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>> No. 5761 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:35 pm
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Evening, Mumsnet lads.

I'm running low on ideas of what to read to my son [7]. We're working our way through the Mr Gum books and if I can't think of something when we're finished my other half will probably subject him to Enid Blyton. We've read The Hobbit and all of Ronald Dahl's books for children but I don't know where to go next, possibly Harry Potter (although I've never read them so I don't know what they're like) or maybe something by Terry Deary as he's obsessed with ancient Egypt. Goosebumps?

I'd be grateful for any tips. Any books you were particularly fond of from your childhood?
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>> No. 5786 Anonymous
9th October 2014
Thursday 12:42 pm
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>>5781
You seem to be forgetting the important bonding time that exists when parents and children read together. Perhaps you missed out on it in your childhood, but I can still recall every line of Cops and Robbers thanks to my father tirelessly reading it to me what felt like every night when I was a youngun. It's one of my most distinct memories from that age, and my dad still - when prompted - can start reciting the verses with me, and I can tell he enjoys doing so as for a brief moment he remembers me as his 2 year old rapscallion and not the young adult with voting privileges and council tax that I now am.

These things are important, trust me.
>> No. 5787 Anonymous
9th October 2014
Thursday 3:49 pm
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>>5770
> I read them around that age and Animal Farm especially made a distinct impression on me.
Eh, you too?
>>5782
I remember stumbling upon the book about child upbringing. Opened my fucking eyes regarding all those adult trickery.
>> No. 5937 Anonymous
29th January 2015
Thursday 8:56 pm
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OP here, I've picked up Artemis Fowl today so I'll let you know what I he thinks of it after he's finished reading The Story of Matthew Buzzington to me.
>> No. 5938 Anonymous
29th January 2015
Thursday 10:19 pm
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>>5937
Great shit.
>> No. 5939 Anonymous
30th January 2015
Friday 12:22 am
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>>5786
Can't agree more, although it brings up sad memories as well as it reminds me of a time when my father wasn't such a cynical, work orientated selfish prick.

I don't want to bang on about the internet and so on, but it has driven a massive wedge between families. If I ever have kids I'll make reading to them paramount.

Sage for emo tripe
>> No. 5940 Anonymous
30th January 2015
Friday 8:10 pm
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Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing et al. are good to read to kids because putting on a small child's voice when reading Fudge's dialogue is fun.
>> No. 5984 Anonymous
26th May 2015
Tuesday 9:52 pm
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>>5937
>so I'll let you know what he thinks of it after he's finished reading The Story of Matthew Buzzington to me.

We've read a few of them, they're brilliant. Sorry, lads, a bit late with an update here. We've just finished Alex, the Dog and the Unopenable Door and now we're working through Circus of Thieves and the Raffle of Doom.
>> No. 5985 Anonymous
27th May 2015
Wednesday 4:22 pm
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War Horse - Michael Morpurgo
>> No. 5987 Anonymous
27th May 2015
Wednesday 4:51 pm
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Please, let him work through the Goosebumps when he gets slightly older.

I'm still damaged from that TV episode where the protagonist went all "IF YOU CAN'T BEAT EM, JOIN EM".
>> No. 5988 Anonymous
27th May 2015
Wednesday 10:47 pm
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>>5761
When I read this I expected to find a reference to your son labelled 7...
>> No. 5989 Anonymous
3rd June 2015
Wednesday 2:45 am
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>>5761 Try the edge chronicles, rarely see them mentioned but they have pirates alchemy, airships, goblins, an odd world on the edge of the world, definitely worth reading if he's into action and some fairly magestic fantasy stories it's worth reading, also inkspell, inkheart. and the boy in striped pyjamas (although the modification to fuhrer and Auschwitz piss me off a bit)
>> No. 5990 Anonymous
3rd June 2015
Wednesday 11:58 pm
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>>5989 also the adrien mole books are fairly fun, not sure how well they translate for the modern generation but great books anyway...

