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>> No. 5761 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:35 pm
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Evening, Mumsnet lads.

I'm running low on ideas of what to read to my son [7]. We're working our way through the Mr Gum books and if I can't think of something when we're finished my other half will probably subject him to Enid Blyton. We've read The Hobbit and all of Ronald Dahl's books for children but I don't know where to go next, possibly Harry Potter (although I've never read them so I don't know what they're like) or maybe something by Terry Deary as he's obsessed with ancient Egypt. Goosebumps?

I'd be grateful for any tips. Any books you were particularly fond of from your childhood?
Expand all images.
>> No. 5762 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:42 pm
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The Bartimaeus Trilogy will be beyond him at the minute but one day he'll fucking love it. Same (perhaps) for Pratchett's Diggers, Truckers and Wings.
>> No. 5763 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:45 pm
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>>5761

I suggest the Artemis Fowl series, I still enjoy them. Lord of the Rings isn't too far away either, I read it myself as a 10 year old.

Harry Potter books are all right, they wont make you want to blow your brains out at least.

The King's Blades series by Dave Duncan are maybe a bit mature, but I loved them as a kid. It has a bit of shagging here and there and copious amounts of awesome knights doing awesome stuff, which I loved.

Have you considered His Dark Materials series? Northern Lights, etc.
>> No. 5764 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:47 pm
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>>5761
It's like the Iliad but with woodland creatures.
>> No. 5765 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:49 pm
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>>5761

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Enchanted_Wood_%28novel%29

These were magical for me, no pun intended. I don't know why you're against are Enid. I've heard bad things about Terry Deary on .gs, but I always enjoyed the Horrible Histories books.

I'd suggest these, I really enjoyed them. You might want to check them out before you start reading them with your son though, some of the themes are violent. That's according to wikipedia, I don't remember anything too bad in them. There might have been one where the protagonists were nearly burned at the stake as witches or summat, but that's about it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spooksville
>> No. 5766 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:51 pm
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Harry Potter is good, and you'll likely find yourself getting interested in the story after the second or third book. I might hold off on hitting the end of the series until your child is older, but by the time you've gotten through to Goblet Of Fire they should be able to cope.

You should definitely, definitely read him Horrible Histories and related series (there's some science and technology ones done in the same vein). They're not stories but it's always good to try and capture their imagination with these otherwise "dry" subjects before they hit them at secondary school.

You may also enjoy the Artemis Fowl series, they're quite pithy. Others by Eoin Colfer might be a bit above your kid (they're more 10+ years kinds of books) but I don't doubt your child is smart and would still enjoy that kind of adventure story. There's also the Alex Rider books - they're a bit like watered down James Bond adventures for the modern child.

The Lemony Snicket/A Series Of Unfortunate Events I also remember enjoying around that age, and until I was about 13/14 too. I tended to read quite above my age as a child (I was onto YA fiction and LOTR by my tweens) so you might need to adjust based on your son's development.

He will almost certainly be entranced by the Lynne Reid Banks series The Indian In The Cupboard. They're fantastic. A must-read for kids that age.

I similarly remember enjoying going through my dad's copies of Just William stories. They're a bit antiquated and you might need to explain this to your lad but they're good fun too.

I'll update more as I think of them, I hope this starts you off. If I had to pick one in my list the begin with, it'd be the Indian In The Cupboard. It's just a glorious, glorious series. Anyone who didn't experience it in their childhoods has missed out on something beautiful in the pantheon of classic children's literature. Please expose him to it while he's still young enough to truly be lost in the fantastical.
>> No. 5767 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:52 pm
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Is he too old for The Phantom Tollbooth? The answer to that is probably no. If he liked The Hobbit you might try Phantastes by George MacDonald. It's preferable to C.S. Lewis, at least. Some things by H.G. Wells are on a similar level to The Hobbit, as is The Tripod Trilogy and even the HHGTTG, if you don't mind him hearing about drinking. Stig of The Dump? Swallows and Amazons?
>> No. 5768 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:54 pm
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>>5764
Definitely, then when OP has finished reading that to him, he could help him create his first fursona as a father-son project.
>> No. 5769 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:54 pm
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The Phantom Tollbooth remains one of my favourite ever books.
>> No. 5770 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 9:54 pm
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>>5763
Oh christ, I can't believe I left Pullman off the list. It's a great introduction into why to not trust organised religion. It should be required reading for all schoolchildren imo. +1 on that suggestion.

