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>> No. 4633 Anonymous
1st August 2010
Sunday 2:24 pm
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Look at this fucking thing, /nom/. Gaze upon it.

Fucking yum.

(It's five or six inches in diameter, in case the scale isn't obvious.)
217 posts omitted. Last 50 posts shown. Expand all images.
>> No. 10043 Anonymous
26th October 2013
Saturday 10:01 pm
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Yellow Stagshorn fungus that I saw earlier today, this stuff is everywhere. Apparently it is sometimes used as garnish, though I think I'd be a bit freaked out if that arrived on a plate.
>> No. 10070 Anonymous
1st November 2013
Friday 4:46 pm
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>>10043
Jelly Tooth fungi (not a great photo, apologies). Edible but tasteless - with its jelly-like consistency it's suitable for being candied, apparently.
>> No. 10071 Anonymous
1st November 2013
Friday 4:48 pm
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I took some home for a closeup of the underside.

So, who's hungry?
>> No. 10197 Anonymous
9th December 2013
Monday 11:43 am
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I live right next to some decent woods. I really should start identifying some of these.
>> No. 10198 Anonymous
9th December 2013
Monday 3:18 pm
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>>10197
The first frost kills off the majority of mushrooms, so now is not really the time to go hunting if you're in the northern hemisphere (and probably not great even if you aren't).

Autumn is the best season.
>> No. 10636 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 5:39 pm
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Alright lads I was cutting the grass and I found these fellas are they good to eat? or are they just going to give me kidney failure and/or make me see silly things?
>> No. 10637 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 5:43 pm
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>>10636
Could be St George's mushrooms, it's about the right time of year. Better shot of the gills?
>> No. 10638 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 6:03 pm
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>>10637
Assuming this is what you mean by gills.
>> No. 10639 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 6:13 pm
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>>10638
That checks out but you'll need to do a bit of reading so you can verify the identification (photos can be deceiving). Google around for St George's mushroom, and check against Livid Entoloma.
>> No. 10640 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 6:33 pm
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>>10639
Oh bloody hell they do look similar don't they. It could be either really, just going to chuck em I think.
>> No. 10641 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 6:46 pm
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>>10640
It's not all about looking similar - an image alone isn't enough to positively identify most mushrooms, you need to consider where they were found, how they bruise, how they smell, in some cases you'll need to make a spore print, etc. If you aren't confident in the basic steps of identification (St George's are pretty easy, as it goes) and don't want to learn, then yeah, throwing them out is probably the best plan.
>> No. 10642 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 8:55 pm
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>>10641
Fair enough,the bin for them then.
>> No. 10643 Anonymous
19th May 2014
Monday 9:14 am
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>>10642
St George's are absolutely lovely, but >>10641 is bang on: if you don't know what you're doing and are 100% sure of what you're about to eat, then don't.

That said, once you know where St George's are they come back in the same spot annually, and if you found them while mowing I'm guessing they're on your lawn? So, you've got a year to learn your stuff and a potential feast to look forward to next spring.
>> No. 12163 Anonymous
29th November 2016
Tuesday 10:16 pm
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>>4902
Toasting in an epic bread

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 12166 Anonymous
29th November 2016
Tuesday 10:48 pm
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>>12163
JIZZCOCK

(I mean its almost three years lad, come on)
>> No. 12167 Anonymous
29th November 2016
Tuesday 11:23 pm
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Finally, after 6+ years of searching, I found an edible cep this year. Must've identified 30-40 others in the mean time. "Common", according to Phillips - not fucking common for me.

Delicious, though. Also found a bunch of chanterelles at the same location. A damn fine dinner.
>> No. 12168 Anonymous
29th November 2016
Tuesday 11:33 pm
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>>12167
That looks splendid.

