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>> No. 4633 Anonymous
1st August 2010
Sunday 2:24 pm
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Look at this fucking thing, /nom/. Gaze upon it.

Fucking yum.

(It's five or six inches in diameter, in case the scale isn't obvious.)
Expand all images.
>> No. 4634 Anonymous
1st August 2010
Sunday 2:40 pm
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>>4633
Some sort of mutant fungi?
>> No. 4635 Anonymous
1st August 2010
Sunday 7:12 pm
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>>4634

Looks like a puffball to me... but could be wrong.
>> No. 4636 Anonymous
1st August 2010
Sunday 8:00 pm
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I never asked how does one eat a puffball - fry it? Boil it? Bake it?
>> No. 4637 Anonymous
1st August 2010
Sunday 8:14 pm
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It is a giant puffball. It was cut into roughly steak-sized slabs, seasoned with salt and pepper, and then fried for a few minutes per side.

Heavenly.
>> No. 4638 Anonymous
1st August 2010
Sunday 8:35 pm
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Did it go well with the bottle of cloudy piss?
>> No. 4639 Anonymous
1st August 2010
Sunday 10:33 pm
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>>4638

This is why I stopped buying 'special edition lemonade' from that tramp in the town centre.
>> No. 4640 Anonymous
2nd August 2010
Monday 5:26 am
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That's elderflower pop. It's pretty good too.
>> No. 4641 Anonymous
2nd August 2010
Monday 9:49 am
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OP, are you an /eco/ regular?
>> No. 4642 Anonymous
2nd August 2010
Monday 1:43 pm
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>>4638
Looks more like homebrew. Sort it out.
>> No. 4643 Anonymous
2nd August 2010
Monday 5:52 pm
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>>4640
I thought it was elderflower, I just made about 20 litres of the stuff, nice one op!
sage for adding nothing of value.
>> No. 4645 Anonymous
3rd August 2010
Tuesday 11:10 pm
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>OP, are you an /eco/ regular?
No. I'm not much of a treehugging hippy, either.

>Looks more like homebrew. Sort it out.
There's nothing to sort, elderflower pop is supposed to look like that. It is slightly cloudy on account of it not coming out of a factory.

It's not the most flattering of photos, perhaps.
>> No. 4646 Anonymous
4th August 2010
Wednesday 3:45 am
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>>4645
Sort it out was in reference to the doubting poster. The brew looks splendid, it's un-/eco/ to not realise that.
>> No. 4647 Anonymous
4th August 2010
Wednesday 12:40 pm
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>>4646
I was mermly gently mocking to cover up my fungus envy. A typical tale, told a thousand times all over the world every day.
>> No. 4648 Anonymous
8th August 2010
Sunday 5:53 pm
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OP, where did this godly puffball? Find it in the woods?
>> No. 4656 Anonymous
9th August 2010
Monday 1:17 pm
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In a field in Wales.

(They're usually a bit bigger, to be honest.)
>> No. 4693 Anonymous
14th August 2010
Saturday 3:11 pm
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Loads of field mushrooms pooping up around here (SE) due to the recent rain. I picked a bag full yesterday and they were lovely.
>> No. 4697 Anonymous
14th August 2010
Saturday 4:48 pm
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I picked the biggest, heaviest field mushroom I've ever seen a couple of days back. Unfortunately it was occupied :(
>> No. 4698 Anonymous
15th August 2010
Sunday 1:41 pm
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>>4697

By what, a gnome?
>> No. 4699 Anonymous
15th August 2010
Sunday 2:53 pm
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Maggots.
>> No. 4700 Anonymous
15th August 2010
Sunday 7:16 pm
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>>4633
Beautiful OP, beautiful

>>4636
Best way to treat any fungus, wild or otherwise, is to fry in half/half oil and butter - oil for heat, butter for flavour - and a generous amount of salt. Serve on toast. Oh yes.

I'm getting mighty excited by the impending shroom season.
>> No. 4701 Anonymous
16th August 2010
Monday 12:05 am
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>I'm getting mighty excited by the impending shroom season.
It's all going on out there right now (to say nothing of the St George's mushrooms which were around April-June). I've been hitting my regular parasol patch every five days or so for the last few weeks and have not yet come back empty handed.

Pic related, a couple of massive parasols (and the aforementioned infested field mushroom on the far right). The middle one was about 7 inches across. They're actually getting a bit too big at that point - the brown colouring on the top is quite tough.

I do the same oil/butter combo, coincidentally, on my dad's advice, though I'd never thought of the heat/flavour thing. Always with some garlic, though, and a dollop of cream if available. Flour as thickener if required. Chunky slab of homemade bread. Wonderful.

Last year I found out that the brightly coloured red and apricot mushrooms that the hill gets covered in near by are actually edible, and delicious. Both species are supposed to be uncommon but there are always enough of them up there to feed an army. I'll try to remember to photograph it, the scarlet carpet is quite a sight.
>> No. 4702 Anonymous
16th August 2010
Monday 8:14 am
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All fungi are edible. Some fungi are not edible more than once.
>> No. 4703 Anonymous
16th August 2010
Monday 5:56 pm
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>>4701
Sadly, not 'round here it isn't. It's still dry as a bone.
>> No. 4763 Anonymous
2nd September 2010
Thursday 8:31 pm
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Today's haul.

I measured the big parasol this time. 9.5" at broadest. Unfortunately it's a little past its best, but still edible. Apparently they can grow up to 40cm across (!) so it's not as big as I thought.

Shaggy inkcaps in the middle. There's some confusion about these - some people think they make you sick if eaten with alcohol. This is only the case for the normal inkcap, and the distinction between the two is as visually obvious as the name suggests.

Field mushrooms on the right. No maggots this time.
>> No. 4775 Anonymous
4th September 2010
Saturday 6:42 pm
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>>4763
They look lovely.
>> No. 4776 Anonymous
4th September 2010
Saturday 7:08 pm
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>>4763
Looking good.

4703 here: things are looking up here at last - the local downland is producing fine crops of Fairy Ring, Parasol and Field shrooms. I love this time of year.

On a trip to Wales I feasted on boletes day after day. Beautiful.
>> No. 4785 Anonymous
7th September 2010
Tuesday 6:16 pm
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It is a shame I don't eat mushrooms at all. They seem a huge source of food if you live near fields.
>> No. 4788 Anonymous
8th September 2010
Wednesday 3:10 pm
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>>4785

I feel the same. People are so enthusiastic about them it makes me wish I enjoyed them more.
>> No. 4789 Anonymous
8th September 2010
Wednesday 9:50 pm
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>>4763
Never really fancied the parasols much, Do they taste nice?
Also I wouldn't eat a Shaggy inkcap, they just seem too soggy.
I've found a nice patch near me where I have found a few boletus edulis. Here's one I ate earlier.
>> No. 4790 Anonymous
9th September 2010
Thursday 10:18 am
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>>4789
Yes. The parasol is truly very nice; I couldn't comment on other members of the group.
>> No. 4794 Anonymous
9th September 2010
Thursday 1:17 pm
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>>4789
Parasols are lovely.

I try not to be too picky - not everything is as tasty as a Penny Bun, but that's no reason not to eat it, you just have to be a little more creative with 'em. Deep fried battered parasols are lush and mushroom pate (made with garlic and cream cheese) is a great way to liven up even the plainest of shrooms.


>>4785 >>4788

Why don't you like them? Perhaps you've just never had them cooked properly? They really are a very tasty way to get your protein.
>> No. 4795 Anonymous
9th September 2010
Thursday 2:04 pm
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>Never really fancied the parasols much, Do they taste nice?
Lovely. Toss the stem though.

>Also I wouldn't eat a Shaggy inkcap, they just seem too soggy.
You need to get them before they go inky. This necessitates picking them perhaps before you'd think they're sizeable enough to be ready; either way, they should be white inside. Then they're delicious - nice than field mushrooms or parasols in my opinion.

>I've found a nice patch near me where I have found a few boletus edulis. Here's one I ate earlier.
Nice one. Found some Larch boletes the other day. They've been dried for flavouring (soup stock etc).
>> No. 4796 Anonymous
9th September 2010
Thursday 6:10 pm
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>>4794

>Why don't you like them?

For me, it's the texture. Something about the fact that it's a fungus puts me off. I really don't know why, I'm not a picky eater by any stretch, I can stomach anything from fish eyes to snails to Cheesestrings but for some reason a big chunk of mushroom knocks me sick. I'm aware of how delicious they are too, a mushroom soup free of floating bits is divine.

If I had more time on my hands I'd train myself to eat them. I know I'm missing out.
>> No. 4798 Anonymous
10th September 2010
Friday 11:57 am
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Today's haul, just showing off really.
>> No. 4799 Anonymous
10th September 2010
Friday 12:02 pm
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>>4798
Tasty looking.

Personally, I'd've left the smaller two to shed their spores, and used a paper rather than plastic bag. (But I'm just jealous, really).
>> No. 4800 Anonymous
10th September 2010
Friday 1:35 pm
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You sure about that one in the bottom left?

Remember that one of the main reasons to let mushrooms grow before picking them is accurate identification.

>used a paper rather than plastic bag.
I've been told that a wooden basket is best but nobody's ever been able to explain any logic behind this. I just use plastic bags.
>> No. 4801 Anonymous
10th September 2010
Friday 1:48 pm
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>>4800
Paper is better than plastic because it lets the shrooms get some air.

Baskets are better than paper because it allows the spores to fall out - so as you walk you help distribute and propagate the species.
>> No. 4802 Anonymous
10th September 2010
Friday 5:41 pm
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The spore thing makes sense but I'm not convinced that staying damp is a terrible thing for a mushroom, and it's not like a Morrisons bag is airtight anyway.
>> No. 4804 Anonymous
11th September 2010
Saturday 4:17 pm
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>>4800

Pretty much what >>4801 + plastic causes mushrooms to "sweat", it's why supermarkets provide paperbags for mushrooms.
>> No. 4876 Anonymous
30th September 2010
Thursday 9:52 pm
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Found some of these today, commonly called the hedgehog mushroom. Easily identified by it's spines on the underside, hence the name. Really delicious, I can highly recommend.
>> No. 4880 Anonymous
1st October 2010
Friday 9:46 am
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>>4876
Mmm... have always fancied one of these, but never found one.

On a recent trip we came back with bay, cep, red foot, and ruby boletes plus deceivers, parasols and charcoal burners. What a feast. Just bloody yum.
>> No. 4883 Anonymous
1st October 2010
Friday 10:02 pm
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>>4880
Nice. A medley is the way to go. Here's another first one for me. The Wood Cauliflower, looks nasty so I was dubious but was just gawjus, deep mushroomy flavour and had the texture of al-dente pasta.
This season has been excellent.
>> No. 4884 Anonymous
2nd October 2010
Saturday 4:18 am
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>>4876
>>4880
>>4883
Good hauls all round, by the sound of it, especially you, 4880, though I hope you were careful identifying the deceiver.

My last expedition came up with yet more huge parasols (my main spot has had so many of these over the last few weeks that I've had to leave lots of them to rot, which hurts, but there's only so many dishes a man can cook from the same thing before boredom strikes the palette) and a couple of unknown collections, one of which was "poisonous" and the other "deadly poisonous".

I'm going to find the time to visit a common next week where I've found various hygrocybes (mostly meadow wax caps and scarlet wax caps) in insane quantities in years past. Wish me luck.
>> No. 4896 Anonymous
4th October 2010
Monday 6:24 pm
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Found all these with my dad today, after he spotted some in the location a day or so earlier. He'd never managed to find Chanterelles before, so it was quite a happy moment.