On that vein, it's never too early to read them Lord Of The Flies. Animal Farm too. Well, maybe wait until he's 10 or so. I read them around that age and Animal Farm especially made a distinct impression on me.
>> No. 5771 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 10:04 pm
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This series is also worth a crack. It might be a bit confusing and high-brow for a 7 year old (it's basically a fantasy re-imagining of 1984) but it's quite absorbing. Mudnuts!
>> No. 5772 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 10:06 pm
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>>5762
>Same (perhaps) for Pratchett's Diggers, Truckers and Wings.

We had Diggers somewhere, but I can't say that I've seen it since we moved house. I was planning on giving him my Discworld novels when he's a bit older.

>>5763
Thanks, lad. I have the His Dark Materials trilogy, but I was planning on holding them back for a few years. However I've got most of the Sally Lockhart books so he may be ready for them.

>>5764
Thanks, lad.

>>5765
I can't comment on The Faraway Tree series but the Famous Five, Secret Seven, etc. books we've got are dire (actually, the
Five Find-Outers books are alright); always the same dull opening chapters about meeting up for the school holidays, a few chapters where they call each other asses and idiots, the odd chapter where she's forgotten the name of the cook or one of the other characters and starts calling them something else and a chapter or two about suspicious looking foreigners. At least they're not as bad as Horrid Henry.
>> No. 5773 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 10:11 pm
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>>5763
Oh fuck Artemis Fowl is great.

>>5772
Can I please stress the Bartimaeus trilogy for later, it was easily my favourite book as a child. I might reread it actually.

>>5771
Never liked them.
>> No. 5774 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 10:13 pm
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There was a book I read as a child about a few dogs stranded on an island having come off a fishing boat. I can't for the life of me find what it is.
>> No. 5775 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 10:39 pm
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>>5772
I'd disagree with the lad who suggested LOTR since he's seven, but he might be ready for The Hobbit and Tolkein's other shorter bits like Farmer Giles of Ham.
>> No. 5776 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 11:12 pm
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>>5775

OP said he had already read him The Hobbit.
>> No. 5777 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 11:14 pm
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Read him the nightly ramblings of .gs of course!

I can't really offer any good advice because I was basically illiterate until year 6.

>>5774

I know what you mean. The first "proper" book I read was about a millipede and his mum getting smoked out of his home, but I can't remember the name at all.
>> No. 5778 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 11:18 pm
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>>5776
Ah, sorry, had beers this evening. What about Charlotte's Web, Watership Down (though don't let him watch the cartoon) or Lloyd Alexander's Chronicles of Prydain series? I remember enjoying those around OP's lad's age, and I think they're all still in print.
>> No. 5779 Anonymous
8th October 2014
Wednesday 11:54 pm
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>>5766

>The Lemony Snicket/A Series Of Unfortunate Events I also remember enjoying around that age, and until I was about 13/14 too.

I didn't discover the series until my late twenties and I thought it was very witty.

>>5767

>Is he too old for The Phantom Tollbooth? The answer to that is probably no.

Heck no. Some of those puns would go way over kids' heads.

The above are my two biggest recommendations.

A Boy and a Bear and a Boat is pretty decent and there's a lot of issue fiction like My Sister Lives On The Mantelpiece, When I Was Joe and R.J. Palacio's Wonder. The latter two are great but might be a little old for him.

I enjoyed Arthur C. Clarke's Dolphin Island as a kid but I had to skip the first couple of chapters. There's this peculiar thing where he drastically changed his prose style after those, like he's just remembered what age bracket he's meant to be writing for.

I liked The Class That Went Wild, A Cat Called Amnesia and Aliens In The Family.

The London Eye Mystery is good too. So are Louis Sachar's.
>> No. 5780 Anonymous
9th October 2014
Thursday 12:40 am
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>> No. 5781 Anonymous
9th October 2014
Thursday 3:05 am
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Excuse my ignorance but is seven not old enough to begin solo reading? I know I was devouring Horrible Histories at that age, though I was perhaps advanced.
>> No. 5782 Anonymous
9th October 2014
Thursday 6:11 am
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>>5781

Any book is appropriate for anyone of any age to read. I was reading geology and astronomy books on my own by the time I was seven and could program in basic BASIC using the Amstrad CPC 464 manual. Children are smarter than adults. Don't hold them back.
>> No. 5783 Anonymous
9th October 2014
Thursday 6:24 am
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>>5782

>Any book is appropriate for anyone of any age to read.