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 6185 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 8:46 am
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I'd forgotten how sinister the Thomas the Tank Engine series was until I read Bulstrode to my daughter last night. Bulstrode was complaining at the docks while waiting go get loaded up and when Percy finally arrives the trucks are cheeky little shits whom end up falling off the docks into Bulstrode. They decide to make an example of Bulstrode by leaving him stranded on a beach to get covered in bird shit.
>> No. 6186 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 10:57 am
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>>5990
It seems ever so slightly cruel to ban someone for poor grammar in a thread about children's books.
>> No. 6187 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 11:14 am
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>>5761
You're doing your child a great disservice if you don't try something from The Edge Chronicles.

It's what got me started on reading as a kid and I'll never forget how great the book was in opening up my mind and giving me a creative freedom like no other book had.

It has scattered illustrations to help create a picture, but not too many so you can keep your mind solely focused upon the books.

I didn't read them all, but I read The Last of the Sky Pirates, which is part of a trilogy in the series, as they are all broken down into sets of three.

Start on Last of the Sky Pirates man, it is something I'll forever be fond of and remember.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_of_the_Sky_Pirates
>> No. 6188 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 12:18 pm
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>>6186
Sometimes you've got to be cruel to be kind.
>> No. 6189 Anonymous
19th October 2015
Monday 3:17 am
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>>6185

My nephew got this for Christmas in about 2003 when train crashes had been in the news a lot. It contained this video


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klsbzC9V0Yg

which seemed rather dark, especially the bloodbath at 00:30.
>> No. 6190 Anonymous
19th October 2015
Monday 12:22 pm
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The crashes are fairly tame, apart from perhaps the train drivers having mental breakdowns due to having to work with engines that have minds of their own and not infrequently come off the rails.

It's nothing compared to the tyranny of Sodor. Henry getting bricked up in a tunnel for not wanting to go out in the rain. Smudger getting turned into a generator for demonstrating independent thought and nonconformity. Stepney nearly getting murdered by a pair of diesels just for being a steamy. If you don't prove yourself to be a Really Useful Engine then you are in for it.
>> No. 6191 Anonymous
19th October 2015
Monday 3:48 pm
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>>6190

This picture reminds me, better let the cat out of Cat Jail. Half and hour is long enough.
>> No. 6192 Anonymous
20th October 2015
Tuesday 11:21 pm
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>Not reading your children British Empire history

Why not? Educational, fun, interesting, related to life. He will be a mile ahead of all his class mates in history and understanding the world

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 6233 Anonymous
6th December 2015
Sunday 11:31 am
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OP here, we're working our way through Narnia. I'd forgotten how much casual sexism is in them.

>>5777
>The first "proper" book I read was about a millipede and his mum getting smoked out of his home, but I can't remember the name at all.

Harry the Poisonous Centipede? We read that a few months back, although I only get about half the story because he'll read a few chapters himself each night.
>> No. 6234 Anonymous
7th December 2015
Monday 3:24 am
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>>6233
Brace yourself for more dolphin rape than you remember when the Calormenes start popping up.
>> No. 6265 Anonymous
4th January 2016
Monday 8:32 pm
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>>6234
We've just finished The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Does Aslan turn out to be Jesus? The ending of the book suggests that religion is going to be laid on rather thickly at some point during the final two novels.
>> No. 6266 Anonymous
4th January 2016
Monday 8:54 pm
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>>6265
Aslan is obv. a Christian analogue but as far as I recall there is no direct reference to religion.
>> No. 6267 Anonymous
4th January 2016
Monday 10:34 pm
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>>6265
>>6266
Aslan is Jesus, there are various Christian themes and parallells in most of them, and later books introduce Tash, the Calormene god. Since the Calormenes are obvious Arab stereotypes, it's ambiguous if Tash is an analogue for Allah or simply a pagan deity; The Last Battle makes it fairly clear that Tash is Satan as I recall, so make of that what you will.
>> No. 6268 Anonymous
4th January 2016
Monday 11:28 pm
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Well done, OP. You've read your kid the Narnia novels, and thus brought a wee little ARE SI into the world.