Also some Saffron milk caps which were just eaten, very tasty.
>> No. 4900 Anonymous
5th October 2010
Tuesday 9:08 am
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>>4896
Delicious - how did you cook the chanterelles?
>> No. 4902 Anonymous
6th October 2010
Wednesday 12:54 pm
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The existence of this thread hurts me. I wish to declare my HATE for all participants.
>> No. 4903 Anonymous
7th October 2010
Thursday 10:51 am
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>>4902
I too, used to be disgusted by mushrooms. Then I grew up!
>> No. 4904 Anonymous
7th October 2010
Thursday 10:59 am
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>>4902
But mushrooms will save the world!

http://www.youtube.com/v/XI5frPV58tY
>> No. 4905 Anonymous
7th October 2010
Thursday 1:27 pm
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>>4900
In a parsley sauce.

Hunting for more today.
>> No. 4907 Anonymous
7th October 2010
Thursday 10:36 pm
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I met this fellow recently, but photographed it rather than acquiring it. The others I met (chanterelles, hedgehogs and a cauliflower) I acquired rather than photographed, but I am going out tomorrow and shall hopefully return with photos as well as a meal or two.
>> No. 4915 Anonymous
9th October 2010
Saturday 7:54 pm
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>>4907 I ran across this the other day? What is it? All I know is that it looks like a toadstool but isn't.
>> No. 4917 Anonymous
9th October 2010
Saturday 10:29 pm
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>>4915

Looks like a fly agaric.
>> No. 4920 Anonymous
10th October 2010
Sunday 8:17 am
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>>4917
Yes, it is A. Muscaria.
Here is some of what I met yesterday. The purple corts are said to be edible, but not particularly tasty. The Amanita on the lower right is also known as DEATH CAP, not sure how it tastes. They say that A. Muscaria is actually quite good if it is first detoxified, has anyone tried this?
>> No. 4921 Anonymous
10th October 2010
Sunday 9:19 am
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>The Amanita on the lower right is also known as DEATH CAP, not sure how it tastes.
A joke in poor taste, if you don't mind my saying.

>They say that A. Muscaria is actually quite good if it is first detoxified, has anyone tried this?
My parents say that the closest they ever saw of anyone actually turning green was when some friends of theirs tried fly agaric. Suffice to say it did not go down well.
>> No. 4924 Anonymous
10th October 2010
Sunday 5:01 pm
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>>4920
Cortinarius Iodes doesn't grow in the the UK (I'm assuming you are in the UK). I'd be careful with any Cortinarius species as many are poisonous.
>> No. 4940 Anonymous
11th October 2010
Monday 5:27 am
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>>4924
You are very knowledgeable in this category.
I am not in the UK.
Please don't shun me.
>> No. 4951 Anonymous
15th October 2010
Friday 9:27 am
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>>4876
4880 here. I found some! Absolutely delicious. Made hedgehog pancakes with chive butter. Nomnomnom.

Also came across a whole load of white saddles (pic), but didn't fancy them much, although I believe they're prized in oriental cooking.
>> No. 4953 Anonymous
15th October 2010
Friday 5:32 pm
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Although I stand by my hatred for all things fungi, this one does amaze me

http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/plants/news-gruesome-bleeding-mushrooms

sage for FUCKING MUSHROOMS
>> No. 4954 Anonymous
15th October 2010
Friday 9:18 pm
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>>4921

I've had Fly Agaric mushrooms, and they made the walls pulse. The hippies who introduced me to them seethed (yes, 'seethed') them in milk, threw away the milk, rinsed them and plopped them into a teapot.

I didn't get at all sick.
>> No. 4955 Anonymous
15th October 2010
Friday 10:27 pm
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>>4951
Nice one mate. Still finding Ceps but must be near end of season for them, pic related
>>4953
Mushrooms are wonderful, Aren't they?
>>4954
Sounds legit.
>> No. 4956 Anonymous
16th October 2010
Saturday 6:26 am
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>>4953
yes, that i certainly unappealing, in a horror film kind of way, but at least it doesn't look like a penis the way some young boletes do.

>>4954
I was told to do the same thing with my cauliflower mushroom, except for the part about throwing away the milk. my book said pour how milk over it and let it sit an hour before cooking it. I made the milk into a cream sauce and poured it over my s. crispa omelet.
>>4955
beautiful, i am jealous. i found a lobster weighing a full kilogram on wednesday
>> No. 5033 Anonymous
28th October 2010
Thursday 8:21 pm
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I found a nice, big Trooping Funnel yesterday (I would've photographed it but I was hungry). I found some last year and thought they were absolutely delicious, and after this last one I'd have to say that they're the tastiest wild mushroom I've eaten. They're certainly the nicest of the dozen or so edible species I've enjoyed this year.
>> No. 5044 Anonymous
29th October 2010
Friday 1:15 pm
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http://www.youtube.com/v/iIyfEMAMn4Q shrooms you say
>> No. 5096 Anonymous
5th November 2010
Friday 4:45 am
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frog bolete
>> No. 5097 Anonymous
5th November 2010
Friday 4:58 am
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also found these little ones
they're not really food, but still highly sought after
>> No. 5108 Anonymous
6th November 2010
Saturday 6:14 pm
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>>5097
Are those psilocybe cyanescens?
>> No. 5109 Anonymous
8th November 2010
Monday 6:26 am
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>>5108
you are correct.
>> No. 5120 Anonymous
13th November 2010
Saturday 5:09 pm
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>>5097

They can be used as food. I'm sure they have nutritious potential as well, and they have a distinctive flavour.

Are they this year's?
>> No. 5123 Anonymous
13th November 2010
Saturday 8:23 pm
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>>5109
indeed.
Care to tell us when and where (habitat etc not precise location) you found them?
Its one that's been on my 'hitlist' for a few years. Interesting species that seem, by all accounts, to be taking a foothold in the UK.
>> No. 5128 Anonymous
15th November 2010
Monday 8:34 am
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>>5123
the habitat in question is a public park in a posh neighborhood where children play and families picnic, just at the edge of landscaping mulch under a pair of medium sized as yet unidentified conifers. penny-bun thrives in this park as well, so do amanitas phalloides and pantherina. my guess is that, of the lot, pantherina is the one most likely to get eaten.

>>5120
yes, this years, i've been collecting them and giving them away to pretty much anyone who wants them, or i have been, the fruiting rate has dropped of the a very slow pace lately.
i feel just like a satyr, sans fur, its quite a thrill. the boletes i keep for myself.
>> No. 5165 Anonymous
21st November 2010
Sunday 7:52 pm
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Alright, my apologies for coming late to the party.

How do so many of you know what all these kinds of mushrooms (fungi, if that's the correct term) are?

I still have this childhood fear of, "OH NO, don't eat that; it's a toad-stool, and that shit'll kill you." so I've never really experienced mushrooms past what the local Tesco/Markets sell.

Any resource would be much appreciated, or the recommendation of a good book.

Hope they were all enjoyable, and thanks for the tips about oil/butter combo, and how to best consume.

As you were.
>> No. 5166 Anonymous
21st November 2010
Sunday 10:04 pm
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>>5165
The bible is Roger Phillips' "Mushrooms" which is as comprehensive a tome as you will ever need. It's a little challenging -frustratingly, he often uses highly specific words but doesn't bother to include them in the glossary- but if you want to identify a random British mushroom you will do so with this book. Get the latest edition if possible, though it's worth mentioning that older editions include a step-by-step identification guide (I assume it was removed on account of being teeth-gratingly difficult to use).

I have a few other books but almost never use them - if I'm in doubt after identification I go online and check out my suspicions.

Don't buy a foreign book, and don't assume any book on British mushrooms applies when you're abroad. Case in point, the parasol mushroom - these are commonly found both here and in the States, but there's a nearly identical species over there that causes fairly serious gastric upsets (they can only be told apart by spore prints).
>> No. 5168 Anonymous
22nd November 2010
Monday 7:56 am
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>>5165
as well as acquiring the appropriate text, going out on a hunt with someone that is in the know is a very valuable learning experience for a person new to the sport.
>> No. 5171 Anonymous
23rd November 2010
Tuesday 10:07 am
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>>5166
>>5168
Excellent, thank you for the advice, I'll get hunting for that book now.

I'll see if I can't find someone who regularly goes picking for them, and see if I might tag along. My hopes are too high where I live though.

I think even if I checked, double checked and checked again I'd still be to scared of eating them, especially if I'd been picking alone.

I wonder if, similar to that 'what pill did I just find on the floor' app, there's a similar one for shrooms? That'd be nice.
>> No. 5172 Anonymous
23rd November 2010
Tuesday 2:42 pm
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>I wonder if, similar to that 'what pill did I just find on the floor' app, there's a similar one for shrooms? That'd be nice.
There are various such guides, but they vary. The ones I've seen online and in free pamphlets with a newspaper etc are typically extremely limited in scope, usually just a handful of the main easily identified species. The other extreme is the one I mentioned in older editions of Phillips' book where really you need a microscope and slides to assess the colour/size of spores to make a positive identification. Usually I can't be fucked.
>> No. 5173 Anonymous
23rd November 2010
Tuesday 11:27 pm
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>>5171
>I wonder if, similar to that 'what pill did I just find on the floor' app, there's a similar one for shrooms?

There is a Phillip's mushrooms app for the iphone.
http://www.appstorehq.com/wildmushroomsofnorthamericaandeuropebyrogerphillips-iphone-229742/app

You're a bit late in the year now though mate.
>> No. 5174 Anonymous
24th November 2010
Wednesday 4:17 am
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>>5171

>'what pill did I just find on the floor' app

What is this app called exactly? Purely for curiosity's sake, you understand.
>> No. 6037 Anonymous
24th April 2011
Sunday 10:02 am
6037 Calocybe gambosa
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Hello again, chaps.

St George's day has come and gone, and it's just been too dry here: anyone had any joy finding our national hero?
>> No. 6038 Anonymous
24th April 2011
Sunday 12:55 pm
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I went on a delightful stroll around Castle Combe yesterday, and found this. Is it a fungus? Is it edible?
>> No. 6040 Anonymous
24th April 2011
Sunday 1:45 pm
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>>6037 Unfortunately not. Had a quick look around last week but like you say, far too hot and dry.

