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>> No. 9430 Anonymous
26th January 2016
Tuesday 10:09 pm
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Huddersfield charity shop finally says goodbye to a shutter which lasted 26 years


http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/west-yorkshire-news/huddersfield-charity-shop-finally-says-10780879

That's it. That's literally it. A charity shop has replaced one of its roller shutters after having the same one for 26 years. It's all go in Huddersfield.

I challenge you lads to find a more pointless news story than this.
979 posts omitted. Last 50 posts shown. Expand all images.
>> No. 17866 Anonymous
8th February 2019
Friday 3:57 pm
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>>17865

The military is an odd one, as they're constantly researching but not often implementing. They might have mind control lasers in a lab somewhere but they're running twenty year old trucks and ancient rifles on real life campaigns, because it works and it costs nothing.
>> No. 17870 Anonymous
8th February 2019
Friday 5:13 pm
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>>17865

Civilian electronics is miles ahead of anything the military have. We get a competitive market, with new models being released every few months; the military get stuff that's out of date before it even goes into production, because the development and procurement process drags on for years.

As an example, the Clansman radio system was standard issue from 1976 to 2000. The replacement Bowman system started development in 1989, was finalised in 2000 and was fully deployed by 2008; the system is intended to be in operation until 2026.

You can go on eBay right now and buy better radio equipment than the British military have access to. The Personal Role Radio used for communication within an infantry squad doesn't have trunking capacity, so squad members can't directly communicate with anyone outside the squad; requesting air support or a medical evacuation might involve a chain of people playing Chinese whispers, hearing a message on one radio system and repeating it into another.

By contrast, a DMR radio costing about £100 has longer range than the PRR, it has secure encryption, it can inter-operate with a wide variety of other radio equipment and it has trunking facilities allowing direct private calls between any two users on the network. A DMR call can be relayed by a repeater over a long-range radio channel, or routed anywhere in the world via an internet gateway.
>> No. 17872 Anonymous
8th February 2019
Friday 5:40 pm
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>>17870

The Budget of the UK armed forces is a total joke compared to what the US throws at the Pentagon every year and even their setup is a bit strange in that they spend billions on classified spy satellites but their bog standard infantry are almost as underfunded as ours.
>> No. 17883 Anonymous
8th February 2019
Friday 6:53 pm
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>>17870
That sounds about right for mass use. They need to ruggedise and approve the kit to more rigorous standards than consumer level. The end result will be getting tech years late and paying out the arse for it.

How about the spooks, though?
>> No. 17886 Anonymous
8th February 2019
Friday 7:41 pm
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>>17872

That's partly because military spending serves as a cover to fund high tech industry. It's perceived as unacceptable in capitalist societies to simply give massive handouts to certain sectors.
>> No. 17888 Anonymous
8th February 2019
Friday 11:43 pm
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178881788817888
U.S. Department of Defence budget request for FY 2019: $686 bn

Projected NASA budget for FY 2019: $20 bn

UK Ministry of Defence budget FY 2017-18: £46 bn

European Space Agency budget 2019: €5.72 bn

(sources: Wikipedia)
>> No. 18005 Anonymous
10th February 2019
Sunday 7:22 pm
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https://www.glasgowlive.co.uk/news/glasgow-news/glasgow-flight-forced-divert-manchester-15808599

A plane from Glasgow to Tenerife was forced to divert to Manchester Airport because of issues with plumbing on board.

Passengers on board the Jet2 LS155 flight left Glasgow Airport at about 08:55am this morning, bound for the Canary Islands.

But the flight was forced to return to the UK while over Cork in the Republic of Ireland.

The flight later landed safely in Manchester, where local fire services were waiting.

A spokeswoman for Jet2 confirmed the diversion was the result of a minor technical fault with the plane's water system – and that it was mainly to do with providing hot water for teas and coffees.

She confirmed the passengers have been transferred onto another flight and are expected to continue on their journey this afternoon.
>> No. 18006 Anonymous
10th February 2019
Sunday 7:24 pm
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>>18005
>hot water for tea

Come on though, that is a genuine life-threatening emergency.
>> No. 18008 Anonymous
10th February 2019
Sunday 7:54 pm
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>>18006

How awful for a plane full of Glaswegians to have to sit five hours on a plane without coffee and tea.

