on an agency's books, if they're big enough they will work around your schedule and you'll be paid more than if you work directly for somewhere.
>> No. 94164 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 5:57 pm
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>>94157

>Belarus isn't a place anyone wants to imitate but I like their policy of everyone taking a couple weeks in the years to pick crops, paint fences and that sort of thing.

This is actually how Ant Societies operate. Every ant does every job pretty much at some point in their lives. All of the best technologies are based on biomimicry pretty much.

Consider the ant thou sluggard! Observe her ways and be wise.

Also check out E.O. Wilson's 'The Social Conquest of Earth' for more ruminations on such anty topics Also 'Civilization as Divine Superman: A Superorganic Philosophy of History' by Alexander Raven Thompson if you want some vintage technocratic utopia banter and to get a better idea of where our current political trajectory is heading currently.
>> No. 94166 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 6:39 pm
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRIP0vBtcBg
>> No. 94169 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 8:10 pm
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>>94166
"Comments are turned off. "

Can't begin to imagine why.
Although surely this will unite the whole UK. May even unite the whole fucking galaxy in loathing. Sweet motherfucking christ.
>> No. 94170 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 8:33 pm
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>>94166

This is basically Neoliberal Völkisch Movement
>> No. 94171 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 9:01 pm
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>>94166>>94170
It's certainly revealing that the first verse opens with a line about all the "storms and wars" we've survived even though we haven't been at a realistic threat on invasion since Bonaparte was 'avin' it large as the jefe politico of France. Not going to get into why it couldn't happen in 1940, just trust me when I say it wasn't on the cards.
>> No. 94172 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 9:49 pm
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>>94170
I prefer to hope it's a Slovenian pisstake.
If not, I await their version with bated breath.
>> No. 94173 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 10:30 pm
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y24VBzlAU_g

It's happening lads. Just wait until everyone's back in the office and it's going to be a humanitarian disaster, there will be starving middle class people physically fighting over the last mozarella and pesto sourdough bagel.
>> No. 94175 Anonymous
22nd June 2021
Tuesday 11:35 pm
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>>94173
>3 Mar 2017

In the grim dark future there is only immigration debates. There is no peace amongst the stars, only an eternity of cunt-offs and immigration targets, and the laughter of thirsting office-drones.
>> No. 94178 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 9:16 am
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>>94173
Why does she have to specify Pret not once, but twice? I thought it was Katie Hopkins at first, she's doing a satire of the poshos right?
>> No. 94179 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 12:10 pm
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>>94178
For the same reason QT audience members can mysteriously talk like they've rehearsed a 'gotcha' line from a political committee. I could make an argument about the need for the BBC to filter obvious plants but I'm not sure the 'normal' people in the audience are any better.
>> No. 94180 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 12:30 pm
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>>94178
>>94179

Plant or satire, we're kidding ourselves if we try to hold on to the idea it's not an ambarassingly accurate picture of how an awful lot of middle class people actually felt.

It was always a wierdly contradictory sort of argument though. A big part of that pro-immigration, cosmopolitan viewpoint is meant to be the position that "Imgrunts Tekkin' Are Jobs" is a preposterous myth, and yet somehow it's also true that the economy is held afloat by immigrant labour to such an extent that to remove it would cause disaster.

I mean, I know the real reason for that contradiction was the unspoken "shut up povvo and know your place" but still.
>> No. 94182 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 12:55 pm
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>>94180
I'm unsure if the 'they took our jerbs' line really involves farm work or low-tier service industry in this country. Part of that is down to wages and a chronic underinvestment in productivity but do we really have the young people for it and aren't things like summer fruit picking more or less a default working holiday profession?

It does seem hypocritical for us to complain but then also have our own young work as agricultural scabs in Oz.
>> No. 94183 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 2:25 pm
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>>94180
That's not at all a contradiction. Not that I necessarily agree with both but they can easily both be true.
>> No. 94184 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 3:27 pm
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>>94179


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYasj3D9MrY

The best normal person ever asking a question on QT was Jimmy in 2014
>> No. 94186 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 3:49 pm
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5 years on, were they right?
>> No. 94187 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 4:04 pm
94187 spacer
>>94184
That man's a good lad, need more like him. I think we'd need a new war to instil that kind of commitment to the Union though.
>> No. 94188 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 4:07 pm
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>>94186
Well so far we've got the holidays in Dunstable, the ban on sex and I might as well work at a circus. Only thing wrong is that food comes in Huel form.

>A years supply of that thing you like
>And that other thing

I'm ashamed to admit that it would probably mean three spice jars of smoked paprika and some Nescafé gold.
>> No. 94189 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 5:20 pm
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>>94186

Well, my house is definitely full of twigs.
>> No. 94190 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 6:28 pm
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>>94189
That's dead classy.
>> No. 94191 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 7:38 pm
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>>94190

Jars full of twigs just seem to appear on every surface in this house. I could swear that they're breeding.
>> No. 94192 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 7:58 pm
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>>94191
That's a reed diffuser.
>> No. 94193 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 8:43 pm
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>>94192

It's a jar of fucking twigs m8.
>> No. 94194 Anonymous
23rd June 2021
Wednesday 9:04 pm
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>>94192

Diffuser? I hardly know 'er.
>> No. 94195 Anonymous
24th June 2021
Thursday 9:00 am
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'One Britain, One Nation' has heavy 'One Country, Two Systems' vibes.
>> No. 94196 Anonymous
24th June 2021
Thursday 11:26 am
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>>94195
>> No. 94197 Anonymous
24th June 2021
Thursday 11:31 am
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>>94196
Why is there an eerie green glow in her office?
>> No. 94198 Anonymous
24th June 2021
Thursday 11:32 am
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>>94197
The mothership is waiting outside.
>> No. 94209 Anonymous
24th June 2021
Thursday 3:15 pm
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>>94197

The prefects are the voices of the headmaster
>> No. 94210 Anonymous
25th June 2021
Friday 7:21 am
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>Mobile operator EE will charge new UK customers extra to use their mobile phones in Europe from January.

>Those joining or upgrading from 7 July 2021 will be charged £2 a day to use their allowances in 47 European destinations from January 2022. EE, which is part of BT Group, previously said it had no plans to reintroduce roaming charges in Europe.

>It is the first UK operator to reintroduce the charges since the EU trade deal was signed in December. Since 2017, mobile networks in EU countries have not been allowed to charge customers extra to use their phones in other EU countries.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-57595913

We've taken back control of roaming charges!
>> No. 94212 Anonymous
25th June 2021
Friday 8:55 am
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Happy 'One Britain, One Nation' Day lads, I can't believe it's that time of year again.
>> No. 94247 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 2:07 am
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>Lorry driver shortage threatens Haribo sweets
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-57690505

Its been a pleasure serving with you two. Should we meet at the sweet aisle know that I shall give no quarter and expect none.
>> No. 94248 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 2:16 am
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>>94247
I've always fancied being a lorry driver though. How much do they earn?
>> No. 94250 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 6:52 am
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>>94248
I've had a quick look on Indeed and there's lots of HGV jobs advertised between £40k and £55k, plus all the handjobs you could ever wish for from your driver's mate.
>> No. 94262 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 9:04 pm
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>>94248
If you're genuinely up for it, there is a national shortage of HGV drivers as they're all ageing out. My mate was a warehouse picker for ASDA and got offered the training and now works for ASDA as a n HGV driver, on considerably more money.
>> No. 94264 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 9:17 pm
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>>94262
It can't be too long before the entire industry is automated, mind you.
>> No. 94265 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 9:47 pm
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>>94264

How long, though? I assume the technology is almost certainly already there, it's just the public perception/politics hurdle to go, but I'm not quite convinced that's an easy step. The other thing is liability, has anyone worked out whose fault it is when a driverless HGV crashes? I can see a very silly world in which a 'driver' is still required to sit there and just be there 'in case'. This is mostly how aviation works, the technology to automate an entire flight has been possible for decades, but the flesh sacks in the two seats in the front are still required to be there. This is obviously a simplification I have adopted to wind up pilots, but it's not incorrect.
>> No. 94266 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 9:50 pm
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>>94265
https://www.thedrive.com/tech/40899/self-driving-semi-truck-completes-950-mile-delivery-10-hours-faster-than-a-human-trucker-could

It is definitely almost there. According to this article, the truck drives itself on highways/motorways but the flesh sack gets involved in built-up areas.
>> No. 94267 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 9:54 pm
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>>94265
>>94266
Probably not a bad time for lorrylad to get into it just before the door closes.
>> No. 94268 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 10:09 pm
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>>94267

I think as more automated lorries pop up, the price for drivers for lorries that don't drive themselves will similarly just keep going up, as it'll become even more specialist. There's, I'm quite sure, a lot of specific lorry jobs that you'd need/want humans for - would anyone on an active building site ever trust a glorified Roomba to dump 8 tonne of stone safely and accurately? Will self-driving trucks ever be signed off for dangerous goods transport? Will an airport ever let their fuel trucks be unmanned? (I can almost certainly say they will not).