I try every year and have a few books to identify. Never find a fucking thing.
>> No. 12178 Anonymous
1st December 2016
Thursday 7:52 pm
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>>12167
I would have washed and cooked it first but that's a matter of personal taste.
>> No. 12179 Anonymous
2nd December 2016
Friday 8:58 am
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>>12166

I think he posted that after find this thread on KYM. This thread is credited as being one of the origins to "Absolutely Disgusting".
>> No. 12250 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 7:21 am
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I love mushrooms

I've never picked them though, been too scared

I live in Wales though

How do I become a successful (read: not dead) mushroom picker?
>> No. 12251 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 8:44 am
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>>12250
Ideally by going picking with someone who knows their stuff, but failing that by grabbing a decent book on the topic and really digging in (my recommendation still goes to Roger Phillips' seminal tome Mushrooms). Unfortunately there's quite a learning curve to scale if you're going to go it alone - you'll need to be doubly cautious with what you pick. Learning about the deadly poisonous ones is probably a good start, if for no other reason than that doing so should help put a healthy dose of fear into you. Learning to identify the killers will also teach you some terms, habitats, and basics of genera. I'll be lazy and point you to >>10025; as a quick litmus test, if you aren't confident in identifying the difference between those, then don't go eating anything you pick. Over the years I've derived a lot of fun (and food) from mushrooms as a hobby, but you can't half-arse it. Most of the folklore strategies for identifying safe mushrooms are dangerously inaccurate, and even advice that's good in one country can be bad in another.

It's also not really the best time of year anyway. You might find some St George's around (and they're pretty easy to find and identify), but autumn time is the real season for it.
>> No. 12329 Anonymous
9th October 2017
Monday 3:10 pm
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>>12168

I have been going mushroom hunting for nigh on a decade now, and it was also a popular weekend activity with my parents when we were little.

Ceps have largely eluded me so far though; I found one big haul once in a very remote forest in the Midlands, on my way passing through with a few hours to kill. But I have yet to find a spot in the outskirts of Greater London where they grow. I've followed all the advice on what kind of vegetation they prefer and what kind of soil and its acidity and what-have-you, but so far, nothing.

I do know a few spots around here where you can find good quantities of bay and slippery jack boletes every autumn. And those are the places where I usually go to get my foraged mushrooms.

Never really got into gilled mushrooms. There are just too many of them, and even as an experienced mushroom hunter you have a very real risk of wrongly identifying edible ones which can then do anything from give you a day on the crapper to put you six feet under. The worst that can happen to you with boletes is that you will get diarrhoea and a bad feeling in your stomach for a day or two.
>> No. 12330 Anonymous
9th October 2017
Monday 3:31 pm
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A friend keeps having a god at me for tasting mushrooms at random when we're out. Just a little nibble held on the tongue, if it burns spit it out. Some taste like soap, some fish, etc. I donno man, maybe I'll die because of it but I doubt it. The area I'm around doesn't seem to have a huge variety anyway so I think it unlikely I'll find something bad.
>> No. 12331 Anonymous
9th October 2017
Monday 8:52 pm
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Any ideas what these are (apart from too late?)
There are often loads of things growing here, but these look more credibly edible than most of the blue scary stuff
>> No. 12332 Anonymous
9th October 2017
Monday 11:53 pm
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>>12331

That could be the so-called Stinking Parasol, Lepiota cristata. Its toxicity is disputed, the best guess among mycologists seems to be that it's slightly poisonous, but you probably wouldn't eat it in the first place, because of its repulsive smell and taste, as the name suggests.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lepiota_cristata
>> No. 12333 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 7:14 am
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>>12332
Could be. I'd hazard a guess that they're shaggy parasols (I'd give the latin, but it's become a bit of a taxonomic mess over the years). Distinguishing the two should be obvious enough, as one stinks and the other doesn't. Shaggy parasols are not advised for eating unless well cooked, and even then some people report mild upsets, and in rare cases, severe poisoning. I've been eating them for decades without ill effect, for what it's worth.

Parasol mushrooms are worth looking out for, as they are easily identified by the snakeskin-like stem, found in the same kind of places, safe to eat, quite tasty, and about as equally common. If you're outside the UK though (or apparently, even in some parts of Scotland, now) and don't have much experience with mushroom identification you will want to be very careful that you don't confuse them for the "false parasol" (Chlorophyllum molybdites), which causes extremely unpleasant, though not lethal, stomach upsets. Discerning between the two is easy even for a complete amateur if you've got an internet connection to check the differences. By all accounts you don't want to get it wrong, though, and as it's the most common cause of mushroom poisoning in America, people obviously do.
>> No. 12334 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 8:25 am
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Thanks, chaps. Will have a harder look if more pop up.
This morning's find didn't look too tempting, to be honest.
Will also buy a book, and stop bothering you (unless there's something interestingly ambiguous - which, I imagine for an unschooled dolt, will be every single one...)
>> No. 12335 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 12:18 pm
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>>12334

yeah, about the picture, you don't want to pick ANY mushrooms that have gone off like that. You would get severe food poisoning even from the most harmless species.