A real emergency for them probably would have been no Mars bars or crisp packets.

Speaking of plumbing though, I was on a coach trip to southern France once as a teenlad, and there was a problem with the bus's toilet. I think the septic tank had a failing O ring somewhere and some of the liquid was dripping out from the toilet's pipes. In 35 degrees Celsius, in mid-July. The whole inside of the bus began to smell like a mix between chemical toilet, stale piss, feminine hygiene products, and raw shit. Just a disgustingly musky smell that I will probably never forget. It got so bad that we then took an extended stop at a service station near Montpellier, where the driver together with his co-driver spent one or two hours emptying out the septic tank, and attempting to fix the O ring and getting rid of the smell inside the bus. We were then asked not to use the toilet until further notice. They were then able to source a new O ring from a garage down there a few days later and put the toilet back into full working order.
>> No. 18009 Anonymous
10th February 2019
Sunday 8:16 pm
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>>18006
It's code for lemon soaked paper napkins.
>> No. 18010 Anonymous
10th February 2019
Sunday 10:49 pm
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>>18008
They're Glaswegians. Would you take the risk?
>> No. 18011 Anonymous
10th February 2019
Sunday 11:03 pm
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>>18008
>A real emergency for them probably would have been no Mars bars or crisp packets.
Glaswegians savvy enough to fill out a passport form and be able to provide evidence are probably going to be more concerned with the lack of booze on a flight.

They're drunkards, not fatties. Very rarely see a fat Wegie, the dole scum skew more towards heroin than Farmfoods cheesecake.
>> No. 18012 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 12:07 am
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>>18006

Weirdly, galley equipment like water boilers and warming ovens are considered safety-critical because of the risk of fire. The kettle in a plane is so massively over-engineered that it costs about £10,000. If anything in the galley starts playing up, the default option is to divert to the nearest airport just in case it catches fire.
>> No. 18013 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 1:32 pm
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>>18012

> The kettle in a plane is so massively over-engineered that it costs about £10,000.

I was going to say it's a bit like that ballpoint pen the Americans developed for millions of dollars so it would function aboard a spacecraft, while the Russians simply gave their astronauts pencils. But apparently, that isn't really what happened:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fact-or-fiction-nasa-spen/

A special ballpoint pen was developed indeed, but the $1m development costs were fronted by a private investor, and the Russians actually ended up using that same ballpoint pen. Price per unit for sale both to the American and Russian space agencies was $2.39.

It turns out the humble pencil isn't your best choice in weightlessness aboard a space capsule, because it has minute particles and flakes coming off it all the time, which can cause problems in other equipment and electrical circuitry as those particles float freely through the spacecraft's air in zero gravity. So a space pen is definitely recommended.
>> No. 18014 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 1:49 pm
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>>18013

Even if a pencil worked (I've never quite worked out how people believed it might) the Fisher Space Pen is incredibly useful in a lot of earthbound situations.

A normal ballpoint is gravity fed, so you can't write on something against a wall for very long, stops writing at about 5C, and can leak at about 40C. There's a lot of people who see some or all of those conditions daily. A felt tip pen or indeed a pencil can sort of solve these issues, but even they are fucked if you get them wet, and you still need to sharpen the latter all the time.
>> No. 18015 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 4:04 pm
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>>18014

A pencil would work in space, it just presents a non-trivial risk of burning down the spacecraft and killing everyone on board. The graphite in a pencil lead is electrically conductive, so if it breaks off and floats into a bit of equipment it could cause a short circuit. You only have a finite amount of air on board, so even a small fire can suffocate the crew.

Incidentally, one of the biggest day-to-day worries on the International Space Station is broken glass. The shards just float about in mid-air, so unless you're incredibly careful about cleaning it up, there's a risk that you'll inhale a shard and drown in your own blood. They have to use some amount of glass equipment for the scientific work on board, but they treat it with extreme care due to the unique risk it presents in microgravity.
>> No. 18017 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 5:08 pm
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>>18015

>A pencil would work in space, it just presents a non-trivial risk of burning down the spacecraft and killing everyone on board.