>>6038
Looks like a morel, if it is then it is indeed edible, highly desirable in fact.
>> No. 6041 Anonymous
24th April 2011
Sunday 4:39 pm
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>>6038
>>6040 is right - that looks like a delicious morel. Poisonous when raw, mind, so be warned, but very tasty cooked. A good spot. The only worthwhile spring 'shrooms, other than St George.
>> No. 6065 Anonymous
25th April 2011
Monday 8:31 pm
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>>6041
They're not so much poisonous raw as they are upsetting to the stomach. I don't like to see the term "poisonous" thrown around so liberally because a lot of people are put off of mushrooming because of fear of poisoning. A good number of the most sought after mushrooms will give one an unhappy tummy if they're eaten raw, but that doesn't make them poisonous. A potato needs to be cooked to be eaten also.
Amanita phalloides is poisonous.
>> No. 6548 Anonymous
19th July 2011
Tuesday 6:35 am
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The season dictates that this topic need to reappear on the front page of this board. People who live near me claim to be finding penny buns (in France they call them "ceps") currently. Other rare & delicious morsels are bound to be popping out of the ground in the coming weeks and months. I personally aim to find some agaricus augustus, which I have never tasted, but have read wonderful things about.
>> No. 6554 Anonymous
21st July 2011
Thursday 7:37 pm
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>>6038

That reminds me of "The Nipple". Awful picture.
>> No. 6572 Anonymous
29th July 2011
Friday 7:24 am
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>>6554
Morels and lotus root are both delicious. Now I'm wondering how they would be together, probably great, maybe even better with some Maasdam or Jarlsberg.
>> No. 6811 Anonymous
3rd October 2011
Monday 7:22 pm
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Has anyone else found anything nice yet this year?
>> No. 6814 Anonymous
3rd October 2011
Monday 7:45 pm
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>>6548

Looks like she's holding a big willy. Fungi are far too phallic for my delicate eyes.
>> No. 6841 Anonymous
7th October 2011
Friday 2:52 am
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>>6814
It is in fact a big willy, not a fungus.
>> No. 6842 Anonymous
8th October 2011
Saturday 10:34 am
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>>6811
yes.
>> No. 6863 Anonymous
14th October 2011
Friday 12:09 am
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Best thread on /nom/.
I went to pick shrooms with my grandparents alot when i was a kid and wanted to pick that up this autumn, then lost my drivers license and the only place for shrooms within footwalk is my fridge ;_;
Pic is of some non- edible i took when cheking out the woods some weeks ago.
>> No. 6870 Anonymous
15th October 2011
Saturday 8:20 pm
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>>6863
Those look interesting but I have no Idea what they are. From what I can see the gills looks decurrent which could suggest some sort of cantharellus. I'll have a search through my books and see what i can come up with.
>> No. 6872 Anonymous
16th October 2011
Sunday 1:47 pm
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>>6863
>>6870
Velvet roll-rim (Tapinella atrotomentosa)
>> No. 6878 Anonymous
17th October 2011
Monday 9:24 am
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>>6872
I disagree for a number of reasons, the most convincing of which is that I met a large collection of velvet roll rims last weekend and the ones in that photo certainly do not look like what you say they are (clubbed gills, lack of velvet, etc.). I was going to put forth a guess of gilled boletes, but that doesn't really look right to me either and I hate to guess that something is a delicious edible and then turn out to be wrong (even if its not me doing the eating), although the slugs seem to like those ones,
>> No. 6885 Anonymous
19th October 2011
Wednesday 6:18 am
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>>6842
that is a beautiful collection, especially the penny buns. i've never had that dark topped chanterelle variety.
what are they like?
>> No. 6886 Anonymous
19th October 2011
Wednesday 12:47 pm
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>>6885
Very nice. Not as fruity smelling as the yellow variety, but similar taste. Also they grow in abundance (this was less then half of my total haul) so make a good meal. First time I've found them, but really pleased, because as you know, Once you find a good spot it can reward you for years.
>> No. 7216 Anonymous
16th December 2011
Friday 3:57 pm
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Cooked this up a couple of months back. Mixture of different boletus cooked in white wine and butter. Fuck, it was tasty...
>> No. 7217 Anonymous
16th December 2011
Friday 5:58 pm
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>Once you find a good spot it can reward you for years.
It really is the key for successful mushroom hunting - find a spot and remember it.

Anyway, OP here, it was quite nice to see this thread bumped, so thank you >>7216. I've been away for a year or so; attached is this season's best find, more giant puffballs. I found out that giant puffballs have a surprising longevity if kept in the fridge, I think it was finally polished off two weeks later and still fine.

Not a great mushroom year for me otherwise, though. That weird hot spell at the start of October seemed to confuse the shit out of the shrooms in my patches, I came back empty-handed several times despite hitting all the best spots. Seems like the rest of you did alright, >>6842 especially. What a fucking catch, that must've been a delight.
>> No. 7219 Anonymous
16th December 2011
Friday 10:50 pm
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Is this thread still here? I don't really like mushrooms and I've always found it odd. They don't seem to taste of anything, they're like tofu.
>> No. 7220 Anonymous
17th December 2011
Saturday 2:00 am
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>>7219
If you mean the mushrooms in Tesco then you're right. Wild mushrooms have a wide range of flavours. Some are great just fried, some are better used in soups or in baked recipes, some can be dried for later use in stock or as flavouring for other dishes. And finding them is half the fun.

Sorry the thread doesn't interest you, anyway.
>> No. 7222 Anonymous
17th December 2011
Saturday 2:52 am
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>>7220
Oh I see. No, I've never had wild mushrooms to my knowledge. Can I only acquire them by foraging?
>> No. 7224 Anonymous
17th December 2011
Saturday 11:59 am
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>>7216
That looks good. Shame about the soggy looking slice of white bread. Could you not have at least toasted it?
>> No. 7225 Anonymous
17th December 2011
Saturday 5:58 pm
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>>7222
You might get lucky and find someone selling fresh wild mushrooms at a farmers market or something, but obviously that would be during the season. I've heard it's not uncommon in some parts of Europe but I don't recall ever seeing anyone selling genuine wild mushrooms in a shop unless they were dried (and ridiculously expensive). The gourmet fresh mushrooms you get in supermarkets (oyster mushrooms etc) are pretty unremarkable.

Foraging is good fun though, honest. Going for really long walks in the countryside isn't really my thing but add a proper purpose and I'm there.
>> No. 7226 Anonymous
17th December 2011
Saturday 6:00 pm
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>>7225

>Going for really long walks in the countryside isn't really my thing but add a proper purpose and I'm there.

A thousand times this. We should all meet up and go on a /nom/ ramble next autumn.
>> No. 7227 Anonymous
17th December 2011
Saturday 6:57 pm
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>>7226
If you think I'm divulging my prime fungus locations, then you have another thing coming lad.
>> No. 7228 Anonymous
17th December 2011
Saturday 9:34 pm
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>>7225

> Going for really long walks in the countryside isn't really my thing but add a proper purpose and I'm there.

This. The only time I ever go there is to look for Magic Mushrooms.
>> No. 7229 Anonymous
17th December 2011
Saturday 9:34 pm
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>>7227

>prime fungus locations

We're not going to plunder your fungus, lad.
>> No. 7236 Anonymous
18th December 2011
Sunday 3:08 am
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>>7227
I read a book which said that you shouldn't ask people where they find their mushrooms. Seems a little uptight to me, I'm always happy to take people along if they're interested (they aren't, as a rule), but apparently that's the etiquette and I guess I can kind of see it.
>> No. 7237 Anonymous
18th December 2011
Sunday 3:11 pm
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>>4633
>(It's five or six inches in diameter, in case the scale isn't obvious.)
That's the caption of my Okcupid profile picture.
>> No. 7238 Anonymous
18th December 2011
Sunday 3:52 pm
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>>7227
No, we should go to a virgin location.
>> No. 7314 Anonymous
6th January 2012
Friday 3:36 am
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>>7236
>you shouldn't ask people where they find their mushrooms. Seems a little uptight to me

its because there is a good chance they will lie to you so as preserve their secret and since you're not likely to be able to tell if they're fibbing, asking is somewhat pointless. its not really etiquette, its something more like conversational efficiency.
>> No. 7318 Anonymous
6th January 2012
Friday 12:01 pm
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>>7314
Poor little bolete.

Anyway, I think you're wrong. Most people don't live assuming every conversational exchange of data among friends enjoying a hobby is mired in potential deceit, so it is genuinely an issue of etiquette. I wouldn't ask if I didn't trust the person, anyway.
>> No. 7319 Anonymous
6th January 2012
Friday 12:59 pm
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I have never discovered any problems with that sort of etiquette. But then I only talk to people with a passing interest in free food rather than those who identify themselves as foragers or whatever.

Stumbled upon this recently: http://mycorant.com/
>> No. 7333 Anonymous
7th January 2012
Saturday 11:43 pm
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>>7319
Have you ever met anyone who identified themselves as a "forager"? I didn't realise that was a thing that people did.
>> No. 7945 Anonymous
16th May 2012
Wednesday 9:54 am
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I found Morels! You have no idea how happy this makes me.
>> No. 7946 Anonymous
16th May 2012
Wednesday 10:35 am
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>>7945
Well done. They're a lot bigger in the ground than I thought.
>> No. 7947 Anonymous
16th May 2012
Wednesday 10:47 am
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>>7946
Yes, much bigger than I expected. Delicious, too. A little oil, a little butter, a little salt, fry... luscious.
>> No. 7948 Anonymous
16th May 2012
Wednesday 11:08 am
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>>7945
Whereabouts do you go foraging to find such desirable mushrooms as these? I'm stuck in the middle of the city and can't help but think that makes it rather unlikely I'll find anything of use in this urban mess.
>> No. 7949 Anonymous
16th May 2012
Wednesday 11:23 am
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>>7948
Yeah - the countryside.

Although, morels in particular do have a reputation for having adapted well to urban life and having a penchant for bark-mulch. Think allotments, gardens, parks, rose-beds and so on.
>> No. 7953 Anonymous
17th May 2012
Thursday 10:58 am
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>>7945
Super! I'd love to find some Morels, but haven't really had the time to go looking. I did see lots of St.Georges this week though.
>> No. 7978 Anonymous
21st May 2012
Monday 6:09 am
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>>7945
I think I have a good idea how happy it makes you as I found two fairly recently. Congratulations.

>>7948
The pair I picked were at the interface between the edge of a gravel path and the ground in a fairly urban public park and it was under coniferous trees.
>> No. 7980 Anonymous
22nd May 2012
Tuesday 11:19 am
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found a lovely 10+ foot ring of St George's last night. Very pleased.

>>7978
> the interface
This is good advice. 'Shrooms are creatures of the margins, of the boundaries.
>> No. 8268 Anonymous
16th July 2012
Monday 1:59 am
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A peculiar year of mushrooms so far. Caught the first few George's in June, which is a bit late, and a sizeable bounty of field mushrooms at the same time, which is too early. All confused by the year's weather, apparently? Delicious all the same.
>> No. 8275 Anonymous
16th July 2012
Monday 12:07 pm
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Whoa, is this thread nearly two years old? You guys fucking love your mushrooms.
>> No. 8289 Anonymous
19th July 2012
Thursday 4:12 pm
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I'm reasonably confident that my Gran's front garden grows magic mushrooms. They always sprout around August - September and they look pretty typical of what you'd expect them to look like.

I've never picked them through fear of death, but I was wondering if someone could take a guess at what they might be.
>> No. 8290 Anonymous
19th July 2012
Thursday 4:38 pm
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>>8289

Take a picture next time you see them, but nothing else looks much like the liberty cap. Just make sure they have the "nipple" on top.
>> No. 8306 Anonymous
23rd July 2012
Monday 6:19 pm
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>>8290
Indeed there's little to confuse a liberty cap with, and nothing poisonous. Photos would be welcome, though.

There are actually loads of other psilocybes in the UK (I found out that half a dozen different ones have been observed in my home county) but the rest aren't really common and aren't so easily identified. My dad did find some of another variety and gave them to me but I never had the nerve to try them, as there's no way of knowing how strong they are.

