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>> No. 12088 Anonymous
2nd September 2016
Friday 12:54 am
12088 Why am I adding the ingredients I'm adding? Specifically for this dish.
I added too much salt to my lemon sauce. I know that because it tastes of salt. Went about 600ml water, 400g sugar, lots of lemon zest and peel, 100 ml corn starch and then about 80g salt. I was trying to follow an amalgamation of a google recipe and the recipe on a bottle of lemon sauce I got. It seemed on point at the time but now it tastes way salty. I've been adding more water and some lemon juice but in the back of my head I know it's going to simmer away and leave the salt. So I've left it for now, will the salt condense at the bottom, or is the corn starch a binding agent of some kind?

Also, when breading chicken, I was told flour, drizzle in beaten salted egg, and then cover in breadcrumbs. This kind of works but I'm not sure why I'm doing these things. Why do I need flour and egg to make the chicken sticky enough for breadcrumbs? Why can't I just put flour, egg, and breadcrumbs in a bowl and roll it about?

How do the takeaways do lemon chicken?
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>> No. 12089 Anonymous
2nd September 2016
Friday 1:14 am
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The best way to remove excess salt is a peeled, quartered, raw potato. Simmer in the sauce and it soaks up the salt. Also just try adding more sugar for balance. Salt won't condense in liquid, it'll remain suspended.

Try mixing flour, egg, and breadcrumbs together and see what happens. it creates a thick paste you won't be coating anything with.

And put simply, flour sticks to moist chicken, egg sticks to flour, breadcrumbs stick to egg. That's why you do it in stages.

I suspect a lot of chinese takeaways buy a wholesale lemon sauce or even a frozen lemon chicken, because it always seems the same. But it sounds like your recipe is right.
>> No. 12090 Anonymous
2nd September 2016
Friday 2:39 am
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Thanks a lot mate, makes sense. I'll try the potato thing.
>> No. 12092 Anonymous
2nd September 2016
Friday 2:56 am
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400g sugar and 80g salt? Jesus lad, no wonder it tastes awful that's far too much. Unless you're trying to provide enough salt for ~40 people's daily intake just in a sauce.
>> No. 12093 Anonymous
2nd September 2016
Friday 6:42 am
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>>12092

Yeah, I wasn't really thinking about how much salt it actually was. Just gonna start from scratch if potatoes don't work. Although potatoes would cost as much as more lemons. Was a bit drunk. Think I'll nail it next time though.
>> No. 12094 Anonymous
3rd September 2016
Saturday 1:17 am
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>>12093

You just need one potato lad.
>> No. 12281 Anonymous
11th April 2017
Tuesday 3:31 pm
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>>12089
I actually learned this from watching Archer. It's saved quite a few stews of mine, after getting some Himalayan sea salt for Christmas I fine it so satisfying crumbling it onto things I was far too liberal with it.

Incidentally I'm not a salt hipster and didn't request it, I personally fail to see why it's any better than ordinary sea salt crystals. But a well meaning friend bought me it and I've enjoyed using it.
>> No. 12282 Anonymous
11th April 2017
Tuesday 5:54 pm
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>>12281
And I've just realised the abject idiocy of describing Himalayan salt as 'sea salt'. Old habits die hard.
>> No. 12283 Anonymous
11th April 2017
Tuesday 6:27 pm
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>>12089
>I suspect a lot of chinese takeaways buy a wholesale lemon sauce or even a frozen lemon chicken, because it always seems the same.
Most cheap Chinese takeouts buy their lemon chicken, and the rest of their stuff, wholesale frozen in large quantities. Same deal with most of the dishes from cheap Indian takeouts (and with pretty much everything in any kebab shop) - which is why they all taste more or less the same as each other. Some may try and hide it by adding a few odds and ends of their own, or mixing up sauce bases etc, and if you're in London or on curry mile then it's a different story, but as a general rule if you're going with a cheap takeout in a town in Britain then all of their stuff will have come straight out of a tub, which came out of a freezer, which came from a giant wholesale conglomerate syndicated all across the UK. Very few will be carefully dusting lemon chicken by hand and leaving it to season in the back, because they can't afford the labour/time/wastage costs associated with that. You'll know the ones that are preparing their own stuff, because their prices will typically be twice as high.

(I know I'm quoting an old post, blame >>12281.)
>> No. 12284 Anonymous
11th April 2017
Tuesday 7:07 pm
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>>12283
Sadly true, though sometimes nicely familiar. For genuine Chinese food you either have to find a London joint with a no reservation policy filled to the gills with tattooed beardy types or keep a beady eye out for where the Chinese students at your nearest uni tend to frequent. They won't recognise or touch the stuff at most of our supposedly Chinese restaurants.

Also has anyone, anywhere, ever ordered one of the mysterious omelette dishes they have in what they call the English section of the menu? I've always been intrigued but never enough to spend money on it. Not to mention I'd probably get food poisoning.
>> No. 12285 Anonymous
11th April 2017
Tuesday 7:17 pm
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>>12283
My local Indian is a 10ft by 6ft extension on the side of a slightly dodgy pub, and they have a metal shed just outside they use to store their ingredients in.
I sort of find it hard to believe that they aren't just shipping everything in frozen, but it is honestly the best Indian takeaway I've ever ordered from, it's comparable to the quality of food you get if you dine-in at renowned restaurants in Birminghams balti belt. The rest of the reviews on just-eat agree with me too.
I've also seen them unloading vegetables off a van sometimes which is a good sign, even if they are sneaking in some frozen chicken when no-ones looking.

>>12282
>And I've just realised the abject idiocy of describing Himalayan salt as 'sea salt'. Old habits die hard.

Well it was in the sea once.
so was my piss
>> No. 12288 Anonymous
11th April 2017
Tuesday 7:46 pm
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>>12285
There are exceptions. There's an Indian near me who unquestionably cook their own stuff from scratch (and it's fantastic), but they're vegetarian so there's a lot of "meat problems" there that they don't have to deal with, and that's reflected in their price. You might just have got lucky and found a place with an old Indian lass with a bindi who sweats away in the kitchen every day of the week doing it all by the recipes her mother's mother passed down. Lucky you.

>keep a beady eye out for where the Chinese students at your nearest uni tend to frequent.
Yeah, or similarly ask an Indian/Pakİstani taxi driver to drive you to where he goes for dinner, as I think someone on here tipped me off to many years ago. As a rule of thumb, if the clientele of the place you're eating in match the country represented, you're probably in for a good meal.
>> No. 12295 Anonymous
12th April 2017
Wednesday 6:09 am
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>>12288

>Yeah, or similarly ask an Indian/Pakİstani taxi driver to drive you to where he goes for dinner,

Yup.

When I was at uni I ended up moving into a street abutting the main drag. Of all the take-outs there were two that looked fucking shite. One a Mexican, one Turkish. But I noticed that they were rammed with Spanish and Turks respectively, every hour they were open.

Fuck me that food was goood and cheap.

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