I thought that was only an issue in high-oxygen environments like the early Apollo capsules. On board the ISS, the atmosphere is pretty much equal to the Earth's atmosphere at sea level, with 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and one percent various different things like CO2. Even the air pressure is almost exactly the same.

I think this is done because high oxygen levels in the air you breathe are actually harmful to your health during long-term exposure, e.g. for several months at a time on board a space station. So they keep the oxygen at the level that humans have naturally adapted to on Earth. Which then also means that flammable objects on the ISS are no more likely to catch fire than they are on Earth.
>> No. 18018 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 6:41 pm
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>On board the ISS, the atmosphere is pretty much equal to the Earth's atmosphere at sea level, with 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, and one percent various different things like CO2. Even the air pressure is almost exactly the same.

I find that difficult to believe. Surely after nearly 20 years of international farts the walls must be stained magnolia.
>> No. 18019 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 7:07 pm
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>>18018
They have machines on board that scrub the air and water.
>> No. 18020 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 7:09 pm
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>>18018

Utter mirth.
>> No. 18023 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 7:45 pm
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>>18017

Hyperoxic atmospheres massively increase the risk of ignition, but pencils still pose a risk in normoxic environments. Down here on earth, faulty electrical equipment is the second leading cause of house fires after smoking. Overheating electrical equipment is much more dangerous in microgravity, because there's no convection - you're totally reliant on forced-air cooling. Smoke detectors don't work particularly well in microgravity, because smoke doesn't rise. There's a huge amount or wiring and circuitry hidden behind panelling, so a smouldering fire could go undetected for some time; debris has relatively free access to this equipment, because it's all part of the same recirculating air system.

The threat posed by fire is magnified in a spacecraft, because there's no easy way to remove smoke or replace contaminated air. You can't just go outside and open the windows to let the smoke out. A relatively small fire could force an emergency evacuation of the ISS, with a substantial risk of fatality. For similar reasons, an ammonia leak from the thermal management system constitutes a major crisis on the ISS. They do have self-contained breathing apparatus as part of their firefighting kit, but that only supplies about half an hour of air; donning the EVA suits is pretty futile, because it takes three people an hour to get someone into one.

I've posted this video before on .gs, but it's well worth watching if you have an interest in safety, engineering or extreme environments; it's about the Piper Alpha disaster and highlights how all risks are massively amplified when you can't just run away from the hazard. If the Piper Alpha disaster had happened on a land-based installation, there would have likely been no fatalities; because it was stuck in the middle of the North Sea, 167 people died.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9h8MKG88_U

>>18019

The air on the ISS is clean, but very stale. The air processing system can remove major contaminants, but there's only so much it can do about smells. Scott Kelly described it as smelling like "antiseptic, garbage and body odor". There are no laundry facilities, so everyone just wears the same clothes for two weeks and seals them up for disposal. Mir had much more primitive air filtration systems and absolutely reeked, to the point that cosmonauts going up to the station were warned in advance. Submarines are apparently notoriously farty.

https://www.wired.com/story/astronaut-scott-kelly-explains-how-the-iss-is-like-harris-county-jail/
>> No. 18024 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 9:29 pm
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>>18023

>Submarines are apparently notoriously farty. 

One of my cousins served on a Royal Navy submarine for a few years. He told me that it's only bad when you surface and get to smell some natural fresh air, and then have to go back inside because you are submerging again or whatever. After a while though, you get used to it again. He says the smell is a horrible mixture of guys' body odour (only the cooks get to shower regularly, for sanitary reasons), mechanical grease, and salt water.
>> No. 18025 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 9:35 pm
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>>18024
My dad was in the Navy - he also claimed that submarines fucking stank to high heaven. The hot-bunking they do (where they essentially share beds while another person is on shift) render the mattresses so rank that they are burned after every tour.
>> No. 18026 Anonymous
11th February 2019
Monday 9:56 pm
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>>18025

Yeah my cousin also told me about the hot bunking. Kind of disgusting.