There's also companies like mine that just bought 15 lorries to move things between our sites, and would never in a million years have paid the extra upfront cost for automated ones. Until it's as cheap to buy an AI truck as it is to buy a ropey LDV and pay a bloke's salary, I'm sure there's plenty of medium businesses with specific infrastructure who will have no financial incentive to change.

I'm by no means denying the coming change, it's happening, but I also don't think having an HGV license will become useless entirely in our lifetime.

Also, I for one cannot wait for bands of roving Mad Max style car gangs to patrol the M1, looking for automated lorries to board and rob, while being chased by police robot drones that transform into metal bobbies and fight them on the top of the speeding lorries.
>> No. 94269 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 10:19 pm
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>>94268
>There's also companies like mine that just bought 15 lorries to move things between our sites, and would never in a million years have paid the extra upfront cost for automated ones. Until it's as cheap to buy an AI truck as it is to buy a ropey LDV and pay a bloke's salary, I'm sure there's plenty of medium businesses with specific infrastructure who will have no financial incentive to change.

I reckon it will work like electric initially, you'll have higher upfront but it will be offset by lower wear and tear.

Still I get your point, we'll probably get some form of high-speed lines for automated vehicles only that will be used to deliver bulk to depots. Perhaps with passengers cramming into special 'carriages' like farm animals. These 'rail' vehicles will be like proof of concept in what is a less arduous environment where routes can be largely controlled centrally perhaps by some 40-something man in a basement.
>> No. 94270 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 10:45 pm
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>>94269
>offset by lower wear and tear.

One of the things I'm most looking forward to with the EV revolution is I'll actually be able to understand / fix a car if it's electric. All that oil/grease/combustion scares me, but give me electricery and batteries and I'm all over it.

It's the mechanics/garages I feel a bit sorry for. For sure, there will be a very long tail (30 years+) of servicing combustion engines, but a lot of those jobs will change drastically.
>> No. 94271 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 10:48 pm
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>>94270
>> No. 94272 Anonymous
2nd July 2021
Friday 11:09 pm
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>>94271

Fortunately, proprietary software tends to be much less tamper-proof than the manufacturers would hope. I reckon that in the electric future, car repair will be more like phone repair - most of the job will be keeping up with the latest workarounds and sourcing grey-market parts from China.


>> No. 94273 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 12:14 am
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>>94270
>It's the mechanics/garages I feel a bit sorry for

I don't, they all seem to either be dickheads or criminals from my experience.
>> No. 94274 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 12:29 am
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>>94273
Was a bloke with a forearm tattoo mean to you once?
>> No. 94275 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 1:25 am
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>>94273
It's a rite of passage in life that you find a local, trustworthy, cheap garage to service your cars that isn't a main dealer. It took me 22 years driving a car to find one. I take brand/very new cars to mine and he charges me about £150 a year for a service and the MOT.

Same probably goes for plumbers, but I know all the Polski peeps so that bit is easy.
>> No. 94276 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 2:06 am
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>>94274
No it's that the mechanics work as mechanics for a reason because it really is a bad job in winter while the manager is up to his elbows in low-moderate level crime and sleaze.
Probably different with official dealers but on the whole we could do without the industry. And the related debt slavery of Big Tool.
>> No. 94277 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 2:21 am
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>>94275

It really is a whole process. It's even harder when you mostly do you own work, like I do, because then you're only really looking for someone infrequently, and you're probably wanting them to do something laborious, boring, or that requires specialist equipment - and finding garages that even want to take these jobs at all can be difficult, let alone stumbling upon an actually good one.

The mobile mechanic bloke that does my mum's annual service (I'd do it, but I don't think she trusts me, given that half my cars are perennially broken) charges a hundred quid for the full whack, including MOT. If he has to do anything major like replace discs, it's £160. He also charges £50 to take your car for an MOT and it always, always comes back with no advisories, so he's a useful man to know. Aside from that dodginess, I can tell he's a good mechanic, because I once asked him how much he'd charge to change the water pump on my R53 Mini and he told me to fuck off, so he definitely knows his onions.
>> No. 94278 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 3:00 am
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I wish I knew enough about cars to know if my mechanic is good or not. I think I've found the good one now, but for years I lived in a much more urban locale and my only real option was a Halford or a Kwik Fit, and I didn't trust either of them as far as I can spit on them.

That said I'm horribly lazy with car maintenance anyway because it means taking a day out of my very busy schedule of sleeping through the day and wanking to obscure porn all night, and walking ten minutes back from the garage. I'm pretty sure my front brakes are on bare metal by now. You don't need brakes, right?
>> No. 94279 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 3:19 am
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>>94278
For really simple stuff like brakes, Kwik Fit is fine.
>> No. 94280 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 3:27 am
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>>94278

>I'm pretty sure my front brakes are on bare metal by now. You don't need brakes, right?

I get you're jesting but if your pads ever did wear down to the metal, you'd likely be shelling out for new brake discs too, so I'd not recommend it.

Home car maintenance is a tricky one, it'd be easy for me to say it's simple, and in theory it is - changing brake pads, for example, is really incredibly basic, you just undo a bolt, pop a thing out, and pop another thing back in. But to get that far, you need a jack, a wheel wrench, ideally at least one axle stand for safety, a socket set, and a space to actually do all this in, and so on. They're just big meccano sets, but it's the size of them that really makes them tough to DIY.

At the same time, keeping a car running at least safely should be the bare minimum expected of a driver. And it is, in some ways, but I just think most folks don't realise how dangerous something basic like an underinflated tyre is - and there's certainly people on our roads who have no idea how to inflate a tyre, let alone what pressure they should be inflated to, or how to find that information.
>> No. 94281 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 3:33 am
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>>94279

Kwik Fit are one of those outfits that I think gets a worse reputation than they deserve, I think a lot of their negative press comes from people who do take their absolutely knackered, never been serviced Micra there and are outraged when they get an £800 bill to repair all the horrors they've inflicted on it over the years and decide they've been scammed.

I think chain garages work just like any independent place, in that it really depends on who's running the place. I get my tyres done at the local ATS Euromaster, and the gaffer there is knowledgeable and, as far as I can tell, exceedingly honest. I suppose it doesn't make any sense for him to rip his customers off, it's not like he'd be seeing the benefit. If they offered a bit more of an extensive jobs list, I'd probably give them a lot more business.
>> No. 94282 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 4:04 am
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>>94280

Nah I had expected it to be both pads and discs anyway, they were on their last legs already when I got the car. That's why I've put it off as long as I have. Might as well push it as far as I can under the circumstances, and I haven't been driving as much as I might have over the past year for obvious reasons.

>>94281

I get the impression with those sorts of places, it's just that if you're taking your car there for it's regular servicing or what have you, it's going to be a very quick and impersonal job. They're working on all kinds of cars all day for all sorts of people, they're not going to take the time or have the attention to detail to notice something a smaller time, less rushed mechanic might notice and bring to your attention. That way, preventable things don't come up until they're an actual problem or MOT fail and by then it's more expensive to sort out.

That and they always seem like gormless wankers who simply couldn't give two shits. But that's obviously just down to the individual place and its staff more than anything. I usually get that impression whenever I've been to one though.