I don't know. He might be a bit bemused if you read him Story of the Eye.
>> No. 5784 Anonymous
9th October 2014
Thursday 7:48 am
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>>5781
He will devour a book if it's something he's interested in (Ancient Egypt, space, dragons, nature, etc.) but during the week the usual routine is that he'll read his school book to me and then I'll read him a few chapters. I've read authors say that too many parents punish their children for learning to read by stopping reading to them altogether, plus I like reading to him.

I might have a look at the Ronald Dahl Funny Prize, although I'm sure David Williams has won it and I didn't think much of Mr Stink and Gangsta Granny when we read those.
>> No. 5785 Anonymous
9th October 2014
Thursday 9:34 am
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>>5761

Try the How To Train Your Dragon series of books. They are pretty much nothing to do with the films and have a wit and charm lacking in the Hollywood version.

My boy is just turned 7 and he loves them. You can pick up a dozen of them in a box set for about £35.
>> No. 5786 Anonymous
9th October 2014
Thursday 12:42 pm
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>>5781
You seem to be forgetting the important bonding time that exists when parents and children read together. Perhaps you missed out on it in your childhood, but I can still recall every line of Cops and Robbers thanks to my father tirelessly reading it to me what felt like every night when I was a youngun. It's one of my most distinct memories from that age, and my dad still - when prompted - can start reciting the verses with me, and I can tell he enjoys doing so as for a brief moment he remembers me as his 2 year old rapscallion and not the young adult with voting privileges and council tax that I now am.

These things are important, trust me.
>> No. 5787 Anonymous
9th October 2014
Thursday 3:49 pm
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>>5770
> I read them around that age and Animal Farm especially made a distinct impression on me.
Eh, you too?
>>5782
I remember stumbling upon the book about child upbringing. Opened my fucking eyes regarding all those adult trickery.
>> No. 5937 Anonymous
29th January 2015
Thursday 8:56 pm
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OP here, I've picked up Artemis Fowl today so I'll let you know what I he thinks of it after he's finished reading The Story of Matthew Buzzington to me.
>> No. 5938 Anonymous
29th January 2015
Thursday 10:19 pm
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>>5937
Great shit.
>> No. 5939 Anonymous
30th January 2015
Friday 12:22 am
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>>5786
Can't agree more, although it brings up sad memories as well as it reminds me of a time when my father wasn't such a cynical, work orientated selfish prick.

I don't want to bang on about the internet and so on, but it has driven a massive wedge between families. If I ever have kids I'll make reading to them paramount.

Sage for emo tripe
>> No. 5940 Anonymous
30th January 2015
Friday 8:10 pm
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Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing et al. are good to read to kids because putting on a small child's voice when reading Fudge's dialogue is fun.
>> No. 5984 Anonymous
26th May 2015
Tuesday 9:52 pm
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>>5937
>so I'll let you know what he thinks of it after he's finished reading The Story of Matthew Buzzington to me.

We've read a few of them, they're brilliant. Sorry, lads, a bit late with an update here. We've just finished Alex, the Dog and the Unopenable Door and now we're working through Circus of Thieves and the Raffle of Doom.
>> No. 5985 Anonymous
27th May 2015
Wednesday 4:22 pm
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War Horse - Michael Morpurgo
>> No. 5987 Anonymous
27th May 2015
Wednesday 4:51 pm
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Please, let him work through the Goosebumps when he gets slightly older.

I'm still damaged from that TV episode where the protagonist went all "IF YOU CAN'T BEAT EM, JOIN EM".
>> No. 5988 Anonymous
27th May 2015
Wednesday 10:47 pm
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>>5761
When I read this I expected to find a reference to your son labelled 7...
>> No. 5989 Anonymous
3rd June 2015
Wednesday 2:45 am
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>>5761 Try the edge chronicles, rarely see them mentioned but they have pirates alchemy, airships, goblins, an odd world on the edge of the world, definitely worth reading if he's into action and some fairly magestic fantasy stories it's worth reading, also inkspell, inkheart. and the boy in striped pyjamas (although the modification to fuhrer and Auschwitz piss me off a bit)
>> No. 5990 Anonymous
3rd June 2015
Wednesday 11:58 pm
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>>5989 also the adrien mole books are fairly fun, not sure how well they translate for the modern generation but great books anyway...

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 6185 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 8:46 am
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I'd forgotten how sinister the Thomas the Tank Engine series was until I read Bulstrode to my daughter last night. Bulstrode was complaining at the docks while waiting go get loaded up and when Percy finally arrives the trucks are cheeky little shits whom end up falling off the docks into Bulstrode. They decide to make an example of Bulstrode by leaving him stranded on a beach to get covered in bird shit.
>> No. 6186 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 10:57 am
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>>5990
It seems ever so slightly cruel to ban someone for poor grammar in a thread about children's books.
>> No. 6187 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 11:14 am
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>>5761
You're doing your child a great disservice if you don't try something from The Edge Chronicles.