>'Shrooms are creatures of the margins, of the boundaries.
Maybe so, but one of my most memorable mushroom-picking experiences was an open meadow full of field mushrooms. A mate and I filled a couple of carrier bags full of them and the field still looked pretty much untouched. They weren't hiding at the boundaries that day.
>> No. 8308 Anonymous
23rd July 2012
Monday 9:32 pm
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>>8306

I hereby volunteer to test your mystery mushrooms.
>> No. 8338 Anonymous
3rd August 2012
Friday 9:29 pm
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>>8306
I guess thats why they call thern field mushrooms XD
>> No. 8342 Anonymous
9th August 2012
Thursday 11:17 am
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>>8338

It is species dependent. Some Fungi, indeed grow in the margins and on woodland paths, Whereas some are happier in the middle of pastures and lawns. Some Fungi even grow on trees! To say that Mushrooms are creatures of boundaries is a sweeping generalisation and quite incorrect.
>> No. 8454 Anonymous
8th September 2012
Saturday 2:54 pm
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So has anyone had any luck lately? Absolutely shit-all for me for months now. My dad found one fieldy a few weeks back but that's been it.

It's this weird weather I reckon.
>> No. 8515 Anonymous
10th October 2012
Wednesday 6:46 pm
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>>4633

Did you grow it in the kitchen bro ?
>> No. 8517 Anonymous
11th October 2012
Thursday 10:34 pm
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>>8515
Yes, he grew it in the kitchen. Go back to sleep now.
>> No. 9280 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 9:11 am
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Thought you might like this /nom/. Found about a dozen of them, took four to eat. Lovely lovely. Very subtle flavour, not punchy like a cep or fragrant like a chanterelle, but really tasty.
>> No. 9281 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 9:25 am
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>>9280

Oh my.

Congratulations.
>> No. 9282 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 10:14 am
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>>4920

Umm, they ate death caps in the film Shrooms and it didn't end well.
>> No. 9283 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 10:40 am
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>>9282

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiction
>> No. 9284 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 11:05 am
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>>9283

Sweet. If eating death caps doesn't mean that gentleman's coming after me then I'll go and eat some right now.
>> No. 9285 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 11:07 am
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>>9283
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-22470470
>> No. 9286 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 11:13 am
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>>9285

Curses. If only I had google in my house.
>> No. 9287 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 11:59 am
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>>9280
I am deeply jealous.
>> No. 9288 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 12:03 pm
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>>9285

Then why bring up the film?
>> No. 9289 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 12:19 pm
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>>9288
I didn't. Must've been the Other Chap.
>> No. 9291 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 12:44 pm
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>>9289

I don't know. I just thought it sounded kind of fun to eat a death cap then get chased around by a zombie paedophile monk.
>> No. 9292 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 12:45 pm
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>>9289

Then why bring up the news as though it's relevant to the film?
>> No. 9293 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 12:51 pm
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>>9292

I didn't but someone was just pointing out death caps are highly poisonous in real life.
>> No. 9294 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 1:50 pm
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>>9293

No one is poisoned by mushrooms in the film.
>> No. 9295 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 1:57 pm
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>>9294

but she takes one and goes psychotic and kills all of her friends

That wasn't exactly a desirable side-effect.
>> No. 9296 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 2:14 pm
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>>9295

It still has absolutely nothing to do with reality.
>> No. 9297 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 2:57 pm
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>>9296

but that was the joke and why someone linked the wikipedia article on fiction after.
>> No. 9298 Anonymous
13th May 2013
Monday 3:18 pm
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>>9297

... Yes.
>> No. 9339 Anonymous
18th May 2013
Saturday 12:30 pm
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>>9280
Nice :)
>>9285
I have no sympathy for this woman. You really must be some special kind of idiot to merrily go and add an otherwise unidentified mushroom from your garden to a can of soup. It's amazing how this dopey mare got to the age of 57 without fatally injuring herself knitting or something.
>> No. 9340 Anonymous
18th May 2013
Saturday 1:29 pm
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>>9339
It's probably not quite as daft as it sounds. Death caps look remarkably like field or horse mushrooms - anyone only taught to identify one or two edible mushrooms as a youngster may get blasé about it over time and can get caught out alarmingly easily. This is why it is essential for anyone foraging for mushrooms as food to learn the deadly poisonous varieties as well as the tasty ones.

Young death caps are also apparently indistinguishable from smaller varieties of puffball (even to experts), which is why mycologists advise people not to eat the latter.

Add to all this numerous folk tales for identifying poisonous mushrooms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushroom_poisoning#Folk_traditions) that are all dangerously inaccurate and you're on your way to understanding why hundreds of people die from death caps each year.
>> No. 9349 Anonymous
22nd May 2013
Wednesday 10:15 pm
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>>9280
At the risk of sounding smug, it's me again, this time with a haul of St George's, almost exactly a month late. As always, I've taken less than a third of what I found. I love spring. Can't wait for breakfast.
>> No. 9350 Anonymous
23rd May 2013
Thursday 12:31 am
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>>9349
You bastard. My single spot for Georgies has produced nothing. Morels on top.

Horribly jealous.

What did you cook?
>> No. 9351 Anonymous
23rd May 2013
Thursday 8:34 am
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>>9350
Decided to save them 'til Friday night as there's more than I thought - we have some friends coming for dinner, will probably just fry them in a little butter, oil and salt and serve on toast as a starter.
>> No. 9352 Anonymous
23rd May 2013
Thursday 3:23 pm
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Can mushrooms be frozen without ruining texture or flavour?
>> No. 9353 Anonymous
23rd May 2013
Thursday 3:41 pm
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>>9352
Not really. Some mushrooms respond well to being dried, the rest need eating fresh for best results.

Mushrooms already cooked into other dishes don't suffer much from freezing, but then you've diluted much of the texture/flavour there already.
>> No. 9420 Anonymous
12th June 2013
Wednesday 2:20 am
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>> No. 9421 Anonymous
12th June 2013
Wednesday 9:21 am
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>>9420
Beautiful!
>> No. 9913 Anonymous
10th September 2013
Tuesday 1:17 am
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>> No. 9914 Anonymous
10th September 2013
Tuesday 1:56 am
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>>9913
A wild Jigglypuff appears!
>> No. 9919 Anonymous
23rd September 2013
Monday 6:11 pm
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So how's everyone else doing this season? It's been a bit too dry around my parts but I'm still hopeful, I heard report of chanterelles in some woods nearby so I'll be heading out to check that as soon as this fucking cold clears up.

I just got back from Iceland (the country not the shop) and there were shaggy inkcaps everywhere around Reykjavik, more than I've seen in a lifetime back home.
>> No. 9920 Anonymous
23rd September 2013
Monday 8:11 pm
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>>9919

All I've found this year are a pretty sizeable clump of Destroying Angels.
>> No. 9921 Anonymous
26th September 2013
Thursday 6:40 pm
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>>9919
Chanterelles as predicted (a little past their best, they don't appear to have liked the hot weather over the last few days) - eaten on toast, lovely.

There were a few amanita muscaria too, would've snapped a photo but forgot my camera.
>> No. 9929 Anonymous
30th September 2013
Monday 12:31 pm
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Didn't forget this time.
>> No. 9930 Anonymous
30th September 2013
Monday 12:35 pm
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>>9929
Pretty! It'd be lovely if you could take more location shots like this, there's something nicer about taking a photo before you pick them in their natural environment than of them in a Co-Op bag.
>> No. 9931 Anonymous
30th September 2013
Monday 12:55 pm
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>>9930
I agree. I'll try to do so in future.
>> No. 9932 Anonymous
30th September 2013
Monday 4:58 pm
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Baby shaggy parasol. It was all on its own.
>> No. 9933 Anonymous
30th September 2013
Monday 5:05 pm
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>>9932
What a fantastic name. I think you probably agree with me that mushrooms are really very cute. I think I can see how mycologists get into it.
>> No. 9934 Anonymous
30th September 2013
Monday 5:05 pm
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Porcelain fungus, again just the one. I'd seen these before, they're always amazing to look at - they've got this really glassy thing going on. I'd never bothered checking identification, I figured they're too small to be worth the effort and the brilliant-white colouration sets off alarm bells, but apparently they're edible and reasonably tasty.
>> No. 9935 Anonymous
30th September 2013
Monday 5:25 pm
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>>9933
Mushrooms can be quite cute, yeah. As a counterpoint, boletes are generally pretty manky.

In terms of "getting into it", the primary motivation for me is the meal at the end, though really the chase is as much fun as the catch - it's a perfect excuse to go traipsing around the wilderness for a few hours. I'm still picking pine needles out of my hair.
>> No. 9961 Anonymous
7th October 2013
Monday 2:06 pm
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Found some honey mushrooms; no photo as the camera was out of batteries, they're a pretty regular sight in most places anyway apparently. I wouldn't mention it except that digging around for details I came across this article:
>http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=strange-but-true-largest-organism-is-fungus

Here's a little snippet:
>The discovery of this giant Armillaria ostoyae in 1998 heralded a new record holder for the title of the world's largest known organism, believed by most to be the 110-foot- (33.5-meter-) long, 200-ton blue whale. Based on its current growth rate, the fungus is estimated to be 2,400 years old but could be as ancient as 8,650 years, which would earn it a place among the oldest living organisms as well.

Interesting stuff.
>> No. 9962 Anonymous
7th October 2013
Monday 2:44 pm
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>>9961
http://www.youtube.com/v/vWAA-SrrFUQ
>> No. 9963 Anonymous
7th October 2013
Monday 2:45 pm
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A collection from a recent forage. Nom.
>> No. 9965 Anonymous
7th October 2013
Monday 6:43 pm
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>>9963
Marvellous.

I've made a real effort to go hunting in and around woodlands rather than fields and commons this year in the hope of finding some ceps, or boletes in general, but haven't had much luck. I found the attached earlier today, obviously past it but a little over 20cm in diameter and quite a sight anyway.
>> No. 9966 Anonymous
7th October 2013
Monday 7:08 pm
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I believe this is a panther cap. Roger Phillips says it's poisonous and possibly deadly, wikipedia mentions dangerous levels of muscimol, like fly agaric but in greater concentration. Despite this there is a trip report on Erowid from one intrepid space cadet, although it's not exactly a glowing endorsement; it contains the following gem:
>I certainly would not consider it a good experience, it was rather the most horrific day of my entire life.
>> No. 9968 Anonymous
7th October 2013
Monday 10:56 pm
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>>9966
Aha, you don't bloody say. Fantastic photo for a nice 'get' too. Keep them coming, chaps, and if you're ever in the West Mids and fancy taking me out to hunt for psilocybes do ring.
>> No. 9969 Anonymous
10th October 2013
Thursday 8:26 pm
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>>9966

Panther caps aren't normally deadly, unless you are of bad health in the first place and consume noteworthy amounts.

Poisonings should be rare though. The only edible lookalike of any relevance is the Blusher (Amanita Rubescens), but as it is quite bland and unremarkable in taste, few people even pick them, although they tend to appear in greater numbers wherever you find them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blusher

I once came home with a whole wicker basket full of blushers and couldn't believe my luck, but once I had cooked/fried some of them and tasted them, they really tasted a bit meh... I think I ended up throwing the rest of them in the bin. These days, I only pick boletes. Even the most second-rate variety of edible boletes will still taste better than most gilled mushrooms.
>> No. 9970 Anonymous
11th October 2013
Friday 12:00 pm
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>>9969
>Even the most second-rate variety of edible boletes will still taste better than most gilled mushrooms.
Interesting coincidence, I came home with a suede bolete the other day but didn't end up eating it after reading reports of how bland they are. It is also apparently known as the "boring brown bolete" which a name too amusing not to share.
>> No. 9971 Anonymous
11th October 2013
Friday 11:38 pm
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>>9970

yes, if you've ever had bay bolete or porcino bolete, those two are the cream of the crop among boletes and everything else will just taste disappointing thereafter.