It's like the car equivalent of a Maccies though to me, you don't expect it to be good, you just go there because you forgot your MOT was up in a week and they're the only place with bookings available.
>> No. 94283 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 7:43 am
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I'm in the process of finding a new garage after the one I regularly used for the past five years has closed. It's a pain in the arse.
>> No. 94286 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 1:53 pm
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>>94281
>take their absolutely knackered, never been serviced Micra there and are outraged

I hear exactly the same about WeBuyAnyCar - I've sold them a couple of cars, in both cases they gave me a really good price (and exactly what they said they would pay) - people have very strange ideas about what a car is "worth" and what prices they actually sell for.

>keeping a car running at least safely should be the bare minimum expected of a driver

Couldn't agree more. I'd suggest that changing a wheel, checking tyre pressures and basic weekly maintenance should be part of the test.
>> No. 94289 Anonymous
3rd July 2021
Saturday 10:58 pm
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>>94286

I've used them before too, I do know I could have got maybe 10 or 20% more if I'd sold a car privately, but that would also take about 100% to 200% more effort and annoyance.

I have found they seem to undervalue 'enthusiast' cars, I could sell my MR2 for about five grand but they would give me £1000. I get why, though.
>> No. 94316 Anonymous
18th July 2021
Sunday 8:54 pm
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https://twitter.com/darren_cullen/status/1344697328058437632/photo/1

Traditional British Hobbies.
>> No. 94317 Anonymous
18th July 2021
Sunday 10:38 pm
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>>94316

This is so good.
>> No. 94320 Anonymous
18th July 2021
Sunday 10:41 pm
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>>94316

Is this the new Ork Battlewagon GW promised us?
>> No. 94321 Anonymous
19th July 2021
Monday 11:03 am
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>>943160
I thought the white van was best, until i saw the Mini. Brilliant.
>> No. 94322 Anonymous
19th July 2021
Monday 1:28 pm
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>>94321

This is just like that British Mad Max dream I had. Weird.
>> No. 94323 Anonymous
20th July 2021
Tuesday 12:25 am
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>>94321
SPORT ARE TROOPS

Incredible.
>> No. 94334 Anonymous
20th July 2021
Tuesday 11:52 pm
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>>94321
>The controversial claim made by Vote Leave during the referendum campaign that the UK was giving the EU £350m a week was a trap set to antagonise the Remain camp
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-57880118

Turns out Vote Leave played you lot like a fiddle.
>> No. 94336 Anonymous
21st July 2021
Wednesday 1:24 am
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>>94334
"Haha! We lied and they pointed it out! Exactly as planned!" I'm going to have to watch this interview now to understand this so-called trap. I freely concede that "Let's fund our NHS" is not a promise to fund the NHS, and many Remainers seem convinced that it was, but the idea that Brexiteers lied openly and it was all a big trap to fool the people who saw through it is a 4D chess move I really cannot get my head around.
>> No. 94337 Anonymous
21st July 2021
Wednesday 8:21 am
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>>94336
Surely it's just a mixture of dead cat strategy and rote repetition? If they're talking about the £350m lie, they're not talking about something else. If they're quibbling about the amount, the topic remains "we are sending Europe money" (and there they always concede "Well yes, but also if you look at the net amount..."), and if they're constantly going "Let's talk about the £350m, now, that's not quite true" the key words being repeated are "The £350m", so by attempting to refute the claim on a logical level they actually wind up spreading it on a practical "most of the audience is only half paying attention to the telly because the dog's barking" level.
>> No. 94338 Anonymous
21st July 2021
Wednesday 8:42 am
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Is 14 years in prison for journalists who write about the embarrassing things the government has done "embarrass the government" an advantage of Brexit?
>> No. 94339 Anonymous
21st July 2021
Wednesday 8:58 am
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>>94338
They've had it far too good for far too long.
>> No. 94343 Anonymous
29th July 2021
Thursday 11:57 am
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>>94338
Not according to ARE BORIS
>BORIS Johnson has shot down planned changes to the Official Secrets Act that could jail journalists for 14 years for exposing public interest stories.

>After a massive backlash to a suggested Home Office clampdown that would treat newspapers like spies, the PM mounted a passionate defence of Britain's free Press. And he vowed to protect it as “​​a search light that will continue to shine on every crevice."

>In the wake of the Matt Hancock scandal the PM offered his full throated defence of whistleblowing that has produced “the best and most important stories.” Mr Johnson’s comments came amid alarm that a review of the Official Secrets Act could curtail reporting like The Sun’s expose of the Health Secretary’s lockdown breaking affair. Fears have been raised that a Home Office consultation into updating the 1989 Act could lead to reporters who are given leaked documents or information being treated similarly to hostile intelligence agents. Journalists could face jail sentences of up to 14 years under planned changes that could criminalise the Press for upsetting the current and future governments.

>But in an interview with LBC radio, Boris Johnson said he did not think "for one minute" that the alterations, designed to account for shifting threats in the digital age, would be allowed to prevent journalists from carrying out investigations. The former journalist said: "We don't - I don't - want to have a world in which people are prosecuted for doing what they think is their public duty and... in the public interest. I'm full of admiration for the way journalists generally conduct themselves. Whatever this thing is, I don't for one minute think it is going to interrupt the normal process."

>And he insisted: "The best and most important stories, whether they’re Watergate or Thalidomide or whatever come from tainted sources. One man’s, you know, treacherous betrayer of confidences and irresponsible leaker is another man’s whistleblower." And he vowed: "What we want to do is make sure that we don’t do anything to interrupt the operation of good journalism and bringing you new and important facts into the public domain."

>But, asked whether the consultation on the Official Secrets Act should be "ripped up", Mr Johnson suggested the review of the feedback should continue but sources today gave strong hints the contentious parts will be dropped or tweaked to allow a public interest defence. Asked whether there would be a public interest defence being included in the updated Act, Mr Johnson’s spokesman said last week: "It is a consultation so it is important we allow that to run its course and we study the responses closely before we set out any more details in due course."
https://www. Please ban me/news/politics/15715133/boris-johnson-shoots-down-journalist-jail-plans/
>> No. 94344 Anonymous
29th July 2021
Thursday 3:08 pm
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>>94343
He probably doesn't want to burn those bridges when he wants to go back to work there as soon as possible.
>> No. 94345 Anonymous
29th July 2021
Thursday 3:49 pm
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>>94344
That or he's realised he'll struggle to find people to report on things he's leaked about his own people when he wants to get rid of them.
>> No. 94346 Anonymous
30th July 2021
Friday 1:27 pm
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>>94345
Like Trump, I don't doubt there will be hordes of willing applicants, they'll just be shite.
>> No. 94348 Anonymous
1st August 2021
Sunday 9:55 pm
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>>91916
The western Nazi Bolshevik system is terrible and only the UK can dodge it
>> No. 94382 Anonymous
7th August 2021
Saturday 6:30 am
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UK faces shortage of chips due to high demand for British potatoes from the Continent after floods in Europe wreck crops... and Christmas dinners could be at risk

https://www.Please don't ban me.co.uk/news/article-9870039/UK-faces-shortage-chips-high-demand-British-potatoes-Continent.html

Alright, lads. What the fuck is this? We've left the EU and now we're going to face a shortage of chips, possibly even crisps too, because we're sending our potatoes to the continent rather than keeping them for ourselves. If we've truly taken back control then the government should step in and stop this; no European should have a British potato before people in this country is well stocked up on potato based produce. Now I know how Rio Ferdinand felt.
>> No. 94383 Anonymous
7th August 2021
Saturday 2:49 pm
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>>94382
This is EXACTLY how the Irish potato famine happened. Give it 20 years and we'll all be Americans, celebrating St George's Day on Ellis Island while shops refuse to hire us on account of our disgraceful personal conduct.
>> No. 94384 Anonymous
7th August 2021
Saturday 6:07 pm
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>>94382
>There are also fears the traditional British Christmas dinner could be under threat this year from the potato shortage and a dip in poultry production.