It's what got me started on reading as a kid and I'll never forget how great the book was in opening up my mind and giving me a creative freedom like no other book had.

It has scattered illustrations to help create a picture, but not too many so you can keep your mind solely focused upon the books.

I didn't read them all, but I read The Last of the Sky Pirates, which is part of a trilogy in the series, as they are all broken down into sets of three.

Start on Last of the Sky Pirates man, it is something I'll forever be fond of and remember.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_of_the_Sky_Pirates
>> No. 6188 Anonymous
18th October 2015
Sunday 12:18 pm
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>>6186
Sometimes you've got to be cruel to be kind.
>> No. 6189 Anonymous
19th October 2015
Monday 3:17 am
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>>6185

My nephew got this for Christmas in about 2003 when train crashes had been in the news a lot. It contained this video


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klsbzC9V0Yg

which seemed rather dark, especially the bloodbath at 00:30.
>> No. 6190 Anonymous
19th October 2015
Monday 12:22 pm
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The crashes are fairly tame, apart from perhaps the train drivers having mental breakdowns due to having to work with engines that have minds of their own and not infrequently come off the rails.

It's nothing compared to the tyranny of Sodor. Henry getting bricked up in a tunnel for not wanting to go out in the rain. Smudger getting turned into a generator for demonstrating independent thought and nonconformity. Stepney nearly getting murdered by a pair of diesels just for being a steamy. If you don't prove yourself to be a Really Useful Engine then you are in for it.
>> No. 6191 Anonymous
19th October 2015
Monday 3:48 pm
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>>6190

This picture reminds me, better let the cat out of Cat Jail. Half and hour is long enough.
>> No. 6192 Anonymous
20th October 2015
Tuesday 11:21 pm
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>Not reading your children British Empire history

Why not? Educational, fun, interesting, related to life. He will be a mile ahead of all his class mates in history and understanding the world

(A good day to you Sir!)
>> No. 6233 Anonymous
6th December 2015
Sunday 11:31 am
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OP here, we're working our way through Narnia. I'd forgotten how much casual sexism is in them.

>>5777
>The first "proper" book I read was about a millipede and his mum getting smoked out of his home, but I can't remember the name at all.

Harry the Poisonous Centipede? We read that a few months back, although I only get about half the story because he'll read a few chapters himself each night.
>> No. 6234 Anonymous
7th December 2015
Monday 3:24 am
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>>6233
Brace yourself for more dolphin rape than you remember when the Calormenes start popping up.
>> No. 6265 Anonymous
4th January 2016
Monday 8:32 pm
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>>6234
We've just finished The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Does Aslan turn out to be Jesus? The ending of the book suggests that religion is going to be laid on rather thickly at some point during the final two novels.
>> No. 6266 Anonymous
4th January 2016
Monday 8:54 pm
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>>6265
Aslan is obv. a Christian analogue but as far as I recall there is no direct reference to religion.
>> No. 6267 Anonymous
4th January 2016
Monday 10:34 pm
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>>6265
>>6266
Aslan is Jesus, there are various Christian themes and parallells in most of them, and later books introduce Tash, the Calormene god. Since the Calormenes are obvious Arab stereotypes, it's ambiguous if Tash is an analogue for Allah or simply a pagan deity; The Last Battle makes it fairly clear that Tash is Satan as I recall, so make of that what you will.
>> No. 6268 Anonymous
4th January 2016
Monday 11:28 pm
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Well done, OP. You've read your kid the Narnia novels, and thus brought a wee little ARE SI into the world.

Thanks for reminding me about Harry the Poisonous Centipede though, I missed that post the first time around so thanks whoever bumped the thread too.
>> No. 6269 Anonymous
5th January 2016
Tuesday 7:09 am
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>>6268
>You've read your kid the Narnia novels, and thus brought a wee little ARE SI into the world.

It wouldn't actually surprise me if there was a link between reading Enid Blyton as a child and supporting UKIP. Blooming suspicious looking foreigners, always up to no good.
>> No. 6278 Anonymous
19th January 2016
Tuesday 9:15 pm
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Most of the way through The Last Battle, although I'm only getting half the story as he'll read a chapter or two to himself after I've read to him. In the last chapter I read the dwarfs started calling the Calormenes darkies.
>> No. 6613 Anonymous
11th July 2017
Tuesday 8:55 pm
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OP here again, lads.

