[ rss / options / help ]
post ]
[ b / iq / g / zoo ] [ e / news / lab ] [ v / nom / pol / eco / emo / 101 / shed ]
[ art / A / beat / boo / com / fat / job / lit / map / mph / poof / £$€¥ / spo / uhu / uni / x / y ] [ * | sfw | o ]
logo
technology

Return ]

Posting mode: Reply
Reply ]
Subject   (reply to 26482)
Message
File  []
close
1920px-Linksys-Wireless-G-Router.jpg
264822648226482
>> No. 26482 Anonymous
11th April 2018
Wednesday 12:31 am
26482 Replacing my WRT54G
I found a WRT54G in a skip about a decade ago, dried it out, installed Tomato on it and it's been working ever since. It still works just fine as a WiFi access point for my internet connection, but it's starting to fall flat for my in-house needs. The 1000Mbit LAN ports don't cut it anymore and same-network WiFi connections are lagging behind what's possible on even the cheapest devices out there now.

There are plenty of suggestions on them there interwebs, but I'm curious: do you lot have any suggestions or hands-on experience with more modern Open/DD-WRT-alike compatible WiFi routers?
Expand all images.
>> No. 26483 Anonymous
11th April 2018
Wednesday 1:48 am
26483 spacer
Mikrotik kit is the business. Fast, cheap, hackable and well supported.
>> No. 26489 Anonymous
14th April 2018
Saturday 11:35 pm
26489 spacer
>>26483
Different poster here, but in a similar situation, could you recommend a model?
>> No. 26490 Anonymous
14th April 2018
Saturday 11:54 pm
26490 spacer
>>26489

Probably the hAP ac2. If you have a big house and need multiple wireless access points, then a hAP and two or more cAP lites.
>> No. 26491 Anonymous
15th April 2018
Sunday 2:41 am
26491 spacer
>>26483

Don't you need a specific chipset for it to work - no one could ever tell me for sure if my WRT54GS-UK would work with Open/DD-WRT unless I opened it and checked a chip, which I did, then never got around to using the fucker. It's time I did.

>>26483

I'm a bit pissed and unless at the moment so this all lies and fiction but Microtik is not a good choice if you want security in your router.
>> No. 26493 Anonymous
15th April 2018
Sunday 3:17 am
26493 spacer
>>26491
>Microtik is not a good choice if you want security in your router.
Uh... that's pretty important. Can you elaborate?
>> No. 26494 Anonymous
15th April 2018
Sunday 4:54 am
26494 spacer
>>26491

Most Mikrotik gear will run OpenWRT. I vastly prefer RouterOS, but horses for courses.

https://openwrt.org/toh/hwdata/mikrotik/start

>>26493

At the end of last year, WikiLeaks published a leaked database of the CIA's private hacking tools. This contained detailed explanations of hundreds of zero-day vulnerabilities, including Cisco, Ubiquiti and Mikrotik routers. Malware developers quickly started using these exploits in the wild. Mikrotik seem to have been disproportionately affected, despite having patched the relevant vulnerability (Chimay Red) before the leaks were made public. Most plausibly, this is because their equipment is popular with internet cafes and wireless ISPs in developing countries; Mikrotik equipment is cheap but powerful, giving amateur network administrators ample opportunity to shoot themselves in the foot. They don't have a particularly high rate of vulnerabilities (eight CVE items total, all patched).
>> No. 26495 Anonymous
15th April 2018
Sunday 5:13 am
26495 spacer
>>26493
> Uh... that's pretty important. Can you elaborate?

>>26494
OpenWRT on MikroTik gear, what's the point?

Without letting he cat too far out of the bag RouterOS is the big deal, the source code is available and it's worse Windows in the NT 4 era. Worse than Cisco IOS in the "things to do in ciscoland when you're dead era".

> They don't have a particularly high rate of vulnerabilities (eight CVE items total, all patched).

I'd laugh manically but I can't be arsed. Security researchers look at new cool stuff. Pop open a RouterOS image in IDA Pro next time you're bored and just xref search for memcpy. Hey you might even get yourself on the front page of El Reg.

Sigh.
>> No. 26496 Anonymous
15th April 2018
Sunday 7:42 am
26496 spacer
>>26495
Are other consumer routers similarly vulnerable? Is there a router that isn't leaky like a sieve?
>> No. 26498 Anonymous
15th April 2018
Sunday 7:11 pm
26498 spacer
>>26496
> Are other consumer routers similarly vulnerable?
Yes. Both home/small business and corporate.

>Is there a router that isn't leaky like a sieve?
For home or small business use you want OpenBSD with PF and a copy of https://www.amazon.co.uk/Book-PF-No-Nonsense-OpenBSD-Firewall/dp/1593275897/ or something very much like it.

Most corporate risk analyses assume that the network is compromised and work on segregating data, incident response, and "need to know" policies. In other words I wouldn't trust a Cisco more than a Juniper more than I would MS Word 2007 - they're all heaps of shit to begin with before we even start talking about bugdoors.
>> No. 26569 Anonymous
27th May 2018
Sunday 8:08 pm
26569 spacer
>>26498
> For home or small business use you want OpenBSD

Running on what? Look for something small, fanless and entirely libre and OpenBSD compatible and options quickly shrink.
>> No. 26570 Anonymous
27th May 2018
Sunday 9:50 pm
26570 spacer
>>26569

Can't you just throw OpenBSD on a rpi and be done with it? What do you need "libre" anything for? Everything you want in a routing / firewalling setup comes pretty much out of the box.

Of course if OpenBSD never got around to doing an ARM port just ignore my ignorance and try buggering around with iptables on a locked down Linux instead.
>> No. 26571 Anonymous
27th May 2018
Sunday 9:51 pm
26571 spacer
You can get loads of PFsense boxes on ebay.

Return ]
whiteline

Delete Post []
Password