Potato I can live without, we can just ban the export and laugh as Europeans starve, but I'm not looking forward to a world without chicken. That's the basis for at least 75% of my dinners.
>> No. 94385 Anonymous
7th August 2021
Saturday 6:20 pm
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>>94384
It's okay, you can import the good stuff from the US.
>> No. 94386 Anonymous
7th August 2021
Saturday 6:23 pm
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>>94384
Quorn chicken is fairly realistic tasting, at least if you want it in processed form like nuggets or burgers.
>> No. 94387 Anonymous
7th August 2021
Saturday 6:42 pm
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>>94385
But I was told by the farming lobby that washing chicken in bleach gives you cancer.

>>94386
Too expensive and I doubt production can easily be ramped up on demand. Chicken is great because it's cheap, versatile and quite nutritious which is a niche you can't easily fill.

If all the chickens died tomorrow we'd be in deep shit.
>> No. 94388 Anonymous
8th August 2021
Sunday 12:23 am
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Why do you think Bernard Matthews has been hedging his bets on turkey all this time? That investment's about to come home to roost.
>> No. 94398 Anonymous
9th August 2021
Monday 10:25 pm
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>>94210
>Vodafone is to reintroduce charges for UK customers who use their phones in Europe, despite Britain’s biggest mobile companies previously saying that they would not bring back roaming costs after Brexit.

>Vodafone said new customers and those upgrading will have to pay up to £2 a day to use their monthly allowance of data, calls and text messages in mainland Europe. The company, which is following in the footsteps of BT-owned EE after it made a similar announcement in June, said the charges would come into force from next year.

>O2 has said it will impose an extra “fair use” charge if customers use more than 25GB of data in a month. Three has cut its fair-use data limit from 20GB a month to 12GB a month when in Europe, with a £3 charge per extra gigabyte if customers need to use more data.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/aug/09/vodaphone-to-reintroduce-roaming-fees-for-uk-customers-in-europe
>> No. 94570 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 4:37 am
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Please use the sharing tools found via the share button at the top or side of articles. Copying articles to share with others is a breach of FT.com T&Cs and Copyright Policy. Email licensing@ft.com to buy additional rights. Subscribers may share up to 10 or 20 articles per month using the gift article service. More information can be found at https://www.ft.com/tour.
https://www.ft.com/content/23569cd6-edc1-475e-956a-53ffe5ac5f1c?sharetype=blocked

Boris Johnson’s government has promised it will legislate to allow British traders to sell their wares in pounds and ounces, rather than grammes and kilos, as it unveiled plans to seek a deregulatory dividend from Brexit.

The restoration of old imperial weights, long a demand of Brexiters who resented the imposition of metric measures by Brussels, was among the top potential benefits of the UK leaving the EU listed on Thursday by Lord David Frost, the minister responsible for implementing Brexit.

The possible upsides of the UK’s exit from the EU’s regulatory orbit also included allowing publicans to reintroduce the Crown Stamp on their glassware, which had been prohibited by Brussels but the review described as an “important symbol” of Britishness.


https://www.ft.com/content/23569cd6-edc1-475e-956a-53ffe5ac5f1c
>> No. 94571 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 4:50 am
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>>94570
I'm glad they're doing this - it will be looked back on as one of the many signs of hubris that leads to their replacement.
>> No. 94572 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 7:00 am
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>>94571

Who, the Financial Times?
>> No. 94575 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 9:48 am
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>>94570
I couldn't give a shit about a crown on a glass but abolishing the globally-recognised metric standard in law is the worst idea ever. I understand a kilo but I have no concept of how much a pound or ounce is.
>> No. 94576 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 10:01 am
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I know how much an ounce is because I have bought drugs, however:
As various pundits have pointed out "Now we can label our empty shelves in imperial". Not always empty but it'll be much harder for people to put their finger on the rising costs of food if we're struggling to convert from metric to this.
>> No. 94577 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 10:06 am
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>>94571
CON 49 (+5)
As much as I wish it were true that this will be their downfall, they can literally do no wrong.
>> No. 94578 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 12:35 pm
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>>94570
This is meant for old people I guess.
>> No. 94579 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 1:03 pm
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>>94575
Don't be proud of your ignorance.
>> No. 94580 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 1:06 pm
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>>94579

That argument works doubly well for the people who haven't bothered to learn metric over the past 60 years.
>> No. 94581 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 1:25 pm
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Shrinkflation is going to be bants with metric and imperial combined. Your 750g box of Coco Pops is now 675g, but if you prefer, you can pay 10p more for 1.2lb of Coco Pops. What do you do? Is that a better or a worse deal than getting a bushel for a tenner?
>> No. 94582 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 1:34 pm
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>>94581

Won't shops still have to display that "x pence per 100g" thing on their shelf labels?
>> No. 94583 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 1:43 pm
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>>94582
Sounds an awful lot like red tape that needs slashing to me.
>> No. 94584 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 1:56 pm
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>>94583
Why?

Those signs immediately and easily show how much you're paying extra/less when buying larger pack sizes or multibuys. It makes it easy to compare the prices of similar things, if they aren't sold in the same size containers.
>> No. 94585 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 2:13 pm
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>>94584
You should be able to take some personal responsibility and work it out yourself. It's common sense.
>> No. 94586 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 2:26 pm
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>>94585

I should very not have to carry a calculator around with me when I am shopping to determine what the optimally priced box of cereal is mate.
>> No. 94587 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 2:27 pm
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>>94585

Seems like a great thing to say to people who want imperial back.
>> No. 94588 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 2:53 pm
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>>94585
> It's common sense.

Imperial measurements are not "common sense" when everyone under the age of 60 has been taught metric at school. It's not "common sense" to be able to mentally subdivide fractions of packet and portion sizes and prices in real-time - don't be disingenuous.
>> No. 94589 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 3:08 pm
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>>94588

You've missed a joke.
>> No. 94590 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 3:10 pm
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>>94586
Phones come with a calculator function these days.
>> No. 94591 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 8:05 pm
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You lads do realise that vendors are not required to sell their wares in Imperial measurements? And even if they were, you could navigate it with the very, very simple arithmetic you learned when you were in primary school?

Fuck's sake, it really is like a sewing circle in here sometimes. You'll look for anything to get on your high horse about.
>> No. 94592 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 8:24 pm
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>>94591

I just instinctively resent it because it's pointless in the grander scheme of things. It's one of those things only maungy old pensioners actually care about, and I dislike giving maungy pensioners what they want for the same reason you don't give a maungy child what they want. It only teaches them that if they kick and scream hard enough they can have whatever they like.
>> No. 94593 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 9:14 pm
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>>94592
Fair enough, but the EU banning the use of old measurements was equally pointless. Are you happier catering the whims of maungy old bureaucrats who aren't even from round 'ere?
>> No. 94594 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 9:39 pm
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>>94593

Well, I'd agree with you except for the fact that using metric was at least a sensible move for standardisation.

I just don't get the big deal either way, it's not like you had some EU lawyer crash through your window if you still had an old set of scales in your kitchen. I don't remember there being a Spanish Inquisition when my nan would still order in pounds and ounces at the butcher's.

Whereas doing a u-turn again after what, fifty odd years of it, I can't see a single tangible benefit. I can't see a single reason anyone will actually bother going back, so therefore it appears to be a symbolic gesture intended entirely to appease the maungy pensioner contingent who hold the government hostage.
>> No. 94595 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 10:01 pm
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>>94591

You're looking at the wrong end of it. We know it's fucking pointless, that much is obvious. It's annoying because it's a transparent gesture to score points on their primary, ancient voters.
>> No. 94596 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 10:36 pm
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I also consider it worth mentioning that you've never not been able to buy a pint of milk in this country. It says it's 568ml, but that's because 568ml is a pint. They never moved to 500ml and 1l bottles; milk has always been measured in pints. These people who demand imperial measurements have always had imperial measurements. If they don't know how much a pint actually is, then I'd like to question how patriotic they really are. I bet they're not even English.
>> No. 94597 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 11:08 pm
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>>94596
>I also consider it worth mentioning that you've never not been able to buy a pint of milk in this country
That's not entirely true.
>> No. 94598 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 11:25 pm
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>>94597

That were weird that was.