I guess in the end it's about pushing your threshold of what is bearable for you. Myself, I'd probably already go nuts not being able to take a shower every day. I would not make a good soldier at all.
>> No. 18027 Anonymous
12th February 2019
Tuesday 8:35 pm
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>>18025
>>18026

The new Astute class are supposedly well-berthed enough to eliminate the need for this, I assume the Dreadnoughts will follow suit. I bet the new recruits still have to share a bit until they lose their 'oxygen-thief' status though as space is always too tight. In ye truly olden days (I think up until the early seventies, incredibly) you were allowed to smoke aboard subs, which sounds utterly daft but probably made them smell a lot better at least.
>> No. 18028 Anonymous
12th February 2019
Tuesday 10:13 pm
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>>18027

>you were allowed to smoke aboard subs, which sounds utterly daft but probably made them smell a lot better at least

What's a bit of cigarette smoke going to do to the air inside a submarine that the sweat and BO from a whole crew hasn't already done.

Also, can't they just use activated charcoal air filters or something? There has to be a way to filter some of the stink out even if it gets filled with new stink all the time.

But what I find the most fascinating is that submarines create their own oxygen from sea water by means of electrolysis. I think the unwanted hydrogen is then just released back into the sea. They'll probably have to do something to avoid bubbles though when there is danger of being spotted by enemy forces. Maybe collect it in a pressurized container or something.
>> No. 18029 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 9:24 am
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>>18028
>What's a bit of cigarette smoke going to do to the air inside a submarine that the sweat and BO from a whole crew hasn't already done.
Give people cancer.
>> No. 18030 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 9:41 am
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>>18029
Sweat and BO also cause cancer.
>> No. 18031 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 10:04 am
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>>18030
Other way round, lad.
>> No. 18032 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 10:51 am
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>>18031
Cancer causes sweat and BO?
>> No. 18033 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 11:18 am
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>>18032
Cancer cures sweat and BO.
Permanently
>> No. 18034 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 11:29 am
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>>18029

>Give people cancer

It already did that without cigarette smoke.

https://www.asbestos.com/navy/submarines/

At least the Americans built their submarines with shedloads of asbestos inside them due to its light weight and fire repellent properties. Many servicemen, but also maintenance technicians inhaled plenty of asbestos that way and a significant number developed lung cancer or other respiratory illnesses.
>> No. 18035 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 12:04 pm
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>>18032
Excessive sweating is common once cancer has advanced. Some cancers can directly cause odours, and others blunt your sense of smell so you can't tell you're reeking.
>> No. 18036 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 12:17 pm
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>>18035

>Some cancers can directly cause odours

Which can then be picked up by a specially trained dog nowadays. I saw something on TV about a dog that was trained to smell prostate cancer off a lad's urine. As a non-invasive test, it had about the same success rate as a tissue biopsy, which in the case of the prostate appears to be particularly risky and can lead both to incontinence and impotence if it goes wrong.
>> No. 18037 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 12:21 pm
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>>18036
>I saw something on TV about a dog that was trained to smell prostate cancer off a lad's urine

So doctors don't need to stick fingers up men's arses but they carry on regardless because they're sex fiends?
>> No. 18039 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 1:10 pm
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>>18038

Not many people keep a job for 26 years.
>> No. 18040 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 11:33 pm
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>>18037

>So doctors don't need to stick fingers up men's arses but they carry on regardless because they're sex fiends?

Let them have their moment of fun. After all, half of their day they have to handle dangly old chap testicles.

Fun fact - I once went to see a urologist when I was 16 because I got kicked in the balls accidentally while playing footie, and as I was lying there with my undies down, one of the nurses came in (this was a Catholic hospital). She had the biggest grin you can imagine on her face when she saw me with my knob all out in the open, and the doc kind of had to tell her something like "Yes, thank you, that will be all" to get her to take her eyes off it and exit the room.