Thanks for reminding me about Harry the Poisonous Centipede though, I missed that post the first time around so thanks whoever bumped the thread too.
>> No. 6269 Anonymous
5th January 2016
Tuesday 7:09 am
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>>6268
>You've read your kid the Narnia novels, and thus brought a wee little ARE SI into the world.

It wouldn't actually surprise me if there was a link between reading Enid Blyton as a child and supporting UKIP. Blooming suspicious looking foreigners, always up to no good.
>> No. 6278 Anonymous
19th January 2016
Tuesday 9:15 pm
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Most of the way through The Last Battle, although I'm only getting half the story as he'll read a chapter or two to himself after I've read to him. In the last chapter I read the dwarfs started calling the Calormenes darkies.
>> No. 6613 Anonymous
11th July 2017
Tuesday 8:55 pm
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OP here again, lads.

Laddo is now 10 and still obsessed with ancient mythology, particularly Greek. He's just finished reading the Percy Jackson pentalogy, which he managed in around a fortnight. Are there any books in a similar vein that you'd recommend? I've got the Penguin Little Black Classic of The Fall of Icarus so I may see what he thinks of that; the prose seems fairly accessible.
>> No. 6615 Anonymous
11th July 2017
Tuesday 9:06 pm
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>>6613
For Greek stuff, Robert Graves is pretty great. If he's still into it in 8 years, you can move him onto Roberto Calasso. For want of anything else to add, the Gaiman book of Norse mythology is pretty decent.

Further moving away from the Greeks, maybe the Alex Rider series by Horowitz or Bloodtide and Bloodsong by Burgess.
>> No. 6616 Anonymous
11th July 2017
Tuesday 10:39 pm
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>>6613
10 eh? You gonna start him on Animal Farm and all that stuff mentioned above?

If not, at least give him Boris the Tomato. I love reading it even as an adult, both because it's actually quite hilarious and a great satire of totalitarian fascism.
>> No. 6617 Anonymous
12th July 2017
Wednesday 1:45 pm
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>>6613
You might try "Wolf Brother" and the series Chronicles of Ancient Darkness by Michelle Paver.
>> No. 6618 Anonymous
12th July 2017
Wednesday 5:41 pm
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Thanks, lads.

>>6616
>You gonna start him on Animal Farm and all that stuff mentioned above?

I tried him with Animal Farm a year or so ago but he wasn't interested. It's been a long time since I've read it, but I think the first couple of chapters are a little on the dry side.

We've read a few of the books suggested in this thread, with Artemis Fowl being the clear favourite.
>> No. 6619 Anonymous
12th July 2017
Wednesday 6:15 pm
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>>6618
Fair enough, that's Orwell for you. Boris the Tomato may have similar themes - talking vegetables in a Kent greenhouse with plans of world domination - but it's a lot more accessible. I love it.
>> No. 6642 Anonymous
10th September 2017
Sunday 3:45 pm
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>>5761 can fully recommend
"His dark materials" by Phillip Pullman.

"His Dark Materials is an epic trilogy of fantasy novels by Philip Pullman consisting of Northern Lights, The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass"

So so good. Nothing like the film.
>> No. 6648 Anonymous
10th September 2017
Sunday 10:12 pm
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>>6642
Fucking Golden Compass bullshit. IT'S NOT A COMPASS HOLLYWOOD, DID YOU EVEN READ THE BOOK
>> No. 6650 Anonymous
10th September 2017
Sunday 10:24 pm
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Since this is up top again, I'm going to repeat my support for the Bartimaeus trilogy (>>5762) because they were so much fun when I was young, its about a young twatty kid in a pseudo-alternative reality where the British empire is still on the go, and a certain class of people (aristocracy types) can summon different levels of imps, genies, etc. It's about this kid who gives it a shot at a young age and his adventures with this sassy Djinn called Bartimaeus and how they end up getting involved in higher level politics (that makes it sound dull but it's really not).

Please give it a shot, I might buy the first again since I've lost it. It's not that well known a series but it was my favourite series at the time. I think I read it when I was about 12.