Honestly I think that was the thing that disrupted my eating/cooking routine. I had my routine relatively healthy and wholesome, then after we had the shortages I had to go on to packet noodles and ready meals for a bit because it's all I could get, and I've just been stuck living that way ever since.
>> No. 94599 Anonymous
17th September 2021
Friday 11:36 pm
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>>94598

Was? My local supermarkets are still observably light on stock in many areas.
>> No. 94600 Anonymous
18th September 2021
Saturday 12:00 am
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>>94599

Well, mine aren't. Not of the stuff I buy at least. Which remains packet noodles and frozen pizzas, but still.

I'll get back to making my own pasta sauces and fresh meat and veg one day.
>> No. 94601 Anonymous
18th September 2021
Saturday 5:24 am
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>>94599
I've barely noticed the shortages that are meant to be going on at the minute. Lidl have been light on cucumbers but there's nothing else I've been unable to get.
>> No. 94602 Anonymous
18th September 2021
Saturday 8:04 am
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We really are going back to the good old days. Crowns on pint glasses. Mad cow disease.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-58602051
>> No. 94603 Anonymous
18th September 2021
Saturday 2:26 pm
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>>94602
Bushels need to come back too - proper bushels, with variations per county.
>> No. 94604 Anonymous
19th September 2021
Sunday 4:39 pm
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>>94577
>CON 49 (+5)

Just a three point swing in Opinium's latest poll.
>> No. 94763 Anonymous
30th September 2021
Thursday 7:43 am
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Companies should employ ex-prisoners to fill vacancies instead of demanding more visas for foreign workers, Dominic Raab has said.

The deputy prime minister and justice secretary also backed calls to allow asylum seekers to work as part of efforts to solve huge labour market shortages in the UK. He said that lifting the ban on asylum seekers getting a job would also help them to learn the language and boost their chances of integrating into society if and when they were granted asylum. Raab said that employing former prisoners and offenders serving community sentences would also help to cut reoffending because it would “give people skin in the game, give them something to lose” and “give them some hope”.

In an interview with The Spectator magazine, Raab dismissed Labour’s call for 100,000 migrant visas to be issued to relieve the pressure on lorry drivers and said that employers should instead be raising wages to attract domestic workers. Raab, who was a leading Brexit campaigner in the EU referendum, added: “It leaves us reliant in the long-term on the predicament of cheap labour coming in from abroad. What that will do is depress wages for aspirational working-class people in this country.”

Prisoners are already helped to secure jobs in labour markets with large vacancies, such as hospitality, food production and agriculture. Offenders who are given community sentences could also be deployed in low-skill sectors to plug shortages, Raab suggested. He said: “We’ve been getting prisoners and offenders to do volunteering and unpaid work. Why not — if there are shortages — encourage them to do paid work where there’s a benefit for the economy, benefit for society?


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/dominic-raab-hire-asylum-seekers-prisoners-plug-worker-gap-8nt3k9mbk
>> No. 94769 Anonymous
30th September 2021
Thursday 6:34 pm
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>>94763

Why can't prisoners just go back to doing what they did before the were prisoners?
>> No. 94770 Anonymous
30th September 2021
Thursday 6:49 pm
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>>94769

Because you'd have to arrest them again for it.
>> No. 94771 Anonymous
30th September 2021
Thursday 6:51 pm
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>>94769
Pretty crime?
>> No. 94772 Anonymous
30th September 2021
Thursday 6:56 pm
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>>94770
Not if we take workers off policing and into other fields.
>> No. 94783 Anonymous
30th September 2021
Thursday 9:33 pm
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>>94769
Nobody wants to hire a criminal.
>> No. 94873 Anonymous
19th October 2021
Tuesday 7:10 am
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Why won’t Brits pick vegetables for £30 an hour?

Last year, with the pandemic preventing people entering the UK, David Simmons realised he would have to find local people to work on his farm near Hayle, west Cornwall. He went on local TV, appealed on social media and paid for adverts, and was happy with the result: more than 250 people applied for a role. But after ringing every single applicant, only 37 turned up for the induction and, after seven weeks of picking, just one worker was left. This is surprising when you consider the pay: if you work hard enough, you can get up to £30 an hour picking vegetables on Simmons’ farm, which works out to more than £62,000 a year pro-rata.

Across the UK, vegetables are rotting in the fields, yet supermarket shelves are bare. According to reports, we are also short of 100,000 HGV drivers, 100,000 carers and 188,000 restaurant staff. Despite falling numbers of immigrants looking for work in the UK, for various reasons, Brits aren’t filling the gaps: “[British] people don’t want to work in manual jobs,” says Simmons. These days, you simply can’t get the staff.

To test the theory, I go to Cornwall to harvest broccoli on Simmons’ farm. I arrive at 8am, by which time the Russian and Ukrainian team I meet have already been out for two hours. I cut crowns from the stalk with a very sharp knife, twist off the biggest leaves, and toss them into a basket carried on a tractor being driven behind us. After half an hour of bending, cutting and tossing, I have already worked up a sweat: there is no denying that doing this for eight hours a day, five or six days a week, would be exhausting. But it still seems like an appealing proposition, given the handsome pay.

Part of the reason wages are increasing for jobs like this is because the supply of lower-skilled workers is itself exhausted. For decades, hundreds of thousands of seasonal agricultural labourers would come to the UK to harvest our fruit and veg. But a mixture of Covid and post-Brexit changes to work visas meant that, last year, immigration became net negative for the first time in a generation.

This may be music to the ears of the Government, which recently declared its aim of creating a “high-wage, high-skill, high-productivity” economy, one that focuses on attracting high-earning workers from abroad. Earlier this month, Cabinet ministers said that British industry had “got drunk on cheap labour” in recent decades, and built businesses that can only run when there are millions of people willing to come to the UK to do low-skilled, low-paid work. If they can’t find enough staff to fill these roles, well, tough, goes this argument: either raise wages to attract British workers, or invest in automation.

But if foreign-born workers aren’t doing these jobs, why aren’t the one and a half million unemployed Brits applying for them? A few decades ago, all the manual workers on Simmons’ farm were locals, so the current reluctance of Brits to do the work is, he admits, a frustration. He says that even a generous salary couldn’t motivate the 37 British staff who worked for him last summer. “People didn’t like working outside in the heat because it was summer, they couldn’t get to the fields [on time], and it was hard going on their backs,” he says. As is common in agriculture, his pickers receive a ‘piece rate’, whereby they are paid more the harder they work, but are guaranteed the living wage as a minimum, which is £9.50 an hour; hard-working staff receive more than £20 an hour. But despite the obvious incentive, Simmons struggled to motivate the British staff he hired. “They don’t see the benefit of it,” he says, and it showed in their work rate: last year, his British workers were consistently the slowest, and were thus the lowest paid.


https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/10/17/wont-brits-pick-vegetables-30-hour/
>> No. 94874 Anonymous
19th October 2021
Tuesday 9:11 am
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>>94873

I love how the idea that immigrants don't affect wages is well and truly blown to smithereens, a complete dead horse of an argument that only makes you look like a retard if you try and put it forward; but they're still determined to bury their heads in the sand and blame it on anything but the actual root causes of their woes. There's no end to the number of bollocks patronising classist shite they can come out with to shame the British working class for not being the obedient slaves they are, and they find that much more preferable than maybe admitting that the fact they've driven all the local labour out of the rural areas where they would usually be doing this work, and now most those areas are essentially retirement villages, might have something to do with it. The fact unemployed people in the UK are in totally the wrong parts of the country to make effective seasonal workers, without some form of scheme to transport and accomodate them. The fact that these employers are expecting the British working class to do it in the same slavish conditions the peasants from fucking ex-Soviet countries are willing to, and maybe they could offer better hours and more breaks or something, I don't know.