If you are a beginner with all things mushroom, I suggest sticking to boletes for the time being. The worst they will do if you pick the wrong ones is spoil your meal or give you diarrhoea for a day or two. But you will stay alive. Gilled mushrooms can contain some very nasty toxins, and a few of them, often veey similar looking to edible ones, can outright kill you.

Also, boletes just tend to taste better. Species like the bay bolete or the cep are incredibly tasty if prepared right. Many gilled mushrooms are edible but just taste bland, which is another reason many of them just aren't worth the risk.
>> No. 12336 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 12:35 pm
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These are the ones you want lads. Good times.
>> No. 12337 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 1:22 pm
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>>12336

No, this one. You want this one.
>> No. 12338 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 1:24 pm
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>>12335 Noted, thanks. Bolete hunting begins.
>>12336 Ho bleeding ho. You so funny.
>> No. 12339 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 2:06 pm
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>>12338

Your best bet to find boletes is pine or fir forests. Most boletes prefer those kinds of trees. Some boletes are also found near birch. Try going to areas that aren't highly populated, because naturally people tend to forage close to where they live.

And if you can help it any, go mushroom hunting on a Friday afternoon/evening rather than Saturday or Sunday morning, when most people go. Bring a torch, as nightfall can surprise you when you're deep in the woods and daylight starts fading by the minute. And pause every ten or twenty metres or so, especially when in dense vegetation, to make sure you haven't lost your way and know which direction your car is or the edge of the forest from where you came. Especially when it starts getting dark.
>> No. 12340 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 2:26 pm
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Unfortunately, not a lot of pine tree action in my chosen patch. Hundreds of poxy sycamores, horse chestnuts, sweet chestnuts, lime, hawthorn, few oaks, some birch. Lots of apple- including some ancient ones that sprout massive shelf-like things that go black and drop off. (not been here a whole year, no idea what's growing, really)
>> No. 12341 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 2:43 pm
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>>12340

It pays to have various different foraging grounds. I have three different areas I have been going to for years, all of them more than a 20-mile drive from where I live.

Try to locate pine/fir forests that are within an hour from where you live and which are a bit "out of the way". And take it from there. Visit three or four sites and make a note of the best ones for future reference.
>> No. 12342 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 5:49 pm
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That level of dedication isn't going to happen, I'm afraid. If I'm going out to get mushrooms, I'll go to a shop. Too much other stuff to do, and I really don't need another hobby. Back to seeing what I can find while walking the dog.
>> No. 12343 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 8:52 pm
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I found a sizeable amount of honey mushrooms tonight.

They are some of the most delicious gilled mushrooms in existence, but they require careful preparation, as they contain quite strong toxins when raw. You usually boil them in salt water for ten minutes, and then discard the water and fry or boil them for another five to ten minutes.
>> No. 12344 Anonymous
11th October 2017
Wednesday 12:15 am
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>>12335
>I suggest sticking to boletes for the time being.
This has been repeated in the thread a few times over the years, I'm assuming it's the same poster. If I'd followed your advice I'd have eaten no more than a dozen or so wild mushrooms in total, and it's not like I'm allergic to evergreens, or lacked the opportunity to dive into them. I've spent countless hours in classic bolete territory, miles away from anything more than a dirt track, and come away with nothing time after time. Your good fortune, or my bad luck? Bit of both, probably.