That said, the suede bolete really isn't that bad. My own experience is that it has still got a good hearty bolete flavour. If mixed with other mushroom varieties, it still makes a good dinner.
>> No. 9972 Anonymous
13th October 2013
Sunday 3:29 am
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my experience with lesser boletes is that although they can be bland when cooked fresh, if you dry them they become quite excellent. especially if powered and used as a base for soups and sauces.
>> No. 9973 Anonymous
13th October 2013
Sunday 1:17 pm
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>>9972

yes, mushrooms generally seem to gain flavour when you dry them.

Shiitake mushrooms, for example. The M&S around the corner from where I live often has fresh Shiitake, but I have tried them and they were quite bland. Then one time I bought a bag of dried shiitake mushrooms from a Chinese supermarket, and they were incredibly tasty. That's where I often buy them now. They are also much cheaper there, M&S wants close to £7 for one punnet of bland fresh Shiitake mushrooms, whereas a small bag with twice as much dried Shiitake at the Chinese supermarket is only £ 2.50.
>> No. 9974 Anonymous
13th October 2013
Sunday 1:41 pm
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Just fried up yesterday's haul of Fairy Rings in butter and olive oil with a little salt and garlic, served on toast for brunch. Fucking lush, lads.
>> No. 9975 Anonymous
14th October 2013
Monday 1:01 am
9975 wine caps
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>>9973
cultivated wood growing mushrooms are frequently cultivated on substrates other than wood, straw is commonly used. when cultivated this way the end product is a much blander mushroom. i collect pleurotus (oysters) in the wild, but don't purchase them for this reason.

>>9974
what is the key to positively identifying them? i'm fairly certain i've found them before, but their appliance is so boring and variable that i'm never confident enough to collect them for the table which kind of irks me as my books say wonderful things about them.
>> No. 9976 Anonymous
14th October 2013
Monday 12:01 pm
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>>9975
I know what you mean, they're dubious little buggers, and there's a lot of room for mistakes. For me it's:

* Gills not meeting the stem (this is crucial!)
* Gills forked
* Gills widely spaced
* Stem fibrous and flexible

This is quite a good overview: http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Mushrooms.Folder/Fairy%20Ring%20Mushroom.html
>> No. 9977 Anonymous
14th October 2013
Monday 12:02 pm
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>>9975
Oh, and I completely agree about cultivated mushrooms. Bland, bland, bland.
>> No. 9978 Anonymous
14th October 2013
Monday 12:33 pm
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>>9976
The article mentions that they're good for drying, it's spot on. My dad collects and keeps them specifically for use when there's no fresh ones going.

And yeah, I've never tasted a cultivated mushroom that was anything other than bland and unremarkable. It's the reason a lot of people say they don't like mushrooms, and it's a shame.
>> No. 9979 Anonymous
14th October 2013
Monday 10:21 pm
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>>9978
> I've never tasted a cultivated mushroom that was anything other than bland and unremarkable

I have.
Wood growing mushrooms that are cultivated on their natural substrate (wood) are every bit as good as their natural counterparts, however you won't find many mushrooms like this for sale commercially as cultivation on lesser substrates is more cost effective. I happen to be a big fans of the common grocery store agaricus as well, it can be excellent if you put the effort into preparing it in a pleasing manner.
>> No. 9980 Anonymous
15th October 2013
Tuesday 12:55 pm
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>>9977

It's not unlike tomatoes. They are often grown industrially on rock wool substrate inside huge greenhouses that are bigger than two or three football pitches. You can grow tomatoes at the cost of just a few p. per tomato like this, but they simply pale in comparison to homegrown tomatoes. Lately the industry has managed to come up with new cultivars that have notable flavour despite being grown this way, but it's still not the same.

My nan and my granddad always used to grow copious amounts of tomatoes in their allotment, on natural soil, and they were just very yummy. And that was in Norwich, where the weather is often shit the whole summer.
>> No. 9981 Anonymous
15th October 2013
Tuesday 4:04 pm
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>>9979
>I happen to be a big fans of the common grocery store agaricus as well, it can be excellent if you put the effort into preparing it in a pleasing manner.
Maybe I'm just unimaginative. Could you post a recipe or two, in /nom/ maybe? Honestly curious to hear what you do with them that elevates them anything beyond merely "acceptable".
>> No. 9982 Anonymous
15th October 2013
Tuesday 5:48 pm
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>>9981

I'm not >>9979, but I've got a recipe:

Cream of Mushroom Soup with Agaricus (Button) Mushrooms (or any other kind of mushroom really)

- one midsized onion,
- one midsized shallot
- 250-300 gr of agaricus mushrooms, preferably the brown skinned kind (just for looks, they do taste just like white ones)
- butter
- kitchen herbs
- garlic
- salt
- pepper
- vegetable stock/soup cube
- wheat flour
- 1 cup of double cream
- 1 tablespoon of cheese spread (not Philadelphia)
- dry white wine
- a dash of red wine
- about 1 1/2 teaspoons of triple concentrated tomato paste


Caramelize the diced or sliced onion in a frying pan at medium heat with butter and a dusting of salt. Then douse with white wine, add herbs, a little bit of water and vegetable stock, throw in the sliced shallot, and leave to simmer under a lid.

Next, in a pot, make a roux from melted butter and flour, and gradually and with a lot of stirring (with an egg beater) add about a pint of water and two or three tablespoons of flour, and keep stirring vividly. Also already add the tomato paste and stir well. Try to achieve a "thick" consistency without it becoming too much like a sauce.

When the onions and shallots in the frying pan are cooked soft, turn up the heat and put in the sliced mushrooms. Sear the mushrooms briefly and stir well, then turn down the heat again, put the lid back on and once more leave to simmer.

When the mushrooms are done, pour the frying pan's contents into the pot with your roux, stir gently, then add more white wine, a bit of red wine, more kitchen herbs, some salt, pepper and garlic, vegetable stock, and the cheese spread and double cream. Stir again gently, then leave on the stove at low heat (if you have an electric stove, leave the pot on the turned off plate).

Allow about 45 minutes to an hour for all the flavours to mix and "smooth out", then serve with a sprinkling of grated parmesan cheese as well as a few slices of buttered bread :-)
>> No. 10008 Anonymous
18th October 2013
Friday 6:05 pm
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>>9982
That sounds delicious and I've saved it for later use, but I'm not sure it would showcase much of anything about the cultured agaricus. (I had actually forgotten this thread was already in /nom/ when I requested recipes, which is embarrassing, not least because I started it and included the words "nom" in the OP.)

My camera has been messing me around consuming batteries randomly so my last few forays have gone mostly undocumented. I snapped this yesterday just before it keeled over, a mere two photos on new batteries before telling me it was out of juice, fuck knows what it's playing at. Anyway, it is a Stinkhorn, doing its thing and stinking like something died. Apparently edible when young but you'd have to be pretty desperate. One of the things I really like about mushrooms is the alien-like geometric shapes and patterns you sometimes find in them, both the stem and the head of the stinkhorn have interesting patterns when you get up close (a bolete's pores can be stunning too, I'll try and photograph a closeup one of these days).
>> No. 10009 Anonymous
18th October 2013
Friday 10:25 pm
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>>10008
>Anyway, it is a Stinkhorn, doing its thing and stinking like something died. Apparently edible when young but you'd have to be pretty desperate.

In some parts of central Europe, they are picked and eaten boiled before they break out of their shell and "hatch". They are known as Devil's or Witches Eggs in the Netherlands and Germany.

Rumoured to taste not unlike pickled eggs.

Oh yes, and my granddad is German and also knows a bit about mushrooms, he told me once that the Stinkhorn is also called the Corpse Finger in German... mediaeval superstition saw them as the index fingers of the dead, who had raised them out of their graves to warn the living to stop sinning.

The smell probably helped bring this superstition about... they do smell rank, don't they...
>> No. 10010 Anonymous
19th October 2013
Saturday 12:48 am
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>>9981
i am that person and my own findings over a decade of unreasonable enthusiasm for fungus is that the common grocery store agaricus is quite flavourful, however it is - like almost all of mushrooms - a very, very large fraction water, so when i cook the common button i cook them for a very long time which allows them to sweat out enough of their water and become a lot less bland. i've read about people drying them out completely and the rehydrating them using sauces, marinades, etc., but i haven't gone that far. i use a lot of them, a full kilogram is a good start. i slice them in a food processor and then put them in my frying pan and let them cook, initially covered and with no oil. after about 10 minutes i remove the top and continue to cook them for quite a long time. it doesn't take long after you've started before they're swimming in their own fluids and as the juices evaporate the mushrooms darken. when it seems like all the free moisture is evaporated, keep cooking them, let some of them burn or darken a little. i think salt might help draw the moisture out more quickly, not sure about that, they need some salt, though. anyway, after a while you'll have a small mass of well cooked, delicious regular mushrooms. it won't look like anything next to what you started with, but you'll have cooked mushrooms that taste as good and as strongly as most of the good wild varieties.
>> No. 10012 Anonymous
19th October 2013
Saturday 4:20 pm
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>>10010
Interesting, and worth knowing, thanks. I've never used a food processor to slice mushrooms (mine would just blitz them into bits), do you have an attachment specifically for that?

Attached is this afternoon's haul (with apologies to >>9930, camera problems again). These are trooping funnels. I was quite excited to find them as in the past I've found them to be absolutely delicious, amongst the best I've ever had, but this lot were watery and tasteless. A disappointment.
>> No. 10013 Anonymous
19th October 2013
Saturday 8:10 pm
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>>10012

>trooping funnels

Interesting.

I think I saw mushrooms just like those the other week in the forest where I forage, but I was afraid to pick and eat them because I had no idea what they were. There were loads of them all in one place, easily enough for a fry up to feed three people.

But as they say, better safe than sorry. Too many poisonous mushrooms out there... no fry up is worth risking your life for.
>> No. 10014 Anonymous
19th October 2013
Saturday 8:18 pm
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>>10013
What were you looking for?
>> No. 10015 Anonymous
19th October 2013
Saturday 8:32 pm
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>>10014

I'd like to meet and eat wild mushrooms gathered by a lady, probably fried with wild garlic and butter churned by her hand. Where I live, it could probably happen one day. Thing is, I'm not too clued up on wild food, what mushrooms would I get in wild garlic season? I live near a wood that stinks of wild garlic in season - I see tons of mushrooms on my walks but I don't pick them cos I don't want to grow up looking like a wode covered Gandalf or found dead coverd in mushroom sick. Mushroom picking guidance please anons.
>> No. 10016 Anonymous
19th October 2013
Saturday 8:43 pm
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>>10014

I was looking for boletes actually, and mainly King Boletes. There is an area where I live (near the Lake District) where I have been lucky enough to find plenty of bay and king boletes in recent years. It's a remote spot that is well away from any roads, and it's about a ten minute walk through dense underwood from the nearest place where you can leave your car.

Well anyway, I don't really know much about gilled mushrooms, and to me most boletes taste better anyway, so I've never really bothered with them. If they were trooping funnels and therefore edible, then maybe I passed up a good dinner... but again, to me the first rule of mushroom hunting has always been to not pick mushrooms that you don't know 100 percent.
>> No. 10017 Anonymous
19th October 2013
Saturday 9:05 pm
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>>10015
Ideally you want to go out with someone who knows what they're doing. Failing that, pick a couple and post pictures here. We probably won't ever be able to give you 100% certainty from that alone, but we can point you in the right direction for your own identification, and it'd be fun anyway.
>> No. 10019 Anonymous
19th October 2013
Saturday 9:30 pm
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>to me the first rule of mushroom hunting has always been to not pick mushrooms that you don't know 100 percent
How will you ever know what they are if you don't pick them?