It's weird with business owners isn't it, how it's always everybody else's fault but their own. It's always "oooh but the economy!" or "oooh but the mean old workplace health and safety regulations!" or some other excuse. You don't get far with that attitude in my book. It's time business owners grew up and took ownership for their problems instead of always looking for a handout.
>> No. 94875 Anonymous
19th October 2021
Tuesday 9:18 am
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>>94874
Who needs that when we've got a double-barreled Telegraph journalist from London implying they're lazy after she did the job for a full 30 minutes, two hours after everyone else's shift had started.
>> No. 94876 Anonymous
19th October 2021
Tuesday 10:44 am
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>>94874

>I love how the idea that immigrants don't affect wages is well and truly blown to smithereens

Anybody with economics orientation week at uni under their belt could have told you that.


>>94875

Fairly typical. Doesn't usually end well when the self-proclaimed intelligentsia leave their posh surroundings to stoop down to the common people.

Rent a flat above a shop
Cut your hair and get a job
Smoke some fags and play some pool
Pretend you never went to school
But still you'll never get it right
'Cause when you're laid in bed at night
Watching roaches climb the wall
If you called your dad he could stop it all

>> No. 94877 Anonymous
19th October 2021
Tuesday 10:47 am
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>>94873
>if you work hard enough, you can get up to £30 an hour
>hard-working staff receive more than £20 an hour
>whaddaya mean £10 an hour, I can't afford to pay you £5 an hour!

I bet he's also doing that old sales trick where the workers steadily get their target raised as they hit bonus territory.
>> No. 94878 Anonymous
19th October 2021
Tuesday 11:00 am
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>>94877
It'll be £30 an hour before deductions, like the shitty caravan you have to live on at the farm and for food.

In 2017 the average pay for a summer fruit picker ranged between minimum wage and £10 an hour.
>> No. 94879 Anonymous
19th October 2021
Tuesday 11:01 am
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>>94876

>Anybody with economics orientation week at uni under their belt could have told you that.

Yeah, but the point is that hasn't stopped every major media outlet and every vaguely liberal-lefty EU supporter clinging to it for the best part of the last decade or two.
>> No. 94880 Anonymous
19th October 2021
Tuesday 12:06 pm
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>>94875
If it's anything like the factory job I did ten years ago, you can choose when to start. There are the 6am people and the 8am people who don't want to get up that early. It's the upside of zero-hour contracts. I was always an 8am starter too.
>> No. 94884 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 12:42 pm
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>UK agrees free trade deal with New Zealand
>Professionals such as lawyers and architects will be able to work in New Zealand more easily, the government said. A bottle of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc could cost 20p less as a result of this trade deal and other products like Manuka honey and kiwi fruits could also cost less.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-58988711

What will you be spending your 20p on?
>> No. 94885 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 12:48 pm
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>>94884

I'd save up towards a Freddo.

Broken Britain.
>> No. 94886 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 12:48 pm
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>>94884
That's going right into my astroturf fund so I can sit in the garden and enjoy the sunlit uplands.
>> No. 94887 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 12:58 pm
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>>94884

>Professionals such as lawyers and architects will be able to work in New Zealand more easily

What about regular dickheads like me who just want to get off this rock?

This has always been my main problem with expatigration, honestly. It's always just one way. People from other countries get to come here, poshos with degrees mummy and daddy paid for get to swan off wherever they like, but there's never been a means of escape for me or my sort.

I just want to live in America, play in a dad-rock blues band (they still get paid to play music over there, do you realise?), own a few guns, and shag that Yank bird I used to talk to on MSN in 2006.

Literally my whole life has just been a shite bitter compromise because of the fact I was born in a shit, povvo English town, and the gates of opportunity are seemingly open to everyone else in the world but me.
>> No. 94888 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:25 pm
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>>94887

The New Zealand skill shortage list includes chemical engineers and clinical psychologists but also chefs, diesel mechanics and electricians. It's not a one-way street and there are ample opportunities for ambitious working class people to emigrate. We don't have the mindset for it, or we lost the mindset.


>> No. 94889 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:26 pm
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>>94887
The trade deal with Australia means you can stay there for three years on a visa if you're under the age of 35. Go and root some antipodes.
>> No. 94890 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:34 pm
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>>94889
He spent his whole life forgoing European freedom of movement not to mention practically universal access to higher education. He's as lazy as he is bitter.
>> No. 94891 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:39 pm
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>>94888

Does it include biomed scientists or technicians? You see the thing is I was told this was a good job because it's science and all that, but the reality is I'm just a factory robot in a white coat most of the time, and the pay is shit. I don't mind that but I want to live somewhere nicer than Rotherham or Scunthorpe.
>> No. 94892 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:41 pm
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>>94890

Oh but I have a degree, dickhead. It just wasn't the right degree even though it is the right degree, because it doesn't have the box ticked that nobody ever told me needed to be ticked to get the good jobs.

It's a load of shit and frankly, fuck you, I hope your mum gets raped.
>> No. 94893 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:44 pm
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>>94892
Why do you expect to be spoonfed and have everything handed to you on a plate? Are you incapable of doing things for yourself? You should try channelling your impotent rage into something more productive.
>> No. 94894 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 1:48 pm
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>>94893

No, I'm on strike.
>> No. 94895 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 2:19 pm
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>>94891

Medical laboratory scientists are on the New Zealand national shortage list. Medical laboratory scientists and technicians are on the Australian list.

https://skillshortages.immigration.govt.nz/

https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/working-in-australia/skill-occupation-list
>> No. 94896 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 2:21 pm
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>>94895

Bonza. Call me Sheila and light me barbie mates.
>> No. 94897 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 2:26 pm
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>>94896
That’s a good start, they love a bit of racism down under.
>> No. 94898 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 2:43 pm
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>>94897

It's hardly racism to make fun of Aussies, it's just like calling your own kid ugly.
>> No. 94899 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 2:56 pm
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Skills shortage lists always add to my "lower middle class" victim complex.
Did a trade? Did hairdressing? Great. Come on over. You can start immediately.
Got a degree in generic widget engineering or advanced theoretical microbiology? Maybe even Art if we're feeling kind? Great. Come on over. You can start immediately.
Got a degree in history or sociology or politics or any vague certification of literacy like that? Sorry, you don't seem to have enough points to qualify for any work-to-residence visas. Have you considered: Tourist visa 3156B? 15 minute working holiday visa 6814A? Assisted suicide zoom call 7431E?
>> No. 94900 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 3:00 pm
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>>94899
>Skills shortage lists always add to my "poor life choices" victim complex.

FTFY.
>> No. 94901 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 3:00 pm
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>>94892

I remember being in the third year of my undergraduate degree -- the wrong one, of course, because working class lads are only ever meant to become engineers or computer scientists if they go into higher education -- and looking for a way out of my little Welsh hometown. I wanted to see something new and find out what working life might be like in other countries.

I had tried essentially every structured or semi-structured channel you could think of. Every ERASMUS+ scheme, every bit of EU-funded nonsense, every placement via institutional partnership, even the Godawful volunteer tourism organisations. I had researched them and dutifully filled out application forms and sent off earnest e-mails. Absolutely nothing came of it.

I now work in the EU, but I do remember making a post on the .gs uni board back in the day asking for advice. The same cretins popped out of the woodwork accusing me of wanting spoonfeeding. I was a bit dumbfounded, and came away with an even stronger impression that working in other countries was some sort of secret club with an initiation or rite of passage.

The truth is that you will need some grit and resourcefulness to make it work, and there are going to be moments when no one can help you and you just have to make a call. What everyone ignores is how much more difficult this becomes if you don't have the kind of connections and mentorship that are taken for granted in the middle class crowd. Others just seem to "run into" opportunities while you don't even know where to start. You waste your time jumping through hoops that are designed to weed people out, and you didn't have that key person around to tell you that, actually, doing this is a waste of time, and you should really be looking over here.

Unfortunately, since it sounds like you're in a similar starting position to me, you're really going to have to be far more diligent than the uni mates that arsed about on gap years or had mysterious postgraduate funding.

I suppose the TL;DR is that yes, it is shite and unfair, and that you may have to put in twice the effort to get half the results of others, but that it is indeed worth it, and not everyone is as obtuse as to say you're thick because you had the audacity to ask the question.
>> No. 94902 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 3:06 pm
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>>94899
Most of us got vague certifications of literacy at 16.
>> No. 94903 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 3:14 pm
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>>94900
Poor life choices naturally follow on from poor availability of advice my smug friend.