>Many gilled mushrooms are edible but just taste bland
Yes, many gilled mushrooms are bland, unless you're creative in the kitchen, but some of the easiest to find and identify are delicious. Anyone looking to start picking mushrooms is either going to have to be similarly lucky to you and come upon a trove of Ceps and other bolete delights, or they're going to get disheartened pretty quickly - and they'll have walked past many more edible gilled mushrooms. On the topic of safety:

>The worst they will do if you pick the wrong ones is spoil your meal or give you diarrhoea for a day or two.
You will survive any British bolete, but one to avoid is Satan's Bolete, (Latin transliteration - Rubroboletus satanas[i]). It can give you substantially more than a day or so of the shits. From Wikipedia: [i]A study in 2012 on mushroom poisoning in Switzerland by Katharina M. Schenk-Jaeger and colleagues found Rubroboletus satanas to have caused severe gastrointestinal symptoms including recurrent vomiting and bloody diarrhoea. And of course it's got muscarine in it just for an extra kick, so while you're shitting liquid blood and puking you'll probably be tripping your nut off. This raises mushroom hunting rule number one, which is why I'm going to bold this bit:

There are no such broad generalisations that are safe when it comes to eating mushrooms. Learning about the really toxic/deadly ones can't be separated from learning about the delicious ones; you have to do both.

Now, I've been a bit of an ornery cunt here, to you in particular, but this:
>make a note of the best ones for future reference.
really is key to efficient mushroom foraging. Find a spot where some worthwhile mushrooms are growing, and remember it. Chances are they'll be back year after year, and you won't have to pore over vague internet guides or overly-complex identification manuals.
>> No. 12345 Anonymous
11th October 2017
Wednesday 12:19 am
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>>12343
Er, how were they, by the way? Found scores of them over the years (they're one of the most common mushrooms) but had always read they were toxic and left it at that. I remember reading that their mycelium join up over vast distances and are genetically identical, so by some interpretations they're the largest organic lifeform on the planet.
>> No. 12346 Anonymous
11th October 2017
Wednesday 2:48 am
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>>12344

>I've spent countless hours in classic bolete territory, miles away from anything more than a dirt track, and come away with nothing time after time.

Maybe you were looking for them in years when the weather was too dry. Or you were looking in places that had just been picked clean by somebody before you. The latter is one reason why I said it's a good idea to go on a Friday evening and not on a Saturday morning. Just the other week, I was able to pick a whole basket full of bay boletes and similar species on a Friday afternoon.

But that's one reason why I said it pays to go to a few different areas and just look if there are mushrooms there, and then keep coming back to the best ones.


> Anyone looking to start picking mushrooms is either going to have to be similarly lucky to you and come upon a trove of Ceps and other bolete delights, or they're going to get disheartened pretty quickly - and they'll have walked past many more edible gilled mushrooms.

I believe mushroom hunting teaches you the virtue of persistence, and not giving up even after you've spent an hour looking up and down a section of forest. You are not just going to happen upon a whole massive virgin patch of ceps the minute you enter a forest.

In a way, it's similar to fishing, one of my other nature-related pastimes. If you go fishing to catch loads of big fish, you will inevitably be disappointed 80 percent of the time.

And I just never really got into gilled mushrooms. One year, there was an abundance of blushers here. I picked many of them, but found their taste quite disappointing. The same was true for some other edible species that I have tried.


>It can give you substantially more than a day or so of the shits.

Right. I guess I kind of forgot about the Satan's Bolete there. On the other hand, its distinctive appearance makes it very easy to identify when you're out in the woods, so as long as you remember that one bolete that's a bit more nasty, as well as three or four others that either ruin your meal or can indeed give you the shits, you're golden.


>>12345

They were nice. I made them into a stir fry with onions and vegetables. I don't usually pick honey mushrooms when I see them, but tonight, there was little else edible growing in that section of forest where I was foraging, so I decided to take them home with me. They do require careful preparation though. I asked my mum on the phone, who has decades of experience mushroom hunting, and she said to boil them for ten minutes, discard the water, and then fry them again for ten minutes. It's been close to four hours now since I ate them, and I'm feeling fine. So that must have done the trick.
>> No. 12347 Anonymous
12th October 2017
Thursday 10:21 pm
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>>12346
>Maybe you were looking for them in years when the weather was too dry.
Yeah, maybe. It was a period of a good few years that I was on a major bolete hunt, though.