I'm teasing, but honestly that is an interesting contrast. I tend to pick anything that seems promisingly edible, identification is part of the learning process for me.
>> No. 10020 Anonymous
19th October 2013
Saturday 9:41 pm
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>>10019
>I tend to pick anything that seems promisingly edible

To the untrained enough eye though, even the Destroying Angel can look like it's "promisingly edible".

I've got a big guide book about mushrooms here that I often take with me when I am out. And if I can't identify a mushroom on the spot, not even with the help of my book, then I leave it and don't even put it in my basket in the first place. Once you've got them in your basket, there is a chance when you do identify them as poisonous that you overlook one or two when you throw them back out of your basket. Especially immature mushrooms are often hard to tell apart. So as a safety precaution, only a mushroom that is "100 % approved" goes in my basket and then home with me.

It might sound a bit anal, but my nan's neighbours made the fatal mistake once of eating mushrooms that they didn't know for sure were edible. It wiped out their entire family of four. I kid you not.
>> No. 10021 Anonymous
19th October 2013
Saturday 10:31 pm
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>>10020
>To the untrained enough eye though, even the Destroying Angel can look like it's "promisingly edible".
I keep my mushrooms separated from each other when I pick them, so excepting the deadliest I'm not too worried about contamination (obviously that would change if I somehow ended up with a bag of death caps in there). I'd like to think that my understanding of mushrooms is sufficient at this point that "promisingly edible" counts for something, but the truth is that I'm still learning and with mushrooms there is an awful lot to learn.

>And if I can't identify a mushroom on the spot, not even with the help of my book, then I leave it and don't even put it in my basket in the first place.
For me at least, even with a book proper identification takes time. There's usually some caveat about bruising colouration or exposure to air over time that complicates instant identification.

I am definitely getting more conservative about what I pick, though. It used to be that I'd pick even the tiniest with a view to identifying when I got home, but these days I can't be arsed unless there's at least the potential for a meal at the end of it. I guess that's what I meant by "promisingly edible", thinking about it.
>> No. 10022 Anonymous
20th October 2013
Sunday 11:40 am
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>>9929
Yeah boiiii

So these are apparently both poisonous and hallucinogenic? How much of a risk would you be taking to bite one?
>> No. 10023 Anonymous
20th October 2013
Sunday 11:55 am
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I'm surprised none of you lads has written a book on this. You could call it "Never Mind The Boletes".
>> No. 10024 Anonymous
20th October 2013
Sunday 12:56 pm
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>>10022
>both poisonous and hallucinogenic?

yes, well you won't die from them unless you consume copious amounts, but you will feel the effects of what is known as muscarinic syndrome, named after the Fly Agaric's scientific name amanita muscaria. It includes dilated pupils, cold sweat, indigestion to the point of vomiting and diarrhoea, headache, hallucinations, shortness of breath and recurring overall panic attacks.

Said to be not such a pleasant high. And people of frail health have actually died from it.

>>10021

Like I said, it may seem overly cautious to not pick anything that I can't identify on the spot, but again, my grandma's neighbours, a family of four, were wiped out by deadly mushroom poisoning... I see their headstones everytime I visit my nan's grave... it always reminds me to be careful what mushrooms I pick. It's better to err on the side of caution and go home with an empty basket.
>> No. 10025 Anonymous
20th October 2013
Sunday 1:38 pm
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Fly Agaric need preparing - drying and heating, from memory. Doubtless Erowid and similar will have you covered if you're actually tempted, do some serious reading up beforehand though as apparently it can be a particularly unpleasant experience.

>Like I said, it may seem overly cautious to not pick anything that I can't identify on the spot, but again, my grandma's neighbours, a family of four, were wiped out by deadly mushroom poisoning... I see their headstones everytime I visit my nan's grave... it always reminds me to be careful what mushrooms I pick. It's better to err on the side of caution and go home with an empty basket.
I heard a similar story from our neighbour, a farmer. During the war a bunch of kids were sent from London out to stay with them in the middle of nowhere, and during their stay they enjoyed eating wild mushrooms. They went home, picked and ate mushrooms when they were out on a day trip without really knowing what they were doing, and the whole family died. I imagine it was death caps. For anyone who's thinking of getting into picking mushrooms, consider the attached: on the left are field mushrooms, common to most places, safe to eat, and delicious. On the right are death caps, I'll let wikipedia do the explaining:
>Death caps have been reported to taste pleasant. This, coupled with the delay in the appearance of symptoms—during which time internal organs are being severely, sometimes irreparably, damaged—makes it particularly dangerous. Initially, symptoms are gastrointestinal in nature and include colicky abdominal pain, with watery diarrhea and vomiting, which may lead to dehydration, and, in severe cases, hypotension, tachycardia, hypoglycemia, and acid–base disturbances. These first symptoms resolve two to three days after the ingestion. A more serious deterioration signifying liver involvement may then occur—jaundice, diarrhea, delirium, seizures, and coma due to fulminant hepatic failure and attendant hepatic encephalopathy caused by the accumulation of normally liver-removed substance in the blood. Renal failure (either secondary to severe hepatitis or caused by direct toxic renal damage) and coagulopathy may appear during this stage. Life-threatening complications include increased intracranial pressure, intracranial hemorrhage, pancreatitis, acute renal failure, and cardiac arrest. Death generally occurs six to sixteen days after the poisoning.
Now I don't know what a lot of that means but it sounds pretty fucking rough. All of which is to say, don't eat wild mushrooms if you haven't properly identified them, and if you're just starting out then learning to identify the deadly poisonous ones is probably a priority.
>> No. 10026 Anonymous
21st October 2013
Monday 11:25 am
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>>10025
I know you can prepare fly agaric, a website said the toxins are soluble in water so you just have to boil them and you're set. I just wonder if there's no way to remove the poison without removing the hallucinogenic too. To try and get magic mushrooms on the cheap sort of thing.
>> No. 10027 Anonymous
21st October 2013
Monday 11:37 am
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>>10026
>I just wonder if there's no way to remove the poison without removing the hallucinogenic too
The poison *is* the hallucinogen.
>> No. 10028 Anonymous
22nd October 2013
Tuesday 9:02 pm
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>>10008
>That sounds delicious and I've saved it for later use

Here's a variation on my cream of mushroom recipe, this time with shiitake mushrooms and with an Asian twist... it might seem like a lot of effort to buy all the Asian sauces and condiments listed below, but I promise it's worth it!



Wok Cooked Cream of Shiitake Mushroom Soup


Fresh ingredients:

- two handfuls of dried Shiitake mushrooms (dried mushrooms have much more flavour than fresh ones!)
- one sliced midsized onion
- one small finely chopped carrot
- one half red bell pepper, finely sliced
- one spring onion, chopped
- a little bit of chopped fresh leek
- fresh ginger, finely diced (it's crucial that it's fresh!!)

Authentic Asian condiments/spices:

- rice cooking wine
- peanut oil
- sesame oil
- oyster sauce
- fish sauce
- light soy sauce
- sweet chili sauce

Miscellaneous:

- vegetable stock
- a teaspoon of triple concentrated tomato paste
- one cup of double cream
- corn starch or sauce flour

- - -

Put the dried Shiitake mushrooms in a bowl, pour boiling hot water over them so that they are just about covered, and leave to soak for at least half an hour, the longer, the better. When the mushrooms are completely soaked and soft, gently squeeze out the liquid into the bowl. Do not discard the liquid, we will need it later for flavour. After you have squeezed the mushrooms out, slice them.

Next, fire up the wok, pour in some of the peanut oil and a hint of sesame oil (be careful, sesame oil is potent, it can ruin your dish if overdone), as well as a sprinkling of the finely diced ginger. Throw in the onions, bell pepper, and carrots, and sear at high heat until the onions and peppers start turning brown on the edges. Douse with a bit of vegetable stock, then add a splash of rice wine, some soy sauce, a blob of oyster sauce, a touch of fish sauce and a bit of sweet chili sauce. Lastly, throw in the spring onion and leek as well as the squeezed out liquid from the mushrooms. Leave to simmer at low heat. When the contents start to become soft, add the sliced shiitake mushrooms and let simmer for another five minutes.

Then, add about a pint of vegetable stock, as well as a cup of double cream. As you stir gently, carefully add more sesame oil, soy sauce, fish sauce, oyster sauce, sweet chili sauce and rice wine to taste. Then put in some corn starch or sauce flour to give it a nice thick consistency.

Leave on the turned off stove for 45 minutes to an hour under a lid, stir repeatedly during that time to allow all the flavours to mix and develop. Then re-heat gently and serve.
>> No. 10030 Anonymous
23rd October 2013
Wednesday 3:56 pm
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A photo a friend sent me.
>> No. 10033 Anonymous
23rd October 2013
Wednesday 9:45 pm
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>>10032
What do you mean what?
>> No. 10036 Anonymous
24th October 2013
Thursday 2:24 pm
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>>10030
Sneaky sneaky.
>> No. 10038 Anonymous
26th October 2013
Saturday 4:24 pm
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/10406508/Rise-in-mushroom-theft-from-protected-sites.html

>They also warned that foraging wild fungi can have a devastating impact on wildlife as they exist to break down dead wood as well as provide food for small mammals and insects.

For shame lads, for shame.
>> No. 10039 Anonymous
26th October 2013
Saturday 4:44 pm
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>>10038
Stripping protected areas of mushrooms to sell on isn't quite what's being discussed in the thread you cheeky bugger.
>> No. 10040 Anonymous
26th October 2013
Saturday 5:46 pm
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>>10038
I've been out terrorising the local shrooms this afternoon, mercilessly thinning the fragile population of shaggy ink caps. A hot frying pan awaits those unlucky enough to have been spotted.

I am a monster.
>> No. 10041 Anonymous
26th October 2013
Saturday 8:23 pm
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>>10038

it all depends on how much you pick.

If you descend on a forest with half a dozen people and pick clean an area of five football pitches to sell the mushrooms commercially in bulk, then yes, you are doing damage to the ecosystem.

If you're just the occasional forager looking to augment your dinner once in a while, then you're not doing any harm.
>> No. 10043 Anonymous
26th October 2013
Saturday 10:01 pm
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Yellow Stagshorn fungus that I saw earlier today, this stuff is everywhere. Apparently it is sometimes used as garnish, though I think I'd be a bit freaked out if that arrived on a plate.
>> No. 10070 Anonymous
1st November 2013
Friday 4:46 pm
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>>10043
Jelly Tooth fungi (not a great photo, apologies). Edible but tasteless - with its jelly-like consistency it's suitable for being candied, apparently.
>> No. 10071 Anonymous
1st November 2013
Friday 4:48 pm
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I took some home for a closeup of the underside.

So, who's hungry?
>> No. 10197 Anonymous
9th December 2013
Monday 11:43 am
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I live right next to some decent woods. I really should start identifying some of these.
>> No. 10198 Anonymous
9th December 2013
Monday 3:18 pm
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>>10197
The first frost kills off the majority of mushrooms, so now is not really the time to go hunting if you're in the northern hemisphere (and probably not great even if you aren't).