>>94902
I can't speak for your school, but I wouldn't count my GCSEs as a certificate of anything, not even that I didn't skive.
>> No. 94904 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 3:41 pm
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>>94901
Finding a job, and even just navigating the adult world, is a skill in itself. It's not about social class, I don't think, because I'm posh as balls but my family are all autists and so am I so I just can't hack it. People said to me in 2008, "Why don't you just get a job in X industry?" when Burger King never even called me back. Because jobs in X industry aren't listed on Totaljobs, you thick bellend. And yet other people got jobs there. At some point, someone must have told them the secret and not told me. And it's not even my family; I have friends from school with similarly spergy backgrounds and they've have the same problems, if not worse.

tl;dr ur parents r retards lmao
>> No. 94905 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:00 pm
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>>94904
Not him, but how did you personally overcome being raised by the principal cast of The Peep Show?
>> No. 94906 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:01 pm
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>>94887
There are effectively no significantly hurdles for immigration in the western world unless you're a criminal or useless. Especially to America. You can do it, it might take a decade to become a proper citizen but if that's what you want from life then there's not much to it.

Pomms are the third biggest immigrant group in Australia we're their version of immigrant scabs.

>>94899
Literally just retrain even if you have to do it out of pocket.

>>94901
I've known some complete morons who navigated ERASMUS to go to Spain. One's who had a working class background and no masonic connections. I don't know how you managed to fuck this up other than trying to do it in your third year. Even without ERASMUS you could have studied in courses taught in English in many EU countries.

I'm working class for the record but I'm not thick as a laplanderstanis moustache so YMMV.
>> No. 94907 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:06 pm
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>>94906
>we're their version of immigrant scabs.

Someone I went to school with emigrated to Australia almost 15 years ago. He spends a lot of time complaining about gangs of Africans, mainly Sudanese off the top of my head.
>> No. 94908 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:10 pm
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>>94904

On a population level, I'd argue that the kind of job you end up in is very strongly associated with class. It's been shown, for example, the earnings of people who go to the same universities and attain the same grade in the same subjects can vary considerably over their lifetime depending on their parent's background. Generally, if your parents were in customer service or manual work, then you'll earn less on average than a contemporary whose parents were professionals, even when controlling for what you study and how well you do at uni. I accept this doesn't describe everyone's life perfectly, but it's broadly true.

As for "industry X", I agree there's often an obscure job board and an opaque system of HR criteria that you have to be told about. Many industries are a labyrinth of unpaid internships, unspoken social norms, and internal stealth-hiring. People with parents and friends who have already navigated these shitshows have a huge advantage, and I would broadly term those people to be "middle class".

For the record, I'm now on a very healthy salary and don't consider myself to be "spergy", but I've also been rejected from fairly menial jobs.
>> No. 94909 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:26 pm
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>>94897

In my experience they do, try discussing Aboriginals and you will hear a bunch of terms and descriptions which would result in a court appearance over here
>> No. 94910 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:31 pm
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>>94908
See, this is why your one job in life as a working class lad is to find yourself a posh bird. Not just for your own security and the joy of ruining her but for the good of the family.
>> No. 94911 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 4:32 pm
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>>94906
>Especially to America. You can do it, it might take a decade to become a proper citizen but if that's what you want from life then there's not much to it.

This is pure ignorance. If you're from the UK, you can stay in the U.S. for three months, but beyond that you need a visa of some kind. There are temporary and permanent work visas, the former being, well, temporary, and the latter being extremely competitive (unless you belong to a niche profession).

>I've known some complete morons who navigated ERASMUS to go to Spain. One's who had a working class background and no masonic connections. I don't know how you managed to fuck this up other than trying to do it in your third year. Even without ERASMUS you could have studied in courses taught in English in many EU countries.

I'm very happy for your mate that managed to go to Spain, but you're lacking in imagination if you think that there weren't plenty of other candidates that applied that didn't get it, or even some that would have loved it but had no idea what was available. There's different circumstances, application processes, and availability of information across universities. You rightly point to the fact I only began trying in my third year, but why do you think this was?

>Literally just retrain even if you have to do it out of pocket.

Right, but the point is that many people don't have to do this and therefore have a massive leg-up. It's all well and good to tell people to pull themselves up by their bootstraps, but it's an insanely unfair demand to expect someone self-training while already working full-time to compete with someone who was guided through the right steps from the outset.

Historylad certainly could retrain, but you may be totally underselling the effort necessary and impact it would have on them to do so.

I'm not trying to put anyone off trying, here, I'm just saying I have both changed industry and effectively moved countries, and both are really quite fucking tricky without outside help.
>> No. 94912 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 5:41 pm
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>>94911
I know more than one person who got a short-term work visa in the US and then just... stayed. They give you a social security number even if you're on a student visa, which is all most employers really need. Obviously, you can never leave, but who would even want to? I'm fucking stuck here until they start re-issuing H-1B visas and trying to keep my chin up about it.

"Extremely competitive" isn't really an appropriate descriptor of a long-term work visa, but I realise I'm being nitpicky. You won't be able to even apply for a visa unless an employer has filed a petition on your behalf with USCIS to grant you permission to work in the country, so strictly it's a case of getting a job first and then the visa after.

If you really wanted to come over to the US, it's not impossible, but it is a case of being employed somewhere that cares to go to the extra effort of hiring a foreigner. A mate of mine does kitchen work and I encouraged him to apply for a job at a ranch in Montana, who very nearly employed him despite the mountain of paperwork they'd need to do, so it's worth keeping an eye on openings that are interesting or relevant to you and reaching out to see if places would sponsor a temporary work visa. Not now, mind, they're not giving them out unless it's covid or diplomatic work.
>> No. 94913 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 8:18 pm
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>>94912

If your implying staying on as an illegal this does have some major downsides...like if they the authorities do catch you an unsavory experience of the borderline medieval American prison service

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 94914 Anonymous
21st October 2021
Thursday 8:36 pm
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>>94913
How's that vague certification of literacy treating you?
>> No. 94915 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 4:28 am
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>>94914

probably better than an illegals experience of the American prison service
>> No. 94916 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 8:11 am
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>>94901

Thanks for this lad. It's nice to be reminded not everybody is a sneering arsehole from time tie time. I know it's often just trolling, but still, you encounter it enough in real life that it becomes a real chip on the shoulder.

>I now work in the EU, but I do remember making a post on the .gs uni board back in the day asking for advice. The same cretins popped out of the woodwork accusing me of wanting spoonfeeding. I was a bit dumbfounded, and came away with an even stronger impression that working in other countries was some sort of secret club with an initiation or rite of passage.

It seems to just go hand in hand with the subject matter, and it's weird. I can only assume it's the bitterness of others who have tried and failed (that crustacean bowl effect one lad here always liked to go on about perhaps), or it's just that the posho wankers who know how to do all this because their uncle's best mate works at the home office earnestly showing the way they think of the lower classes when trying to better themselves.

Either way it's rotten and it's the main reason I want to leave this place, I don't want to forever be defined by a Northern accent. Abroad I'll always be "the British guy", but people in other countries won't understand all the subtle class and cultural baggage and prejudice that goes along with it.
>> No. 94917 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 8:52 am
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>>94916
>Thanks for this lad. It's nice to be reminded not everybody is a sneering arsehole from time tie time.

I've always found it queer when people post something online and only want to read responses that reaffirm their choices in life or reinforce their opinion rather than being open to challenge in any way.
>> No. 94918 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 9:46 am
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>>94917

I don't think the issue is being challenged, but rather being challenged with what? "Do your own research" could be the answer to almost any question that's ever asked, but there's loads of contexts where asking for advice is far more beneficial. I'd say jobhunting and emigrating are firmly in that category. It was a combination of guidance, one or two acts of kindness, and a load of hard work that paid off for me.