>Or you were looking in places that had just been picked clean by somebody before you.
I seemed to spend half the time picking cobwebs out of my face and sinking wellie-deep in mud/leafy debris, pretty certain there wasn't anyone else hunting around where I was going. Of course when I did finally find a cep it was at the side of a regularly-used public footpath.

>I believe mushroom hunting teaches you the virtue of persistence, and not giving up even after you've spent an hour looking up and down a section of forest.
I was "lucky" enough to be out of work at the time, so I regularly spent hours per day during the season exploring the area (to get out of the house and stop myself going stir-crazy, as much as anything else). Might just have been that part of Wales.

>One year, there was an abundance of blushers here. I picked many of them, but found their taste quite disappointing.
Do boletes generally retain a more consistent amount of water than gilled mushrooms, I wonder? I remember a few occasions of gilled mushrooms from the same patch that have been fantastic one year and tasteless and watery the next.

>I kind of forgot about the Satan's Bolete there. On the other hand, its distinctive appearance makes it very easy to identify when you're out in the woods
It's not a subtle specimen. It's also apparently far less toxic if cooked, pretty rare, and I certainly don't want to put anyone off getting into foraging for mushrooms, but there just aren't any simple absolutes. There are also a lot of folklore rules of thumb, especially in older "live off the land"-style 70's/80's books that you can still pick up in charity shops etc, that are potentially lethal. I've seen online guides on common mushrooms that only list half a dozen or so that are safe to eat, and those are particularly irresponsible given they're aimed at novices; I remember seeing one that could've easily have passed a death cap for a horse mushroom.

Might have to give honey mushrooms another look, given how often I've come across them in the past.
>> No. 12348 Anonymous
12th October 2017
Thursday 11:05 pm
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>>12347

>I seemed to spend half the time picking cobwebs out of my face and sinking wellie-deep in mud/leafy debris, pretty certain there wasn't anyone else hunting around where I was going. Of course when I did finally find a cep it was at the side of a regularly-used public footpath.

Most mushrooms, certainly boletes, prefer areas of forest floor where there is little undergrowth. Some moss, fern or grass is fine, but you will mostly find them in more bare areas. And although mushrooms are indifferent to light conditions, they often seem to prefer clearings or other slightly more "airy" spots. They also seem to avoid soil conditions that are too wet and muddy.


>I was "lucky" enough to be out of work at the time, so I regularly spent hours per day during the season exploring the area

Mushroom hunting does take its time, like any hobby. But considering that many people who do work spend their evenings or weekends just sat in front of the telly gulping down the pints, you can't really say you haven't got time for it as a wage slave.


>Do boletes generally retain a more consistent amount of water than gilled mushrooms, I wonder? I remember a few occasions of gilled mushrooms from the same patch that have been fantastic one year and tasteless and watery the next.

Not that I would know of, but certainly when it's very wet, they will absorb more rainwater. It also means they spoil faster, so be careful when picking ones that are very wet.


>There are also a lot of folklore rules of thumb, especially in older "live off the land"-style 70's/80's books that you can still pick up in charity shops etc, that are potentially lethal. I've seen online guides on common mushrooms that only list half a dozen or so that are safe to eat, and those are particularly irresponsible given they're aimed at novices;

Buying a comprehensive and fairly recent mushroom guide is key to being a good forager. As I said, my parents have been avid mushroom hunters all their lives, and they've still got the old illustrated books from the 1970s to 1980s. The problem is that a) the hand-drawn illustrations sometimes really don't depict a species well, which can be immensely dangerous especially within the Amanita family, and b) some of the information is so outdated that if you just went by a book like that (perhaps from a second-hand book store or a flea market or a jumble sale), you would run the very real risk of spending a night or two in hospital. All the deadly poisonous mushrooms were marked as such in those old books as they would be in any up-to-date guide, but a few of the species have only in the last 20 or 30 years been found out to be poisonous and are still shown as edible in those old books.

So if you are inspired to try your luck mushroom hunting because you picked up an old guide book for 50p somewhere, that's just about the worst place to start from.

> Might have to give honey mushrooms another look, given how often I've come across them in the past.