Dirty old bag, she must have been at least 40.
>> No. 18041 Anonymous
13th February 2019
Wednesday 11:40 pm
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-zf2UBp7fY
>> No. 18048 Anonymous
14th February 2019
Thursday 1:15 pm
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>An 80-year-old woman was shocked when a naked couple ran into her flat in an Edinburgh tenement and started having sex in the living room before realising they had got the wrong door. The couple fled after they were alerted to their mistake by another naked man who ran in after them.

https://www.edinburghnews.scotsman.com/news/edinburgh-pensioner-shocked-as-naked-couple-enter-wrong-airbnb-flat-and-have-sex-in-front-of-her-1-4872936
>> No. 18074 Anonymous
15th February 2019
Friday 12:38 am
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>>18048
It's that last sentence that makes it.
>> No. 18076 Anonymous
15th February 2019
Friday 1:53 am
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>>18048
This gave me a hearty chuckle.

I know a very similar story that happened to a friend of mine, but it's a bit long for a quick pop on before bed. I'll post it tomorrow. Sage for making a post to remind myself to make a post.
>> No. 18096 Anonymous
16th February 2019
Saturday 9:29 pm
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>>18076

When I was in student housing, we had enclosed shower stalls in the communal toilet rooms. One night after my shit student job in a restaurant, I came home and decided to take a shower before going to bed, and suddenly one of my mates came into the room with some lass and they started showering together in the stall next to me. They were both noticeably drunk (or high? or both?) from he sound of their voices. After a few minutes, their shower suddenly turned into a full on shower bonk with loads of movement and moaning. He was banging her against the slightly flimsy dividing wall between my stall and theirs, and I was quite worried for a moment that the divider was going to break or cave in or something because they were really going at it passionately.

I managed to get out of the shower unseen and unheard, but the next day I kind of really felt weird talking to him when we ran into each other.
>> No. 18097 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 9:10 am
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>>18096

You a poof or summat? You should have joined in. He goes up the front garden, you go in the back door.
>> No. 18100 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 10:35 am
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>>18097

>You should have joined in. He goes up the front garden, you go in the back door.

Very likely scenario indeed.
>> No. 18103 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 11:45 am
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>>18096
When I was younger I would have shuffled away in embarrassment as you seemed to here - now I am fully at the DGAF-age, I think I would have joined in with some rhythmic clapping, increasing in cadence, along with some loud woooooaaahhh ala a football stadium as they reached the crescendo; round of applause at the end.
>> No. 18105 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 12:10 pm
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>>18096
Did you say anything about it? Surely you say "maybe see if you've got the all clear before you go at it hammer and tongs in the communal showers?", but in a friendly, "I'm not really arsed" sort of a way. Maybe even this >>18103

>>18097
Are you an Irish rugby player or summat?
>> No. 18107 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 1:22 pm
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>>18105

>Surely you say "maybe see if you've got the all clear before you go at it hammer and tongs in the communal showers?", but in a friendly, "I'm not really arsed" sort of a way.


Like I said, they appeared to be either drunk or high. It must have just escaped them in their intoxicated state that the stall next to them was occupied. I think I also hadn't turned on my shower yet, so there was no sound of running water coming from my stall to alert them. And I felt a little too embarrassed to just say "Oh, is that you over there?" after recognising my friend's voice and realising that he was having a shower with some lass. I guess I kind of didn't want to ruin the moment for him.

I still wasn't going to confront my friend the next day, because when you live in student housing, you witness each other's sex lives any day of the week anyway. Like that one guy who lived in the room above mine. His girlfriend was living in another city at the time, and they only saw each other at the weekend. And like clockwork, I mean really like clockwork, every Friday night at around 1am, give or take just a few minutes, they would have sex in his bed so that you could hear it in my room. I made a joke to him one time, like, that I could set my clock to him getting it on with her every Friday night. For some reason, he didn't think it was all that funny.
>> No. 18147 Anonymous
17th February 2019
Sunday 9:06 pm
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>>18103

I probably would have stayed and had a wank in that situation in my early twenties, or possibly knocked on the door and asked if they needed a hand if I'd had a couple. Mid twenties I'd have shuffled off, and now I'm about to hit thirty I'd probably just have a wank again.
>> No. 18237 Anonymous
19th February 2019
Tuesday 11:52 am
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>>18236
This isn't fun or pointless, it's just horrible. Why would you post this?
>> No. 18239 Anonymous
19th February 2019
Tuesday 12:05 pm
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>>18237

I've obviously made an error of judgement. Apologies.

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