Autumn is the best season.
>> No. 10636 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 5:39 pm
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Alright lads I was cutting the grass and I found these fellas are they good to eat? or are they just going to give me kidney failure and/or make me see silly things?
>> No. 10637 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 5:43 pm
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>>10636
Could be St George's mushrooms, it's about the right time of year. Better shot of the gills?
>> No. 10638 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 6:03 pm
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>>10637
Assuming this is what you mean by gills.
>> No. 10639 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 6:13 pm
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>>10638
That checks out but you'll need to do a bit of reading so you can verify the identification (photos can be deceiving). Google around for St George's mushroom, and check against Livid Entoloma.
>> No. 10640 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 6:33 pm
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>>10639
Oh bloody hell they do look similar don't they. It could be either really, just going to chuck em I think.
>> No. 10641 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 6:46 pm
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>>10640
It's not all about looking similar - an image alone isn't enough to positively identify most mushrooms, you need to consider where they were found, how they bruise, how they smell, in some cases you'll need to make a spore print, etc. If you aren't confident in the basic steps of identification (St George's are pretty easy, as it goes) and don't want to learn, then yeah, throwing them out is probably the best plan.
>> No. 10642 Anonymous
18th May 2014
Sunday 8:55 pm
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>>10641
Fair enough,the bin for them then.
>> No. 10643 Anonymous
19th May 2014
Monday 9:14 am
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>>10642
St George's are absolutely lovely, but >>10641 is bang on: if you don't know what you're doing and are 100% sure of what you're about to eat, then don't.

That said, once you know where St George's are they come back in the same spot annually, and if you found them while mowing I'm guessing they're on your lawn? So, you've got a year to learn your stuff and a potential feast to look forward to next spring.
>> No. 12163 Anonymous
29th November 2016
Tuesday 10:16 pm
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>>4902
Toasting in an epic bread

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 12166 Anonymous
29th November 2016
Tuesday 10:48 pm
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>>12163
JIZZCOCK

(I mean its almost three years lad, come on)
>> No. 12167 Anonymous
29th November 2016
Tuesday 11:23 pm
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Finally, after 6+ years of searching, I found an edible cep this year. Must've identified 30-40 others in the mean time. "Common", according to Phillips - not fucking common for me.

Delicious, though. Also found a bunch of chanterelles at the same location. A damn fine dinner.
>> No. 12168 Anonymous
29th November 2016
Tuesday 11:33 pm
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>>12167
That looks splendid.

I try every year and have a few books to identify. Never find a fucking thing.
>> No. 12178 Anonymous
1st December 2016
Thursday 7:52 pm
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>>12167
I would have washed and cooked it first but that's a matter of personal taste.
>> No. 12179 Anonymous
2nd December 2016
Friday 8:58 am
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>>12166

I think he posted that after find this thread on KYM. This thread is credited as being one of the origins to "Absolutely Disgusting".
>> No. 12250 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 7:21 am
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I love mushrooms

I've never picked them though, been too scared

I live in Wales though

How do I become a successful (read: not dead) mushroom picker?
>> No. 12251 Anonymous
27th March 2017
Monday 8:44 am
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>>12250
Ideally by going picking with someone who knows their stuff, but failing that by grabbing a decent book on the topic and really digging in (my recommendation still goes to Roger Phillips' seminal tome Mushrooms). Unfortunately there's quite a learning curve to scale if you're going to go it alone - you'll need to be doubly cautious with what you pick. Learning about the deadly poisonous ones is probably a good start, if for no other reason than that doing so should help put a healthy dose of fear into you. Learning to identify the killers will also teach you some terms, habitats, and basics of genera. I'll be lazy and point you to >>10025; as a quick litmus test, if you aren't confident in identifying the difference between those, then don't go eating anything you pick. Over the years I've derived a lot of fun (and food) from mushrooms as a hobby, but you can't half-arse it. Most of the folklore strategies for identifying safe mushrooms are dangerously inaccurate, and even advice that's good in one country can be bad in another.

It's also not really the best time of year anyway. You might find some St George's around (and they're pretty easy to find and identify), but autumn time is the real season for it.
>> No. 12329 Anonymous
9th October 2017
Monday 3:10 pm
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>>12168

I have been going mushroom hunting for nigh on a decade now, and it was also a popular weekend activity with my parents when we were little.

Ceps have largely eluded me so far though; I found one big haul once in a very remote forest in the Midlands, on my way passing through with a few hours to kill. But I have yet to find a spot in the outskirts of Greater London where they grow. I've followed all the advice on what kind of vegetation they prefer and what kind of soil and its acidity and what-have-you, but so far, nothing.

I do know a few spots around here where you can find good quantities of bay and slippery jack boletes every autumn. And those are the places where I usually go to get my foraged mushrooms.

Never really got into gilled mushrooms. There are just too many of them, and even as an experienced mushroom hunter you have a very real risk of wrongly identifying edible ones which can then do anything from give you a day on the crapper to put you six feet under. The worst that can happen to you with boletes is that you will get diarrhoea and a bad feeling in your stomach for a day or two.
>> No. 12330 Anonymous
9th October 2017
Monday 3:31 pm
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A friend keeps having a god at me for tasting mushrooms at random when we're out. Just a little nibble held on the tongue, if it burns spit it out. Some taste like soap, some fish, etc. I donno man, maybe I'll die because of it but I doubt it. The area I'm around doesn't seem to have a huge variety anyway so I think it unlikely I'll find something bad.
>> No. 12331 Anonymous
9th October 2017
Monday 8:52 pm
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Any ideas what these are (apart from too late?)
There are often loads of things growing here, but these look more credibly edible than most of the blue scary stuff
>> No. 12332 Anonymous
9th October 2017
Monday 11:53 pm
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>>12331

That could be the so-called Stinking Parasol, Lepiota cristata. Its toxicity is disputed, the best guess among mycologists seems to be that it's slightly poisonous, but you probably wouldn't eat it in the first place, because of its repulsive smell and taste, as the name suggests.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lepiota_cristata
>> No. 12333 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 7:14 am
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>>12332
Could be. I'd hazard a guess that they're shaggy parasols (I'd give the latin, but it's become a bit of a taxonomic mess over the years). Distinguishing the two should be obvious enough, as one stinks and the other doesn't. Shaggy parasols are not advised for eating unless well cooked, and even then some people report mild upsets, and in rare cases, severe poisoning. I've been eating them for decades without ill effect, for what it's worth.

Parasol mushrooms are worth looking out for, as they are easily identified by the snakeskin-like stem, found in the same kind of places, safe to eat, quite tasty, and about as equally common. If you're outside the UK though (or apparently, even in some parts of Scotland, now) and don't have much experience with mushroom identification you will want to be very careful that you don't confuse them for the "false parasol" (Chlorophyllum molybdites), which causes extremely unpleasant, though not lethal, stomach upsets. Discerning between the two is easy even for a complete amateur if you've got an internet connection to check the differences. By all accounts you don't want to get it wrong, though, and as it's the most common cause of mushroom poisoning in America, people obviously do.
>> No. 12334 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 8:25 am
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Thanks, chaps. Will have a harder look if more pop up.
This morning's find didn't look too tempting, to be honest.
Will also buy a book, and stop bothering you (unless there's something interestingly ambiguous - which, I imagine for an unschooled dolt, will be every single one...)
>> No. 12335 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 12:18 pm
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>>12334

yeah, about the picture, you don't want to pick ANY mushrooms that have gone off like that. You would get severe food poisoning even from the most harmless species.

If you are a beginner with all things mushroom, I suggest sticking to boletes for the time being. The worst they will do if you pick the wrong ones is spoil your meal or give you diarrhoea for a day or two. But you will stay alive. Gilled mushrooms can contain some very nasty toxins, and a few of them, often veey similar looking to edible ones, can outright kill you.

Also, boletes just tend to taste better. Species like the bay bolete or the cep are incredibly tasty if prepared right. Many gilled mushrooms are edible but just taste bland, which is another reason many of them just aren't worth the risk.
>> No. 12336 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 12:35 pm
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These are the ones you want lads. Good times.
>> No. 12337 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 1:22 pm
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>>12336

No, this one. You want this one.
>> No. 12338 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 1:24 pm
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>>12335 Noted, thanks. Bolete hunting begins.
>>12336 Ho bleeding ho. You so funny.
>> No. 12339 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 2:06 pm
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>>12338

Your best bet to find boletes is pine or fir forests. Most boletes prefer those kinds of trees. Some boletes are also found near birch. Try going to areas that aren't highly populated, because naturally people tend to forage close to where they live.

And if you can help it any, go mushroom hunting on a Friday afternoon/evening rather than Saturday or Sunday morning, when most people go. Bring a torch, as nightfall can surprise you when you're deep in the woods and daylight starts fading by the minute. And pause every ten or twenty metres or so, especially when in dense vegetation, to make sure you haven't lost your way and know which direction your car is or the edge of the forest from where you came. Especially when it starts getting dark.
>> No. 12340 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 2:26 pm
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Unfortunately, not a lot of pine tree action in my chosen patch. Hundreds of poxy sycamores, horse chestnuts, sweet chestnuts, lime, hawthorn, few oaks, some birch. Lots of apple- including some ancient ones that sprout massive shelf-like things that go black and drop off. (not been here a whole year, no idea what's growing, really)
>> No. 12341 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 2:43 pm
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>>12340

It pays to have various different foraging grounds. I have three different areas I have been going to for years, all of them more than a 20-mile drive from where I live.

Try to locate pine/fir forests that are within an hour from where you live and which are a bit "out of the way". And take it from there. Visit three or four sites and make a note of the best ones for future reference.
>> No. 12342 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 5:49 pm
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That level of dedication isn't going to happen, I'm afraid. If I'm going out to get mushrooms, I'll go to a shop. Too much other stuff to do, and I really don't need another hobby. Back to seeing what I can find while walking the dog.
>> No. 12343 Anonymous
10th October 2017
Tuesday 8:52 pm
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I found a sizeable amount of honey mushrooms tonight.

They are some of the most delicious gilled mushrooms in existence, but they require careful preparation, as they contain quite strong toxins when raw. You usually boil them in salt water for ten minutes, and then discard the water and fry or boil them for another five to ten minutes.
>> No. 12344 Anonymous
11th October 2017
Wednesday 12:15 am
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>>12335
>I suggest sticking to boletes for the time being.
This has been repeated in the thread a few times over the years, I'm assuming it's the same poster. If I'd followed your advice I'd have eaten no more than a dozen or so wild mushrooms in total, and it's not like I'm allergic to evergreens, or lacked the opportunity to dive into them. I've spent countless hours in classic bolete territory, miles away from anything more than a dirt track, and come away with nothing time after time. Your good fortune, or my bad luck? Bit of both, probably.

>Many gilled mushrooms are edible but just taste bland
Yes, many gilled mushrooms are bland, unless you're creative in the kitchen, but some of the easiest to find and identify are delicious. Anyone looking to start picking mushrooms is either going to have to be similarly lucky to you and come upon a trove of Ceps and other bolete delights, or they're going to get disheartened pretty quickly - and they'll have walked past many more edible gilled mushrooms. On the topic of safety:

>The worst they will do if you pick the wrong ones is spoil your meal or give you diarrhoea for a day or two.
You will survive any British bolete, but one to avoid is Satan's Bolete, (Latin transliteration - Rubroboletus satanas[i]). It can give you substantially more than a day or so of the shits. From Wikipedia: [i]A study in 2012 on mushroom poisoning in Switzerland by Katharina M. Schenk-Jaeger and colleagues found Rubroboletus satanas to have caused severe gastrointestinal symptoms including recurrent vomiting and bloody diarrhoea. And of course it's got muscarine in it just for an extra kick, so while you're shitting liquid blood and puking you'll probably be tripping your nut off. This raises mushroom hunting rule number one, which is why I'm going to bold this bit:

There are no such broad generalisations that are safe when it comes to eating mushrooms. Learning about the really toxic/deadly ones can't be separated from learning about the delicious ones; you have to do both.