Also, Artemis Fowl. Rich supervillain child gets involved with a (literally) underground civilisation of super technologically advanced 'fairies' who have kept themselves secret from humanity for millenia. He runs into a fairy who is a newbie officer for the L.E.P. Recon unit.

Great stuff.
>> No. 6652 Anonymous
11th September 2017
Monday 12:38 am
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>>6650
Didn't realise this is the third time I've wanked over this series, sorry. Whinge.
>> No. 6656 Anonymous
11th September 2017
Monday 7:19 pm
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>>6648
To be fair to hollywood, the religious messages in the book were so offensive to most of America (and enough of the rest of the world) that the only options they had were to massively deviate from the book, or not make it at all.
The correct decision would have been to not make the film at all.
>> No. 6667 Anonymous
22nd September 2017
Friday 4:52 pm
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>>6642>>6648
OP here again. Laddo came home with one of those book fair flyers. Apparently they're making a His Dark Materials TV series.
>> No. 6668 Anonymous
22nd September 2017
Friday 10:06 pm
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>>6667
Let's hope they don't fuck it up.
>> No. 6670 Anonymous
22nd September 2017
Friday 10:19 pm
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>>6668
Don't be silly, of course they will.
>> No. 6671 Anonymous
27th September 2017
Wednesday 9:25 pm
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>>5761

I really enjoyed the Hungry Cities Chronicles (I.e. Mortal Engines + about five sequels)- All about a basically steampunk dystopian future where cities are jacked up on a giant sets of tracks and engaged in 'municipal darwinism'. I thought it was wicked sick when I was about 10.

I'll support the Wind Singer series, and you should definately go with His Dark Materials before year 5/6 as they offer a pretty solid critique and/or narrative regarding religion at a time when those ideas count (I say that from experience).

On Harry Potter - I think you need to start those at a bit of a later date, purely because they pretty rapidly mature from kids on an adventure to moody teens being moody - something I actually found to be pretty awkward/dull by the final tomes, and I was reading these as they came out, at pretty much a similar age to the characters.
>> No. 6672 Anonymous
27th September 2017
Wednesday 9:29 pm
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>>6671
>I really enjoyed the Hungry Cities Chronicles (I.e. Mortal Engines + about five sequels)- All about a basically steampunk dystopian future where cities are jacked up on a giant sets of tracks and engaged in 'municipal darwinism'. I thought it was wicked sick when I was about 10.
I loved the first book when I was younger. For years I've been meaning to get round to reading the rest of the series.
>> No. 6673 Anonymous
27th September 2017
Wednesday 9:39 pm
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>>6672

Go for it - it meanders for a bit but from what I remember (I re-read it about 4 years ago) it ends a satisfying distance from where it begins.

Oh also, they've just wrapped up shooting for a film of the first book, due out 2018.
>> No. 6674 Anonymous
28th September 2017
Thursday 3:34 am
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>>6671
It's Mortal Engines, not 'Hungry Cities'. It'll be bloody sorcerers stones next.

They're making an Artemis Fowl film too. I have absolutely no idea how that will work, I'd put money on it being a disaster.
>> No. 6675 Anonymous
28th September 2017
Thursday 2:43 pm
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>>6671
Part of the reason I didn't carry on reading the series when I was younger is because of how despondent I was at the end of the first book that London was destroyed.
>> No. 6676 Anonymous
28th September 2017
Thursday 7:13 pm
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Going off on the horns of a furious tangent...
Anyone else ever get the thing where reminiscing about one thing automatically ties to a different thing because of two things happening at the same time in the past?
I first read mortal engines at the same time as listening to 40ft by Franz Ferdinand, now those two memories are stuck together in my head and a mention of the book always makes me think of that song.
>> No. 6677 Anonymous
28th September 2017
Thursday 7:13 pm
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>>6675
At least it's a happy ending.
>> No. 6678 Anonymous
29th September 2017
Friday 8:15 pm
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>>6674

Sorry slightly tilt this towards a cunt-off, but I was referring to the series, which is titled as such, cunt.

Upon further inspection of the Wiki, the series appears to be known to the Author as the 'Mortal Engines Quartet'. Cuntoff averted.

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