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>> No. 12249 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 7:18 am
12249 how long will I have my friend for
my best friend is 22 and has the worst diet of anyone I've ever met.

all he eats is white bread, chips, sausages, tomato ketchup, mild cheese and white rice with fried chicken, if he eats at all, and he has like 4 sugars in every cup of tea he drinks

I don't see him changing this of his own accord, so, how long does he have before he kicks it?

also how can I help him
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>> No. 12252 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 10:30 am
12252 spacer
None of that is bad food you mad armchair hippy. I'd give them another 50-60 years from the information you've mentioned.

If they are grossly over or under weight that might be a problem but that has nothing to do with any of the information you have provided.
>> No. 12253 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 10:40 am
12253 spacer
>>12252
>None of that is bad food you mad armchair hippy.

I take it you missed:

>mild cheese
>> No. 12254 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 10:58 am
12254 spacer
>>12253

Oh shit, you are right! My condolences OP I give them less than 24 hours.
>> No. 12255 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 12:47 pm
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At 22 he is still a child yet too old to respond well to pressure without it feeling emasculated. Give it a few years and his tastebuds will learn to love vegetables by themselves, I know because I was like that owing to how my parents eat.

Maybe if he's ever around your place you can offer to make him a dinner/lunch and introduce him to some proper food. Something like chickpea and lentil dhal on toast is nutritious and simple enough for him to make at home. Lead by example.

>>12252
>None of that is bad food you mad armchair hippy.

I'm pretty sure chips count as bad food and I say that as someone who shaves his armpits. The fact that his concept of fruits and vegetables is ketchup could also pose health issues given his obsession with white food already indicates some deficiencies.

>>12253
Its gets worse because I read it as:
>mild cheese and white rice with fried chicken

Which frankly makes me want to slap him around a bit.
>> No. 12256 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 1:37 pm
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>12255

>I'm pretty sure chips count as bad food.

Nope, they are 'empty calories' which are not inherently bad more neutral. They aren't a poison they just don't give you much in the way of micro nutrients.
>> No. 12257 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 3:28 pm
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>>12252

There are no bad foods, but there are bad diets. OP's mate is looking at a ~7 year reduction in life expectancy based on his diet, assuming he doesn't get scurvy in the mean time. Diets high in vegetables reduce the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease independent of caloric intake - fat people who eat lots of veg live longer than fat people who don't.

>>12249

If he's from a very deprived background where eating that sort of diet is the norm, then he'll probably grow out of it in time. Learning to enjoy unfamiliar flavours requires repeated tasting, so I'd gently encourage him to try different foods whenever you have the opportunity.

If he had a reasonably normal upbringing, then the odds are fairly good that he has a minor eating disorder - avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID). If you're in contact with his parents, you might want to have a word with them and express your concerns. You could also give the BEAT helpline a ring.

https://www.b-eat.co.uk/support-services/helpline
>> No. 12258 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 7:23 pm
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>>12257
>If he had a reasonably normal upbringing, then the odds are fairly good that he has a minor eating disorder - avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID).

In my experience of being a student, most people that age eat a bad diet partly through laziness and partly through lack of experience. They leave home never having had to cook for themselves before, and they end up getting into the habit of cooking the same things all the time. Most people grow out of it naturally over a few years.
>> No. 12259 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 7:41 pm
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>>12258

OP's friend's diet appears to be restrictive rather than lazy. Living on takeaways, tins and ready meals is lazy but normal. These foods aren't particularly healthy, but they're reasonably varied and flavourful.

Unless I'm getting the wrong end of the stick, OP's friend seems to eat nothing but a handful of very bland foods. From the image, I assume that OP is implying that his friend is a very picky eater and refuses to eat foods outside of his comfort zone; the phrase "if he eats at all" suggests that his friend has poor meal habits or may be avoidant of food in general.

I could be completely wrong, but I see a description of someone with a disordered relationship to food, not just laziness. Perhaps OP can elaborate on exactly what his friend will and won't eat. Will he eat a normal meal in a restaurant or from a takeaway? Does he regard many normal foods as disgusting? Would he rather go hungry than eat something outside of his usual menu?

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