Now, I've been a bit of an ornery cunt here, to you in particular, but this:
>make a note of the best ones for future reference.
really is key to efficient mushroom foraging. Find a spot where some worthwhile mushrooms are growing, and remember it. Chances are they'll be back year after year, and you won't have to pore over vague internet guides or overly-complex identification manuals.
>> No. 12345 Anonymous
11th October 2017
Wednesday 12:19 am
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>>12343
Er, how were they, by the way? Found scores of them over the years (they're one of the most common mushrooms) but had always read they were toxic and left it at that. I remember reading that their mycelium join up over vast distances and are genetically identical, so by some interpretations they're the largest organic lifeform on the planet.
>> No. 12346 Anonymous
11th October 2017
Wednesday 2:48 am
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>>12344

>I've spent countless hours in classic bolete territory, miles away from anything more than a dirt track, and come away with nothing time after time.

Maybe you were looking for them in years when the weather was too dry. Or you were looking in places that had just been picked clean by somebody before you. The latter is one reason why I said it's a good idea to go on a Friday evening and not on a Saturday morning. Just the other week, I was able to pick a whole basket full of bay boletes and similar species on a Friday afternoon.

But that's one reason why I said it pays to go to a few different areas and just look if there are mushrooms there, and then keep coming back to the best ones.


> Anyone looking to start picking mushrooms is either going to have to be similarly lucky to you and come upon a trove of Ceps and other bolete delights, or they're going to get disheartened pretty quickly - and they'll have walked past many more edible gilled mushrooms.

I believe mushroom hunting teaches you the virtue of persistence, and not giving up even after you've spent an hour looking up and down a section of forest. You are not just going to happen upon a whole massive virgin patch of ceps the minute you enter a forest.

In a way, it's similar to fishing, one of my other nature-related pastimes. If you go fishing to catch loads of big fish, you will inevitably be disappointed 80 percent of the time.

And I just never really got into gilled mushrooms. One year, there was an abundance of blushers here. I picked many of them, but found their taste quite disappointing. The same was true for some other edible species that I have tried.


>It can give you substantially more than a day or so of the shits.

Right. I guess I kind of forgot about the Satan's Bolete there. On the other hand, its distinctive appearance makes it very easy to identify when you're out in the woods, so as long as you remember that one bolete that's a bit more nasty, as well as three or four others that either ruin your meal or can indeed give you the shits, you're golden.


>>12345

They were nice. I made them into a stir fry with onions and vegetables. I don't usually pick honey mushrooms when I see them, but tonight, there was little else edible growing in that section of forest where I was foraging, so I decided to take them home with me. They do require careful preparation though. I asked my mum on the phone, who has decades of experience mushroom hunting, and she said to boil them for ten minutes, discard the water, and then fry them again for ten minutes. It's been close to four hours now since I ate them, and I'm feeling fine. So that must have done the trick.
>> No. 12347 Anonymous
12th October 2017
Thursday 10:21 pm
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>>12346
>Maybe you were looking for them in years when the weather was too dry.
Yeah, maybe. It was a period of a good few years that I was on a major bolete hunt, though.

>Or you were looking in places that had just been picked clean by somebody before you.
I seemed to spend half the time picking cobwebs out of my face and sinking wellie-deep in mud/leafy debris, pretty certain there wasn't anyone else hunting around where I was going. Of course when I did finally find a cep it was at the side of a regularly-used public footpath.

>I believe mushroom hunting teaches you the virtue of persistence, and not giving up even after you've spent an hour looking up and down a section of forest.
I was "lucky" enough to be out of work at the time, so I regularly spent hours per day during the season exploring the area (to get out of the house and stop myself going stir-crazy, as much as anything else). Might just have been that part of Wales.

>One year, there was an abundance of blushers here. I picked many of them, but found their taste quite disappointing.
Do boletes generally retain a more consistent amount of water than gilled mushrooms, I wonder? I remember a few occasions of gilled mushrooms from the same patch that have been fantastic one year and tasteless and watery the next.

>I kind of forgot about the Satan's Bolete there. On the other hand, its distinctive appearance makes it very easy to identify when you're out in the woods
It's not a subtle specimen. It's also apparently far less toxic if cooked, pretty rare, and I certainly don't want to put anyone off getting into foraging for mushrooms, but there just aren't any simple absolutes. There are also a lot of folklore rules of thumb, especially in older "live off the land"-style 70's/80's books that you can still pick up in charity shops etc, that are potentially lethal. I've seen online guides on common mushrooms that only list half a dozen or so that are safe to eat, and those are particularly irresponsible given they're aimed at novices; I remember seeing one that could've easily have passed a death cap for a horse mushroom.

Might have to give honey mushrooms another look, given how often I've come across them in the past.
>> No. 12348 Anonymous
12th October 2017
Thursday 11:05 pm
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>>12347

>I seemed to spend half the time picking cobwebs out of my face and sinking wellie-deep in mud/leafy debris, pretty certain there wasn't anyone else hunting around where I was going. Of course when I did finally find a cep it was at the side of a regularly-used public footpath.

Most mushrooms, certainly boletes, prefer areas of forest floor where there is little undergrowth. Some moss, fern or grass is fine, but you will mostly find them in more bare areas. And although mushrooms are indifferent to light conditions, they often seem to prefer clearings or other slightly more "airy" spots. They also seem to avoid soil conditions that are too wet and muddy.


>I was "lucky" enough to be out of work at the time, so I regularly spent hours per day during the season exploring the area

Mushroom hunting does take its time, like any hobby. But considering that many people who do work spend their evenings or weekends just sat in front of the telly gulping down the pints, you can't really say you haven't got time for it as a wage slave.


>Do boletes generally retain a more consistent amount of water than gilled mushrooms, I wonder? I remember a few occasions of gilled mushrooms from the same patch that have been fantastic one year and tasteless and watery the next.

Not that I would know of, but certainly when it's very wet, they will absorb more rainwater. It also means they spoil faster, so be careful when picking ones that are very wet.


>There are also a lot of folklore rules of thumb, especially in older "live off the land"-style 70's/80's books that you can still pick up in charity shops etc, that are potentially lethal. I've seen online guides on common mushrooms that only list half a dozen or so that are safe to eat, and those are particularly irresponsible given they're aimed at novices;

Buying a comprehensive and fairly recent mushroom guide is key to being a good forager. As I said, my parents have been avid mushroom hunters all their lives, and they've still got the old illustrated books from the 1970s to 1980s. The problem is that a) the hand-drawn illustrations sometimes really don't depict a species well, which can be immensely dangerous especially within the Amanita family, and b) some of the information is so outdated that if you just went by a book like that (perhaps from a second-hand book store or a flea market or a jumble sale), you would run the very real risk of spending a night or two in hospital. All the deadly poisonous mushrooms were marked as such in those old books as they would be in any up-to-date guide, but a few of the species have only in the last 20 or 30 years been found out to be poisonous and are still shown as edible in those old books.

So if you are inspired to try your luck mushroom hunting because you picked up an old guide book for 50p somewhere, that's just about the worst place to start from.

> Might have to give honey mushrooms another look, given how often I've come across them in the past.

Be careful - there is a deadly poisonous lookalike called galerina marginata. I actually saw a bunch of them growing on a tree stump the other weekend. I was going to pick them at first, then I thought I wasn't in the mood for honey mushrooms, and then I actually took the time to get out my guide and look them up because something seemed off that I couldn't put my finger on. They are quite easily mistaken for some members of the honey muhsroom family.
>> No. 12360 Anonymous
15th October 2017
Sunday 6:16 pm
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Found a Destroying Angel today while taking a wee on the edge of a forest.

Less than a handful of these is enough to kill a grown man. They are close relatives of the death cap and contain similar amounts of alpha-amatoxin, the stuff that makes death caps so deadly.

Untreated, you will die a horrible slow and painful death.
>> No. 12361 Anonymous
15th October 2017
Sunday 6:34 pm
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>>12360
Just let us know how it tastes before it kills you, okay?
>> No. 12362 Anonymous
15th October 2017
Sunday 7:09 pm
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>>12361

Well one of its typical characteristics is that it smells of horse radish. And so did this one. So it probably tastes like it as well. Feel free to try it, I'll pass.
>> No. 12363 Anonymous
15th October 2017
Sunday 10:36 pm
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>>12360
These are fucking evil. The only difference is that bulb at the bottom, so if you pick them from the top you cannot tell the difference. You have to pick them from the root. They've killed so many people they deserve the name.
>> No. 12364 Anonymous
15th October 2017
Sunday 11:06 pm
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>>12363
Sorry I'm drunk and I should clarify they're very similar to an edible mushroom I forget the name of. If you pick just the tops of them, they both look the same, which is why they're so dangerous.
>> No. 12367 Anonymous
16th October 2017
Monday 2:02 pm
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>>12364

They can be mistaken for various different edible Agaricus mushrooms. But edible Agaricus usually don't have snow white gills like the Destroying Angel. Then again, variations and mutations are indeed observed in the wild, so there is always the risk of getting it wrong.

Because there are so many similarities between edible Agaricus and deadly Amanita species, you're really much better off simply getting agaricus bisporus, i.e. the common button mushroom, from your local supermarket.
>> No. 12372 Anonymous
16th October 2017
Monday 7:36 pm
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Is there any technique or theory on how to find fungi? I've noticed most of my finds tend to be along paths, which would make sense considering wind borne spores carried along air currents, but then I wondered how many times do I actually leave the path.

It just seems you look down and occasionally spot one or two, then more as you kneel and observe. Over time I guess you'll remember where troops and whatever have been so they'll likely return next year. I guess my resistance is to the fact that you just experience it rather than learning as a skill.
>> No. 12375 Anonymous
16th October 2017
Monday 9:36 pm
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>>12372

From my own experience of picking mainly boletes the last eight or ten years, I can tell you a bit about where to find them. You want areas of forest that consist of pine or fir. Or any conifers really. And boletes usually prefer spots where the vegetation on the forest floor isn't that thick. A bit of moss or dead leaves is fine, but you don't want to be standing in fern, heath, or other vegetation up to your knees.

I've sifted through random images of forest for you on google images, and the picture in this post looks to me like one of your better bets for finding bay boletes and ceps. Try to locate a similar looking patch of forest in your area, and prepare to go up to half a mile or even a mile into the woods off the paths. Because as most people will pick mushrooms right near the paths, it both means that you will only find few there yourself, and they won't be able to propagate in those areas the same way as in more undisturbed spots deep inside a forest. All it takes is one mushroom hunter with a big enough wicker basket who scoured the area an hour before you, and you'll have to wait another week before any sizeable mushrooms will have reappeared. Most people can't be arsed to walk a mile into the woods, but that also means your chances of finding something, both of bigger size and greater quantity, will be much better.
>> No. 12376 Anonymous
20th October 2017
Friday 9:00 pm
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Mushroom season seems to be ending here. I went into an area this afternoon that's almost guaranteed to have enough mushrooms every time to fill up a basket. But today, I went home with just over a handful of bay boletes in acceptable conditon. Despite the fact that we had nigh on 20 degrees here for most of the week. There just don't appear to be many mushrooms left in the ground. So this was probably the last time I went foraging for this year's mushroom season.

I was still able to turn today's yield into half a pot's worth of mushroom vegetable stew. Quite delicious.

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