Be careful - there is a deadly poisonous lookalike called galerina marginata. I actually saw a bunch of them growing on a tree stump the other weekend. I was going to pick them at first, then I thought I wasn't in the mood for honey mushrooms, and then I actually took the time to get out my guide and look them up because something seemed off that I couldn't put my finger on. They are quite easily mistaken for some members of the honey muhsroom family.
>> No. 12360 Anonymous
15th October 2017
Sunday 6:16 pm
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Found a Destroying Angel today while taking a wee on the edge of a forest.

Less than a handful of these is enough to kill a grown man. They are close relatives of the death cap and contain similar amounts of alpha-amatoxin, the stuff that makes death caps so deadly.

Untreated, you will die a horrible slow and painful death.
>> No. 12361 Anonymous
15th October 2017
Sunday 6:34 pm
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>>12360
Just let us know how it tastes before it kills you, okay?
>> No. 12362 Anonymous
15th October 2017
Sunday 7:09 pm
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>>12361

Well one of its typical characteristics is that it smells of horse radish. And so did this one. So it probably tastes like it as well. Feel free to try it, I'll pass.
>> No. 12363 Anonymous
15th October 2017
Sunday 10:36 pm
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>>12360
These are fucking evil. The only difference is that bulb at the bottom, so if you pick them from the top you cannot tell the difference. You have to pick them from the root. They've killed so many people they deserve the name.
>> No. 12364 Anonymous
15th October 2017
Sunday 11:06 pm
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>>12363
Sorry I'm drunk and I should clarify they're very similar to an edible mushroom I forget the name of. If you pick just the tops of them, they both look the same, which is why they're so dangerous.
>> No. 12367 Anonymous
16th October 2017
Monday 2:02 pm
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>>12364

They can be mistaken for various different edible Agaricus mushrooms. But edible Agaricus usually don't have snow white gills like the Destroying Angel. Then again, variations and mutations are indeed observed in the wild, so there is always the risk of getting it wrong.

Because there are so many similarities between edible Agaricus and deadly Amanita species, you're really much better off simply getting agaricus bisporus, i.e. the common button mushroom, from your local supermarket.
>> No. 12372 Anonymous
16th October 2017
Monday 7:36 pm
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Is there any technique or theory on how to find fungi? I've noticed most of my finds tend to be along paths, which would make sense considering wind borne spores carried along air currents, but then I wondered how many times do I actually leave the path.

It just seems you look down and occasionally spot one or two, then more as you kneel and observe. Over time I guess you'll remember where troops and whatever have been so they'll likely return next year. I guess my resistance is to the fact that you just experience it rather than learning as a skill.
>> No. 12375 Anonymous
16th October 2017
Monday 9:36 pm
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>>12372

From my own experience of picking mainly boletes the last eight or ten years, I can tell you a bit about where to find them. You want areas of forest that consist of pine or fir. Or any conifers really. And boletes usually prefer spots where the vegetation on the forest floor isn't that thick. A bit of moss or dead leaves is fine, but you don't want to be standing in fern, heath, or other vegetation up to your knees.

I've sifted through random images of forest for you on google images, and the picture in this post looks to me like one of your better bets for finding bay boletes and ceps. Try to locate a similar looking patch of forest in your area, and prepare to go up to half a mile or even a mile into the woods off the paths. Because as most people will pick mushrooms right near the paths, it both means that you will only find few there yourself, and they won't be able to propagate in those areas the same way as in more undisturbed spots deep inside a forest. All it takes is one mushroom hunter with a big enough wicker basket who scoured the area an hour before you, and you'll have to wait another week before any sizeable mushrooms will have reappeared. Most people can't be arsed to walk a mile into the woods, but that also means your chances of finding something, both of bigger size and greater quantity, will be much better.
>> No. 12376 Anonymous
20th October 2017
Friday 9:00 pm
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Mushroom season seems to be ending here. I went into an area this afternoon that's almost guaranteed to have enough mushrooms every time to fill up a basket. But today, I went home with just over a handful of bay boletes in acceptable conditon. Despite the fact that we had nigh on 20 degrees here for most of the week. There just don't appear to be many mushrooms left in the ground. So this was probably the last time I went foraging for this year's mushroom season.

I was still able to turn today's yield into half a pot's worth of mushroom vegetable stew. Quite delicious.

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