Fair play if you're trying to say that it'll take a lot of effort and personal research -- but then so does, say, earning a degree, and we still have professors/lecturers on hand to curate and structure the information to guide students on things like where to start, how to approach a problem, and where find the best information, right?
>> No. 94919 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 1:31 pm
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>>94917
I've always found it queer when people buy flatpack furniture and only want to read instructions that tell them how to make a bed or an armchair, rather than opening a boxing glove on a spring and a sad-trombone noise.
>> No. 94920 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 2:02 pm
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>>94919
Top analogizing m8
>> No. 94921 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 2:13 pm
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>>94917

Yeah but you do sound like a right prick, in all honesty.
>> No. 94922 Anonymous
22nd October 2021
Friday 3:18 pm
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>>94921
Look where you are. That goes without saying.
>> No. 94923 Anonymous
24th October 2021
Sunday 6:35 am
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Music gear was my primary concern with Brexit, and there was briefly a rough patch last year when everything went official. There was a dodgy transition for a few months where European retailers were just offloading VAT and customs payments to the customer, payable to the courier at the door.

But a year later, Thomann and DV still manage to undercut UK retailers by 10-20% in a lot of cases. Even on gear made in the UK, they are somehow selling it cheaper than UK shops, and their prices include VAT and customs. A Marshall head, which is made in the UK, costs £1299 at G4M or GAK, but is going for just a shade over £1000 from Ze Germans.

How are they doing this, even with all the supply chain nonsense going on right now? Are they just eating the VAT and customs charges while undercutting the competition just to keep the UK customers? Are the UK retailers relying on people not knowing about the tax/customs exemption in order to charge more? Or did it turn out the Brexit deal wasn't actually all that terrible now we've figured it all out? It seems they have a similar arrangement for Swiss customers too.

(And let's not even think about all the costs and energy wasted transporting these goods from Milton Keynes to Treppendorf then all the way back to Leicester or wherever.)

So yeah, I'm still waiting for Brexit to actually impact my life.
>> No. 94924 Anonymous
24th October 2021
Sunday 7:11 am
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>>94923

Thomann's prices are low because they buy a shitload of the product and pass that wholesale saving onto the customer. It's just something you can't compete with unless you also have a comically large warehouse like they do. The supply chain is irrelevant if you ordered 50,000 amps six years ago and are halfway through selling them. They ARE the supply.

Speaking of Thomann, anytime anyone brings them up I feel compelled to mention how surprised I was that their own brand bass and guitar bags were/are so good. I bought a bass one nearly 20 years ago now and it's still going strong.
>> No. 94946 Anonymous
2nd November 2021
Tuesday 11:37 am
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>Morrisons has backed down after customers complained about its labelling of a chicken meat product as containing "non-EU salt and pepper".

>The supermarket chain's salt-and-pepper chicken crown features the Union Flag on its label, which says that it is "made from British chicken". The label provoked an angry reaction on Twitter, including one accusation of stoking "anti-EU hatred".

>In response, the firm said the wording was "an error for which we apologise. We are changing the packaging immediately," A spokesman for Morrisons said: "It is adhering to packaging regulations rather than making any political point." The supermarket said it would change the packaging and de-emphasise the mention of non-EU salt and pepper, but said it would still have to be included somewhere on the wrapping because of packaging laws. Among the reactions from customers, some pointed out the irony of a soon-to-be US-owned supermarket displaying its British credentials.

>Last month, Morrisons shareholders approved a multi-billion pound takeover offer from US private equity group Clayton, Dubilier & Rice (CD&R). The move comes in the midst of a debate in the food retailing industry about firms' increasing tendency to use patriotic imagery on packaging, with trade publication The Grocer identifying it as part of a post-Brexit "culture war".

>However, those who support the trend see the "made in the UK" tag as a sign of quality rather than a political statement.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-59134190

We must now live in a true halcyon age if this is what people have to complain about.
>> No. 95432 Anonymous
23rd February 2022
Wednesday 4:14 pm
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>The government is to launch a study of the economic benefits of reintroducing imperial units of measurement, to quantify a supposed advantage of Brexit.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-imperial-measurements-economic-benefit-study-b2021304.html
>> No. 95433 Anonymous
23rd February 2022
Wednesday 4:22 pm
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>>95432
Nice, that will make things miles better.
>> No. 95459 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 6:50 pm
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>>91916
Yes, if you want to make up your own mind on political matters without government interference.
https://arkmania.in/russia-controlled-rt-sputnik-banned-by-eu-over-ukraine-disinformation/
>> No. 95462 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 6:56 pm
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>>95459
>> No. 95463 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 8:10 pm
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I had a hardcore sissify friend ask me for my views on the removal of Russia Today from the airwaves. I'm happy to support it as part of the sanctions, same as the Winter Paralympians not being allowed to compete and Russian football teams being expelled from tournaments, but they had better bring it back if Russia withdraws. There are very strict regulations about how TV news reporting can be done; just look at how GB News was billed as being our very own Fox News when it's really more like the Antiques Roadshow. I have watched Russia Today slightly less than I have watched GB News, which is also very little, but they really are pretty harmless-seeming and I do support alternative viewpoints being put forward.

It's possible you were being sarcastic with your post, since "government interference" could either be Russia's government interfering with RT's coverage or our own government interfering with RT being shown, but I stand by my point either way.
>> No. 95464 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 8:46 pm
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>>95463
>I have watched Russia Today slightly less than I have watched GB News, which is also very little, but they really are pretty harmless-seeming

My parents had GB news on today while I was there, and it was godawful. It's clearly written around the formula of having personalities framing topics in a way to make you angry and tribal. Obviously any news network can have bias by picking and choosing what to tell you, but its very different when your "newsreaders" are acting out roles.
>> No. 95465 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 9:00 pm
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I tuned into RT for the first time in forever at the start of the war to see how they were covering it. At the time the answer was "not at all", instead they had an overly made up American woman interviewing a bloke in Caliafornia who was claiming wearing masks was making teenagers depressed. I can only assume he spent his teenage years in cryostasis if he thinks that's even going to make a dent on a teenager's psyche.

I would rather chew through one of my own arteries than watch GB News.
>> No. 95466 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 9:02 pm
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>>95463
Sounds like similar to what Jeremy Vine does for a living.
>> No. 95467 Anonymous
5th March 2022
Saturday 11:08 pm
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>>95464
There's a reason people have taken to calling it "GBeebies".

Though, in fairness, I recently saw they had a poll on "should prison be harsher" and the results were 67-33 to No, so they've got at least three viewers.
>> No. 95786 Anonymous
6th May 2022
Friday 8:34 am
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Boris Johnson munches ‘Fukushima popcorn’ as radioactive food rules scrapped

Fish and vegetables grown near the old Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan can be freely sold in Britain after the Food Standards Agency (FSA) scrapped a rule on radioactivity levels in produce.

Controls on a wider range of products, including baby food and breakfast cereals, were lifted several years ago but the FSA maintained tight restrictions on 23 farm products, including bamboo shoot and bracken. After consulting on the issue, the agency decided to remove a threshold that limits Japanese imports that contain more than 100 becquerels, a measure of radioactivity, per kilogram.

The FSA said: “Our risk assessment shows that removing the 100 becquerels per kilogram (Bq/kg) maximum level of radiocaesium for food imported from Japan to the UK would result in a negligible increase in dose and any associated risk to UK consumers. Without specific import controls, the emphasis would fall on food businesses to ensure food is safe under General Food Law. However, we would not recommend businesses need to take any precautions beyond their normal due diligence.”


https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2022/05/05/boris-johnson-fumio-kishida-share-fukushima-popcorn-radioactive/
>> No. 95790 Anonymous
6th May 2022
Friday 11:37 am
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>>95786
So long as it's not so toxic as that shirt tie combination.
>> No. 95827 Anonymous
11th May 2022
Wednesday 6:52 am
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Sounds like we're replacing the Human Rights Act. Take that, wokies!
>> No. 95844 Anonymous
11th May 2022
Wednesday 9:01 pm
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>>95827
Just think of the percentage increase in profits for businesses once we are finally free of the burden of all those bloody rights!
>> No. 95845 Anonymous
11th May 2022
Wednesday 9:42 pm
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Peoples-Front-of-Judea-700x394.jpg
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>>95827

Yeah well, what has the human rights act ever done for us, really, though?

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