Laddo is now 10 and still obsessed with ancient mythology, particularly Greek. He's just finished reading the Percy Jackson pentalogy, which he managed in around a fortnight. Are there any books in a similar vein that you'd recommend? I've got the Penguin Little Black Classic of The Fall of Icarus so I may see what he thinks of that; the prose seems fairly accessible.
>> No. 6615 Anonymous
11th July 2017
Tuesday 9:06 pm
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>>6613
For Greek stuff, Robert Graves is pretty great. If he's still into it in 8 years, you can move him onto Roberto Calasso. For want of anything else to add, the Gaiman book of Norse mythology is pretty decent.

Further moving away from the Greeks, maybe the Alex Rider series by Horowitz or Bloodtide and Bloodsong by Burgess.
>> No. 6616 Anonymous
11th July 2017
Tuesday 10:39 pm
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>>6613
10 eh? You gonna start him on Animal Farm and all that stuff mentioned above?

If not, at least give him Boris the Tomato. I love reading it even as an adult, both because it's actually quite hilarious and a great satire of totalitarian fascism.
>> No. 6617 Anonymous
12th July 2017
Wednesday 1:45 pm
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>>6613
You might try "Wolf Brother" and the series Chronicles of Ancient Darkness by Michelle Paver.
>> No. 6618 Anonymous
12th July 2017
Wednesday 5:41 pm
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Thanks, lads.

>>6616
>You gonna start him on Animal Farm and all that stuff mentioned above?

I tried him with Animal Farm a year or so ago but he wasn't interested. It's been a long time since I've read it, but I think the first couple of chapters are a little on the dry side.

We've read a few of the books suggested in this thread, with Artemis Fowl being the clear favourite.
>> No. 6619 Anonymous
12th July 2017
Wednesday 6:15 pm
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>>6618
Fair enough, that's Orwell for you. Boris the Tomato may have similar themes - talking vegetables in a Kent greenhouse with plans of world domination - but it's a lot more accessible. I love it.
>> No. 6642 Anonymous
10th September 2017
Sunday 3:45 pm
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>>5761 can fully recommend
"His dark materials" by Phillip Pullman.

"His Dark Materials is an epic trilogy of fantasy novels by Philip Pullman consisting of Northern Lights, The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass"

So so good. Nothing like the film.
>> No. 6648 Anonymous
10th September 2017
Sunday 10:12 pm
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>>6642
Fucking Golden Compass bullshit. IT'S NOT A COMPASS HOLLYWOOD, DID YOU EVEN READ THE BOOK
>> No. 6650 Anonymous
10th September 2017
Sunday 10:24 pm
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Since this is up top again, I'm going to repeat my support for the Bartimaeus trilogy (>>5762) because they were so much fun when I was young, its about a young twatty kid in a pseudo-alternative reality where the British empire is still on the go, and a certain class of people (aristocracy types) can summon different levels of imps, genies, etc. It's about this kid who gives it a shot at a young age and his adventures with this sassy Djinn called Bartimaeus and how they end up getting involved in higher level politics (that makes it sound dull but it's really not).

Please give it a shot, I might buy the first again since I've lost it. It's not that well known a series but it was my favourite series at the time. I think I read it when I was about 12.

Also, Artemis Fowl. Rich supervillain child gets involved with a (literally) underground civilisation of super technologically advanced 'fairies' who have kept themselves secret from humanity for millenia. He runs into a fairy who is a newbie officer for the L.E.P. Recon unit.

Great stuff.
>> No. 6652 Anonymous
11th September 2017
Monday 12:38 am
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>>6650
Didn't realise this is the third time I've wanked over this series, sorry. Whinge.
>> No. 6656 Anonymous
11th September 2017
Monday 7:19 pm
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>>6648
To be fair to hollywood, the religious messages in the book were so offensive to most of America (and enough of the rest of the world) that the only options they had were to massively deviate from the book, or not make it at all.
The correct decision would have been to not make the film at all.
>> No. 6667 Anonymous
22nd September 2017
Friday 4:52 pm
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>>6642>>6648
OP here again. Laddo came home with one of those book fair flyers. Apparently they're making a His Dark Materials TV series.
>> No. 6668 Anonymous
22nd September 2017
Friday 10:06 pm
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>>6667
Let's hope they don't fuck it up.
>> No. 6670 Anonymous
22nd September 2017
Friday 10:19 pm
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>>6668
Don't be silly, of course they will.

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